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tv   BBC World News  BBC News  April 20, 2021 1:00am-1:31am BST

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this is bbc news. i'm lewis vaughanjones with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. thejury the jury retires to consider its verdict in the trial of the former police officer charged with killing george floyd. it is a key moment in us policing and race relations. businesses are boarded up in minneapolis in anticipation of unrest over the verdict. mr guvnor calls for cooperation. changes will need to be made. it needs to be started with systemic reforms. some things we can all agree on and work from there. no—one should die for a simple traffic violation. outrage at zero�*s reges gloves announced plans to join a new breakaway football super
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league. and russia's opposition leader alexei navalny is moved to a prison hospital as his alp deteriorates, piling on the pressure for president putin. and mission accomplished. nasa flies a drone over the surface of mars in yet another first for humankind's efforts in space. hello and welcome. we started in the us city of minneapolis. security is being tightened in there as jurors begin considering their verdict in the trial of the former us police officer charged with murdering the black man george floyd last year. derek chauvin denies causing mr floyd's death by kneeling on his neck. the defence says mr chauvin correctly followed police training, but the prosecution
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say his actions were disproportionate and deliberate. footage from the incident was again shown in closing arguments today, and some of it is included, in our correspondent nick brya nt�*s report. it's a measure of the passions aroused by this trial that the courthouse looks more like a prison. and the presence of the national guard serves as a martial reminder of how this midwestern city has become america's most volatile fault line. put your hands up, right now. let me see your other hand. in its closing argument, the prosecution showed police body—cam footage of george floyd's arrest for a minor offence, and his reluctance at getting in the police car because he suffered from claustrophobia and anxiety. already handcuffed, the officers took him out and forced him to the ground. i can't breathe... "i can't breathe. " george floyd uttered these words almost 30 times. this wasn't policing.
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this was murder. the defendant is guilty of all three counts. all of them. and there's no excuse. then derek chauvin listened as his lawyer mounted his final defence. and adhered to police procedures in a highly stressful situation... i can't breathe! ..and that george floyd's drug use and heart condition contributed to his death. the state has failed to prove its case beyond a reasonable doubt, and therefore mr chauvin should be found not guilty on all counts. over this three—week trial, which seen the emotional friends and eyewitnesses, the testimony of medical first responders... in lay terms, i thought he was dead. ..the rare sight of a police chief publicly condemning the actions of one of his officers. it is not part of our training and it is certainly not part of our ethics or our values. ..and the dramatic moment when derek chauvin decided
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not to testify. i will invoke my fifth amendment privilege today. this has become a familiar american streetscape — shops boarded up and ready for a storm of protest. but tonight, a pause for prayer for the family of george floyd, their testament of hope that justice will be served. nick bryant, bbc news, minneapolis. within the past hour minnesota governor tim waltz gave a public safety briefing ahead of the verdict — referring also to the death of daunte wright who was shot by a police officer earlier this month after he was pulled over for a traffic infringement. he reiterated his call for change. that rage that will be on the street regardless of what happens is channelled into a positive way and that positive way means change. we have to have that change. we can't live like this. we cannot continue to live like this. systemic and
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fundamental changes will need to be made. it needs to be stout —— data with systemic public safety returns. the very simple truth which they think we can all agree on and then work from there, they want to die for a work from there, they want to die fora simple work from there, they want to die for a simple traffic violation. there are enough smart people out there and another agreement around that that we should be able to find some answers. because, to be very clear, if we don't find that answer we will be right backin that answer we will be right back in this situation and i'm going to continue to say it just as we cannot continue, we cannot live this way. tim waltz there. the announcement was as shocking as the response has been swift. 12 of europe's biggest football clubs intend to break away to form a super league of their own. fans are furious. ruling bodies are scrambling. even the british prime minister has weighed in. if it goes forward, this would be the biggest shake—up in football in a generation. here's our sports correspondent andy swiss. for decades it has provided a
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game of some of its most iconic and enduring images, but european football's premier club completion finds itself under threat like never before after a rebellion that has plunged the sport into turmoil. england's big six, manchester united, liverpool, manchester city, chelsea, arsenal, and spursjoining some of city, chelsea, arsenal, and spurs joining some of spain and italy's top clubs to set up a new super league. the shock news derailed uefa's announcement of a revamped champions league and today the man in charge of the european game didn't hold back in his condemnation, issuing this warning to any players involved.— warning to any players involved. uefa and the footballing _ involved. uefa and the footballing world - involved. uefa and the footballing world stand | involved. uefa and the - footballing world stand united against the disgraceful self—serving proposals we have seenin self—serving proposals we have seen in the past 2a hours from a select few clubs in europe that are fuelled purely by greed above all else. the players who will play in the closed league will be bad on playing in the world cup and
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europa. in my opinion, this idea is a split in the face of all football lovers and our society as well. so we will not allow them to take it away from us. ., , ., ., us. the idea is for a new mid week competition _ us. the idea is for a new mid week competition with - week competition with teams continuing to play in the national league's. there would be 15 permanent founding members, three of which are yet tojoin, plus a members, three of which are yet to join, plus a further five sides who would qualify annually. at the breakaway clubs have been worn they could be thrown out of european, additions and even forced to leave the premier league if they don't back down. it will have massive _ they don't back down. it will have massive ramifications. they don't back down. it will. have massive ramifications on our game in this country. it will wreck the pyramid system that has been so important to local football clubs, that has been so important to localfootball clubs, to local football clubs, to communities, and localfootball clubs, to communities, and teams. and it takes up the competition. seldom if ever seen at the premier league clubs, these are the absentee billionaire owners whose drive to increase revenues are squeezed by the pandemic lies behind a plot
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that will see them share £3 billion just that will see them share £3 billionjust for signing on. billion just for signing on. this billionjust for signing on. this is a mixture, i think, of greed and desperation, because a number of these very large club have overspent massively and got themselves into a very difficult financial predicament, with huge debts. i think this is, there is a lot of money involved, but i think it is a bad thing for foot will, indeed.— it is a bad thing for foot will, indeed. �* ., . ., , ., will, indeed. amid a chorus of condemnation _ will, indeed. amid a chorus of condemnation the _ will, indeed. amid a chorus of| condemnation the government said it would start a band led review of the game and try to block the breakaway. we review of the game and try to block the breakaway.- review of the game and try to block the breakaway. we will be reviewin: block the breakaway. we will be reviewing everything _ block the breakaway. we will be reviewing everything the - reviewing everything the government does to support these clubs to play. i have discussed these options with the prime minister this morning and we are working at pace across government and with football authorities. they wanted to reassure this house of a very robust response. —— i want to. we will do whatever it takes to protect our national game. takes to protect our national came. ~ ., ., ., game. with the eurozone home soil on the _ game. with the eurozone home soil on the horizon _ game. with the eurozone home soil on the horizon this - game. with the eurozone homej soil on the horizon this summer seems that to be a return to better times for british
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football, instead the stars of the game face an uncertain future as their sport threatens to tear itself apart. —— eurozone home soil. that was dan roan there. for the first time in six decades cubacommunist party has a leader isn't one of the castro brothers. he has been chosen to succeed raul castro who announced on friday he was resigning. the island has not been governed by anyone other than for dell or raul castro since the cuban rye bread —— revolution way back in 1959. will grant reports. it has been a communist party congress heavy on the symbolism of continuity stop in each appearance raul castro, who shared the stage with the man who replaced him as president, now he has passed him the baton as the first secretary as well. the first time cuba is ruled by
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someone other than a castro since 1959. it is a significant historical moment in cuba and yes, industries, most people have more pressing concerns. they are coping with the worst economic crisis the island has seen since just after the cold war, with cues around the block for basic goods. translation: i for basic goods. translation: ., �* 4' translation: i don't think the leadership are _ translation: i don't think the leadership are capable - translation: i don't think the leadership are capable of- leadership are capable of getting this out of this spot, says this havana resident. the country is _ says this havana resident. the country is in — says this havana resident. the country is in a _ says this havana resident. the country is in a terrible shape at the moment. the committed revolutionary olga sanchez disagrees. "we, the true cuban communist, support them, " she says. the task facing the new leadership is daunting. the covid—19 pandemic has battered the tourism —based economy stop many private businesses have closed, others are struggling to survive. it is all a far cry from a few years ago, when the
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us and cuba re—established pneumatic ties and raul castro then hosted president obama in havana. it seemed a page had finally been turned. four years of the trump administration have reversed about an so far president biden shows no inclination to either lift the embargo or undo his predecessor's hardline the island. at predecessor's hardline the island. �* _ predecessor's hardline the island. �* .y, ., island. a cuba policy shift or additional _ island. a cuba policy shift or additional steps _ island. a cuba policy shift or additional steps is _ island. a cuba policy shift or additional steps is currently | additional steps is currently not among the present�*s top foreign policy priorities. —— president's from the death of fidel castro to raul castro's retirement, the changing of the guard of cuba has been gradual. as all those who fought alongside the castro brothers also retired from the politburo, the age at the table's top table is younger, but that doesn't necessarily mean modernisation. and without fresh ideas there is almost certainly more economic hardship ahead in a post castro cuba. will grant, bbc news.
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stay with us on bbc news. still lots to come. including: celebrations at nasa as its helicopter takes off on mars. the first powered flight on another planet. the stars and stripes at half—mast outside columbine high. the school sealed off, the bodies of the dead still inside. i never thought that they would actually go through with it. one of the most successful singer—song writers of all time, the american pop star prince has died at the age of 57. i was — it's hard to believe it. i didn't believe it. we just — he was just here saturday. for millions of americans, j the death of richard nixon in a new york hospital has i meant conflicting emotions. a national day of— mourning next wednesday, sitting somehow uneasily. with the abiding memories of the shame of watergate.
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and lift off of the space shuttle discovery with the hubble space telescope, our window on the universe. this is bbc news, the latest headlines: the jury in the trial of the former police officer charged with killing george floyd retires to consider its verdict — the case is seen as key moment in us race relations and policing. plans for 12 of europe's top football clubs to form a breakaway super league have been greeted with outrage. nasa says a new chapter in space exploration has been opened after a successful test flight of a drone on mars, calling it their "wright brothers moment."
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the drone, called ingenuity, was airborne for around a0 seconds — the first powered controlled flight by an aircraft on another world. more ambitious flights are planned for the days ahead. here's our science correspondent rebecca morelle. it was a flight that lasted just a0 seconds. but by hovering in the martian air, turning and then landing, nasa's ingenuity helicopter made history. applause. ingenuity has performed its first flight. and this was the moment mission control learned of the success. human beings have neverflown a rotorcraft outside of our own earth's atmosphere.
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we don't have to say it any more. we have flown, human beings have flown a rotorcraft on another planet! and we have started it by flying at mars. it's a huge deal for humanity. the helicopter took pictures, too, this one mid—flight capturing its own shadow below and anotherjust before it touched down. until now, nasa had no guarantees this would work. these flights are testing cutting—edge technology. on board are solar panels and a thermostat, so the helicopter can survive temperatures down to —80 degrees. for each flight, scientists upload a plan, but ingenuity also has to make decisions by itself. high—tech cameras and sensors can spot obstacles, so it can adjust its height to avoid these. but the helicopter can also use these features as landmarks so it could navigate its way down to the ground. this flight is just the start. in the coming days, the helicopter will begin to fly further afield and it could transform our view of mars. helicopters can cover more ground, can act as scout
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vehicles, can go into different areas that the rover can't go into. and then they can do co—ordinated science data. future manned missions to mars can utilise a drone helicopter. so there is a lot of opportunity. more than 100 years ago, the wright brothers made history with the first powered aircraft on earth. now a little mars helicopter has shown the same is possible on another planet, propelling us into a new era of space exploration. rebecca morelle, bbc news. we can now speak to adam steltzner who's is the chief engineer of the mars 2020 project at nasa'sjet propulsion laboratory. we've laboratory. chatted before. thank you for we've chatted before. thank you for coming back on the programme.— for coming back on the programme. for coming back on the rorramme. . ~ ., .,
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programme. thank you for having me. programme. thank you for having me- another _ programme. thank you for having me. another success _ programme. thank you for having me. another success to _ me. another success to celebrate, our significant is it? �* , ., ., celebrate, our significant is it? ., ., , it? it's a great day for us, it's a great _ it? it's a great day for us, it's a great taper - it? it's a great day for us, i it's a great taper exploration and really humanity. we had some hiccups on the way to the success and it made the early morning hours here in california veryjoyful. i morning hours here in california veryjoyful. california very “oyful. i bet. we can california veryjoyful. i bet. we can understand - california veryjoyful. i bet. we can understand the - california veryjoyful. i bet. | we can understand the idea california veryjoyful. i bet. i we can understand the idea of having this flight on a different planet, millions of miles away, that's an impressive headline, but talk as to why exactly it is impressive. what are some of the challenges for controlled flight on a different planet? well, certainly in mars, mars has a very vaporous sleep then atmosphere, one 100 that of earth so flying a helicopter on mars required us to rewrite the book of rotorcraft. we need to design it differently, absolutely upside down from the way we would design the rotors
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in the flexible motors, totally different on mars for us than they are here. but additionally, it proves that we can do such a feat and that opens up the possibility for being able to reach out and survey the surface of mars at a scale we don't usually have the opportunity to do. on a rover, you can see very high resolution but only that which is in the line of sight and from an orbiter, you can see everything, but you are hundreds of miles away, see have a challenge in resolution. the helicopter operates in the middle zone and promises to be able to educate us about mars surface operations in a way we have yet to experience. anxious about why. _ have yet to experience. anxious about why, what _ have yet to experience. anxious about why, what the _ have yet to experience. anxious about why, what the you - have yet to experience. anxious about why, what the you scum l about why, what the you scum what the value of this will be.
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what is next, then?— what the value of this will be. what is next, then? next we go throu~h a what is next, then? next we go through a set — what is next, then? next we go through a set of— what is next, then? next we go through a set of at _ what is next, then? next we go through a set of at least - through a set of at least wobbly for experimental test flights. each flight will be a little bit higher, will do some diverting and returning to the landing site and then we will be able to do more and more. after each vehicle flight, we to limited down information from the computer on board and see how it behaves, see how it formed, and then decide how far to push it for the next one. just taking a step back a second, we did speak to you before when we were approaching mars. surprised at how well things have gone or were you always this confident? confident, no. delighted would be a better term. operating at big rover like perseverance or
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operating this tiny little lightweight helicopter, ingenuity, are very, very difficult to do. it may seem obvious but they really are. so expect a certain amount of hiccups along the way, a certain amount of challenges and set backs that hopefully you will be able to overcome. thus far, knock on wood, the operation has been very, very smooth. and so all of the hard work of the thousands of women and men at the lab, around nasa, across the globe, including european contributors, is really blooming and showing food for us and we are very delighted. fantastic, congratulations again.
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unicef says the number of children in central america has increased who are stranded. they are rather waiting to cross into the us or being pushed back. the agency says the number is increasing by nearly 300 children every day. us federal officials are investigating a fatal car crash in texas which local police say appears to have happened with no—onein appears to have happened with no—one in the driver's seat. two people died in the tesla car. investigators are expected to look into whether the vehicle was being controlled by its autopilot system. tesla says it had rises drivers to keep their hands on the wheel and pay attention, even when using that feature. there's been strong condemnation of russia over recent days with president putin coming under international pressure on several fronts. the us imposed new sanctions on russia last week for meddling in elections and on monday the eu criticised the kremlin over the build up of troops on the ukrainian
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border. the us government has said the world will hold the russian government to account if the prominent opposition leader, alexei navalny, dies in prison. correspondent steve rosenberg reports from krasnoyarsk, in siberia, on the growing tensions within putin's russia. where is russia going undeeradimir putin? what kind of a country is the president building? what is he thinking and planning? getting inside vladimir putin's mind is artist vasily slonov�*s job. he sees a leader determined to keep power. translation: however you mix up the pieces, i
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russia's jigsaw will always show putin. he's outplayed everyone. all his opponents have been removed, jailed, poisoned or killed. alexei navalny was poisoned and later imprisoned. the opposition leader is on hunger strike. there's growing concern about his health and growing pessimism among his supporters. injanuary, police detained igor at a pro—navalny protest. translation: we're going back to the red terror of stalin when anyone who thought differently from the great leader was persecuted. now, people who don't support our president are seen as enemies. patriotic chimes — a sign of the times. the kremlin's encouraging national pride and distrust of the west. in krasnoyarsk, we're being followed... ok, there it is again, the same numberplate. ..everywhere we go. the fact that we're being followed shows just how nervous
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the russian authorities are, how sensitive they are to potential criticism about what's happening here, and also how suspicious they are of the west. so one of the cars that's been following us has just pulled up here. we're going to try and have a little chat. he says he's not following us, it's just our imagination. that's not true. for kseniya and herfamily, it's not the west they fear, it's russia's direction. but like most russians, they avoid politics and protests. i think that people are afraid because if your director finds that you went there...
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to a protest? yeah, and maybe you were jailed, sometimes you can lose yourjob. people are just afraid. when you look into the future, what kind of a russia would you like your son to live in? i would like russia to be more free. but, you know, i don't believe that anything will change in the nearest future. but change can happen suddenly in russia. communism collapsed, and some think that a system built around one man, even a strong man, is dangerously unstable. translation: russia is heading straight for a big catastrophe. i i'm certain. it's irreversible. it's like the titanic heading for the iceberg. the overriding feeling i get about russia is uncertainty, and that's of global concern because the direction russia takes has consequences for the whole world. steve rosenberg, bbc
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news, krasnoyarsk. you can reach me on twitter — i'm @lvaughanjones. hello there. april showers have been in short supply. it's been a very dry month so far. and for most places, tuesday will be another dry day with some sunny spells. but across the north of the uk, we can expect some patchy rain, courtesy of a weather front — you can see it here on the chart — drifting in from the northwest, moving slowly southeastwards through the day and weakening all the while. for much of england and wales, we're starting off the day dry with some spells of sunshine, although quite misty and murky for some of these eastern coasts. and through the day, i think we'll see a gradual build—up in cloud amounts.
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there may even bejust the odd rogue shower into the afternoon. for scotland and northern ireland, our frontal system bringing cloud, outbreaks of patchy rain southwards. behind it, the skies will brighten but the winds will strengthen, and it will be quite a chilly afternoon across the northern half of the uk. further south, we're looking at highs 15, 16 degrees or so, and as we go through tuesday night and into the first part of wednesday, the remnants of that weather front will continue to sink southwards, so pushing down across england and wales, with more in the way of cloud here, the odd spot of rain, with clearer skies developing from northern ireland and scotland. some places will see a frost to start wednesday morning. so, through wednesday, that weather front will continue its journey southwards. not much left on it by this stage, just a band of cloud and the odd spot of rain, high pressure building back in behind, bringing sunnier skies for parts of scotland and northern ireland. so, our weatherfront
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bringing cloud southwards across england and wales. the odd spot of rain, quite misty and murky again for some of these eastern areas. could see the odd sharp shower breaking out through the day down toward the southwest, but sunnier skies for northern england, northern ireland and scotland. the highest temperatures will be where we get a bit of shelter, down towards the south and the west, 15 or 16 degrees. and then as we move out of wednesday into thursday, the remnants of that weather front clear well out into the near continent, high pressure really asserts itself right on top of the british isles, as we head through friday into the weekend, it stays predominantly dry with some spells of sunshine by day, and still the potential for some frost at night.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: the jury in the trial of derek chauvin, the former police officer charged with murdering george floyd in minneapolis last may, has retired to consider its verdict. in his summing up, thejudge urged the jurors to avoid any bias and rely on the evidence. plans by six english football clubs to join a planned european super league have been met with outrage from several quarters. -- 12 —— 12 football clubs. the british government has said it will do "whatever it takes" to prevent the move. meanwhile, the president of european football's governing body has threatened to ban players. and cuba's ruling communist party has elected the president miguel diaz—canel to replace raul castro as party chief, ending six decades of rule by the castro brothers.
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now on bbc news — the media show.

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