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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 20, 2021 10:00am-1:00pm BST

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this is bbc news, the latest headlines here and around the world. as borisjohnson meets football officials to find ways of preventing english clubs joining a breakaway european super league — the premier league's leading all—time scorer calls for those clubs to be thrown out. the super league have chucked a grenade at the premier league and chucked a grenade to everyone else. well, chuck one back. ban them. ban them immediately. do you agree with alan shearer? could the season end in chaos with clubs unable to play? on twitter, it's @vicderbyshire, or you can email victoria@bbc.co.uk. also this hour... tensions remain high across the united states — as the jury in the trial of former police officer derek chauvin, who's accused of killing
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george floyd, prepares to deliver its verdict. the government says it's speeding up its target to cut carbon emissions in the uk — by 15 years. the thousands of unaccompanied children trying enter the united states — currently being held in us government custody, with the number continuing to grow. hello and welcome if you are watching in the uk or around the world. the backlash over plans for a new european super league is intensifying. 12 clubs, including six
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from the premier league, unveiled proposals for a breakaway tournament, which they wouldn't have to qualify for and from which they'd never be relegated. the british prime minister boris johnson will chair a meeting of senior football officials and fan groups to discuss what should happen to the clubs planning on joining the new league. the m other premier leagues who aren't participating in the super league are also holding talks later to discuss their response. it's notjust fans who are angry — jurgen klopp, manager of liverpool — one of the clubs that's agreed tojoin the new league — reiterated last night his opposition to it and said players weren't to blame. the real madrid president florentino perez, who is now chairman of the super league, has defended the plans, saying it's aimed at �*saving football'. alan shearer, the premier league's record goalscorer, says in retaliation, the premier league should ban the breakaway clubs. the super league have chucked a grenade at the premier league and chucked a grenade to everyone else. well, chuck one back. ban them. ban them immediately, if you can.
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if they can. and i'm sure that they'll look at every possible legal angle and what pressure they're under in doing that. but if you can, do it. alan shearer also voiced his sympathy forjurgen klopp, saying he was in a difficult position. i mean, he made his feelings clear on the european super league over a year ago, didn't he, where he said he didn't want it? he also said that again last night, he didn't want it. he doesn't want what his owners want. and that is a really powerful voice, when someone of his stature, someone that has brought huge success to liverpool, one of so many great managers — shankly, dalglish, paisley, fagan — when you look at all these guys who have been massive to that football club, now you've got another one speaking up against it. so, he is a powerful voice, and i'm sure that he will tell his owners what he thinks.
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and it's not fair on him, being put in that situation last night. it's not fair of the captain having been put in that situation, to come out to the media to try and explain what they don't like. where are these owners? why don't they come out? why don't they come out and face the media and tell us why they've done it, why they want to close shop that no—one else can get into? let's hearfrom one of the men at the forefront of the plans — real madrid's president. florentino perez. he's been defending the plans on spanish tv. translation: uefa is a monopoly. they should be more transparent, they should know why they say these things. all we want is to make football better, we want to save football, which is at risk, it really is. uefa has not had a good image throughout their history. i don't want to mention some of the things that
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have happened at uefa, but i have to say that. they need to be transparent. they need to start a dialogue, instead of threatening. there's no need for them to threaten anybody. they've created a champions league format that, in our opinion, doesn't work. there's no—one who says that it works, i can assure that. i've spoken to every league, to every federation, and no—one understands it. besides, they say it will start in 2024, but we will be dead by 202a. there are clubs here that have lost hundreds of millions this year and the previous one. it's going to be the 15 clubs who will play against each other every week that's going to bring the money in. that's the greatest show in the world, there's nothing like that. and there's no other sport that can gather 4,000 million people watching a few teams play. this is for the sake of football.
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i'm here to defend real madrid and make it better. i won the elections, so now i have four years ahead of me to improve the situation, and this is one of the things we can do to improve the situation. today, with the incomes of the champions league, it's like now, we are dying. there's less and less audience, and less and less money. we are all dying — the big ones, the medium—sized ones and the small ones. they say the new format will begin in 202a. i'm sorry, but we will all be dead in 202a. the money will come for all of us because this is like a pyramid. if the ones on top have money and we don't lose any money, then it will flow down and it will reach everybody because we will buy players, because we will be supportive. but if we don't create that money, then it won't exist for anybody. the former liverpool and england
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playerjohn barnes is with us. hello, john barnes. what would be wrong with watching liverpool against real madrid lie in bashan twice a year live on amazon or facebook? —— live twice a year. what facebook? -- live twice a year. what effect does — facebook? -- live twice a year. what effect does it — facebook? -- live twice a year. what effect does it have _ facebook? -- live twice a year. what effect does it have on _ facebook? -- live twice a year. what effect does it have on the _ facebook? —— live twice a year. “twat effect does it have on the rest facebook? —— live twice a year. “tit"iegt effect does it have on the rest of the people not invited to the party? of course, we put this on ourselves, of course, we put this on ourselves, when the premier league broke away in 1982, there were five clubs called traitors because they wanted to break away from the football league, but the other 15 teams in the league, the old first division, put up with it because they were given financial incentives to do so, to the detriment of the championship and league1 to the detriment of the championship and league 1 and league two, they cut them adrift, and this is happening now, apart from it is six teams who want to leave the premier league behind. financially, they are not leaving the premier league, but the money they can make will make it harderfor the money they can make will make it harder for the other 15 teams in the premier league to compete with them and that is the issue. but we brought it upon ourselves when we started the premier league, we
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stopped this altruistic thinking behind football been for everybody because the premier league has been a closed shop where people make more money than us. so i think we put this on our shelves. it is wrong. however, i think it is a negotiation tactic to get more money from uefa to keep the champions league as it is and to give the big boys more money. i is and to give the big boys more mone . t, �* is and to give the big boys more mone . i, �* ~ ., is and to give the big boys more mone . t, �* ,, t, t, , money. i don't know if that is riaht, money. i don't know if that is right. you — money. i don't know if that is right, you know, _ money. i don't know if that is right, you know, i— money. i don't know if that is right, you know, i don't- money. i don't know if that isj right, you know, i don't often money. i don't know if that is - right, you know, i don't often read the financial times, but i did this morning because they are reporting, and we mention it yesterday on air, if american investment bankjp morgan are bankrolling this, the clubs have signed contracts and they are going to get 200 to 300 million euros as a bonus. can you imagine the glazes or the fenway sports group turning that sort of money down, this was the money offered to the top premier league teams and they took it. to the top premier league teams and they took it— they took it. to the detriment of everybody _ they took it. to the detriment of everybody else. _ they took it. to the detriment of everybody else, the _ they took it. to the detriment of everybody else, the problem - they took it. to the detriment of. everybody else, the problem with they took it. to the detriment of - everybody else, the problem with the rest of this is the premier league
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teams will not be party to this so they are the ones complaining because if they were invited and to because if they were invited and to be given the money, they would not have objected, so this thing about morality and it being run for football once again is ridiculous. i think it is wrong, i do not think it should happen. == think it is wrong, i do not think it should happen-— should happen. -- being run for football. you _ should happen. -- being run for football. you think _ should happen. -- being run for football. you think no _ should happen. -- being run for football. you think no moral- should happen. -- being run for| football. you think no moral high ground should be taken by people in this country, the difference between the european super league and the creation of the premier league, and i remember the controversy and the angen i remember the controversy and the anger, at least there was relegation.— anger, at least there was relegation. that is the only difference. _ relegation. that is the only difference. but _ relegation. that is the only difference. but that - relegation. that is the only difference. but that is - relegation. that is the only difference. but that is not l relegation. that is the only - difference. but that is not going... i think we have lost you. that is annoying. i can read some e—mails and text messages while we try to getjohn barnes back, are you back? promotion and relegation in england in the premier league, the premier league will not change, but the top six will be much richer than the rest of the premier league so it will be harderfor the rest of the premier league so it will be harder for the likes of leicester to compete, but there
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still will be promotion and relegation. d0 still will be promotion and relegation.— still will be promotion and releaation. t, still will be promotion and releaation. ., ~ ., relegation. do you agree with alan shearer that _ relegation. do you agree with alan shearer that the _ relegation. do you agree with alan shearer that the six _ relegation. do you agree with alan shearer that the six anguish - relegation. do you agree with alan shearer that the six anguish clubs | shearer that the six anguish clubs including your old club liverpool should be thrown out of the premier league? the should be thrown out of the premier leauue? ., t. t, league? the premier league cannot survive without _ league? the premier league cannot survive without them _ league? the premier league cannot survive without them and _ league? the premier league cannot survive without them and you - league? the premier league cannot survive without them and you check| survive without them and you check them out and the sponsors pull out. so which sponsors will be involved, will they want that product without the top six? if fifa ban england players from playing for england and argentinian and german and spanish players, what is a world cup with brazil and argentina his players play for the top teams?- brazil and argentina his players play for the top teams? sorry about these technical _ play for the top teams? sorry about these technical issues, _ play for the top teams? sorry about these technical issues, it _ play for the top teams? sorry about these technical issues, it is - play for the top teams? sorry about these technical issues, it is so - these technical issues, it is so frustrating. can“t these technical issues, it is so frustrating. can't wait for the old days when we have guests back in the studio, which may be some time. we might try and get him back because i was enjoying the conversation. we have got something from the fifa president, the head of world football, gianni infantino. he is telling the tale breakaway european super league clubs today that they cannot be half in, half out of the
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established football system and must face up to the reality of their decision —— the 12 breakaway. so let's look at the quotes. if some elect to go their own way, then they must live at the consequences of their choice, they are responsible for their choice. concretely, this means either you are in or you are out, you cannot be half in and half out, you cannot be half in and half out, that has to be absolutely clear. i don't know if he is talking about half out, the six from this country can be, cannot be in the premier league, is that what he means a? i“m premier league, is that what he means a? i'm not sure, to be honest. he goes on, we can only strongly disapprove of the super league, which is a closed shop, breaking away from current institutions. there is no doubt whatsoever of fifa “s disapproval and we give full support to uefa. the government's preparing to announce more ambitous targets to cut carbon emissions — ahead of an international climate change summit in glasgow this autumn.
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borisjohnson boris johnson wants to borisjohnson wants to cut them by 15% almost three years earlier than previously planned. aviation will be included for the first time. it will mean major changes on your heating, power, insulation, what vehicles you drive and how much meat you eat, frankly. 0ur environment analyst, roger harrabin. so, hopping on a plane will probably, not certainly because policy has to be determined, hopping on a plane will probably become more expensive if you do a lot of it. frequent flyers. that is actually popular with the general public, the idea of having a levy on frequent flyers. when it comes to driving we are going to have to be buying all electric cars anyway virtually by 2030 because of the new government rules on that. so people will be getting rid of their old cars. 0n gas boilers, that is more tricky one, we do have a challenge in
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getting people's home is heated by other means, by low carbon means, after because things like electric heat pumps in the garden or air source heat pumps are not as efficient as gas or rather, they don't pack out as much heat as gas. don“t pack out as much heat as gas. so we are going to have to insulate our homes more. and the government is not giving much incentive for that at the moment. in fact, it has scree —— it has scrapped the green homes grant. so what might this policy mean forjobs? the independent non—profit organisation green new deal uk says investing in greenjobs could replace everyjob lost in the uk as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. we can speak to fatima ibrahim, its co—executive director, now. what do you mean by green jobs? greenjobs are low what do you mean by green jobs? green jobs are low carbon jobs. they arejobs that help green jobs are low carbon jobs. they are jobs that help is actively decarbonise our economy. wind turbines, retrofitting homes so we are warning homes in a home —— in a
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way much more compatible with climate targets and low carbon sector is that already exist. jobs in education, our care sectors and national health service, the job in education, our care sectors and national health service, thejob is already being done that are good for the planet and helping our communities and they are at the heart of our communities as we have found over the last year. and investing in greenjobs is a no—brainer, particularly looking at the stats coming out of the 0ns today that paints a really bleak picture for workers and especially young people coming out of the pandemic. but also the other news coming out today is we are seeing the second highest rise in carbon emissions in human history. and investing in greenjobs emissions in human history. and investing in green jobs will allow us to decarbonise our economy, meet climate targets and also importantly pull millions of people out of unemployment and deliver good jobs all around the country, helping us level up, which apparently is a priority for the government, though we are really not seen the plans to match the rhetoric.— we are really not seen the plans to
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match the rhetoric. yes, exactly. we have not match the rhetoric. yes, exactly. we have got this — match the rhetoric. yes, exactly. we have got this new _ match the rhetoric. yes, exactly. we have got this new target, _ match the rhetoric. yes, exactly. we have got this new target, 15 - match the rhetoric. yes, exactly. we have got this new target, 15 years i have got this new target, 15 years earlier than planned. 2035. what kind of actions do we need to see from this government, whoever the next government is, in order to make that happen?— that happen? yes, this is a really imortant that happen? yes, this is a really important target, _ that happen? yes, this is a really important target, but _ that happen? yes, this is a really important target, but emissions l important target, but emissions don“t important target, but emissions don't respond to targets. nor do these unemployment figures. it is important to recognise these targets are coming ahead of the big climate summit this week being held by the us presidentjoe biden. sorry, why is that relevant? the reason it is relevant is in comparison to what other countries are doing in comparison to us. the government has flagship template plan they published last year, the plan to deal with climate emergency, the amount they were investing was only 5% of whatjoe biden has invested in jobs and infrastructure in the green economy. jobs and infrastructure in the green econom . y jobs and infrastructure in the green econom. , t, , t, t, t, economy. sorry, that is not a fair comparison. _ economy. sorry, that is not a fair comparison, they _ economy. sorry, that is not a fair comparison, they have _ economy. sorry, that is not a fair comparison, they have a - economy. sorry, that is not a fair comparison, they have a massive population compared to our laws.
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that is when you scale it down to the uk economy. so proportionately? proportionately, we are investing nothing in comparison to the us and in comparison to france and germany. the big thing the government needs to do is put their money where their mouth is to make sure these targets are backed by credible plans that allow us to see a pathway to these targets that allow us to see a pathway to decarbonising our economy and levelling up our country in the meantime. , and levelling up our country in the meantime-— and levelling up our country in the meantime. , t, t, , t, t, meantime. give me an example of a credible plan. _ meantime. give me an example of a credible plan, just _ meantime. give me an example of a credible plan, just make _ meantime. give me an example of a credible plan, just make it _ meantime. give me an example of a credible plan, just make it tangible i credible plan, just make it tangible because quite often when we talk about carbon emissions, it doesn't mean anything to most people. tbs, mean anything to most people. tangible plan would be to greener our transport. tangible plan would be to greener our transport-— tangible plan would be to greener our transort. . ., ., , ., ., our transport. what does that mean in ractical our transport. what does that mean in practical terms? _ our transport. what does that mean in practicalterms? it _ our transport. what does that mean in practicalterms? it is _ our transport. what does that mean in practicalterms? it is investing i in practical terms? it is investing in practical terms? it is investing in electrical— in practical terms? it is investing in electrical vehicle _ in practical terms? it is investing in electrical vehicle charging - in electrical vehicle charging points up and down this country. a tangible plan is the green homes plan was a fiasco, itjust was not rolled out in the right way and the government scrapped it without
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trying. it is true we need to decarbonise our buildings, they are a huge source of carbon emissions and thousands of people around the country are unable to keep their homes one because they are not insulated properly. if we were to invest in insulation in buildings up and down this country, that would create jobs and every single consist —— constituency and is a tangible way to reduce carbon emissions. thank you very much. fatima ibrahim. we will try to talk tojohn barnes again because we are nothing if not persistent, he used to play for liverpool, as i am sure most of you know. you don't agree with alan shearer, who said the premier league should chuck out the six clubs because she said that would be the end of the premier league, essentially. so what do you think either the football authorities or the government can realistically do to stop this european super league? i don't know what legally they can do and i am sure the premier league will want to check out the six teams because the sponsors would pull out so what is the point of that to keep
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a viable product? —— they would not want to check out the six teams. this came about because the top teams have an issue with uefa. it is a negotiating tactic to get uefa around the table to get more money from them in the champions league and everything will stay the same. so a lot of people are posturing and threatening, i think the premier league will suffer more. i think fifa will suffer more if you don't have a world cup with ronaldo, messi and harry kane. flit; have a world cup with ronaldo, messi and harry kane-— have a world cup with ronaldo, messi and harry kane. oh, my goodness, the technicals have — and harry kane. oh, my goodness, the technicals have failed _ and harry kane. oh, my goodness, the technicals have failed us _ and harry kane. oh, my goodness, the technicals have failed us again, - technicals have failed us again, sorry about that. i suppose we could just use the phone. sorry. a jury in minneapolis will resume its deliberations later today, in the trial of derek chauvin, the former us police officer charged with murdering george floyd. america is braced for the outcome of a case that is seen as a pivotal moment in us race relations and policing. security has been significantly
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increased around the court building in minneapolis as officials prepare for protests once the outcome of the trial is known. a warning — there is distressing footage in this report from our washington correspondent lebo diseko. his name... was george perry floyd jr. the first words of closing arguments focusing on george floyd, the man. the prosecution making an early effort to get ahead of claims about mr floyd“s use of drugs. ..that he was not conscious... for nearly two hours, the prosecution tookjurors through the main points of their case — that mr chauvin pressed down on mr floyd until his lungs no longer had room for him to breathe, and that derek chauvin betrayed his badge and everything it stands for. when he was unable to speak, the defendant continued. when he was unable to breathe, the defendant continued — beyond the point that he had a pulse, the defendant continued.
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this wasn't policing, this was murder. but mr chauvin“s lawyer said the defence was focusing on an incomplete picture. nine minutes, 29 seconds. it's not the proper analysis, because the nine minutes and 29 seconds ignores the previous 16 minutes and 59 seconds. it tries to reframe the issue of what a reasonable police officer would do. his lawyer arguing that george floyd had been resisting, and said the officer's actions were legal, given the knowledge they had. the aim — to create reasonable doubt on the charges. all rise for the jury. ifjust one juror has that, it would mean a hung jury and a possible mistrial. this is a peaceful protest, but make no mistake, minneapolis is a city on edge. thousands of extra national guard and law enforcement have been drafted in, in case of any violence.
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the jury is now sequestered, as they consider their verdict. whatever that is will have huge implications for this city and for this country. lebo diseko, bbc news, minneapolis. well, in the wake of george floyd“s death, protests took place around the world and in a video that went viral, community activist and father of two curtis hayes implored two generations of protesters to "find a better way" to express their pain over police killings of african americans. let's watch a clip of that video now. he angry at a6, i“m angry at 31. you angry at 15! do you understand me? you are putting yourself in harm's way. you are putting yourself in harm's wa . ., �* , ., you are putting yourself in harm's way-_ there _ you are putting yourself in harm's way._ there are - you are putting yourself in harm's way._ there are otheri way. no, it's not. there are other counterparts _ way. no, it's not. there are other counterparts the _ way. no, it's not. there are other counterparts the same _ way. no, it's not. there are other counterparts the same age, - way. no, it's not. there are other counterparts the same age, they| way. no, it's not. there are other - counterparts the same age, they have the same powers, come up with a
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better way because we ain't doing it! and i have a five—year—old son and it ain't happening! and we can speak now to curtis hayes, a community activist who is also running for a place on the city council in his hometown of charlotte. thank you for talking to us, curtis hayes. what has it been like for you watching this trial?— watching this trial? first, thanks for havin: watching this trial? first, thanks for having me. _ watching this trial? first, thanks for having me. watching - watching this trial? first, thanks for having me. watching the - watching this trial? first, thanks | for having me. watching the trial and watching the argument of the prosecution and then watching the argument of the defence and just again watching george floyd call and plead for his life has been hard and it has been traumatising. but again, excited about the deliberation and excited about the deliberation and excited that the prosecution was able to bring a strong case. if derek chauvin is found guilty, what effect do you think that will have? the effect i think it will bring and
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haveis the effect i think it will bring and have is what we have been longing forfor have is what we have been longing for for a very long time, have is what we have been longing forfor a very long time, which is police accountability. we see the evidence, we have seen what derek chauvin did. the prosecution delivered a very strong case, so if he is convicted, it shows that america is turning the curve about what life they care for and what life, and making sure that the police respects all lives and black lives, instead ofjust white lives. so i think that is a very strong moment right now to prove to american citizens that they do care about black lives. if american citizens that they do care about black lives.— about black lives. if derek chauvin is found not _ about black lives. if derek chauvin is found not guilty, _ about black lives. if derek chauvin is found not guilty, what _ about black lives. if derek chauvin is found not guilty, what effect - is found not guilty, what effect will that have?— is found not guilty, what effect will that have? ., ,, ., , ., , will that have? you know, you see it in everybody. _ will that have? you know, you see it in everybody. all _ will that have? you know, you see it in everybody, all america _ will that have? you know, you see it in everybody, all america sits - will that have? you know, you see it in everybody, all america sits and i in everybody, all america sits and waits on their hands. if derek chauvin is not found guilty, i do believe that you will cause a bigger divide in america than there already is. i was looking at all of the
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evidence over the course of the case and the evidence, if the evidence fits, you must come out with a guilty verdict. brute fits, you must come out with a guilty verdict-— fits, you must come out with a guilty verdict. we will see what ha ens, guilty verdict. we will see what happens. thank _ guilty verdict. we will see what happens, thank you _ guilty verdict. we will see what happens, thank you very - guilty verdict. we will see what happens, thank you very much | guilty verdict. we will see what i happens, thank you very much for talking to us, thank you, curtis hayes, community activist. mps will take evidence on covid variants and international travel, they will hear about the threat posed by the indian variant, whether the uk could face a third wave as restrictions are eased and the effect of the government because my approach to border policy and international travel. —— the government's approach. this comes as india“s been added to the government's "red list" for travel — meaning that from aam on friday, british and irish citizens arriving into the uk, will have to quarantine in a designated hotel. non—residents will be banned
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from entering the country entirely. it comes after more than 100 cases of the indian variant were identified in the uk. 0ur transport correspondent, caroline davies, reports. delhi is going into lockdown. cases are rising across india, and there's a growing concern about the so—called indian variant of the coronavirus. while it's under investigation, the uk government has taken a new step. we've made the difficult, but vital, decision to add india to the red list. this means anyone who is not a uk or irish resident or a british citizen cannot enter the uk if they've been in india in the previous ten days. uk and irish residents, and british citizens who've been in india in the past ten days before their arrival, will need to complete hotel quarantine for ten days from the time of arrival. the rules will come in from aam on friday morning. it's less than four months since india banned flights from the uk, trying to contain the uk variant. with this virus, dynamics between countries can change quickly. when flights restarted, india“s government restricted them
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to 30 a week between the two countries, and seats back to the uk before friday are already in short supply. vick and his family are currently in ghaziabad on the outskirts of delhi. i immediately looked into the flights. so, a, i couldn't get any flights back home. b, i have to quarantine with a small child now — that is another worry. c, it is ridiculously expensive to be in hotel quarantine for ten days. and the variant here in india is worrying — people have started panicking about it. there is a sense of panic around. international travel from england could still restart to some countries from the 17th of may, but this announcement shows it will be a while until the world is open — as the list of countries designated red gets longer, not shorter. caroline davies, bbc news.
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at 5pm, the prime minister will lead a downing street press conference on coronavirus and you can watch it live on the bbc news channel. the scottish first minister nicola sturgeon will give a covid briefing later — she“s expected to confirm the lockdown easing measures planned for april 26th. and wales will see its lockdown restrictions eased further from saturday — with six people from six different households being able to meet outside. pubs, restaurants and cafes will also be able to open outdoors as planned from monday. a travel bubble launched yesterday between australia and new zealand could be in jeopardy. a border worker at new zealand“s auckland airport is said to have tested positive for coronavirus. prime ministerjacinda ardern said the country's health authorities were liaising with their australian counterparts. turkey is second in the world behind india in terms of the spread of covid—19. turkey is now second in the world — only behind india — in terms of the spread of covid—19.
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the daily infection rate has exceeded 60,000 in the past week. however — the total number of deaths is relatively low. the authorities aim to have everyone over forty years old vaccinated by the end ofjune. but some are hesitant about being inoculated. this is one of the oldest state hospitals in istanbul, and here alone, they have given our 23,000 doses of the vaccine. across the country, around 8 million have had both jabs out of a population of around 83 million, so about 10% of the population here is fully vaccinated. the door is open here at eight in the morning and we have seen a stream of people arriving, and you can now get a vaccination until midnight, the hours have been extended because the numbers coming forward fell after ramadan began, so you can come here in the evening after breaking the fast and get your vaccination. i'm with 72—year—old sevim.
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you have just had your vaccination, how are you feeling? how has covid changed your life in the last year? what has the last year been like for you? i am with an associate professor at the hospital. there are two vaccines available, the chinese sinovac and pfizer biontech. trials in brazil said it was only
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about 50% effective. are people expressing a lot of concern about that to you? there are concerns about vaccine hesitancy and the take—up of the vaccine. one in four of the over—65s have not come forward to have their shot. turkey is now battling a third wave of covid—19, with skyrocketing cases. the numbers of daily infections have gone up to over 60,000 in recent days, so doctors are urging people to come forward and get their vaccination.
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the latest unemployment figures came out this morning. they show that the number of uk workers on payrolls dropped by 56,000 last month. in total, since march 2020, and through the covid lockdowns, it“s fallen by 813,000. these are the figures from the office for national statistics. we spoke to our economics correspondent andy verity. the picture is like a deep freeze overwinter in the labour market because of the lockdowns and furlough schemes and support schemes which were kept in place. you actually had a downtick in the official rate of unemployment which is still amazingly low largely because of the money spent on furlough schemes etc. but also for a bad reason, the unemployment rate does not reflect what is going on in the labour market. for this reason if you for example were laid off and told to collect
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benefits for a while, and when the economy reopens we will rehire you. when you are asked in the survey, do you have a job to go back to? you will not answer no, so you will not be classified as unemployed. we know there are 830,000 people in paid employment than at the start of the pandemic, most won't show up as unemployed because of those reasons. within that 800,000 drop in paid employment, it is something like 350,000 people in hotels and restaurants who are not working any more. that is huge. it hits young people far harder. if you look at the number of people who have lost theirjobs, paid jobs, it is something like 80%, 78% under the age of 35, and 3a% under the age of 25.
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the bulk of this crisis is borne by young people who least need protection of the lockdown because of the virus. there are some interesting patterns. one other thing to highlight is the amount of worklessness. if you add the number of people out of work completely to the numbers who are workers on furlough. if you add in for example the fall in self—employment, 600,000, you get something like 6.2 million people who are workless because of the pandemic. that is the mountain we have to climb, as the economy reopens and support schemes wind down, will we be able to find jobs that last, viablejobs for those people? a question about primark, they are handing back millions of pounds worth of furlough they took from taxpayers. that is right. because these things were done at speed, the furlough money went out to employers who
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didn't really need it. primark is a prosperous and popular company. it has reasonable profit margins, they were making money. although they had a long period making less money than before and the furlough scheme underwrote a lot of businesses like that, they did not have to worry, they ended up with a surplus from the taxpayer, whereas the taxpayer collectively we have a huge deficit and debt to repay. it is an interesting sign corporate britain and there have been other examples is acknowledging in some ways it has had an easy pandemic. so handing back the money is one thing they can do. thank you. voters are due to head to the polls in two weeks. there are parliamentary elections as well. 5 live“s anna foster is on the road this week elections as
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well. today she's in stockton. anna. still on stockton high street. i wanted to show this, when it is important to people casting their vote. we know there are issues people always consider when deciding which way to vote and one is the economy, their local high street, the area around them, the atmosphere, how much they had to spend, add workplaces look like. you can see this beautiful street with lovely buildings, this is the castlegate centre. it doesn't look as great as the rest of the high street. this is central to the efforts to regenerate stockton high street because that will be locked down. on the other side of it which you can't see is the river tees. what they are hoping to do is really open it up, bring more people in to
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get more people shopping, spend money to help the economy. this will turn into a huge part down to the river. it sounds fantastic. but this high street suffers from many issues of empty shops, letting signs. they are doing what they can to make people's lives and pockets feel better and that feeds into the election. in stockton—on—tees they do not have a council election this time, there are five or six seats coming up as by—elections. they do have a metro mayor election, they have a metro mayor election, they have a metro mayor election, they have a conservative mayor at the moment. this has been a huge deal, it was before the red wall collapse of 2019, their first real incursion into heartland labour territory. the economy has been a really big talking point in this electoral campaign. let us talk and more ——
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let us talk to jason maxwell who runs the business improvement district in scott —— in stockton. i was saying how beautiful the high street is but it has been troubled. it has been troubled over the last year with— it has been troubled over the last year with the pandemic but even going _ year with the pandemic but even going back a little bit before that, we lost _ going back a little bit before that, we lost businesses like marks and spencers. — we lost businesses like marks and spencers, debenhams, and before we were slightly on the road to recovery. _ were slightly on the road to recovery, getting used to the fact we did _ recovery, getting used to the fact we did not— recovery, getting used to the fact we did not have those big names. there _ we did not have those big names. there are — we did not have those big names. there are people starting to come out again. a couple of weeks ago the shops were closed and it would have been deserted. it is not as busy as it once was as to what are you doing to attract people in and get them to spend money locally? what we can see this morning, it clearly— what we can see this morning, it clearly is — what we can see this morning, it clearly is a — what we can see this morning, it clearly is a sunny morning and we have _ clearly is a sunny morning and we have lots— clearly is a sunny morning and we have lots of— clearly is a sunny morning and we have lots of people on the high street — have lots of people on the high street. there wasn't that number a
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couple _ street. there wasn't that number a couple of— street. there wasn't that number a couple of weeks ago. what we are trying _ couple of weeks ago. what we are trying to— couple of weeks ago. what we are trying to do in stockton is change the perception of our high street. people _ the perception of our high street. people think it is a dour place with few businesses but from our experience as a business improvement district. _ experience as a business improvement district. we _ experience as a business improvement district, we have over a00 businesses right here in the district _ businesses right here in the district area. about 170 are independent. that is where the growth — independent. that is where the growth of— independent. that is where the growth of the town centres will come from. _ growth of the town centres will come from, having a balance between independent and national retailers. we are _ independent and national retailers. we are one partner in the town centre — we are one partner in the town centre the _ we are one partner in the town centre. the borough council has transformed this high street over the last— transformed this high street over the last 15 years. you talked about the last 15 years. you talked about the castlegate centre. there's business —— those businesses are being _ business —— those businesses are being encouraged to fill the void in the high— being encouraged to fill the void in the high street and move across. i think— the high street and move across. i think it _ the high street and move across. i think it is — the high street and move across. i think it is really important to remember that retail won't there be
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all and _ remember that retail won't there be all and end — remember that retail won't there be all and end all, it has to be more, about— all and end all, it has to be more, about experiences as well as retail. when _ about experiences as well as retail. when we _ about experiences as well as retail. when we had this parkland which will be three _ when we had this parkland which will be three times the size of trafalgar square. _ be three times the size of trafalgar square. we — be three times the size of trafalgar square, we can put on more events and bring _ square, we can put on more events and bring people back to visit the retailers — and bring people back to visit the retailers we do have. it will be an amazing — retailers we do have. it will be an amazing space. it _ amazing space. it sounds beautiful. you have explain what you are trying to do. stockton is an area with pockets of deprivation, real poverty. when people are struggling with their daily lives and see money being spent on big projects, do you find it hard tojustify spent on big projects, do you find it hard to justify to people who maybe don“t it hard to justify to people who maybe don't understand why the money is going there instead of helping them day—to—day? that is absolutely right, one of the perceptions we need to change. a lot of the _ perceptions we need to change. a lot of the funding is coming from outside. _ of the funding is coming from outside, not necessarily taxpayers
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zest money. grants from the high streets _ zest money. grants from the high streets fund. all the work is to improve — streets fund. all the work is to improve facilities right here in the heart _ improve facilities right here in the heart of— improve facilities right here in the heart of stockton for the residents and wider— heart of stockton for the residents and wider borough. jason— and wider borough. jason maxwell from stockton business improvement district. we will talk about the economy as the day goes on. and look at these red all seats, the first real chance for people to vote in a big way since many in this part of england lent borisjohnson their vote in 2019. there is a by—election in hartlepool as well. a lot to find out about how people feel about their day—to—day lives and how they might vote. and i will be in hartlepool next week. and you can find out what elections are taking place in your area — and see all the candidates by heading to the bbc news website bbc.co.uk/news.
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breaking news. first regarding football and the european super league. this from the uefa president who is reaching out to the owners of the new european super league clubs, saying, there is still time for them to back down onjoining saying, there is still time for them to back down on joining the breakaway competition, still time for them to change their minds. the quote is, everyone makes mistakes. the uefa president appealing to those clubs from spain, italy and england, to change their minds on joining that european super league. another bit of breaking news. regarding the lobbying row over david cameron and the lobbying he did with the current chancellor over a company he had shares in. the former prime minister david cameron and the chancellor have both been asked to give evidence to the house of commons at treasury select committee investigating the lobbying
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efforts made by green cell and those working for it. the chairman of the committee has asked david cameron to provide details of contact he had with the chancellor and any other ministers and officials at the treasury. david cameron has been asked for the full text of messages he sent to the chancellor, he texted him on his mobile, and details of a phone conversation he also had with him. in a letter to the chancellor the committee has asked that he and the committee has asked that he and the treasury provide details of all their contacts with mr cameron and their contacts with mr cameron and the company, and for an estimate of how much effort the treasury put in to try to help the company and how it compared with the effort and help given to other firms are trying to access covid financing and how many other similar financing firms the treasury actually spoke to. we reported earlier on the number of jobs lost in lockdowns. more than half of those affecting people under
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the age of 35. calls from young people struggling to find a job and a place to live have increased by 33% in the pandemic. centrepoint, which works with under 25s, says family breakdowns during lockdown have been one of the key factors for the increase. emma glasbey reports. the past year has turned many lives upside down. the first lockdown leftjamie home less. only 20 he has been through a family breakdown. he is now living in barnsley supported by the youth homeless charity centrepoint. how did you find it when you came here? i didn't like it at first. but then i got to know the staff and i realised not to be scared. i just chill with everyone and i got used to everyone and started enjoying it. and ifound it better, it helped my anxiety a bit more because i was more accepted there than at home. if i didn't have this i don't know what i would do, honestly.
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supporting young, vulnerable people through three lockdowns has come with many challenges. is that zoomed in? centrepoint is still seeing more and more young people asking for help. isolating at home with family, there were more family breakdowns which in turn led to more mental health. chantelle has been supporting young people at the charity based in barnsley. the isolation at the start, it was really terrible for those young people. it was surprising to see it increase. when the referrals were coming through, it was the mental health side of things, it increased rapidly. the uncertainty for vulnerable young people is being seen on the streets. in leeds 2a—year—old kaz has a place to stay but she is pregnant and is struggling financially. with covid, it has been really bad to associate, make friends, just to sort of feel like you have got that help.
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because a lot of the support, with covid, has been closed down. since coming out of lockdown there are a lot more - youngsters on the streets, i teenagers, in their early 20s. the youngsters don't know how to help themselves, l they don't know where to go. it is more difficult. for them to get out of the situation than the adults. the most vulnerable have been disproportionately affected by covid. the younger generation may be less at risk from the virus. but more at risk from the long—term impact. emma glasby, bbc news. well, we can speak now to 19—year—old cam who throughout the last year struggled to get work and a permanent place to live. hello. i know last year when you are 18 you came out of care, and you are going to move in with your dad and you were excited at the prospect, tell us about it.
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i was extremely excited at the prospect of moving in with my dad, it was a new place, i wanted to move away from my hometown because there weren't manyjobs going. they weren't manyjobs going. they weren't accepting people like me in that small town. it was a new experience and i was really excited. you were taking your cv around to try to find work, what employment were you looking for? honestly i was just looking for anything i could do because anything would have helped me at that point, just to give me something to get out of bed for, to give me something to look towards everyday like going to work, customer care, cleaning, absolutely anything, honestly. the two of you, you and your dad, living together, didn“t the two of you, you and your dad, living together, didn't quite work out as you hoped.
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what did you do then? this out as you hoped. what did ou do then? i , t, what did you do then? as mentioned, it didn't work — what did you do then? as mentioned, it didn't work out _ what did you do then? as mentioned, it didn't work out so _ what did you do then? as mentioned, it didn't work out so i _ what did you do then? as mentioned, it didn't work out so i stayed - what did you do then? as mentioned, it didn't work out so i stayed with - it didn't work out so i stayed with a friend for a little bit. and then my personal adviser, she got in touch to find me a place. i stayed with a lovely woman in the town i live with now. when you talk about your personal adviser, that is someone who you can talk to when you have come out of care, you were in care. 0nce talk to when you have come out of care, you were in care. once you get to 18, you are not incur any longer, you are expected to look after yourself a personal adviser is there to try to give you help if you need it. yes. my personal adviser i can talk to whenever i need. we have a grant which helps us to move on and get furniture if say we don't have a job, we don't have much money behind us or anything. she is always there
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to help me through many different things, moving on, trying to get a new flat, advice, anything in general really. tell us about night stop, i don't think our audience might have heard of it, it is such a brilliant idea. it is an organisation that takes in young homeless people and they give them a new shot at life. it is a new start completely. you get back on your feet, start completely. you get back on yourfeet, you get time, you get help, little supplies if you need anything and you don't have any money, you can ask for toilet roll, toiletries. they will always help you out no matter what. go there for advice. they mostly give you a good place to stay with good people. they
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don't mess about, they really do help you out, i am so grateful. it is a partner of the charity we mentioned earlier, people volunteer to open up their home to young people like yourself. 0bviously they have been vetted. it gives you somewhere to stay so you are not on the streets. yes, without them i would have been sleeping on the streets for a bit. have you ever had to sleep on the streets since coming out of care? luckily never because i have always had a good support network with my dad, and then my friends and then night stop. and what about now? i have moved on and i am living in another organisation st basil's. they give you your own flat. i have my own key. it is a really good
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establishment, very good for people who need a place urgently. and i think there are around a0 of them in the uk. they are quite widespread. not a lot of them but quite a few and i think that is pretty good. you did manage to get some work in december. 0bviously lockdown happened injanuary december. 0bviously lockdown happened in january so what december. 0bviously lockdown happened injanuary so what is the situation now? at the moment i am at college, full—time college, so i haven't really got full —— haven't really got time for a job but i have been looking for something part—time around the corner or in town. it is around the corner or in town. it is a bit difficult because everything is opening up again, everybody is taking jobs and it is difficult to get yourfoot in taking jobs and it is difficult to get your foot in the door to get a job, it is quite difficult, but i will keep trying and see if i can get somewhere. what are your ambitions for the future, what are you doing at
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couege future, what are you doing at college and what you want to do ultimately? i am doing animal care at college. and i want to have a sanctuary for dogs and cats who have been chucked out on the streets, not looked after any more. i want look after animals and bring them back up to full health and hopefully give them a good here —— and hopefully get them a good home. thank you for talking to us today. tens of thousands of unaccompanied children are being held in us government custody and the number continues to grow. president biden promised change at the border — but he's extended — rather than repealed —(tx map)one but he's extended — rather than repealed — one of the most restrictive immigration policies. almost all migrants from latin america are being denied entry — apart from unnaccompanied children.
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sophie long reports from tijuana. hundreds of people, many of them very young children, camp in tents and makeshift shelters, crushed up against the border wall. the promised land is in sight but out of reach. translation: i can't sleep at night. ifear my life is in danger. i'm afraid someone could come and hurt me and my children. i never thought that i would make my children go through so much pain. andrea left el salvador with her husband and two young sons in 2019 because gangs killed half her family. they applied for asylum under president trump and have been waiting, living like this, in one of the most dangerous cities in the world ever since. the number of people coming here, trying to find shelter on the edge of tijuana, at one of the busiest entrances to the united states, is growing by the day. some are hopeful that rumours that president biden will open the border are true. others have lost all hope and now having to make decisions they never thought they would.
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my husband got killed and they told us they were going to come for us. rosaura lives with the same fears here as she did in guerrero where her husband was killed by a cartel. they take girls and, you know, do bad stuff. they get abused, they get killed, they get taken. it“s those fears — and the fact that president biden has said he will not return unaccompanied children to the danger they fled — that's leading parents to believe this is the answer. this night—time footage shows smugglers dropping two young girls from the top of the border wall. they are left alone to fend for themselves. young child crying and speaking spanish. this little boy was found by border patrol, terrified and alone.
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many parents who have been trapped here for a year or more understand that if they send their children ahead that their children will not be returned, and they have genuine concerns and fears whether they're ever going to make it out of mexico alive, and they would rather have the chance for their children to live, even if it means never seeing them again, than all of them dying here together. president biden said his would be a more humane approach to border enforcement, but so far, his efforts have resulted in nearly 22,000 children being held in us government custody, separated from their parents. sophie long, bbc news, on san diego—tijuana border.
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the former us vice president, walter mondale who served under jimmy carter has died. he was 93, and ran as the democratic candidate for the white house in 198a but suffered a landslide defeat to ronald reagan. in a statement, jimmy carter described walter mondale as the "best vice president" in his country's history. former sports minister tracey crouch who has been appointed to lead a review of football has said nothing is off the table. asked if the european super league could be stopped if she told an institute for government event both the promised and culture secretary has set out very robust views on this. asked if it was possible to pass new laws before the start of next season she said, i am not sure there will be proposals put forward for the season kicking off in august but suddenly it has been made clear the government will look at everything and for me there is nothing of the table in terms of the review. if we get to a position where legislation is required for perhaps some regulatory purposes then i suspect that i will be made available for
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that i will be made available for that to happen. michael is a supporter of manchester united and says he is really angry and sad by the news. william in glasgow says, what is the fuss about? it will be the same, they pay on a weekend and in europe mid week. you are watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather. hello again. we are looking at more fine, dry, sunny weather for most of england and wales again today. the early morning rising sun was picking up some cloud from an approaching weather front just to the west of mumbles in swansea. here is that weather front bringing rain to northern ireland and scotland already today. but over the next few hours that rain will turn lighter and patchier and as it clears we will see a mixture of sunshine and showers following across northern areas. now this weather front bringing the light and patchy rain is a cold front and behind that the area is turning cooler.
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across england and wales, in the sunshine, it will feel pleasant even on the warm side with highs up to 17 degrees in cardiff. behind the cold front, the temperatures will drop away significantly. this afternoon temperatures around nine degrees in stornoway and aberdeen, feeling a good deal cooler here. overnight tonight, ourweather front sinks southwards into england and wales. bringing a few patches of rain with it. the skies clear meanwhile in scotland and frost will begin to return here but with that thicker cloud further south it won't be as cold a night. temperatures around 7 degrees in birmingham for example. tomorrow our weather front continues southwards bringing cloud across wales, the midlands and east anglia and southern counties in the afternoon. the odd spot of rain is possible but it is looking dry. and pressure will begin to build again across northern areas of the uk so lots of sunshine and dry weather to come. the winds are light but tending to come from a northerly direction bringing that cooler air to many of us.
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temperatures starting to dip a little below par for the time of year through wednesday afternoon. into thursday, high pressure really does build in across the uk. the weather will be dry with increasing amounts of sunshine and with the high centred over the top of us the winds will be pretty light for all of us. after a cold and locally frosty start to the morning we should see afternoon temperatures returning a little bit above normal for the time of year. so, warm in the sunshine, temperatures around 16, perhaps feeling on the cool side with the onshore winds across parts of east anglia where temperatures arejust ten in norwich. not much rain so far this month, not much rain as we look at the forecast for the weekend and next week as well. that is your weather.
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this is bbc news. i“m annita mcveigh. the headlines at 11... as borisjohnson meets football officials to find ways of preventing english clubs joining a breakaway european super league, the premier league's leading all—time scorer calls for those clubs to be thrown out. the super league have chucked a grenade at the premier league and chucked a grenade to everyone else. well, chuck one back. ban them. ban them immediately. the government says it's speeding up its target to cut carbon emissions in the uk by 15 years. latest employment figures show that four fifths of the people who've lost theirjobs since the pandemic began are under the age of 35. a big increase in young people looking for help during the pandemic, with many struggling to find a job
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and a place to live. the thousands of unaccompanied children trying enter the united states — currently being held in us government custody — with more arriving all the time. welcome to bbc news. the backlash over plans for a new european super league is intensifying. 12 clubs, including six from the premier league, unveiled proposals for a breakaway tournament which they wouldn't have to qualify for and from which they'd never be relegated. prime minister borisjohnson will chair a meeting of senior football officials and fan groups to discuss what should happen to the clubs planning on joining the new league. the 1a other premier leagues
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who aren't participating in the super league are also holding talks later to discuss their response. meanwhile, the head of world football has attacked the plans and warned the clubs involved they will have to live with the consequences of their actions. the head of uefa said the owners had made a huge mistake, but that there was still time to change their minds. but the real madrid president florentino perez — who is now chairman of the super league — has defended the plans saying it's aimed at "saving football." alan shearer, the premier league's record goal—scorer, says the premier league should retaliate and ban the breakaway clubs. the super league have chucked a grenade at the premier league and chucked a grenade to everyone else. well, chuck one back. ban them. ban them immediately, if you can. if they can. and i'm sure that they'll look at every possible legal angle and what pressure they“re under in doing that. but if you can, do it.
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alan shearer also voiced his sympathy forjurgen klopp, manager of liverpool, one of the clubs that's agreed tojoin the new league, who reiterated his opposition to the plans last night. i mean, he made his feelings clear on the european super league over a year ago, didn't he, where he said he didn't want it? he also said that again last night, he didn't want it. he doesn't want what his owners want. and that is a really powerful voice, when someone of his stature, someone that has brought huge success to liverpool, one of so many great managers — shankly, dalglish, paisley, fagan — when you look at all these guys who have been massive to that football club, now you've got another one speaking up against it. so, he is a powerful voice, and i'm sure that he will tell his owners what he thinks. and it's not fair on him, being put in that situation last night. it's not fair of the captain having been put in that situation,
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to come out to the media to try and explain what they don't like. where are these owners? why don't they come out? why don't they come out and face the media and tell us why they've done it, why they want to close shop that no—one else can get into? let's hearfrom one of the men at the forefront of the plans — real madrid's president and the chairman of the european super league, florentino perez. he's been defending the plans on spanish tv. translation: we don't - have the money, apart from tv translation: uefa is a monopoly and they should be more transparent. tote they should be more transparent. we want they should be more transparent. - want to save football, which is asterisk. it really is. uefa has not had a good image through their history. i don't want to mention things that have happened there, but i need to say that. they need to stay transparent and start a
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dialogue. there is no need to threaten anybody. they have created a champions league format which, in our opinion, does not work. there is no one that says that it works, i can assure that. i have spoken to every league, to every federation, and no one understands it. besides, they said it would start in 202a, but we will be dead by 202a. there are clubs here who have lost hundreds of millions this year and the previous one. it's going to be the previous one. it's going to be the 15 clubs who will play against each other every week that is going to bring the money in. that is the greatest show in the world. there is nothing like that and there is no other sport that can gather for thousands million people together to watch people play. this is for the sake of football. i am here to defend real madrid and make it
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better. i won the elections so now i have for years ahead of me to improve the situation and this is one of the things we can do to improve it. today, with the incomes of the champions league, it is like now we are dying. there is less and less audience and less and less money. we are all dying, big, medium and small ones. they say the new format will begin in 202a. i“m format will begin in 202a. i'm sorry, but we will all be dead in 202a. the money will come from all of us because this is like a pyramid. if the once on top have money, it will go down and reach everybody, because we will buy players and be supportive. if we don't create that money, it will not don“t create that money, it will not exist for anybody. so what can the government actually do — if anything? we can speak to the conservative mp and former chair of the digital,
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culture, media and sport committee, damian collins. good morning and thank you for joining us. should politicians really be involved in this? is this not for the markets, clubs, owners and fans? ., , ., «t and fans? know, football is not like and fans? know, football is not like an other and fans? know, football is not like any other business, _ and fans? know, football is not like any other business, they _ and fans? know, football is not like any other business, they are - any other business, they are community assets and need to be run in a sustainable way so football clubs are not merged like businesses taking over and broken up. they should be run in a sustainable way, so government should get involved and there is an important issue in terms of competition law, can this news format be regarded as a cartel which has been created for the benefit of teens within it which will damage the leeks and football? in case like that, the competition authorities should take a look at
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this. ,, ., , , ., , this. should we be seeing a response like this and — this. should we be seeing a response like this and would _ this. should we be seeing a response like this and would we _ this. should we be seeing a response like this and would we be _ this. should we be seeing a response like this and would we be if— this. should we be seeing a response like this and would we be if we - this. should we be seeing a response like this and would we be if we were l like this and would we be if we were not in an election period? it is like this and would we be if we were not in an election period?— not in an election period? it is our national game _ not in an election period? it is our national game and _ not in an election period? it is our national game and you _ not in an election period? it is our national game and you have - not in an election period? it is our national game and you have seen | not in an election period? it is our- national game and you have seen from the outcry, they are upset about this and feel excluded, not included and why they look to the government for help is full to long the commercial interests have run the game that do not have an effective regulator. the fa is a weak body thatis regulator. the fa is a weak body that is powerless to do anything about it and people had turned to the government. we should also be looking at creating a proper independent regulator and statutory powers which could intervene to protect the integrity of competitions and to ensure clubs are being run in a sustainable way. that is something i hope comes from this. does the argument for a super league, a different kind of league,
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if not this super league, have merits? . ., . ., if not this super league, have merits? .., . ., , if not this super league, have merits? . ., , , merits? the concern i have is it is a closed shop- — merits? the concern i have is it is a closed shop. it _ merits? the concern i have is it is a closed shop. it takes _ merits? the concern i have is it is a closed shop. it takes a - merits? the concern i have is it is a closed shop. it takes a small. a closed shop. it takes a small number of teams and says that forever they will be at the top and get the best deals, if and when they share money with the football pyramid, they can reshape football around their commercial interests and everybody else will be living from the crumbs. it is integral to football and something that has made football and something that has made football is huge success in england, thatis football is huge success in england, that is competition. you cannot have that is competition. you cannot have that if most clubs are excluded from top competition.— top competition. looking at the monetising _ top competition. looking at the monetising of _ top competition. looking at the monetising of the _ top competition. looking at the monetising of the game - top competition. looking at the monetising of the game and - top competition. looking at the - monetising of the game and proposals for further monetising of the game and proposals forfurther monetising, is it monetising of the game and proposals for further monetising, is it the case that previous governments should have done more to regulate the influx of foreign money and foreign oligarchs owning english clubs and as a result, what we're seeing now, people are saying it is
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now more about business people making money from the game rather than the love of the game itself? what i think we have needed for a long time is a proper owners and directors test, fit and proper persons test and premier league have done a good job in policing that themselves. the football league do not have the resources to have that properly. ofcom have discretionary tests to decide whether someone is a fit or proper person to hold a broadcasting licence and we need someone to do something similar for football to keep bad owners out. how can you run it without those owners? we need more oversight on the financial operations of the club, access to financial data on how the club is being run, but also looking at how competitions are not down to clubs dictating what competitions they play in and how the money is shared. they should be decided by
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governing bodies and we need to look at whether we give the fa the power to say, actually, you cannotjoin an unsanctioned competition and create your own competitions because they suit you. it is ourjob as a national governing body to make sure football is played in a fair and open way for all teams and notjust allow a small number of teams to gang up allow a small number of teams to gang up and make money for themselves. that is what we need to do. in response to this, we need to look quickly to say, are their existing rules in place and sanctions that would be effective against the six clubs in england to stop them joining this super league and if there are, do we need to look at new legal powers to give those football bodies or a new regulator that power? we need to resolve that pretty quickly. that power? we need to resolve that pretty quickly-— pretty quickly. when you wear chair ofthe pretty quickly. when you wear chair of the dcms — pretty quickly. when you wear chair of the dcms committee, _ pretty quickly. when you wear chair of the dcms committee, some - pretty quickly. when you wear chair of the dcms committee, some of i pretty quickly. when you wear chair- of the dcms committee, some of these questions were being asked. what were the barriers to doing more when
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you were chair of that committee? football is run as a private competition so could or should be government legislate those infrastructures? there is no... the premier league do not want an independent regulator, nor do the fa. now we see those two bodies potentially powerless to stop something that could affect them both and now we might have a consensus within the football family of what is needed to prevent this. the circumstances are different now and widespread reform might be possible. and widespread reform might be ossible. , , ., ., possible. time is short, looking at what we are _ possible. time is short, looking at what we are hearing _ possible. time is short, looking at what we are hearing from - possible. time is short, looking at what we are hearing from the - possible. time is short, looking at i what we are hearing from the various parties in this row. on the issue of sanctions being appropriate, john barnes said that if you kick these clubs out of the premier league, the money from sponsors would fall away and have a negative impact on other clubs as we trickle down through the
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rest of the premier league and other leaks. that can't really be the way this needs to go, can it miss it is an important _ this needs to go, can it miss it 3 an important point and it has been no successful leak in the world at generating money. it is distributed throughout the world of football and if they were kick out, the broadcasters could re—demand the renegotiation of their contracts. it comes for a big —— renegotiation of their contracts. it comes fora big —— it renegotiation of their contracts. it comes for a big —— it comes with a big hit for the league as well. it is essential that could apply, however. we need to look at actually trying to impose an in game sanction and finding the clubs and docking points will not affect them at all. the financial gains from the super league would far outweigh that. but could competition will come in to prevent competitions like this being
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made in this way? we need to look at whether there are remedies in law rather than in game sanctions to stop this happening.— rather than in game sanctions to stop this happening. thank you for our stop this happening. thank you for your thoughts _ stop this happening. thank you for your thoughts on _ stop this happening. thank you for your thoughts on that _ stop this happening. thank you for your thoughts on that today. - stop this happening. thank you for your thoughts on that today. who | your thoughts on that today. who will blink first in all of this is the question we can ask. at lot of this is about money. dr dan plumley is a football finance expert at sheffield hallam university and joins us now. good to have you with us today. let's go over first of all again who will sponsor this super league, who benefits beyond the actual clubs from it most financially and will any of this money, because this is the argument behind the scenes they are making, trickle down throughout the clubs in the countries? titer;r the clubs in the countries? they have come _ the clubs in the countries? they have come out _ the clubs in the countries? they have come out and _ the clubs in the countries? they have come out and said - the clubs in the countries? ii'téi have come out and said they will
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offer payments to the rest of the football pyramid throughout the domestic leagues and we do not know the ins and outs of that in terms of numbers because they are hypothetical. we have seen figures of up to £5 billion worth of revenue for this league in any given season and they are saying they will share and they are saying they will share a percentage of that amongst the football pyramid. we do not also know which football broadcasters are involved and i imagine we will see an open top streaming provider rather than the traditional broadcasters, shorter content targeting a different generation of fans. there are no concrete details of that yet, but that will be driving if that money goes to the lower reaches of the football pyramid. what we have seen over the course of tonight is that those systems have been skewered in favour of the big clubs, so that is no different in this regard and the bigger clubs know that and are using that as leveraging this argument as
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well. i ., , , ., well. and the money people are confident that _ well. and the money people are confident that there _ well. and the money people are confident that there are - well. and the money people are confident that there are enough | well. and the money people are - confident that there are enough fans to go around to justify the costs involved in creating this super league, which sees no relegation of the founding members? rare league, which sees no relegation of the founding members?— league, which sees no relegation of the founding members? we have seen that in the past _ the founding members? we have seen that in the past and _ the founding members? we have seen that in the past and as _ the founding members? we have seen that in the past and as recently - the founding members? we have seen that in the past and as recently as - that in the past and as recently as october, jp morgan, big financial banks in america are likely to be behind us and will be again. there is no doubt that there are people there to finance this and do not know exactly what has been agreed, if anything, at this point in time, but the investment is there and we talked about an american model and this is very much a part. it is a closed league for intent and purposes and that provides financial security for those clubs and longer term growth for those clubs with stock market models and those kind of things. it is no supply is to see american owners pushing this and that comes with greater financial
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rewards, but also less financial risk for those clubs and it is the clubs involved in that competition that will benefit most. isn’t clubs involved in that competition that will benefit most.— that will benefit most. isn't the case that those _ that will benefit most. isn't the case that those clubs _ that will benefit most. isn't the case that those clubs that - that will benefit most. isn't the case that those clubs that wanti that will benefit most. isn't the i case that those clubs that want to be in this super league are those with the most debt or anticipating the greater future costs and if there are sanctions forjoining, what would be likely affect be on their share prices? hat what would be likely affect be on their share prices? not necessarily known for the _ their share prices? not necessarily known for the first _ their share prices? not necessarily known for the first part, _ their share prices? not necessarily known for the first part, there - their share prices? not necessarily known for the first part, there are | known for the first part, there are many clubs not involved, big clubs, that have high debt levels. they have been lots of poor financial mismanagement across football for the last 20 years or so and that is nothing new, so it is not the case that these clubs are worse off financially. they are the most powerful, and that is where they have used this argument to leveraging the super league against getting what they want from domestic governing bodies or uefa, and we have seen that little bit from this. what is your hunch here? is it all about leveraged and getting more
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within the existing structures, like the champions league? because it feels this time, and i know this has been floated a number of times before, like it is really serious, like it might actually be happening. i think that is how i have attended over the 2aa8—hour is also. we are further down the line than we ever have been with this and there is nothing legally binding yet, so we are not there yet with it but we have a real statement of intent and the next point will be who blinks next. the premier league and uefa have their own interests as well and we mention the premier league, it is a worse product without those clubs in it. that can be something used in negotiations. we appear to be further down the line with this than we have ever been, but still a long way to go in terms of what this looks like in the finer detail. is
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looks like in the finer detail. is it naive to say we are in this position because of regulation which has been too soft touch or do you think this was always going to be inevitable as we look at the monetisation of the game? t inevitable as we look at the monetisation of the game? i think i have always — monetisation of the game? i think i have always said, _ monetisation of the game? i think i have always said, and _ monetisation of the game? i think i have always said, and we _ monetisation of the game? i think i l have always said, and we mentioned it previously, around regulation in football, that is a good idea and there has been a case for that. time, but extends back into the early 1990s and the premier league itself was a breakaway league. it kept the link to the football league through promotion and relegation, but we have seen a situation where clubs had been able to self—government and clubs vote on changes, but we have created a system here whereby clubs can govern what happens within their league. what we have seen is bigger clubs utilise that to their advantage and that has been happening since the early 90s. we chemical for more
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regulation and changes to the structure, but we have not done that historically. —— we can call. interesting to talk to you. historically. -- we can call. interesting to talk to you. thank ou ve interesting to talk to you. thank you very much- _ interesting to talk to you. thank you very much- i— interesting to talk to you. thank you very much. i would - interesting to talk to you. thank you very much. i would love - interesting to talk to you. thank you very much. i would love to l interesting to talk to you. thank. you very much. i would love to hear what you think about all of this. you can get in touch with me on twitter and use the hashtag bbc york questions and we will try to read out your comment through this morning. —— bbc your questions. the government is preparing to announce more ambitous targets to cut carbon emissions ahead of an international climate change summit in glasgow this autumn. borisjohnson wants to cut them by almost 80% by 2035, almost 15 years earlier than previously planned. international aviation and shipping will be included in the target for the first time. it will mean major changes on heating, power, insulation, transport and food. our environment analyst roger harrabin told me what that could mean for everyday life.
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soon, hopping on a plane will probably, not certainly, because policy has to be determined, hopping on a plane will probably be more expensive if you do a lot of it, the frequent flyers. that is actually popular with the general public, the idea of having a levy on frequent flyers. when it comes to driving, well, we are going to have to be buying all electric cars anyway by 2030 because of the new government rules on that. so people will be getting rid of their old cars. on gas boilers, that is a more tricky one. we do have a major challenge in getting people's homes heated by other means, by no—carbon means, often because things like electric heat pumps in the garden or air source heat pumps are not actually as efficient as gas or rather, i should say, they don't pack out as much heat as gas, so we are going to have to insulate our homes more and the government is not giving much incentive for that at the moment. in fact, it scrapped
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the green homes grant. primark are to repay £121 million in furlough money. the fashion retailer, which claimed the cash under the government's job retention scheme, has made the decision despite a recent slump in profits. official figures show that younger people continue to bear the brunt of the unemployment crisis during the pandemic. the office for national statistics said 811,000 payrolljobs were lost in the year to march, with people under 35 accounting for 80% of the fall. our business correspondent ben thompsonjoins me now. really striking statistics about how the pandemic is affecting those 35 and under, and of course with i believe around 5 million people still on furlough, you have to wonder how many of those full into that as well. wonder how many of those full into that as well-— wonder how many of those full into that as well. yes, you are right and we are starting _ that as well. yes, you are right and we are starting to _ that as well. yes, you are right and we are starting to get _ that as well. yes, you are right and we are starting to get a _ that as well. yes, you are right and we are starting to get a clear- we are starting to get a clear indication of what the longer—term impact of what this might be
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on—the—job market. these figures cover up until march and 5 million people are still having their salary subsidised by the government because they cannot return to work in any normalfashion. particularly hospitality, retail, the sectors where there is a gradual reopening but they are no means back to normal. the unemployment overall is dipping from 5% to a.9%, but nonetheless that is expected to grow by the end of the year, as employers start to get a sense of what their business looks like and what demand and what customers are willing to spend and how many staff they will need. the idea of it being young people is a real concern because if you look, 80% of all of the jobs that were lost since the pandemic began, it is about 813,000 jobs lost so far, 80% of them are those who are young people. that is partly because of the nature of the job
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they are in, hospitality, retail, they are in, hospitality, retail, they will be an element of last in, first out when it comes to things like redundancies and they tend to be less secure jobs in the first place. that is probably one of the reasons. we should look at agenda as well, women most badly affected because they tend to be in lots of those hospitality and retailjobs. the axe was not full evenly in terms of jobs the axe was not full evenly in terms ofjobs here, so there is a concern about how to create more security for those young people, more apprenticeships and training schemes to get them back into work when this is over. , ., ., ~' to get them back into work when this is over. , ., ., ,, ., , ., is over. lets look at prime art re aint is over. lets look at prime art repaint £121 — is over. lets look at prime art repaint £121 million _ is over. lets look at prime art repaint £121 million in - is over. lets look at prime art| repaint £121 million in furlough money. what is the thinking behind that? ., money. what is the thinking behind that? ,, , , , , money. what is the thinking behind that? i, , , , , ., ., money. what is the thinking behind that? i, , _ , ., ., ., that? quite simply, they have had a treat time that? quite simply, they have had a great time since _ that? quite simply, they have had a great time since reopening. - that? quite simply, they have had a great time since reopening. you - that? quite simply, they have had aj great time since reopening. you will know primark, it is one we watch quite a lot but is an unusual case, because unlike most retailers, it
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does not have an online presence and there is no website. you cannot buy from them when it is short, so in the lockdowns of this year, it lost a lot of money. £1.1 billion worth of sales was lost as a result of the lockdowns stop but in england and wales, doors reopened last monday and they had a great time. many stores had queues around the block and they say customers are back to numbers they have not seen since before the crisis. they have repaid the money and have said that since they have money coming into the tills, they do not need that furlough money to keep the business ticking over. last week was particularly good and there was pent—up demand for all retail because they have been closed for so long. the easter holidays and the weather was good, lots of people were out shopping. the question is how long that will continue. do
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people feel they have money in their pockets, because remember, this pandemic has been felt by different people and some have faced a terrible fallout. others have had a good pandemic and have now got a bit of money to spend and primark, like other retailers, will hope that they are one of the shops that sees that money. the former prime minister david cameron and the chancellor of the exchequer have both been asked to give evidence to the house of commons treasury committee, which is investigating the lobbying efforts by the financial firm greensill capital and the company's recent collapse. it is one of several inquiries underway into the issue. our political correspondent, damian grammaticas is on the line from westminster. david cameron among others saying that he would be willing to talk and give evidence once he knows the terms of reference of any enquiry. what is the likely date for this and the timescale? the
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what is the likely date for this and the timescale?— what is the likely date for this and the timescale? the enquiry has sent out these letters _ the timescale? the enquiry has sent out these letters today _ the timescale? the enquiry has sent out these letters today from - the timescale? the enquiry has sent out these letters today from the - out these letters today from the chairman of the enquiry, and he has written to david cameron, rishi sunak, governor of the bank of england and a couple of others, and what he says that they will seek to begin taking evidence next week and that after that, they look to produce a report pretty quickly. his letter contains quite a number of very specific questions to mr cameron and to mr rishi sunak, both for them and more broadly, for the government and governed officials as well. ., ., government and governed officials as well. ., «t , ., government and governed officials as well. ., «t ., , ., government and governed officials as well. ., ., , ., well. thank you. couple of your thou~hts well. thank you. couple of your thoughts on _ well. thank you. couple of your thoughts on the _ well. thank you. couple of your thoughts on the super - well. thank you. couple of your thoughts on the super league, l well. thank you. couple of your i thoughts on the super league, the proposals and what it might mean for football. andrew says, united movement from all fans with one voice should be used to boycott any television channel that broadcasts
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the new super league. another says, all fans and government bodies can try to stop it but it is out of their hands because it will be the owners were the final say. send in your thoughts on that on twitter and i will try to read out more of them. now it's time for a look at the weather. hello. for most parts of england and wales, we are looking at a fine day again with plenty of sunshine in the forecast today. further north and west, we have a cold front bringing outbreaks of rain today. that rain turns increasingly light and patchy over the next few hours, clearing to sunshine and showers for northern scotland, where it will turn a lot cooler. ahead of the front, it will still warm in the sunshine, temperatures around 17, just nine across northern scotland as that cold front clears through. there could be the odd isolated shower in north—west england and wales. overnight, the cold front will continue southwards bringing
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a little bit of patchy rain. given the cloudier skies, not as cold as recently across england and wales. northern ireland turning slightly chilly with frost patches in scotland. tomorrow, cloudier weather drifts into southern areas of england as the dregs of that cold front arrive. temperatures for most areas dropping a little bit below normal for the time of year. that is your weather.
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hello this is bbc news with anita mcveigh. the headlines: borisjohnson is chairing a meeting of football chiefs and fans to discuss ways of preventing english clubsjoining a european breakaway super league. the government says it's speeding up it's target to cut carbon emissions in the uk by 15 years. latest employment figures show that four—fifths of the people who have lost theirjobs since the pandemic began are under the age of 35. tensions remain high across the united states
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as the trial of a former police officer accused of murdering george floyd nears its conclusion. there has been a big increase in young people looking for help during the pandemic, with many struggling to find a job and a place to live. sport now and, for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here“sjohn watson. i expect you are starting with european super league this morning! further condemnation for the european superleague proposals from uefa president alexander ceferin, who has called on the six english breakaway clubs to "come to their senses" out of respect for their fans. uefa have passed proposals to revamp the existing champions league to an expanded 26 team tournament from 202a, but stark warnings for those clubs
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today who want to forge a more lucrative path. i would like to address the owners of some english clubs. gentlemen, you made a huge mistake. some will say it is greed, others disdain, arrogance, flippancy or complete ignorance of england does not fit all culture, but actually it doesn't matter. what matters is that there is still time to change your mind. everyone makes mistakes. come to your senses, everyone makes mistakes. come to yoursenses, not everyone makes mistakes. come to your senses, not out of love for football, because i imagine some of you don't have much of that, but out
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of respect for those who bleed themselves dry so that they can go to the stadium to support their team and want the dream to be kept alive. for those, you change your mind. do it out of respect for the english people, for the home of football. uefa are taking legal advice on what sanctions they might be able to impose, from expelling clubs to banning players from international competition. the fifa president, gianni infantino, says the 12 involved in the breakaway league must be prepared to face the consequences. if some elect to go their own way, then they must leave with the consequences of their choice. they are responsible for their choice.
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completely. this means either you are in or you are out. you cannot be half in or half height. think about it. think about it. the 1a premier league clubs not involved have been called to an emergency shareholders meeting this morning. everton said they“re "saddened and disappointed" by the plans which "tarnish the reputation of the league and disrespect every other club". alan shearer has urged the premier league to expel the clubs involved. the super league have chucked a grenade at the premier league and chucked a grenade to everyone else. well, chuck one back. ban them. ban them immediately, if you can. if they can. and i'm sure that they'll look at every possible legal angle and what pressure they“re under in doing that. but if you can, do it. one of those clubs involved, tottenham, parted company with managerjose mourinho yesterday.
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former player ryan mason has been named interim manager until the end of the season. he's only 29. a nasty head inury curtailed his career. he steps up from his role as head of player development and will lead out his boyhood club in their game with southampton tomorrow and in this weekend's league cup final against manchester city. to the world snooker championship, where the first round is continuing at the crucible with former finalist ali carter taking onjack lisowski. it“s carter who has had the better of the first mini—session. he“s won three of the first four to now lead by seven frames to six. you can watch live coverage on bbc two and the bbc sport website and app, with the first to ten making the second round. we will be following all the reaction and latest developments with regards to that plan european
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super league throughout the day. more now on that backlash to form a breakaway european super league —— european super league. many fans of post the glazer takeover of manchester united back in 2005 and some decided to set up their own club, fc united of manchester. it is now the biggest fan owned club in the uk by the number of members. lets speak to the chair of their board of directors, adrian seddon. good to have you with this, adrian. could you tell us more about the beginnings of your club? yes. could you tell us more about the beginnings of your club?- could you tell us more about the beginnings of your club? yes, so in 2005 there — beginnings of your club? yes, so in 2005 there was _ beginnings of your club? yes, so in 2005 there was a _ beginnings of your club? yes, so in
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2005 there was a group _ beginnings of your club? yes, so in 2005 there was a group of - beginnings of your club? yes, so in i 2005 there was a group of manchester united supporters who felt that the glazer takeover was a step too far, and a line in santry were prepared to cross. as football fans you suddenlyjust can't give up going to football, so the decision was taken to create their own football club. because you can't go and support another team either, so we set up our own. for us, fc united is a continuation of manchester united, the good things we remember from a childhood of watching manchester united. ~ , , united. why was the glaser involvement _ united. why was the glaser involvement a _ united. why was the glaser involvement a step - united. why was the glaser involvement a step too - united. why was the glaser| involvement a step too far? united. why was the glaser i involvement a step too far? it united. why was the glaser - involvement a step too far? it is the ownership — involvement a step too far? it 3 the ownership model, the fact that manchester united went from being a very rich and successful football club based on supporter engagement to being a team that was wrong for the benefit of the shareholders and the benefit of the shareholders and the glazer family. the supporters
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came down the pecking order. we could say it was a business model that relied on making more and more money and not on footballing integrity or supporters. unfortunately, the latest development is the natural progression of what happened in 2005. d0 progression of what happened in 2005. , ., progression of what happened in 2005. _, , , progression of what happened in 2005. , , progression of what happened in 2005. , ., 2005. do you see this as an extension. _ 2005. do you see this as an extension, the _ 2005. do you see this as an extension, the idea - 2005. do you see this as an extension, the idea of - 2005. do you see this as an extension, the idea of the l 2005. do you see this as an - extension, the idea of the super league, an extension of that model that caused you to form your own breakaway club?— that caused you to form your own breakaway club? yes, because the glazer family _ breakaway club? yes, because the glazer family have _ breakaway club? yes, because the glazer family have never _ breakaway club? yes, because the glazer family have never been - glazer family have never been interested in the football, they are purely business men, they are to drive the profits for the shareholders. sporting integrity is the least of their concerns. as football fans, what is so special about football is the fact that whether you are a supporter of manchester united or fc united, you start the season aspiring to be as good as you can be. the dream is to take your club further. for them,
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thatis take your club further. for them, that is not the reason why they do this. they do this to make the money. unfortunately, the business model they have is to try to get into the champions league every year to drive that revenue, but manchester united have not been able to do that. this is a way of guaranteeing that, guaranteeing the money every year. the by—product is that it money every year. the by—product is thatitis money every year. the by—product is that it is a closed shop, that no team can aspire to do what wimbledon did in the 80s and 90s, to rise through the ranks. do you want to watch football were the result does it matter? the watch football were the result does it matter? ., , ., ., , . , it matter? the owners of any club are interested _ it matter? the owners of any club are interested in _ it matter? the owners of any club are interested in the _ it matter? the owners of any club are interested in the football - it matter? the owners of any club are interested in the football in i it matter? the owners of any club| are interested in the football in as much as a successful team brings in more money. this idea of a closed circuit with hardly any opportunity to move into this group of teams in the super league, no prospect of the founding members being relegated.
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does that take away the element of jeopardy that so many fans love when it comes to the beautiful game? yes. it comes to the beautiful game? yes, ou watch it comes to the beautiful game? yes, you watch football _ it comes to the beautiful game? yes, you watch football for _ it comes to the beautiful game? yes you watch football for the highs, but also for the loose, the defeats, relegations are just as important in shaping the successful moments. sport is about that, it is about passion. if you have a competition where it really doesn't matter, well, there will be a winner, but for the rest it doesn't matter. where is the passion? the sort of language that is coming out, talking about traditional fans being language that is coming out, talking about traditionalfans being legacy fans that there are no longer interested in. that is terrible. these are fans that are driven these football clubs for generations. their parents, grandparents went to these matches. d0 their parents, grandparents went to these matches.— these matches. do you think in the lona term these matches. do you think in the long term the _ these matches. do you think in the long term the fans _ these matches. do you think in the long term the fans will— these matches. do you think in the long term the fans will fall - these matches. do you think in the long term the fans will fall away i long term the fans will fall away from these clubs, if the super league does go ahead?-
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from these clubs, if the super league does go ahead? there will alwa s be league does go ahead? there will always be fans — league does go ahead? there will always be fans interested. - league does go ahead? there will always be fans interested. there i always be fans interested. there will always be tv channels interested injoining it. a lot of the drama and the excitement of the sport will be gone because it is that model were results don“t sport will be gone because it is that model were results don't really matter. yet, in one way i'm sure it will be a lot of razzmatazz and it'll be interesting to some people, but is not what people go to sports to watch for. the passion and excitement will be gone. is to watch for. the passion and excitement will be gone. is there an wa excitement will be gone. is there any way for _ excitement will be gone. is there any way for this _ excitement will be gone. is there any way for this super _ excitement will be gone. is there any way for this super league i excitement will be gone. is there i any way for this super league model and what we have at the premier league and so forth to coexist? t league and so forth to coexist? i don't think so. i think this is a challenge that they have sex now. due to clubs covering football or is it the governing bodies that govern football? this has been brewing for years. this is the big showdown. probably helped by the fact that this week there will not be supported on the ground because of covid. the clubs are weak and financially through covid. it seems like the right time to be doing
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this, but it is a coup. looking at the other clubs in the premier league, why would they want to compete with clubs that have such a major advantage financially because of this super league? itjust becomes 26 clubs from the uk that can compete. every year you will have those clubs at the top of the premier league because they have vastly superior funds. i think it is important that we take a step and stop this now. if we allow it to happen, there is no going back. adrian set in, thank you so much for joining us. we have some tweets on this. one person says that the key protagonists are the club pass back billionaire owners and jpmorgan. another says, white english fans think they are owed anything by
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their clubs? this person says, clubs and their footballers have been entirely mercenary for ages now, although we have heard football managers, football players voicing their opposition to this idea of a super league. it is not necessarily the managers and players who are driving this. dave says, super league equals greed, nothing whatsoever to do with improving football. one solution is to bandy associated clubs from the country league and associated competitions and fans turned their backs on the straighter clubs. those are some of the messages we have time for. to keep your thoughts on that story come again. it will be featuring prominently for quite a while, i think. iwill prominently for quite a while, i think. i will try to read out more of your comments.
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britain's unemployment rate fell for a second month in a row to a.9% in the december to february period. more than half of the 813,000 jobs that have been lost in the pandemic belonged to people under the age of 25. meanwhile, calls from young people struggling to find a job and struggling to find somewhere to live have increased by 33% during the pandemic, according to centrepoint. the charity, which works with under 25s, says family breakdowns during lockdown have been one of the key factors for the increase. emma glasbey reports. the past year has turned many lives upside down. the first lockdown leftjamie home less. only 20 he has been through a family breakdown. he is now living in barnsley supported by the youth homeless charity centrepoint. how did you find it when you came here? i didn't like it at first. but then i got to know the staff and i realised not to be scared. i just chill with everyone and i got used to everyone
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and started enjoying it. and ifound it better, it helped my anxiety a bit more because i was more accepted there than at home. if i didn't have this i don't know what i would do, honestly. supporting young, vulnerable people through three lockdowns has come with many challenges. is that zoomed in? centrepoint is still seeing more and more young people asking for help. isolating at home with family, there were more family breakdowns which in turn led to more mental health. chantelle has been supporting young people at the charity based in barnsley. the isolation at the start, it was really terrible for those young people. it was surprising to see it increase. when the referrals were coming through, it was the mental health side of things, it increased rapidly. the uncertainty for vulnerable young people is being seen on the streets. in leeds, 2a—year—old kaz has a place to stay but she is pregnant
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and is struggling financially. with covid, it has been really bad to associate, make friends, just to sort of feel like you have got that help. because a lot of the support, with covid, has been closed down. since coming out of lockdown there are a lot more - youngsters on the streets, i teenagers, in their early 20s. the youngsters don't know how to help themselves, l they don't know where to go. it is more difficult. for them to get out of the situation than the adults. the most vulnerable have been disproportionately affected by covid. the younger generation may be less at risk from the virus. but more at risk from the long—term impact. emma glasby, bbc news. we can speak now to paul brocklehurst, senior helpline manager,
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at centrepoint. thank you forjoining us today. you run this national helpline, which specifically helps young people at the point at which they have become homeless. give us your take on the extra demands on your services since the pandemic started.— the pandemic started. yeah, the last 12 months have _ the pandemic started. yeah, the last 12 months have been _ the pandemic started. yeah, the last 12 months have been the _ the pandemic started. yeah, the last 12 months have been the busiest i the pandemic started. yeah, the last| 12 months have been the busiest ever for our helpline. there has been an increase by a third in the cold that we are getting, but also a lot more desperate people, as well. unfortunately, a lot of that has coincided with periods of national or local lockdown, where young people have tended to lose jobs in sectors like retail and hospitality. it also being at home, combined with theirfamily, particularly as it also being at home, combined with their family, particularly as the family are getting on very well, that can lead to family breakdown and young people being kicked out and young people being kicked out and not having anywhere to go. ii'iin�*n�*
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and not having anywhere to go. how difficult has — and not having anywhere to go. how difficult has it _ and not having anywhere to go. how difficult has it been to provide the sort of help and services that you would normally during a pandemic? es, would normally during a pandemic? lot of services that we work in partnership with have not been able to open their doors, lots of places that you would go to in person, the day centres, have not been able to openin day centres, have not been able to open in a covid safeway. that has put extra pressure on services like ours. also, local councils have a duty to support young people. they have not always been as accessible as we would like to see for young people. young people have not been able to get through on the phones, they have had to wait a long time for councils to get back to them so they can solve their homelessness. what has been happening to people? if there has been a family breakdown to the extent that somebody is on the streets, where has someone like that typically gone to?— that typically gone to? there have been very few _ that typically gone to? there have been very few options. _ that typically gone to? there have been very few options. we - that typically gone to? there have been very few options. we speakl that typically gone to? there have l been very few options. we speak to that typically gone to? there have i been very few options. we speak to a lot of young people and we talked
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them through what their race. there are services that are up and running and we work with as many services as we can, but it has been so much harderfor them to access we can, but it has been so much harder for them to access any support. 50 harder for them to access any su i tort. ., ., harder for them to access any sun-oft, ., ., , support. so have more people entered a rou:h support. so have more people entered a rough sleeping _ support. so have more people entered a rough sleeping than _ support. so have more people entered a rough sleeping than otherwise? i a rough sleeping than otherwise? absolutely. young people are having to sleep rough during the pandemic. a spokesperson for the government says they have provided over £750 million in the last year to tackle homelessness and rough sleeping. have you seen evidence of that money being able to help some if not all? yeah, everyone in the scheme, which looks to get everyone off the streets and into a covid safe accommodation, was definitely showing the real scale of change that can be achieved when there is political will. unfortunately, that was only a short burst and it was necessarily targeted at the young people we support. everyone works
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well for people who have been on the streets for a long time, it was not really set up for people who have become duly homeless. so, yes, it did show the scale of the problem and showed how much the government can do when there is well, but there is still more to be done. the icture is still more to be done. the picture you _ is still more to be done. the picture you are _ is still more to be done. the picture you are painting, paul, is showing how uniquely vulnerable young people have been to the pandemic, to the impacts of the pandemic, to the impacts of the pandemic, and therefore what sort of support is needed to help bring them out of these situations, as we hopefully get to a better points with the pandemic, with vaccinations, and with society opening up a little bit more? ultimately, the government need to have a long—term plan for tackling youth homelessness. they need to be ring fencing funds and putting accommodation in place there is provision for anyone who might be
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sleeping rough. nobody should be sleeping rough. nobody should be sleeping rough. nobody should be sleeping rough in the country today. really good to talk to you, paul. i wish you all the luck with your project at centrepoint. in the house of commons... here in the uk, a cross—party group of mps has started taking evidence on covid variants and international travel. they“ll hear from a variety of experts on issues such as whether the uk could face a third wave as restrictions are eased and the effectiveness, the government's approach to border policy and international travel, and the threat posed by the indian variant. we will keep a close watch on that and if only —— are any statements of notes, we will bring that to you.
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and let's look in more detail now at concerns over that indian variant. there“ve been more than 100 cases of this now identified in the uk. and india has now been added to the government's "red list" for travel — meaning that from aam on friday, british and irish citizens arriving into the uk, will have to quarantine in a designated hotel. non—residents will be banned from entering the country entirely. our transport correspondent caroline davies reports. (pres)the scottish first minister nicola sturgeon will give delhi is going into lockdown. cases are rising across india, and there's a growing concern about the so—called indian variant of the coronavirus. while it's under investigation, the uk government has taken a new step. we've made the difficult but vital decision to add india to the red list. this means anyone who is not a uk
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or irish resident or a british citizen cannot enter the uk if they've been in india in the previous ten days. uk and irish residents, and british citizens who've been in india in the past ten days before their arrival will need to complete hotel quarantine for ten days from the time of arrival. the rules will come in from aam on friday morning. it's less than four months since india banned flights from the uk, trying to contain the uk variant. with this virus, dynamics between countries can change quickly. when flights restarted, india“s government restricted them to 30 a week between the two countries, and seats back to the uk before friday are already in short supply. vick and his family are currently in ghaziabad on the outskirts of delhi. i immediately looked into the flights. so, a, i couldn't get any flights back home. b, i have to quarantine with a small child now — that is another worry. c, it is ridiculously expensive to be in hotel quarantine for ten days.
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but the variant here in india is worrying — people have started panicking about it. there is a sense of panic around. international travel from england could still restart to some countries from the 17th of may, but this announcement shows it will be a while until the world is open — as the list of countries designated red gets longer, not shorter. caroline davies, bbc news. the scottish first minister, nicola sturgeon, will give a covid briefing later — she“s expected to confirm the lockdown easing measures planned for april 26th. wales will see its lockdown restrictions eased further from saturday — with six people from six different households being able to meet outside. pubs, restaurants and cafes will also be able to open outdoors as planned from monday. the nasa team which has successfully flown a small helicopter on mars has
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been speaking about the next steps and ambitions for mars exploration. in the first ever powered flight on another planet, the small drone, which is called ingenuity, was in the air for less than a minute. it reached a height of around three metres, where it hovered briefly before returning to the ground. nasa is promising more adventurous flights in the next few days. dr thomas zurbuchen, the associate administrator for nasa“s science mission, said this along with earlier missions offered a template for eventually sending astronauts to mars. we believe that this is really a new tool in the tool box of exploration. we have an analog in the history of nasa and that is in “97 we put a little rover on mars and right now we have perseverance up there and we are planning with the europeans, the european community, we are planning a sample return, the first round trip to mars. because of that technological
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demonstration... sojourn, it was called in 1997. so for us, we think a similar timescale, perhaps even faster in this case, we will be able to use it to do science exploration. and then, in a decade or so, we'll see, we'll be able to work with the international community and bring astronauts there. of course, we're first going to the moon. we need to take astronauts out of low earth orbit and really learn how to extend stays away from earth, and that is what we are going to learn at the moon. but then, of course, we want to go to mars. that's our goal, that we have thought and dreamt about for decades now. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. hello, again. we are looking at more fine, dry, sunny weather for most of england and wales again today. the early morning rising sun was picking up some cloud from an approaching weather front just to the west of
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mumbles in swansea. here is that weather front bringing rain to northern ireland and scotland already today. but over the next few hours that rain will turn lighter and patchier and as it clears we will see a mixture of sunshine and showers following across northern areas. now this weather front bringing the light and patchy rain is a cold front and behind that the area is turning cooler. across england and wales, in the sunshine, it will feel pleasant even on the warm side with highs up to 17 degrees in cardiff. behind the cold front, the temperatures will drop away significantly. this afternoon temperatures around nine degrees in stornoway and aberdeen, feeling a good deal cooler here. overnight tonight, ourweather front sinks southwards into england and wales. bringing a few patches of rain with it. the skies clear meanwhile in scotland and frost will begin to return here but with that thicker cloud further south it won't be as cold a night.
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temperatures around 7 degrees in birmingham for example. tomorrow our weather front continues southwards bringing cloud across wales, the midlands and east anglia and southern counties in the afternoon. the odd spot of rain is possible but it is looking dry. and pressure will begin to build again across northern areas of the uk so lots of sunshine and dry weather to come. the winds are light but tending to come from a northerly direction bringing that cooler air to many of us. temperatures starting to dip a little below par for the time of year through wednesday afternoon. into thursday, high pressure really does build in across the uk. the weather will be dry with increasing amounts of sunshine and with the high centred over the top of us the winds will be pretty light for all of us. after a cold and locally frosty start to the morning we should see afternoon temperatures returning a little bit above normal for the time of year. so, warm in the sunshine, temperatures around 16, perhaps feeling on the cool side with the onshore winds across parts of east anglia where temperatures arejust ten in norwich. not much rain so far this month, not much rain as we look
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at the forecast for the weekend and next week as well. that is your weather.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... as borisjohnson meets football officials to find ways of preventing english clubs joining a breakaway european super league, the premier league's leading all—time scorer calls for those clubs to be thrown out. the super league have chucked a grenade at the premier league and chucked a grenade to everyone else. well, chuck one back. ban them. ban them immediately. the government says it's speeding up it's target to cut carbon emissions in the uk by 15 years. latest employment figures show that four fifths of the people who've lost theirjobs since the pandemic began are under the age of 35. a big increase in young people looking for help during the pandemic, with many struggling to find a job and a place to live. the thousands of unaccompanied
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children trying enter ——to enter the united states currently being held in us government custody, with more arriving all the time. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. let's cross live edinburgh, where scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon is about to lead the government's coronavirus briefing — she“s expected to confirm whether the lockdown easing measures planned for april 26 will go ahead. we will be back at their as soon as she begins to speak. —— we will be back there. —— we will be back there. the backlash over plans
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for a new european super league is intensifying. 12 clubs, including six from the premier league, unveiled proposals for a breakaway tournament which they wouldn't have to qualify for and from which they'd never be relegated. prime minister borisjohnson will chair a meeting of senior football officials and fan groups to discuss what should happen to the clubs planning on joining the new league. the 1a other premier leagues who aren't participating in the super league are also holding talks later to discuss their response. the head of world football has attacked the plans and warned the clubs involved they will have to live with the consequences of their actions. the head of uefa said the owners had made a huge mistake, but that there was still time to change their minds. but the real madrid president florentino perez — who is now chairman of the super league — has defended the plans saying it's aimed at "saving football." this report from joe lynskey. if the european super league is an attack on the game, then football and society have gone on the counter. this was elland road last night,
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where leeds united supporters showed what they thought. theyjoined the voices round the country who“ve condemned the plans. the prime minister, the opposition leader and european politicians all say it would damage the sport. and the president of uefa, who govern football in europe, said this. this idea is a spit in the face of all football lovers and our society, as well. so we will not allow them to take it away from us. on twitter, the duke of cambridge, writing in his role as fa president, said we must protect the entire football community, and that he shares the fans“ concerns. the words now are on the pitch, too. this was leeds“ goalkeeper last night wearing a t—shirt with a champions league logo, and "earn it". the 12 super league clubs want a midweek competition that's a closed shop — no—one would be relegated — but even those who represent
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them don't support it. i can only give my personal opinion, and i don't like it one bit and hopefully it doesn't happen. we are here, we are the faces of the club and we arrived here today, and the leeds supporters were shouting at us. we had a walk in the city and the people were shouting at us, as if we would have made the decision — and we didn't. it's the premier league's big six clubs looking to break away. today the other 1a will meet to go through the plans. and the government's launching a fan—led review into football itself. these six clubs announced this decision without any consultation with football authorities or with government. worst of all, they did it without any dialogue whatsoever with their own fans. we will do whatever it takes to protect our national game. so i'm absolutely appalled at the fact that football has come this far into the hands of greedy owners. i'm obviously a burnley fan.
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we are so small our budgets depend on people like the top six staying in the premier league, and for them to just treat it like their own personal company is absolutely disgusting. it'sjust going to ruin everyone's dream, everyone's game - and it's just ridiculous. when the stock exchange opened yesterday, man united“s share price grew by nearly 10%. but now the anger from supporters is rising, too. some say this is a plan to break up football, but the people in the game are standing firm. joe lynskey, bbc news. let me give you today's statistics, the total number of cases reported yesterday was 178, which is 1.a% of the total number of tests and means the total number of tests and means the overall number of confirmed cases is now 22a,092. 106 people are
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currently in hospital, which is two more than yesterday and 13 people are in intensive care. that is one fewer than the number reported yesterday. u nfortu nately, unfortunately, too —— were reported yesterday and that takes the number of deaths recorded under this daily definition to 76aa. i want to send my deepest condolences to everyone across the country who is grieving loved one. let me also give an update on the vaccination programme. as of 7:30am this morning, 2 million people have received their first dose of vaccine and that is an increase of 2358 since yesterday. however, in addition, a0,152 people received a second dose yesterday and the total number of second doses
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administered now is 797,267. we have now given a first dose of vaccine to more than 60% of the adult population. last week, we effectively met the target of offering the first dose to all over 50—year—olds, carers and adults with underlying health conditions. there will inevitably be some in these categories who may not have had their invitation letter and capsule address has been changed or your letter has gone missing. if that is the case, you can phone your gp or phone the national helpline and find the details of that on our website. with groups that have now been offered the first dose of vaccine, which are thejcb i priority groups, they account for 99% of all covid deaths. so the fact that i first dose has been offered to everyone in
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those groups and there has been such a high take—up of vaccine so far is an important milestone and that is one of the factors giving us the confidence to ease restrictions further. in past seven days, we have also seen continued welcome evidence that case numbers are continuing to fall. seven days ago, we were reporting to hundred and 87 new cases everyday on average. —— 287. at the moment it is 286 on average and overall, since earlyjanuary, we have seen a reduction of more than 90% in the average daily case numbers. the weekly case rate per 100,000 people has also fallen from 38 to 30 over the past seven days. the number in hospital and intensive care is also on a downward trend and we have seen that small increase today, but we will see fluctuations on a day—to—day basis, but the trend
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is firmly downwards. thankfully, as we continue to see the number of deaths, it is also falling, although every single death is still one that is causing grief to a family somewhere across the country and we should never lose sight of that. but all in all, we have seen a sustained improvement and that has already allowed us to relax restrictions in recent weeks. almost all children are back in school full—time, which will be a massive relief to them and their parents. over the weekend, just past, new rules came into force for meetings and travel restrictions within scotland were lifted. taking all of the recent data into account, i am pleased to confirm that from monday the 26th of april, those parts of the country currently in level four, which includes all of the mainland of scotland, will move down to level three. we then expect,
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assuming data continues going in the right direction, all of scotland will move to level two on monday the 17th of may and that shift will mean, for example, that from that date, people will be able to meet in small numbers in each other“s homes for the first time in a long time, there will be further reopening of hospitality and outdoor contact sport for adults will resume. then if circumstances permit, i can confirm that it would be the intention to move to level one on monday the 7th ofjune, before then, i hope moving to level zero in late june and then, as we go into the deeper part of the summer, to something much more like normality over the course ofjuly. so we are hopeful, very hopeful, of seeing a sustained progress in the weeks and months ahead. of course, i want to focus today on the changes taking place most immediately from monday coming, the 26th of april. first, in
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doing that, i want to address some information specifically to those on the shielding list, because they are clinically vulnerable to covid. from next monday, the advice will be that those on that list can return to the workplace if you cannot work from home, but if you can, for now you should be working from home. but if you need to return to work, you should speak to your employer about how your workplace can be made safe. in addition, from next monday, children who have been shielding can return to school and i know how difficult the last few months have been for everyone, but there is no doubt they have been especially difficult for people who have been required to shield. so i am very grateful to all of you for everything you have done to keep yourselves safe and help keep other people safe. i hope that over the next few weeks, you can enjoy being able to get out and about a bit more
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and that the understandable anxiety you have been living with for the past year is beginning to reduce, evenjust a past year is beginning to reduce, even just a little bit. past year is beginning to reduce, evenjust a little bit. most past year is beginning to reduce, even just a little bit. most of the other changes i will set out will apply to everyone. from next monday, all shops which are still closed will be able to reopen and old close contact services like beauty parlours can reopen. hairdressers opened a couple of weeks ago of course. it will be monday possible to collect takeaway food indoors rather than from a hatch window and hospitality venues like cafes, pubs and restaurants can reopen too. in outdoor settings, opening hours will be determined by local licensing laws and alcohol can be said outdoors and people can meet in groups of up to six from up to six different households. the rules hospitality indoors are different because the risks of transmission are greater indoors and cafes and
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pubs and restaurants from monday will be able to open indoors until 8pm. but they are not yet able to serve alcohol indoors. up to six people will be able to meet indoors, but they must come from a maximum of two households. contrary to some suggestions you might have seen in the media, requirements and physical distancing for hospitality in our latest guidance had not changed from the guidance that was in place previously. but we are also publishing today updated guidance on the collection of customer contact details and contact details should be taken down for all members and notjust each group. that is additional proportion —— proportion to account for any outbreak. it is important to remember that although indoor socialising is permitted in public places, albeit in limited numbers, cafes and restaurants for
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example, it is not yet permitted in our own homes. i know that can seem illogical, and can seem difficult and unfair because it is a difficult and unfair because it is a difficult and unfair because it is a difficult and unfairthing, but and unfair because it is a difficult and unfair thing, but we know that the risk of transmission can be higher in the home as opposed to a cafe or bar because it can be harder to stick to physical distancing and ensure good ventilation. we hope that the rules on in—home socialising will ease from the 17th of may but not immediately on the 26th of april. from the 26th of april, attendance limits at funerals and weddings and related events like wakes and perceptions will increase from 20 to 50 and in addition, tourist accommodation can reopen from monday. however, in self—catering accommodation, rules on indoor meetings still apply, which means that until the 17th of may, two households cannot stay in the same accommodation. other
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changes that come into force from monday are as follows. nonessential informal childcare can restart, nonessential work is again permitted inside people past mccombes, including cleaning and repair work and painting and decorating. —— inside people's homes. gyms and swimming pools can reopen for individual exercise and indoor attractions public buildings such as art galleries and museums are also able to reopen from monday. finally, very importantly, i can confirm that all remaining travel restrictions will be lifted on the 26th of april for travel anywhere inside scotland and for travel between scotland, england and wales, so from monday you can travel anywhere across britain for any purpose. we will also remove any restrictions on travel to and from northern ireland. and the channel islands and the isle of man, but people should check the
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rules for entry on each of these territories before travelling. it is important to stress that we might need to enforce local travel restrictions from time to time either within scotland or between scotland and parts of the rest of the uk if there are areas which have flare—ups of covid, local outbreaks or the general situation is causing concern. i hope the general easing of travel restrictions from monday will be welcome to lots of people and i know it will be particularly welcome to those in scotland with family in england or vice versa. there are a couple of other points i want to make before i finish and moved to questions. the first is about testing. two weeks ago i we would make lateral flow testing available to anyone in scotland to those who wanted. i can confirm that that will be available to anyone in scotland from the 26th of april. you
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can order lateral flow tests online for delivery to your home and you can find information on how to do that on the scottish government's website. alternatively, you can collect the tests from covid testing centres in the afternoon or early evening. i would encourage everyone to take advantage of this offer, but i want to highlight one issue in particular today where we are really encouraging people to make sure they use lateral flow testing as appropriate. last week, i spoke about the situation on our islands. we are keeping island communities at the same level as the rest of the country at the moment to allow travel between island communities and the rest of scotland and we know that creates a risk for island communities. many of them currently have very very low rates of covid and they will be welcoming visitors from parts of scotland and they are
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looking forward to that, where covid also beats a higher level. if you are planning to travel to travel to an island, we encourage you to take two lateral flow tests before you depart. the second test should be on the date planned to travel and the first should be three days before you travel. that means if you test positive, you have a chance to take a pcr test, which is more sensitive, to confirm the result before making a final decision on cancelling your visit. this is potentially an important way in which we can minimise the risk of bringing covid into island communities while nevertheless allowing our island communities the benefit of opening up communities the benefit of opening up again to visitors. so if you are planning on travelling to an island over the course of next week, it is possible to get tests from today and i would encourage you to do that. the final point i want to stress relates to international travel stop
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as he may have seen in the media because of quite rapidly and significantly deteriorating covid situation in india, we have changed the rules in relation to travel to india. there is a concern about a new variant of the virus that is spreading there. from friday, if you have been in india for essential purposes and are returning to scotland, you must now stay in managed accommodation for ten days and that must be at the place where you first arrived back in the uk. if you first arrived back in the uk. if you are travelling via london, you must stay in a hotel in london. more importantly, please remember that international travel for nonessential purposes is not yet permitted. i know this is really difficult for the aviation and tourism sector, but most of all, it is difficult for people who have family overseas. when we talk about international travel, there is a tendency, including on my part, to
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talk about holidays, but for many people, it involves seeing family and friends and loved ones. i understand how difficult it is an distressing it is for many people and we do want to stress this, we want to restore normality to international travel as quickly as possible but we must be sensible as we do that in light of the risks that we face and in light of the risks that we see across any part of the world stop we will continue to work with the government to a agree a common approach to international travel in the weeks and months ahead, but until at least the 17th of may, and possibly for a period after that, you should not leave the uk for nonessential purposes. that is for now an important measure to try to protect the progress we have made domestically and continue down that track of opening up our economy and our society as much as possible. so to conclude, the changes that will come into force on monday,
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building on the changes we have had in the past couple of weeks, have been really hard earned and long—awaited. i know many across the country will be looking forward quite rightly and understandably to perhaps having a drink in a beer garden, catching up for a coffee with a friend at a cafe, going to the shops that you have not been able to visit fossil time, or perhaps taking a break somewhere in scotland stop —— visit for some time. but even as we enjoy these moments, we still need to be careful. covid is at much lower levels than it has been in a long time in thing we met scotland, but it is still there and still circulating. last week, more than 1500 people in scotland tested positive for covid and some will require to go into hospital, others, including many young people, will sufferfrom longer covid. we must
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remember that the virus we are dealing with now is much more infectious than it was when bars and cafes were last open. so it is really important that as we enjoy these new freedoms, we continue to be careful and take all of the required precautions. in particular for now, please do not meet up with other households in europe or their homes, we know that that is a particular risk. —— in yours or their homes. continue to work from home if you can. download the protect scotland at as you start to go out more and that will help you get notified if you have been in contact with someone who has tested positive. and remember the facts, where your face covering, avoid places that are busy, clean your hands, clean surfaces that you are
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others are touching, two meet a distancing requires a mac remains important and get tested if you have symptoms. these measures have been important all along, but as we ease up important all along, but as we ease up and start to go about more of our normal business, the facts advisor becomes even more important because they become in a sense the first line of defence against the virus. continue to be sensible, take the necessary precautions and if we all do that, hardware it is, i am optimistic that what we have seen in the weekend just past with some easing, substantial easing that we will see from monday into may and june, we are on a journey that is something much closer to the normal life we are all desperately craving. my life we are all desperately craving. my thanks again to everybody for your patience and forbearance and sacrifice over the past year and indeed for your patience throughout today's rather lengthy update, but i wanted to make sure you had all of the details of what we expect to
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happen in the days and weeks ahead. i will now go straight to questions. renault and jason have stood patiently helping to wait with questions. —— greg or anna jason. we will go firstly to stv and can i remind everybody, because we are still in the pre—election period, i will only answer questions that are strictly related to covid. other issues i will take away from here and deal with separately. goad and deal with separately. good afternoon- _ and deal with separately. good afternoon- i— and deal with separately. good afternoon. iwondered, - and deal with separately. good afternoon. i wondered, you'll. and deal with separately. good afternoon. i wondered, you'll be aware _ afternoon. i wondered, you'll be aware of— afternoon. i wondered, you'll be aware of the confusion and anger amongst — aware of the confusion and anger amongst many in the hospitality industry— amongst many in the hospitality industry over the last week over the use of— industry over the last week over the use of physical distancing measures. you addressed it, but to be clear for those — you addressed it, but to be clear for those cafe and restaurant owners watching. _ for those cafe and restaurant owners watching, would you expect that from monday, _ watching, would you expect that from monday, it— watching, would you expect that from monday, if someone from one household meets somebody else from another _ household meets somebody else from another household to have a meal, both of— another household to have a meal, both of them should sit at least one
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metre _ both of them should sit at least one metre apart at that table? secondly, in terms _ metre apart at that table? secondly, in terms of— metre apart at that table? secondly, in terms of the testing for communities, you are encouraging people _ communities, you are encouraging people to — communities, you are encouraging people to take tests, but it does not sound — people to take tests, but it does not sound like it will be mandatory. why is _ not sound like it will be mandatory. why is it _ not sound like it will be mandatory. why is it not — not sound like it will be mandatory. why is it not a mandatory requirement before travelling? firstly, — requirement before travelling? firstly, yes, i do expect people in hospitality who are from different households to stay one metre apart. remember, hospitality has a sector exemption, and exemption from two metres, so it is one metre. but that has not changed since the last time hospitality was open. you referred to confusion and anger, but someone referred to it this morning as scaremongering and i would actually say that we should not have myths about the rules circulating because it does not help anybody, least of all those in our hospitality sector. there is no change to the physical distancing requirements in our revised guidance for the reopening
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next week compared to the guidance in place last time pubs and restaurants and cafes were allowed to open. anybody who says otherwise, it is misleading people. it remains really important that we have physical distancing between those from different households. what is also not in the interest of hospitality is if we have outbreaks again that then lead to individual premises having two players or outbreaks that then see wider immunity transmission and we have to have local dance again, which perceive pubs and restaurants and cafes closing again.— cafes closing again. nicola sturgeon. _ cafes closing again. nicola sturgeon, the _ cafes closing again. nicola sturgeon, the first - cafes closing again. nicola. sturgeon, the first minister cafes closing again. nicola i sturgeon, the first minister of scotland, confirming all parts of scotland, confirming all parts of scotland in level four will move to level three from monday the 26th of april and shops already not open it will be able to open as well, so close contact services, the vaccination programme was giving confidence to ease restrictions further. we are going to go to our
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colleagues in sport in just a second, but let mejust colleagues in sport in just a second, but let me just mention that we have this statement from the prime minister and culture secretary, who met with representatives from the fa, premier league and fan groups this morning to discuss action against the proposed european super league. the prime minister expressed solidarity with fans and confirm that they have the government's full backing to take whatever action necessary, the premier league, the fa, to stop these plans for a super league. much more on that in sport now withjohn watson. hi, john. good afternoon. warnings, anita, from uefa, european football's governing body, that those breakaway clubs face being banned from their domestic leagues. so liverpool and manchester united, along with the other four not competing in the premier league. its head, alexander ceferin, speaking at their congress today, urged england's “big six“ to reconsider their plans.
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i would like to address the owners of some english clubs. come to your senses, not out of love for football, come to your senses, not out of love forfootball, because i imagine some of you do not have much of that, but out of respect for those who lead themselves dry so that they can go to the stadiums to support the team and want a dream to be kept alive. for those, you change your mind. fifa too have said clubs will face sanctions. the 1a premier league clubs not involved have been called to an emergency shareholders meeting today. everton said they“re "saddened and disappointed" by the plans, which "tarnish the reputation of the league and disrespect every other club". alan shearer has urged the premier league to expel the clubs involved. the super league have chucked a grenade at the premier league and chucked a grenade to everyone else. well, chuck one back. ban them. ban them immediately, if you can.
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if they can. and i'm sure that they'll look at every possible legal angle and what pressure they“re under in doing that. but if you can, do it. one of those clubs involved, tottenham, parted company with managerjose mourinho yesterday. former player ryan mason has been named interim manager until the end of the season. he's only 29. a nasty head inury curtailed his career. he steps up from his role as head of player development and will lead out his boyhood club in their game with southampton tomorrow and in this weekend's league cup final against manchester city. to the world snooker championship, where the first round is continuing. we can bring you live pictures from the crucible theatre in sheffield, where two—time finalist ali carter is up against jack lisowski. it's currently 8—7 with 10 frames needed for a place in the second round. this afternoon, world number one
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judd trump begins his campaign. you can watch all the action right now on bbc two and the bbc sport website. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. we are staying with the proposed european super league. the prime minister and the culture secretary were talking to the football association, the premier league and fan groups this morning. we are hearing that all attendees realise that action was needed to uphold the fundamental principle that any club should have the chance to play and win against the biggest players in the game. the prime minister is said to have commented that he was clear that no action is off the table and the government is exploring any
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possibility, including legislative options to ensure these proposals are stopped. let's get more on all of this with the football finance expert, roger bell. roger, iam not expecting you to talk about the legal ins and outs of it all, but ultimately, is it inevitable that the owners of these big, big clubs will get what they want? that is a very big question. it is football romance meeting hard business reality. there is a gross misunderstanding about what the state of the economics of the game are at the moment, which are probably not sustainable. tell us your thoughts on the economics of the game. he said they are unsustainable? clu bs clubs have gone through an economic
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loss of £3.8 billion. the big six, that we are talking about being in the dock at the moment, since 2008—9 have gone through 2.2 billion of economic losses. losses on the scale are not sustainable. we have been seeing, and i don't want to be an apologist for what is going on at the moment, but we have been predicting a development along these lines for several years. hat“? predicting a development along these lines for several years.— lines for several years. how does a su er lines for several years. how does a super league _ lines for several years. how does a super league then _ lines for several years. how does a super league then get _ lines for several years. how does a super league then get these i lines for several years. how does a super league then get these clubs| super league then get these clubs out of financial difficulty? i super league then get these clubs out of financial difficulty?- out of financial difficulty? i think it is a number— out of financial difficulty? i think it is a number of— out of financial difficulty? i think it is a number of things. - out of financial difficulty? i think it is a number of things. it i out of financial difficulty? i think it is a number of things. it gives | it is a number of things. it gives them a chance to reconstitute the league and address the cost base, probably the players and their agents, that is one. it gives them a greater slice and greater control over commercial revenues principally coming from tv, and tv in the far east. ~ ., coming from tv, and tv in the far east. . ., ., ., coming from tv, and tv in the far east. ~ ., ., ., ., . ,, east. what about all the other clubs outside of this _ east. what about all the other clubs outside of this group, _ east. what about all the other clubs outside of this group, this _ east. what about all the other clubs outside of this group, this closed i outside of this group, this closed shop, if it goes ahead?-
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outside of this group, this closed shop, if it goes ahead? again, that is reall a shop, if it goes ahead? again, that is really a question _ shop, if it goes ahead? again, that is really a question of— shop, if it goes ahead? again, that is really a question of tv _ shop, if it goes ahead? again, that is really a question of tv money i is really a question of tv money goes. the best analogy i can give you for hi tv income has driven the finances of the game, the premier league was started in 1992, a pint of beer then was 1.a5. if a pint of beer followed the increments that the team feel deal announced, it would now be £5. that is driven the whole economics of the game. there are signs that the brakes are going on, which urged what i expected really behind this whole initiative, they are looking for a new source tv income. it they are looking for a new source tv income. ., , ., , income. if there are these threats too, for example, _ income. if there are these threats too, for example, exclude - income. if there are these threatsj too, for example, exclude players from representing their countries in the world cup, for example. if there is enough disquiet amongst the managers and players of these clubs about this proposal, do you think the owners will listen to that? i
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think they will have to do. they will need to be our compromise. i think banning players for playing for their country, think banning players for playing fortheir country, i“m think banning players for playing for their country, i'm not a lawyer, but i think you would get into areas like restraint of trade and things like restraint of trade and things like that. they will have to be a compromise. we have seen this coming. the anti—competitive element, the idea that you don't have any relegation from the sleek, it is very like american football and american baseball, where there is no promotion or relegation there. we have seen an influx of american investment and money into the english game, it is the americanisation of european football. good to hear from you, good to hearfrom you, roger good to hear from you, roger bell. let's have a look at the weather. good afternoon to you all. great
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conditions here in edinburgh, as it is in good parts of scotland. for northern ireland, as well. this waterfront is working its way southwards. add a drop in temperature relative to yesterday, seven or 8 degrees cooler in aberdeen. we could get to between 16 and 18 in england and wales. if he showers in the pennines, the midlands, maybe to the west of london. very few, though. if you are after rain for the garden, you could be disappointed. this waterfront will be pushing southwards overnight. in parts of northern ireland and scotland, the frost is back. the sunshine will arrive back in northern ireland through the morning tomorrow. into the afternoon, one or two showers in wales, south—west england and the channel islands. more of a breeze for england tomorrow, and with the breeze coming from the north—east, it will be chilling on the eastern
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coast, but sunnierfor it will be chilling on the eastern coast, but sunnier for northern ireland and scotland.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: borisjohnson is chairing a meeting of football chiefs and fans to discuss ways of preventing english clubsjoining a european breakaway super league. the government says it's speeding up it's target to cut carbon emissions in the uk by 15 years. latest employment figures show that four—fifths of the people who have lost theirjobs since the pandemic began are under the age of 35. tensions remain high across the united states, as the trial of a former police officer accused of murdering george floyd nears its conclusion. there has been a big increase in young people looking for help during the pandemic, with many struggling to find a job and a place to live. in just over two weeks“ time,
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voters around britain will be heading to the polls. in scotland and wales there are parliamentary elections, whilst in england voters will be choosing who will sit on their local councils. 5 live“s anna foster is on the road this week and will be bringing us an insight in to what voters want from their elected representatives and what local issues will be sending people to the polling stations in these elections. today she's in stockton. anna. hello. this week we are looking at the red wall seats across the north of england, the north—east of england in particular. back in 2019, the general election, and the absolute shock when some real labour heartland westminster constituencies tent conservative, in some cases for the first time ever. we are looking into what is informing people's folk right now, how little since they voted. so much has changed economically due to the pandemic,
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people? lives are very different. i wanted to find out what people are thinking. they have an election for mayor here in straight conservative— labourer fight. mayor here in straight conservative— labourerfight. we mayor here in straight conservative— labourer fight. we are mayor here in straight conservative— labourerfight. we are in mayor here in straight conservative— labourer fight. we are in the natural progression boxing gym here in stockton. you have been preparing for this chat, it is making me slightly nervous the way you are hopping from foot to foot and stretching, like we are about to spar. imran, the local elections are just a couple of weeks away. your gym has been closed because of the pandemic. it is floating something thatis pandemic. it is floating something that is at the front of your mind at the moment? it that is at the front of your mind at the moment?— that is at the front of your mind at the moment? it is certainly not. it was only a — the moment? it is certainly not. it was only a couple _ the moment? it is certainly not. it was only a couple of— the moment? it is certainly not. it was only a couple of weeks - the moment? it is certainly not. it was only a couple of weeks ago i the moment? it is certainly not. it i was only a couple of weeks ago that i was only a couple of weeks ago that i point _ was only a couple of weeks ago that i point out _ was only a couple of weeks ago that i point out that there were elections. my concentration has been getting _ elections. my concentration has been getting to _ elections. my concentration has been getting to the gym back open, getting — getting to the gym back open, getting the young people back into some _ getting the young people back into some form of physical activity and caring _ some form of physical activity and
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caring about their health, that has been _ caring about their health, that has been the — caring about their health, that has been the most important thing. how has loughton _ been the most important thing. finn-tin has loughton been? you been the most important thing. finite has loughton been? you haven't been able to have physical contact. ii'iin�*n�* able to have physical contact. how have ou able to have physical contact. how have you coped? _ able to have physical contact. how have you coped? it _ able to have physical contact. how have you coped? it has been very difficult. — have you coped? it has been very difficult, anna. it is a big part of people's— difficult, anna. it is a big part of people's lives that have been sidelined for such a long time. but you can _ sidelined for such a long time. but you can see — sidelined for such a long time. but you can see the wait is over, they have _ you can see the wait is over, they have been— you can see the wait is over, they have been in— you can see the wait is over, they have been in the gym and they are so happy— have been in the gym and they are so happy to— have been in the gym and they are so happy to be _ have been in the gym and they are so happy to be pushed through their paces— happy to be pushed through their paces again. trying to get them competitive, which is another big then we — competitive, which is another big then we are involved in. it is a great — then we are involved in. it is a great grassroots sports, it's massive — great grassroots sports, it's massive in the north—east and massive — massive in the north—east and massive throughout the country. our aim now— massive throughout the country. our aim now is _ massive throughout the country. our aim now is to— massive throughout the country. our aim now is to get them back of the competitions. fits aim now is to get them back of the competitions-— aim now is to get them back of the competitions. as she said, you have other things — competitions. as she said, you have other things on _ competitions. as she said, you have other things on your _ competitions. as she said, you have other things on your mind, - competitions. as she said, you have other things on your mind, are i competitions. as she said, you have other things on your mind, are you i other things on your mind, are you going to vote for the next mayor? we“ll even put across in a box? probably won“t.
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we“ll even put across in a box? probably won't. i am not a political person _ probably won't. i am not a political person i_ probably won't. i am not a political person. i don't have a view on the person. idon't have a view on the political— person. i don't have a view on the political landscape within the country _ political landscape within the country. i don't really know much about _ country. i don't really know much about it — country. i don't really know much about it. ~ ., ., . ., about it. when a general election comes, about it. when a general election comes. who _ about it. when a general election comes. who do — about it. when a general election comes, who do you _ about it. when a general election comes, who do you vote - about it. when a general election comes, who do you vote for? i i about it. when a general election i comes, who do you vote for? i have voted for labour _ comes, who do you vote for? i have voted for labour in _ comes, who do you vote for? i have voted for labour in the _ comes, who do you vote for? i have voted for labour in the past. - comes, who do you vote for? i have voted for labour in the past. it i voted for labour in the past. it hasn't — voted for labour in the past. it hasn't been based really on policies and things— hasn't been based really on policies and things of that nature and what they offer~ — and things of that nature and what they offer. i don't think it makes a huge _ they offer. i don't think it makes a huge difference to me and my family who is— huge difference to me and my family who is in— huge difference to me and my family who is in power. do huge difference to me and my family who is in power-— who is in power. do you feel in an area like this, _ who is in power. do you feel in an area like this, there _ who is in power. do you feel in an area like this, there was - who is in power. do you feel in an area like this, there was such i who is in power. do you feel in an area like this, there was such a i area like this, there was such a huge change from labour to conservative at the end of 2019, have you seen things change in terms of your life, in terms of how much money you have got, in terms of the place to regulate, the facilities? can you see a difference? i don't see a difference. _ can you see a difference? i don't see a difference. honestly, i-
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can you see a difference? i don't i see a difference. honestly, i don't. my bubble. — see a difference. honestly, i don't. my bubble, my family, my immediate family— my bubble, my family, my immediate family and _ my bubble, my family, my immediate family and friends, we are just cracking — family and friends, we are just cracking on with life as normal. that _ cracking on with life as normal. that is — cracking on with life as normal. that is why _ cracking on with life as normal. that is why i say i don't think it really— that is why i say i don't think it really affects normal people like me. maybe business people who are in the higher— me. maybe business people who are in the higher echelons of business, it may affect — the higher echelons of business, it may affect them, but certainly not myself _ may affect them, but certainly not m self. ., , ., , , myself. that is really interesting, because obviously _ myself. that is really interesting, because obviously adores, - myself. that is really interesting, because obviously adores, it i myself. that is really interesting, i because obviously adores, it affects us all, but how would politicians, how would they get to you, how would they get their messages to you? what would they prefer that they did to engage you better? you would they prefer that they did to engage you better?— would they prefer that they did to engage you better? you see them often when _ engage you better? you see them often when it _ engage you better? you see them often when it comes _ engage you better? you see them often when it comes to _ engage you better? you see them often when it comes to election i often when it comes to election time. _ often when it comes to election time. you — often when it comes to election time, you see a lot of the politicians coming round looking for poking _ politicians coming round looking for poking about policy, but not really explaining what our local area really — explaining what our local area really needs. that is it for me, really — really needs. that is it for me, really i'm _ really needs. that is it for me, really. i'm at billingham lad
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working _ really. i'm at billingham lad working out of stockton and middlesbrough. ijust need to know how it _ middlesbrough. ijust need to know how it is _ middlesbrough. ijust need to know how it is going to affect my immediate life. i'm not really worried — immediate life. i'm not really worried about national or international politics at all. it is miles— international politics at all. it is miles away for me. in international politics at all. it is miles away for me.— international politics at all. it is miles away for me. in terms of the election for— miles away for me. in terms of the election for mayor, _ miles away for me. in terms of the election for mayor, no _ miles away for me. in terms of the election for mayor, no vote - miles away for me. in terms of the election for mayor, no vote for i miles away for me. in terms of the | election for mayor, no vote for you. anything that could change your mind? ~ , ,., , anything that could change your mind? ~ , ., anything that could change your mind? ~ ,,., , ., ., mind? absolutely, i am willing to listen. mind? absolutely, i am willing to listen- i'm _ mind? absolutely, i am willing to listen. i'm willing _ mind? absolutely, i am willing to listen. i'm willing to _ mind? absolutely, i am willing to | listen. i'm willing to accommodate to ever— listen. i'm willing to accommodate to ever come through our door. we are an _ to ever come through our door. we are an open — to ever come through our door. we are an open gym. if they want to try on campus— are an open gym. if they want to try on campus now floats by coming and speaking _ on campus now floats by coming and speaking to— on campus now floats by coming and speaking to me personally, then they are more _ speaking to me personally, then they are more than welcome. we will have a cup of tea waiting for them. thank you, imran, who runs _ a cup of tea waiting for them. thank you, imran, who runs the _ a cup of tea waiting for them. thank you, imran, who runs the natural. you, imran, who runs the natural progression boxing gym. it looks like the candidates still have a job to do to engage people here. you can find out what elections
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are taking place in your area and see all the candidates by heading to the bbc news wesbite at bbc.co.uk/news. official figures show that younger people continue to bear the brunt of the unemployment crisis during the pandemic. the office for national statistics said 811,000 payrolljobs were lost in the year to march, with people under—35 accounting for 80% of the fall. many of the around five million people still on furlough also fall into that age group. our business presenter ben thompson explained the what the latest figures showed. we are starting to get a clear indication of what the longer term impact of this pandemic might be on thejobs market. these are impact of this pandemic might be on the jobs market. these are at the latest figures to cover up until march and you're right, 5 million people still having their salary subsidised by the government because they are not able to get back to work on any normal fashion, particularly i am looking at hospitality, travel, retail, the sector is that whilst there is a
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gradual reopening in some parts of the country, they are no means back to normal. the unemployment rate overall dipping slightly from 5% down to a.9%, but nonetheless, that is expected to grow by the end of the year as employers start to get a sense of what their business looks like, what demand looks like, what customers are willing to spend and how many staff they will need. that idea of it being young people is a real concern, because if you look, 80% of all of the jobs that were lost since this pandemic began, it is about 813,000 jobs that have been lost so far, 80% of them are those who are young people. that is partly because of the nature of the jobs they are in, things like hospitality and retail. their wheel —— will be and retail. their wheel —— will be an element of last in first out when it comes to redundancy, and they tend to be less secure jobs in the first place. we should also look at
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gender, women are most badly affected because they tend to be a lot of those hospitality and retail jobs. so the axe does not fall evenly when it comes to jobs here. there is a now about how to create employment for the gym people, a renewed call for more apprenticeships, more training schemes to get those people back into work while of this is over —— when all of this is over. fire into work while of this is over -- when all of this is over.- when all of this is over. are we -a in: when all of this is over. are we paying £120 — when all of this is over. are we paying £120 billion _ when all of this is over. are we paying £120 billion of- when all of this is over. are we paying £120 billion of furlough| paying £120 billion of furlough money. what is the behind that? quite simply, they have had a great time since their stores reopens. primark is one that we watch quite a lot. it is an unusual case because unlike most retailers these days, it doesn't have an online presence, there is no website. you can buy from them in their stores are shot. in the lockdown of this year it lost a lot of money. they put a figure on it of £1.1 billion of sales as a result of the lockdown. in england
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and wales commodores were able to reap on last monday and had a great time. many stores think induce around the block of people eager to get back in. they set their customer numbers are back to levels not seen since before the crisis. they have repaid this money, send that because customers are back spending and cash is coming through their tails they do need the money they were paid by the government to keep them ticking over. as a whole, it is worth saying that last week was particularly good, there was a lot of pent—up demand for all retail because that having closed for so long. it was easter holidays, the weather was good, lots of people out shopping. the big question is how long that will continue. do people feel that they have in their pocket, because this pandemic has been felt very differently by different people. some people have had a terrible financial fallout, some people have had a terrible financialfallout, some people have had a good pandemic, able to put money in their pocket, paid on their credit cards, so they have money to
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spend. primark will be hoping that theirs is the shop where the money will be spent. an inquest into the deaths of saskia jones and jack merrit at fishmongers hall has been taking place this morning. eyewitnesses and first responders have been giving evidence. our correspondent zoe conway is in central london. the inquest has been hearing from a young woman who was stabbed. we have been hearing from stephanie, a criminology student, who was studying alongside prison inmates as part of her degree. she described being on the stairs at fishmongercall when usman khan ran towards her. i remember seeing a knife in his right hand, she said. he was holding it above his head. i remember being struck by something, she said. i was aware my arm was
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struck, i remember looking at him in shock and confusion. she also said that he did not look particularly angry, he didn't seem to have an expression on his face. she then made her way up the stairs, she said she walked, not running, she didn't understand what had happened to her. it was only when she got to the top of the stairs and saw the blood that she realised she had been stabbed. we heard from amory wilson, another attendee, who gave herfirst we heard from amory wilson, another attendee, who gave her first date. anne—marie wilson talked about how she had been on the same table as this man can and he had been wearing this man can and he had been wearing this heavy coat, pufferjackets. she said that someone on 30 april said, he must be boiling in that code. several people had been remarked —— had remarked on the coat he was wearing. we also heard what the police had described as a convincing but fake suicide belt was hidden
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underneath that cooked that day. thank you for that update. in germany, the race to become the centre—right candidate to succeed angela merkel as chancellor has been won by armin laschet of the cdu, after his rival stepped aside. markus soeder, of the bavarian csu party, has offered his full backing to armin laschet. our correspondent damien mcguinness is on the line from berlin. who is armin laschet? he is the premiere of the second most popular states in germany. he is a grantee in the conservative bloc. a well—known supporter of angela merkel, particularly over the refugee policy. he has been accused of wavering a bit during the pandemic. he doesn't do very well in the polls. that is why we have had this bitter row between his bavarian rival, the leader of the bavarian
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conservative party, markus soeder, and him. they have been fighting it out to try to be the conservative bloc? candidate for chancellor. armin laschet, as party leader, is the one who should have got the nomination. they haven't been able to agree for the last ten years, it has been an unedifying spat for power. in the middle of the pandemic, this is the lasting photos of wanted, to watch two men argue about thejob. the party of wanted, to watch two men argue about the job. the party has done very badly. it has been hit hard by this. they will have to unite because we have an election in five months, armin laschet is the man who will try to take angela merkel“s place in those elections in september. police in northern ireland have been dealing with a subset —— a suspect device in dungiven in county londonderry at the house of a police officer. arlene foster said she had spoken to the police officer.
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michelle o'neill said the attempted murder is reprehensible and that politicians must unite against these reckless actions. as we've been reporting, the latest figures show that britain's unemployment rate fell for a second month in a row to a.9%, that's for the period from december to february. more than half of the 813,000 jobs that have been lost in the pandemic belonged to people under the age of 25. meanwhile, calls from young people struggling to find a job and struggling to find somewhere to live have increased by 33% during the pandemic, that's according to centrepoint. the charity, which works with under 25s, says family breakdowns during lockdown have been one of the key factors for the increase. emma glasbey reports. as we've been reporting, the latest figures show that the past year has turned many lives upside down. the first lockdown leftjamie home less. only 20 he has been through a family breakdown. he is now living in barnsley supported by the youth homeless
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charity centrepoint. how did you find it when you came here? i didn't like it at first. but then i got to know the staff and i realised not to be scared. i just chill with everyone and i got used to everyone and started enjoying it. and ifound it better, it helped my anxiety a bit more because i was more accepted there than at home. if i didn't have this i don't know what i would do, honestly. supporting young, vulnerable people through three lockdowns has come with many challenges. is that zoomed in? centrepoint is still seeing more and more young people asking for help. isolating at home with family, there were more family breakdowns which in turn led to more mental health. chantelle has been supporting young people at the charity based in barnsley. the isolation at the start, it was really terrible for those young people. it was surprising to see it increase. when the referrals were coming through, it was the mental
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health side of things, it increased rapidly. the uncertainty for vulnerable young people is being seen on the streets. in leeds 2a—year—old kaz has a place to stay but she is pregnant and is struggling financially. with covid, it has been really bad to associate, make friends, just to sort of feel like you have got that help. because a lot of the support, with covid, has been closed down. since coming out of lockdown there are a lot more - youngsters on the streets, i teenagers, in their early 20s. the youngsters don't know how to help themselves, l they don't know where to go. it is more difficult. for them to get out of the situation than the adults. the most vulnerable have been disproportionately affected by covid. the younger generation may be less at risk from the virus. but more at risk from the long—term impact.
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emma glasby, bbc news. a couple more of your tweets on the idea of the european super league. michael has been in touch saying i wonder if financial rewards will be enough, fans boycott games, players don't play because they will be able to play for their countries? and football authorities with stroke current points standings and payments from tv, etc. it is certainly a very complicated picture, isn“t certainly a very complicated picture, isn't it? jerry smith says, the same organisation that has been churning the champions league into an elitist competition are now condemning a group for trying the same. thank you very much for sending in your tweets on that story. it is good to read some of those out. now some of it's time for a look at the weather with matt.
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hello. last night, the frost wasn't quite so widespread across the country and certainly by day, for a fair few of you, under blue skies and strong april sunshine, it does feel warm once again. but if you are a keen gardener and keen to get those plants out, do not go too quickly. yes, for some of you, the frost will not be there tonight, but these are just some of the overnight temperatures in town and cities. anything below around 2 degrees is susceptible to a fast, there will be more to come and it could get colder still into next week. today's colder air is coming back across scotland and northern ireland, temperatures across parts of north—east scotland down around seven or 8 degrees on what we saw yesterday. still some warmth to be had, though, even into the evening across parts of wales and england. 16, 17, 18 degrees the highs, but one or two isolated showers possible. most places dry and sunny, the bulk of today's rain has been on this zone of cloud, patchy rain and drizzle on that, working its way southwards through tonight, showers south of it will fade away. to the north, scotland,
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northern ireland into the clearer air and the colder air, away from the far south of scotland, here and across a good part of northern ireland, there will be a frost into tomorrow morning. not as cold morning. for england and wales, a lot more cloud tomorrow morning. a few spots of rain or drizzle along as weather front as cloud pushes southwards into wales, south—west england later in the day, temperatures probably at the highest through here, but the breeze will be more noticeable across england and wales and is coming in from the north—east, so during those eastern coastal strips of england, the chillier weather is back. nine or ten for some. 15 and 16 towards the south—west, west of scotland and northern ireland slightly milder day tomorrow compared to today, with more sunshine around. now, the dry weather is dominating and will high pressure becomes firmly established across the uk. around it, we are in the lighter winds, the exception being in the set —— channel islands and the south—west of england, always a brazier, keeping things cooler compared to today, but after a chilly start on
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thursday morning, with a frost, temperatures will rise nicely. that will be the case with the rest of the week, frosty by night, but i day temperatures rising. no rainfall symbols on therefore next week, and the rainfall chart for the next five days, that is from the rain today, but apart from that, very little in the forecast, as things stay dry.
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downing street says the government will explore every possibility, including legislation, to help stop a proposed european super league from going ahead. borisjohnson said that plans for a breakaway league involving six english clubs amounted to a closed shop, but they were defended by the man set to chair the league. translation: we don't - have the money, apart from tv rights, so the only way to make football profitable is to make more competitive teams that are more attractive to fans of the biggest clubs from all over the world. the super league have chucked a grenade at the premier league and chucked a grenade to everyone else. well, chuck one back. ban them. ban them immediately. with uk and european football in turmoil, we'll be asking what happens next. also this lunchtime: an ambitious new target to get rid of environmental polluters

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