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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  April 20, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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downing street says the government will explore every possibility, including legislation, to help stop a proposed european super league from going ahead. borisjohnson said that plans for a breakaway league involving six english clubs amounted to a closed shop, but they were defended by the man set to chair the league. translation: we don't - have the money, apart from tv rights, so the only way to make football profitable is to make more competitive teams that are more attractive to fans of the biggest clubs from all over the world. the super league have chucked a grenade at the premier league and chucked a grenade to everyone else. well, chuck one back. ban them. ban them immediately. with uk and european football in turmoil, we'll be asking what happens next.
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also this lunchtime: an ambitious new target to get rid of environmental polluters and change the way we live is set to be announced by ministers. india reels under a severe second wave of covid—19, with hospitals struggling to cope. and refugees on the us border having to make desperate decisions about their children's future. some are hopeful the rumours that president biden will open the border are true, others have lost all hope and are now having to make decisions they never thought they would. young people bear the brunt of unemployment, as new figures show that four out of five who lost theirjob last year was under 35. and coming up on the bbc news channel: tottenham appoint former player ryan mason as interim manager after the sacking ofjose mourinho yesterday.
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good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. downing street has said it will explore every possibility, including legislation, to stop plans for a european super league. following a meeting with officials from two of the sport's governing bodies, borisjohnson said they had the government's full backing to take whatever action was necessary to put a stop to the proposals. the idea, which would see six top english clubs join european sides in a new competition, has drawn widespread condemnation. but the president of real madrid, one of the breakaway clubs, has defended the move, saying that dwindling audiences and major losses meant something had to change. our sports correspondent andy swiss reports.
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the message was clear, protest outside elland road last night and even above it as leeds faced liverpool, one of the teams involved in the proposed super league. fans are so often divided by football now united in fury. are so often divided by football now united infury. i’m are so often divided by football now united in fury-— united in fury. i'm absolutely a- alled united in fury. i'm absolutely appalled the _ united in fury. i'm absolutely appalled the fact _ united in fury. i'm absolutely appalled the fact that - united in fury. i'm absolutely - appalled the fact that footballers come this far into the hands of greedy owners. i am a burnley fan. we are so small, our budgets depend on people like the top six staying in the premier league. for them to treat it like their own company is discussing. it’s treat it like their own company is discussing-— discussing. it's going to roof del mi . ht discussing. it's going to roof del might ruin _ discussing. it's going to roof del might ruin everyone's _ discussing. it's going to roof del might ruin everyone's game, . discussing. it's going to roof del| might ruin everyone's game, it's ridiculous — might ruin everyone's game, it's ridiculous-_ ridiculous. after being held to a draw, ridiculous. after being held to a draw. even _ ridiculous. after being held to a draw, even the _ ridiculous. after being held to a draw, even the liverpool- ridiculous. after being held to a | draw, even the liverpool captain whose club have signed up to the breakaway said he didn't support it. i can only give my personal opinion and i_ i can only give my personal opinion and i don't — i can only give my personal opinion and i don't like _ i can only give my personal opinion and i don't like it— i can only give my personal opinion and i don't like it one _ i can only give my personal opinion and i don't like it one bit. - and i don't like it one bit. h0pefully_ and i don't like it one bit. h0pefully it _ and i don't like it one bit. hopefully it doesn't -
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and i don't like it one bit. i hopefully it doesn't happen. and i don't like it one bit. - hopefully it doesn't happen. it's a sentiment being echoed around the country, a backlash against a bid to create a ring fenced elite. there's even calls for the english clubs to be —— involved to be thrown out of the premier league. ban be -- involved to be thrown out of the premier league.— be -- involved to be thrown out of the premier league. ban them. ban them immediately _ the premier league. ban them. ban them immediately if _ the premier league. ban them. ban them immediately if you _ the premier league. ban them. ban them immediately if you can. - the premier league. ban them. ban them immediately if you can. if - the premier league. ban them. bani them immediately if you can. if they can. i'm sure they will look at every possible legal angle and what pressure thereunder in doing that. but if you can, do it. this morning, the 14 premier _ but if you can, do it. this morning, the 14 premier league _ but if you can, do it. this morning, the 14 premier league clubs - but if you can, do it. this morning, the 14 premier league clubs not. the 14 premier league clubs not involved have been discussing what to do next. among them, everton, who issued a stern statement. downing street have also held talks
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with the football authorities. the prime minister says no action is off the table, including legislative options to stop the proposals. in terms of competition law, could this be regarded as a former cartel which has been created for the benefit of the teams within it, the more damage the teams within it, the more damage the business model of the premier league and other leagues and be damaging for the whole of football. the super league clubs insist they are helping football. real madrid claim the money generated will save the sport. claim the money generated will save the sort. �* ,, �* ~ ., �* the sport. translation: we don't have the money. — the sport. translation: we don't have the money, apart _ the sport. translation: we don't have the money, apart from - the sport. translation: we don't have the money, apart from tv - have the money, apart from tv rights — have the money, apart from tv rights the _ have the money, apart from tv rights. the only way to make football _ rights. the only way to make football profitable is to make more competitive teams more attractive to fans from _ competitive teams more attractive to fans from all over the world. three ofthe fans from all over the world. three of the six english _ fans from all over the world. three of the six english clubs _ fans from all over the world. three of the six english clubs have - of the six english clubs have american owners and some believe thatis american owners and some believe that is the real financial factor. this is a very american model of
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professional— this is a very american model of professional sport. _ this is a very american model of professional sport. it— this is a very american model of professional sport. it provides . professional sport. it provides financial— professional sport. it provides financial security— professional sport. it provides financial security for— professional sport. it provides financial security for those - professional sport. it provides i financial security for those clubs. consequences _ financial security for those clubs. consequences could _ financial security for those clubs. consequences could be _ financial security for those clubs. consequences could be severe. l financial security for those clubs. - consequences could be severe. their players could be banned from the world cup and the head of world football has this morning. if some elect to go — football has this morning. if some elect to go their _ football has this morning. if some elect to go their own _ football has this morning. if some elect to go their own way, - football has this morning. if some elect to go their own way, then i football has this morning. if some l elect to go their own way, then they must leave with the consequences. either you are in or you are out. for some of england's most historic clubs then, theirfans for some of england's most historic clubs then, their fans and for football, the stakes could hardly be higher. andy swiss, bbc news. let's speak to our correspondent, nick beake, in milan. how's this gone down there? well, already it has created something incredible, a miracle you could say because it seems to have
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united italians along its most famous and fractured fault lines, football and politics. supporters from different teams and politicians from different teams and politicians from different teams and politicians from different backgrounds seem to be speaking with one voice. they don't like this proposal one bit and they have been making their voices heard in the past 24 hours or so. one voice we heard in andy's report was the head of fifa. he has spoken about the consequences. inter milan, ac milan and juventus are involved. the message from the fans is clear. it shared in other european countries as well. interestingly, think of impact will vary, depending on the country. in germany and france, so far none of the top teams have been willing to sign up for this competition, to put their future in the hands of this
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competition. someone else we have heard from today is the man in spain who has claimed this is all about saving football. but from the fans we have spoken to today, this doesn't feel like saving football. their fear is that it could be something that actually kills football. . ~ something that actually kills football. �* ., ~ something that actually kills football. ., ~ something that actually kills football. �* w ., ~ football. nick beake, thank you, in milan. let's speak to our sports correspondent, laura scott, who's outside the premier league's headquarters in london. where does this leave us now? well, a meeting is ongoing involving the 14 premier league clubs not involved in the european super league. their meeting with the premier league's chief executive and chairman and that meeting is ongoing. that's the first time these clubs have had a chance to get around the table and discuss the explosive plans that emerged over
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the weekend. and what they plan to do to revolve this crisis. earlier today, the premier league fa and severalfan groups met today, the premier league fa and several fan groups met with the prime minister, borisjohnson, to discuss the super league as well. what came out of that was a clear message from government that they will support action is necessary to cause a stop to the plans for a super league. they said they wanted to give it a red card. the premier league now knows it has that backing from government to take the action, but our understanding as ministers think the first move should come from within football. amid stinging attacks from rival clubs, including everton this morning, and continuing public backlash, the question now is, how strong is the resolve of the clubs involved in this super league plan? and are they willing to write out this storm to get the rewards they feel they will get, the financial and football rewards from this plan for themselves and the
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rest of the game?— rest of the game? laura, many thanks. laura _ rest of the game? laura, many thanks. laura scott _ rest of the game? laura, many thanks. laura scott there. - the government is preparing to announce much steeper, legally binding cuts to the uk's carbon emissions. ministers want to reduce them by almost 80% by 2035, much sooner than expected. hitting the target would require more electric cars, low—carbon heating, and, for many, cutting down on meat and dairy. labour has welcomed the move, but says the rhetoric must be matched with reality. here's our environment analyst, roger harrabin. the government's new target for cutting emissions will happen 15 years earlier than previously planned. so what does that mean for us? well, it means that this old girl will be replaced by an electric model when she dies. we'll be expected to walk and cycle more, too. people who spend a lot of time in the air will probably have to pay more taxes.
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our trusty gas boilers will need to be replaced by 2035 with something cleaner, and the government's going to have to help us insulate our homes better. if you don't like snails, you just call them escargots and they'll be magnifique! our diets are going to change a bit too. a little less meat and cheese. and here's what's interesting, the changes we will be making in the uk will be paraded on the world stage, when us presidentjoe biden holds his climate conference later in the week. for the first time, international shipping will be fully included in the uk's climate change targets. the shipping industry has fought to prevent governmental rules curbing their emissions. now ideas like this, high—tech sails to help our cargo ships, will attract more attention as the industry seeks clean solutions. electric planes will come,
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but they won't be viable for long haulfor a long time. clean aviation fuels are expensive and scarce at the moment. government policy is needed in a way that's not happened before. the big thing the government needs to do is put their money where their mouth is, to make sure that these targets are backed by credible plans that allow us to see a pathway to these targets, that allow us to see a pathway to decarbonising our economy, but also levelling up our country in the meantime. we are all in climate change together and it does seem at last as though the government and companies around the world are starting to take that seriously. a lot of people will drink to that. roger harrabin, bbc news. our chief environment correspondent, justin rowlatt, is here.
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it sounds ambitious. is it? it is designed to show that britain is serious about cutting carbon ahead of the conference in glasgow in november. it is ambitious but it is in line with what the advisory committee said. it's all about signalling to the world were serious about this. and what will it mean for us? we had a good rundown from roger. more renewable power, electric cars, low carbon heating systems, it means perhaps eating less meat and dairy, it means a massive effort to insulate our leaky homes. we have a terrible housing stock in britain. it means driving a bit less, walking and cycling more. aviation,
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certainly for frequent flyers, will get more expensive. critics say it is very easy to set these targets, much harder to meet them. they want to see concrete policies from government that will lead to is meeting this ambitious target they have set. , , ., , meeting this ambitious target they have set. , , . , ., have set. justin, many thanks. justin have set. justin, many thanks. justin rowlatt _ have set. justin, many thanks. justin rowlatt there. _ young people are continuing to bear the brunt of unemployment caused by the pandemic. the latest official figures show more than 800,000 payrolljobs were lost in the year to march, with people under 35 accounting for 80% of those affected. here's our economics correspondent, andy verity. not super league, but street league. aiming to help young people pick up skills on and off the field, from dribbling to maths. this 16—year—old
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in clydebank near glasgow says he and his friends are struggling. it’s and his friends are struggling. it's and his friends are struggling. it's a rotten and his friends are struggling. it�*s a rotten time for people my age. it's not looking good. people are going to struggle to getjobs with the exam results they've got. the number of — the exam results they've got. the number of people in paid employment has dropped by 813,000. more than half were under 25. as well as paying the highest economic price for lockdowns, young people have benefited least because they are the group least in need of protection from the virus. however, as the economy reopens, the rehiring should begin. we economy reopens, the rehiring should beuin. ~ ~' ., economy reopens, the rehiring should beuin. ~ ~ ., ., begin. we know in the longer term we will be able to — begin. we know in the longer term we will be able to deliver _ begin. we know in the longer term we will be able to deliver that, _ begin. we know in the longer term we will be able to deliver that, but - begin. we know in the longer term we will be able to deliver that, but in - will be able to deliver that, but in the short— will be able to deliver that, but in the short term some of our skilled staff are _ the short term some of our skilled staff are not able to return to work and we _ staff are not able to return to work and we are — staff are not able to return to work and we are struggling with some shortages, particularly around chefs — shortages, particularly around chefs. ~ ., ., , chefs. with the easing of lockdowns, vacancies are — chefs. with the easing of lockdowns, vacancies are already _
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chefs. with the easing of lockdowns, vacancies are already rising, - chefs. with the easing of lockdowns, vacancies are already rising, but - vacancies are already rising, but not everyone can become a chef. the employment — not everyone can become a chef. the employment figures showed some signs of green _ employment figures showed some signs of green shoots — employment figures showed some signs of green shoots in— employment figures showed some signs of green shoots in march, _ employment figures showed some signs of green shoots in march, but— employment figures showed some signs of green shoots in march, but we - of green shoots in march, but we have _ of green shoots in march, but we have a _ of green shoots in march, but we have a daunting _ of green shoots in march, but we have a daunting task _ of green shoots in march, but we have a daunting task ahead - of green shoots in march, but we have a daunting task ahead of. of green shoots in march, but we| have a daunting task ahead of us. there _ have a daunting task ahead of us. there is— have a daunting task ahead of us. there is a — have a daunting task ahead of us. there is a covid _ have a daunting task ahead of us. there is a covid employment- have a daunting task ahead of us. there is a covid employment gap| have a daunting task ahead of us. l there is a covid employment gap of have a daunting task ahead of us. - there is a covid employment gap of 6 million _ there is a covid employment gap of 6 million people. — there is a covid employment gap of 6 million people, those _ there is a covid employment gap of 6 million people, those who _ there is a covid employment gap of 6 million people, those who have - there is a covid employment gap of 6 million people, those who have lost. million people, those who have lost theiriohs_ million people, those who have lost theiriohs or — million people, those who have lost theirjobs orare_ million people, those who have lost theirjobs or are furloughed. - million people, those who have lost theirjobs or are furloughed. we - theirjobs or are furloughed. we need _ theirjobs or are furloughed. we need to— theirjobs or are furloughed. we need to focus _ theirjobs or are furloughed. we need to focus on _ theirjobs or are furloughed. we need to focus on getting - theirjobs or are furloughed. we need to focus on getting those i need to focus on getting those people — need to focus on getting those people back— need to focus on getting those people back into _ need to focus on getting those people back into work, - need to focus on getting those . people back into work, otherwise need to focus on getting those - people back into work, otherwise we could _ people back into work, otherwise we could see _ people back into work, otherwise we could see a — people back into work, otherwise we could see a worrying _ people back into work, otherwise we could see a worrying rise _ people back into work, otherwise we could see a worrying rise of- could see a worrying rise of unemployment _ could see a worrying rise of unemployment later- could see a worrying rise of unemployment later in - could see a worrying rise of unemployment later in thel could see a worrying rise of- unemployment later in the year. within_ unemployment later in the year. within that — unemployment later in the year. within that figure, _ unemployment later in the year. within that figure, 4.7 _ unemployment later in the year. within that figure, 4.7 million i within that figure, 4.7 million staff are on furlough. what we won't know for months is how many people will or won't find their way back into work. andy verity, bbc news. nicola sturgeon has confirmed the biggest changes to scotland's lockdown measures since they were introduced on boxing day last year. the first minister said the scheduled unlocking would go ahead as planned, with hospitality venues, gyms and non—essential shops
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reopening from next monday. all travel restrictions will also be lifted. coronavirus is spreading at a terrifying rate in india, and hospitals in many parts of the country are overwhelmed, leaving people struggling to get help for their loved ones. about 1,800 people have died of covid in the past 24 hours. our correspondent yogita limaye has been to a crematorium in ghaziabad, bordering the capital, delhi, where the situation is desperate. while we've been here, every 20 minutes to half an hour, we've seen an ambulance come in bringing dead bodies in. we've seen families who say they've been waiting here for 14, 16 hours to perform the last rites of their loved ones. the surge they are seeing here is because of the coronavirus crisis. i've been speaking to people here who talk about their struggles finding hospitals, finding healthcare for their loved ones. a man told me that he had
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to go to three hospitals. finally, his mother was admitted into the fourth but, by then, it was too late. and on her death certificate, it says, "brought dead". and today, he's brought her here to perform the last rites. this is happening notjust in ghaziabad, where i am, but in many parts of india, as it's in the grips of a fierce second wave of the coronavirus pandemic, and hospitals across the country really are struggling to cope with the numbers that are coming in. people who could be saved are dying because they can't get an icu bed. in some places, there's a severe shortage of oxygen as well. some lockdown restrictions are now in place, but many are asking that it's now been over a year since the world has been dealing with the pandemic, why was india not better prepared for this second wave? yogita limaye reporting there. the time is 13:18. our top story this lunchtime:
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downing street has said it will explore �*every possibility�*, including legislation, to stop plans for a european super league. and the desperate struggle of refugee families living along the mexican border with the united states. coming up on the bbc news channel: english super league clubs face being banned from the premier league, uefa warns, as its head, aleksander eferin, tells them they've made a huge mistake. jurors in the us city of minneapolis are preparing for a second day of deliberation in the trial of derek chauvin, the former police officer accused of murdering george floyd. their verdict — when it comes — is likely to be seen as a pivotal moment in us policing and the treatment of black americans. cities across the united states are bracing for unrest when the decision is announced, whatever the result. gary o'donoghue is in
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minneapolis for us now. no doubting the tension, as the us awaits this verdict? yes, that's right. and i think that is a reflection of what happened last year after george floyd was killed. this city and other cities around the united states saw widespread protests, some of them violent, quite a lot of looting, a police station was burned here in minneapolis for example. so in anticipation of these verdicts coming in at some point, there are national guard on the streets here, around 3,000 of them, carrying their m4 is and extra police. and that is being reflected in other cities around america, too. thejury of course have already begun their deliberations, three hours or so yesterday. they will get back into that in the next hour or so. looking
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at those three separate charges. there has been an element of controversy right at the end of yesterday, of course, because one democratic congresswoman made some remarks about hoping there was a guilty verdict and that came up in courtjust at the guilty verdict and that came up in court just at the end of proceedings, and thejudge court just at the end of proceedings, and the judge described those comments as apparent and suggested they may even be grounds for the defence to appeal in future if there is an appeal. but we are just waiting on these 12 men and women to come back with their verdicts in what will be a momentous case in the whole history of america, race and policing. gary, thank you. _ america, race and policing. gary, thank you. gary _ america, race and policing. gary, thank you, gary o'donoghue. - the role of a former tory party donor in a government deal to buy personal protective equipment during the pandemic has come to light after an apparent administrative error. it's the latest in a series of revelations about deals awarded to those with government connections. let's speak to our special
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correspondent, lucy manning. tell us more. well, this is about a man who appears to be a very well—connected man, he stood twice as a tory party candidate and he has also been a councillor for the tory party, he is standing again. he has given around £4000 to the conservative party and he has been on visits when the prime minister was on visits to the uk and also with david cameron. he lists himself as an advisor to priti patel, although we understand that is an unpaid position. and mrjassal was also helping to get a company £100 million dealforfacemasks. we only know that because although this deal was signed injuly, it was seven months before the details were published after the government was found to have acted unlawfully by not publishing these contracts,
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these deals for pp in time. and when these deals for pp in time. and when the documents came out, the details were crossed out so we could not see he was connected to this firm, but in another document, in an apparent clerical error, the name of samir jassal was listed and we were able to see that he has these connections to see that he has these connections to the conservative party. and the good law project, the campaign group who have brought legal action against the government over the sort of cases, are also looking to bring this over this case as well. it is of profound... _ it's of profound public importance that we discover who has benefited from these special arrangements put in place, who has benefited from the billions of public money spent, and at whose direction, who was making these referrals? mrjassal says that the company has beenin mrjassal says that the company has been in this sort of business for more than 20 years. the department of health say ministers have no role in deciding who is awarded these contracts. . , ., , in deciding who is awarded these contracts. , . , .,
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the prosecution has begun outlining its case in the trial of three men charged with perverting the course ofjustice in the aftermath of the hillsborough disaster. former south yorkshire police officers donald denton and alan foster, and former police solicitor peter metcalf, have all denied the charges. our correspondent, judith moritz, is in salford. tell us more about what was said this morning. tell us more about what was said this morning-— tell us more about what was said this morninu. ~ ., . ., , this morning. well, sarah whitehouse qc 0 ened this morning. well, sarah whitehouse 0c opened the — this morning. well, sarah whitehouse qc opened the case _ this morning. well, sarah whitehouse qc opened the case for— this morning. well, sarah whitehouse qc opened the case for the _ qc opened the case for the prosecution and she began by telling the jury this is prosecution and she began by telling thejury this is not prosecution and she began by telling the jury this is not a trial about the jury this is not a trial about the causes of the hillsborough disaster, she said it is not about whose fault it was, it is about the actions of three men its aftermath. and she explained that in 1989, peter metcalf was a solicitor acting for south yorkshire police and donald denton and alan foster are senior officers. and she said they tried to minimise the blame for hillsborough that might have been heaped upon the south yorkshire police and they had done so by
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altering accounts, statements made by police officers after the event. she explained that peter metcalf had given advice about those alterations and donald denton and alan foster had followed that advice. she said to the jury, you had followed that advice. she said to thejury, you might be thinking, haven't we had lots of inquiries and investigations about hillsborough? yes, we have, it is true, she said, but this trial is the first and only time that a jury of 12 people will have considered the evidence that you are about to consider. we are just 32 years now this week since the disaster. she added that this is important, the name of hillsborough is known throughout the land is a scene of a terrible disaster, you must put out of your mind is what you already know and listen to the evidence here. and this is being heard at the lowry theatre in salford, which is being used as a temporary court room because of the coronavirus pandemic and judge davis told thejurors although coronavirus pandemic and judge davis told the jurors although this is a theatrical setting, told the jurors although this is a theatricalsetting, it told the jurors although this is a theatrical setting, it is a serious and important trial with solemnity
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and important trial with solemnity and important trial with solemnity and important legal proceedings to be considered. all three men who are defendants in this case deny the charges against them.— defendants in this case deny the charges against them. thank you very much, judith- — a bomb has been defused after it was found under the car of a serving police officer in northern ireland. the device was found outside the officer's home in a rural area close to dungiven, in county londonderry, and police service northern ireland confirmed the device was "viable". northern ireland's first minister, arlene foster, said she condemned those who sought to harm the officer and herfamily. the welsh conservatives have promised to cut income tax if they succeed in creating thousands of newjobs over the next four years. launching their senedd election manifesto, the party said it would cut the basic rate by 1% before the next election — and focus on building the economy. it is vital that we focus on the challenge ahead of us, whilst reflecting on what has happened over the last 12 months. what has been a difficult and challenging 12 months
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for virtually every man, woman and child in this country. and what people want to think about from their politicians on the 6th of may is that those politicians are going to go back to cardiff bay and actually enact the economic changes, the economic reforms that will create qualityjobs in every part of wales. 65,000 jobs, this manifesto talks to, about creating 15,000 green jobs and making sure there are opportunities via the 150,000 apprenticeships that this manifesto addresses that we will look to create. refugees living along the mexican border with the united states are resorting to increasingly desperate measures to get theirfamilies across. hundreds of people are camped in the town of tijuana, hoping that the change in administration might mean a better chance of entering, and remaining, in the us. but some are smuggling their children over the wall unaccompanied, in the hope that they won't be returned. sophie long reports. hundreds of people —
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many of them very young children, camp in tents and makeshift shelters, crushed up against the border wall. the promised land is in sight, but out of reach. translation: i can't sleep at night. i feel my life is in danger. i'm afraid someone could come and hurt me and my children. i never thought that i would make my children go through so much pain. andrea left el salvador with her husband and two young sons in 2019 because gangs killed half her family. they applied for asylum under president trump, and have been waiting, living like this, in one of the most dangerous cities in the world, ever since. the number of people coming here — trying to find shelter on the edge of tijuana, at one of the busiest entrances to the united states — is growing by the day. some are hopeful that rumours that president biden will open the border are true. others have lost all hope and are now having to make decisions they never thought they would.
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my husband got killed and all they told us are they were going to come for us. rosara lives with the same fears here as she did in guerrero, where her husband was killed by a cartel. they take girls and, you know, do bad stuff. they get abused. they get killed. they get taken. it's those fears, and the fact that president biden has said he will not return unaccompanied children to the danger they fled, that's leading parents to believe this is the answer. this night—time footage shows smugglers dropping two young girls from the top of the border wall. they are left alone, to fend for themselves. this little boy was found by border patrol terrified and alone.
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many parents who have been trapped here for a year or more understand that if they send their children ahead, that their children will not be returned, and they have genuine concerns and fears whether they're ever going to make it out of mexico alive. and they would rather have the chance for their children to live, even if it means never seeing them again, than all of them dying here together. president biden said his would be a more humane approach to border enforcement but, so far, his efforts have resulted in nearly 22,000 children being held in us government custody, separated from their parents. sophie long, bbc news, on the san diego—tijuana border. time for a look at the weather.
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this is matt taylor.

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