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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 16, 2021 11:00pm-11:31pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the diplomatic row between russia and the us intensifies — moscow orders ten us diplomats to pack up and leave. we have a special report from ukraine where tensions build — diskeeper had done a little bit. —— just keep your head down a little bit. we have a special report from ukraine where tensions build — as russian troops gather along the country's eastern border changing of the guard in cuba — raul castro confirms he's stepping down as leader of the communist party. china's leader calls for global cooperation in fighting climate change. final preparations for the funeral of the duke of edinburgh — a very personal ceremony planned by the duke himself.
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hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. a diplomatic row between russia and the us is intensifying, with moscow expelling ten american diplomats from the country — and recommending the us ambassador return home. the moves are in response to sanctions imposed by washington on thursday, over what the white house called "russia's harmful foreign activities" — from election interference to cyber attacks and the build up of russian troops along ukraine's border. we'll have more from our correspondent in eastern ukraine shortly, but first for more on russia's response to these latest american sanctions, here's our moscow correspondent steve rosenberg. the kremlin said that it acts according to reciprocity. so we are expecting a diplomatic tit—for—tat. america expelled ten russians, russia expels ten americans and eight us officials have been put on
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the black list. interesting that the russians have recommended that the us ambassador pop home for consultations. it is not an expulsion, but it's certainly a strong hint that the us ambassador should perhaps be in washington at the moment. but crucially, i think the moment. but crucially, i think the doorfor dialogue is the moment. but crucially, i think the door for dialogue is still open because in a statement, the russian foreign ministry put out and said that they noted thatjoe biden�*s wards, the relationship with russia and noted his proposalfor a summit. so, i would expect that discussions will continue perhaps behind closed doors and the possibility of a us russia summit sometime this summer. meanwhile escalating tensions between ukraine and russia have been the focus of international talks between ukraine's president and the leaders of france and germany. volodymyr zelensky has been anxious to increase international support following the recent build—up of russian troops along ukraine's eastern border and in crimea.
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there have been tensions between russia and ukraine ever since russia annexed the crimea in april 2014, and russian—backed forces seized a large swathe of eastern ukraine's donetsk and luhansk regions — coloured in turquoise here. a ceasefire was negotiated in 2015, but it remains fragile. our correspondentjonah fisher reports now from the frontline near marinka in eastern ukraine. rpg shell. yours, or theirs? theirs. in eastern ukraine a war that had been dormant is coming back to life. just keep your head down a little bit. this is marinka. just a hundred metres separate these ukrainian army trenches from the positions of the russian—backed forces. for the last six years very little has changed here along the front line in eastern ukraine, but the last few weeks has seen
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a very dramatic shift in mood, and that's because on the russian side of the border there's been a massive build—up of both personnel and equipment. they have their trenches over there. news of the troop movements have coincided with a deterioration of the situation on the ground. how seriously are soldiers here taking the possibility of russia launching a full—scale invasion? at war, you always have to be serious. it doesn't matter if you are expecting for escalation or you do not, but no matter what will happen we will do ourjob. we will stand here until the end. during our time in the trenches we get a glimpse of how tense things have become.
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what's going on? over there, 600 metres from us, is a drone. a drone. yeah, an enemy drone. they are usually carrying charges or grenades. it's better to stay over here. the ukrainian soldiers open fire, but fail to hit the drone. yet another breach of a tattered ceasefire. along the front line, those who can leave have long gone. nalia, a 72—year—old widow, has had no choice but to stay, deciding each day whether to spend her small pension on firewood or on food. her memories are still fresh of the intense fighting of seven years ago. translation: so many people in our village were killed. - there were young women and children shot in their homes.
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wars are so pointless. 0n the roads we see signs that ukraine is getting battle ready. the hope here is that russia is flexing its military muscle rather than preparing for all—out war. jonah fisher, bbc news, in eastern ukraine. cuba's former president, raul castro, has confirmed that he will resign from the leadership of the communist party. he made the announcement at the beginning of a four—day congress of the party. the move means that for the first time in six decades, cuba's communist party is no longer led by either raul castro or his late brother, fidel. 0ur latin america correspondent will grant joins me now. for years, the west is to say as soon the castro is gone, speedboats will start heading from miami. how does that prediction stand up? let’s
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does that prediction stand up? let's face it, that — does that prediction stand up? let's face it, that is _ does that prediction stand up? let's face it, that is not _ does that prediction stand up? let's face it, that is not about _ does that prediction stand up? let�*s face it, that is not about to happen. i think the cuban american conservative lobby in miami and in florida long gave up on that idea, perse florida long gave up on that idea, per se because fidel castro went to his grave not in a way that they would've wanted, peacefully in his sleep and now his brother walks out of the cuban communist party handing over to the hand—picked successor that he wants. so, socialism is firmly in place, state socialism is firmly in place, state socialism is firmly in place in cuba and i don't think politically that this will make any great odds. there'll be major political shifts and there for the time. if major political shifts and there for the time. ., major political shifts and there for the time. . , major political shifts and there for the time. ., , ., ., the time. if the leader is not named castro, the time. if the leader is not named castro. what — the time. if the leader is not named castro, what will _ the time. if the leader is not named castro, what will his _ the time. if the leader is not named castro, what will his name - the time. if the leader is not named castro, what will his name be? - the time. if the leader is not named castro, what will his name be? i- castro, what will his name be? i think it may well be the men who already took over from him as president. miguel diaz, we're going to learn soon and this is just the
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first day. but when he gave his opening address and talked about the being comfortable with the revolutionaries who he has bequeathed his legacy to, i think that gives us a clear indication that gives us a clear indication that miguel diaz is high in the running. ill bejust a rubber stamp vote on monday when whoever it is is chosen. but i think you got thatjob because he is loyal to the castro line. you still exactly what they wanted him to do, he has not gone too far in terms of reform and he has clearly cleared everything with castro before doing anything and i think he is very much there man. cuba for some is played in a central role, including the most dangerous moment in the history of humanity, the cuban missile crisis in 1962. what role does cuba now play in the world? i what role does cuba now play in the world? ~ ., �* , what role does cuba now play in the world? ~ . �* , ., what role does cuba now play in the world? ~ . �*, ., �*, world? i think that's what it's t in: to world? i think that's what it's trying to establish _ world? i think that's what it's trying to establish for- world? i think that's what it's trying to establish for itself. world? i think that's what it's l trying to establish for itself and world? i think that's what it's . trying to establish for itself and i think that's where the internal tensions and divisions in the island
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come in. cuba is currently in its worst economic crisis since the fall of the berlin wall, since shortly after the end of the cold war, a period called the special period or where austerity was biting his scarcities were all across the island. it currently is pretty much that bad. i'vejust left island. it currently is pretty much that bad. i've just left cuba and i've been living there for six years. and i've never seen it this bad and to be at this point with a high point of the administrations, afterfour high point of the administrations, after four years of high point of the administrations, afterfour years of harsh high point of the administrations, after four years of harsh sanctions under donald trump, it really doesn't know where it's going for the next century. they really run the next century. they really run the risk of alienating their youth in the process if they cannot bring their youth with them, who obviously want greater economic gains, i think there will be some serious tensions, societal tensions ahead. let's get some of
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the day's other news nasa has selected elon musk�*s spacex company to build the craft that aims to land humans on the moon for the first time in nearly fifty years. spacex says it will develop reusable starship spacecraft in combination with �*super heavy rockets�* to blast astronauts into space. nasa officials says the mission could take place as soon as 202a. the united nations refugee agency says that as many as sixty five thousand people are fleeing from a city in north—eastern nigeria, after a series of attacks by islamist militants. fighters claiming to be loyal to the self styled islamic state have conducted a series of hit and run attacks on damasak in borno province at least 12 people were killed. a weekend curfew has come into force in the indian capital, delhi, as coronavirus cases there, and across the country continue to soar. shopping malls, gyms, bars and restaurants in the capital are all closed. delhi is now india's worst affected city. president biden has held his first in—person meeting with a foreign leader at the white house on friday.
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japanese prime minister yoshihide suga was there. there was much for the two leaders to talk about — from the strategic threat posed by china, to north korea's missile tests and usjapan trade links. president biden says the us will work closely with japan to develop new technologies, including artificial intelligence and 5g, within norms �*set by democracies not autocracies'. those technologies are governed by shared democratic norms that we both share. by democracy and not autocracies. we are going to work together across a range of fields, from promoting secure reliable 5g networks, to increasing her cooperation on supply chains for critical sectors like semi conductors, to driving joint research in areas like ai, genomics, quantum computing and much more.
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i'm nowjoined by dr mireya solis who is the director at the center for east asia policy studies at the brookings institution. why is the japanese prime minister the first for an in person visit at the first for an in person visit at thejoe biden white house? the first for an in person visit at the joe biden white house? thank you ve much the joe biden white house? thank you very much for— the joe biden white house? thank you very much for having _ the joe biden white house? thank you very much for having me. _ the joe biden white house? thank you very much for having me. it _ the joe biden white house? thank you very much for having me. it is - the joe biden white house? thank you very much for having me. it is quite i very much for having me. it is quite an honour and due to the fact that the indo pacific is at the top of the indo pacific is at the top of the foreign policy agenda of the joe biden administration and japan is a crucial partner to making that effort successful as we just saw from your clip, japan is a technological power. it is very much in the league when developing global supply chains and this various possibilities for its energy corporation that the us want to apply. corporation that the us want to a. .l _ ., corporation that the us want to a- -l . ., ,., ., corporation that the us want to a--l. ., ., , corporation that the us want to apply. how important is the alliance and balancing _ apply. how important is the alliance and balancing against _ apply. how important is the alliance and balancing against the _ apply. how important is the alliance and balancing against the rising - and balancing against the rising china? i and balancing against the rising china? ~ , , and balancing against the rising china? ~' , , ., china? i think it is very important. i think with _ china? i think it is very important. | think with the _ china? i think it is very important. i think with the summit _ china? i think it is very important. i think with the summit is - china? i think it is very important. i think with the summit is also - i think with the summit is also going to reveal to us is how closely allied are these parties or these
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allies when it comes to the china challenge. just a few weeks ago, with the foreign ministers in the defence ministers of the united states and japan issued a statement where japan directly calls out chinese behaviour that undermines international order, this is new. it's also a reference to stability in the taiwan strait we want to see whether there confirmation that there is calling out of chinese behaviour will be a part of the diplomatic speak between these two countries. the diplomatic speak between these two countries. , ., , ., countries. the self-governing island claim by mainland _ countries. the self-governing island claim by mainland china, _ countries. the self-governing island claim by mainland china, the - countries. the self-governing island claim by mainland china, the us- countries. the self-governing island| claim by mainland china, the us and japan expecting mainland china, the communist party to try to change the way china operates towards taiwan to become more aggressive? i way china operates towards taiwan to become more aggressive?— become more aggressive? i think the coal is become more aggressive? i think the goal is deterrence. _ become more aggressive? i think the goal is deterrence. to _ become more aggressive? i think the goal is deterrence. to send _ become more aggressive? i think the goal is deterrence. to send a - become more aggressive? i think the goal is deterrence. to send a signal l goal is deterrence. to send a signal that using force to change this status quo is not going to be acceptable and i think both countries have an interest in supporting taiwan and make it defend
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itself and be resilient in taiwan is a democracy. taiwan also has key capabilities when it comes to semi conductor industry and therefore, i think that if you want stability in the region, and what rule of law, you have to show that matters to you and seeing that in the statement would be significant.— and seeing that in the statement would be significant. thank you so much forjoining _ would be significant. thank you so much forjoining us. _ china has said it is willing to co—operate more with some european countries over the challenges of climate change, as the argument continues over which of the major economies is the biggest polluter. president xijinping made the pledge during a video summit with the leaders of germany and france. and there's movement from the us too — president biden's climate change envoy has been in china this week, trying to kickstart talks. 0ur science editor david shukman reports. china is the world's greatest factory and its biggest polluter, and america is the second largest. together they account for nearly
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half of global emissions, and there is now a us president determined to change that. we can't wait any longer. we see it with our own eyes, we feel it, we know it in our bones. and it's time to act. so he is pushing for a lot more green energy and he is reversing the trump years by sending his envoy john kerry worldwide. secretary kerry, can we avert climate catastrophe? - including the uk last month and crucially china just now. we cannot solve the climate issue without china beginning to reduce their emissions. this is the key to the global puzzle. biden has to figure out a way to compel beijing to begin to cut their emissions or all the efforts we are making domestically are going to be ineffectual. one of the big arguments is over which of these two giant polluters should do more.
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the us points out that it produces about 14% of the global total of emissions while china releases about twice that. but for its part, china says look instead at the accumulation of greenhouse gases since 1750 — america has omitted about a quarter of those while china, which only industrialised relatively recently, has produced far fewer. another dispute is over coal. beijing is encouraging others to burn more of it. i filmed these chinese workers at a coal—fired power station in serbia, one of dozens of projects around the world. and this comes as pressure over human rights leads to worsening international relations, which may mean china sticks with coal. it's got big reserves which it can rely on. if you are looking to a greater tension across the world and particularly a greater confrontation with the united states, you probably want to hedge your bets and keep a hold of coal because there is so much uncertainty in the world.
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today, chinese television reported on president xi having virtual talks with the leaders of france and germany. climate change was the key topic, the pace of diplomacy on this is accelerating. david shukman, bbc news. stay with us on bbc world news, still to come: final preparations for the funeral of the duke of edinburgh — a low key ceremony but it will be watched around the world. pol pot, one of the century's greatest mass murderers, is reported to have died of natural causes. he and the khmer rouge movement he led were responsible for the deaths of an estimated 1.7 million cambodians. there have been violent protests in indonesia, where playboy has gone on sale for the first time. traditionalist muslim leaders have expressed disgust. the magazine's offices have been
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attacked, and its editorial staff have gone into hiding. it was clear that paula's only contest was with the clock. and as for a sporting legacy, paula radcliffe's competitors will be chasing her new world best time for years to come. quite quietly, but quicker and quicker, she seemedj to just slide away under i the surface and disappear. this is bbc news, the latest headlines. russia says it will ask ten us diplomats to leave moscow — and has advised the ambassador to return home for consultations. raul castro says he is resigning as the leader of the cuban communist party, ending his family's six decades in power.
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the mayor of chicago has appealed for calm after the release of footage showing a 13—year—old boy adam toledo being shot dead by a policeman last month. the teenager's death comes at a time of continuing high tension in the us about police killings. barbara plett usher has this update from chicago. adam was killed in the alleyway right behind me and he was one of the youngest people killed by police in recent years and so there is outrage and that is been amplified by the fact that there was this delay in releasing the footage, took more than two weeks and during that time, police talked about an armed confrontation. 0n time, police talked about an armed confrontation. on top of that, this is happening at the same time as the trialfor the killing of george floyd, which also resonates deeply here. i am nowjoined by lorenzo boyd, associate professor of criminaljustice at the university of new haven. he served as a deputy sheriff in boston he's a police consultant and trainer. there has been body can footage of
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the officer's action and that body can footage has been seen widely, what is your assessment of what use of the officers actions? i what is your assessment of what use of the officers actions?— of the officers actions? i think far too often police _ of the officers actions? i think far too often police officers - of the officers actions? i think far too often police officers default l of the officers actions? i think far| too often police officers default to deadly force when they are unsure or if they are afraid. i think we need to retrain police officers on how to engage with civilians, certainly with young people and if we can get them to be retrained and not so quickly go to deadly force, i think they'll be a game changer for everyone. they'll be a game changer for everyone-— they'll be a game changer for eve one. , , ., . everyone. defenders of the police officer said _ everyone. defenders of the police officer said he _ everyone. defenders of the police officer said he only _ everyone. defenders of the police officer said he only had _ everyone. defenders of the police officer said he only had a - everyone. defenders of the police officer said he only had a split - officer said he only had a split second to act, what do you think of that? ., , _, . ., ., that? that is correct, he had a slit that? that is correct, he had a split second — that? that is correct, he had a split second to _ that? that is correct, he had a split second to act _ that? that is correct, he had a split second to act in - that? that is correct, he had a split second to act in many - that? that is correct, he had a i split second to act in many would argue he made the wrong choice. he could have waited, he could've called for back—up or radio to end, there were a lot of things he could have done except for using deadly force. that should always be the last resort and you should only use deadly force when you are absolutely sure. ~ , ., deadly force when you are absolutely sure. . i” ., ., “ deadly force when you are absolutely sure. ~ ,, ., ., ~ ., ., ., .,
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sure. when you look at the footage, what lessons — sure. when you look at the footage, what lessons can _ sure. when you look at the footage, what lessons can you _ sure. when you look at the footage, what lessons can you learn? - sure. when you look at the footage, what lessons can you learn? we - sure. when you look at the footage, | what lessons can you learn? we need to look at things _ what lessons can you learn? we need to look at things before _ what lessons can you learn? we need to look at things before the _ what lessons can you learn? we need to look at things before the actual - to look at things before the actual engagement in the situation. we need to look much before that. how the police engage the community in general, particularly communities of colour, there is already a chasm of distrust. if we can get community members and police officers to sit at the table together to talk about things, if police officers could understand the lived experience of the people they are policing, there will be far fewer fatal shootings. we have seen body cams being deployed for offices across america in recent years we have seen an awful lot of footage. putting some of that footage together from all that you have seen, what if you learned about the way america's policing? learned about the way america's olicin: ? �* u, learned about the way america's olicinu? �* . , ., policing? america polices in a really aggressive _ policing? america polices in a really aggressive fashion. - policing? america polices in a really aggressive fashion. butj really aggressive fashion. but again, it is not the fault of individual officers because there is a lot of really good men and women who are really trying to make a difference in the community. the fatal flaw is the way policing is
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actually done. we have not changed policing in about 110 years. we could go back to community engagement and less of that us versus them scenario, then i think we have a chance.— we have a chance. what about the trainin: of we have a chance. what about the training of police _ we have a chance. what about the training of police officers - we have a chance. what about the training of police officers for- training of police officers for moments like that when they're in an alleyway, they ask someone to surrender, to work on the decisions that they need to make at that precise moment, how long would it take for some of the train to get to the moment where they feel they could take the correct decision? the thin is, i could take the correct decision? the: thing is, i don't could take the correct decision? "the: thing is, i don't know could take the correct decision? ii9 thing is, i don't know that chasing someone into a dark alley is necessarily your best course of action will i would've waited for back—up and i would've called and in and someone could've gotten the other part of the alleyway, it is not an instantaneous thing where you have to catch them immediately right now. you can't out run the radio. so after putting themselves in harms way and running into dark alleys chasing after people, they shouldn't do that, they need to look after themselves, but they also need to protect those around them.- themselves, but they also need to protect those around them. thank you
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so much for — protect those around them. thank you so much forjoining _ protect those around them. thank you so much forjoining us. _ president biden has condemned the latest us mass shooting in indiana, describing gun violence as a stain on the character of the nation. he again urged congress to take measures to prevent weapons falling into the wrong hands. police in indianapolis have confirmed that 8 people were killed in the shooting at a fedex facility. the gunman then took his own life, leaving local hospitals dealing with many more people with gunshot wounds. police are yet to determine the reason for this latest incident. this suspect came to the facility and when he came to the facility, he got out of his car and quickly started some random shooting outside of the facility. there was no confrontation with anyone that was there, there was no disturbance, no argument, hejust appear there, there was no disturbance, no argument, hejustappearto there, there was no disturbance, no argument, hejust appear to randomly start shooting and that began in the parking lot and he did go into the building, into the facility for a brief period of time before he took his own life.
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the royalfamily is preparing to say goodbye to prince philip. his funeral will take place tomorrow at windsor castle, with only thirty mourners inside st george's chapel, due to the pandemic. 0ur royal correspondent daniela relph has the details. we now have the details of the funeral service. a service that was planned by the duke of edinburgh himself and has many personal touches. it is a traditional service and buckingham palace is that it is in line with many royal funerals and there will not be a eulogy, nor will there will not be a eulogy, nor will there be in the readings delivered by members of the royal family and the dean of winchester will pay tribute to the duke of edinburgh's kindness, humourand he tribute to the duke of edinburgh's kindness, humour and he would describe his unwavering loyalty to the queen as inspirational. all of the queen as inspirational. all of the music in this service has been selected by the duke himself. it
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includes the hem, eternalfather strong to save. it has that mind and it for those in peril on the sea and thatis it for those in peril on the sea and that is clearly a nod to his own at naval career. the service will end with the national anthem sung by a choir ofjust four with the national anthem sung by a choir of just four people with the national anthem sung by a choir ofjust four people to abide by covid—19 regulations and it is a deeply religious solemn service as the queen says farewell to her husband of 73 years, which surely must be one of the saddest days of her long reign. the duke of edinburgh's funeral takes place at windsor on saturday. and we will have special coverage of the events, starting at 1130 gmt. do try to join us for that.
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hello there. friday was another fine spring day and we will continue with this dry theme throughout the weekend and perhaps into monday as well. some chilly mornings but it will not be quite as cold overnight nor during the day as it has been of late. we had some patchy cloud bubble up on friday but the thicker cloud was towards the northwest of the uk and that brought rain in the northwest of scotland. that is fading away. the next weather system will be hanging out in the atlantic and we will be dominated by high pressure that stretches down from scandinavia. another cold start of frost across parts of england and wales and eastern parts of scotland. a bit milder for northwest scotland and northern ireland where we have more of a breeze and sun—cloud for a while. sunny start for many, any mist and fog soon lifting, some patchy cloud will bubble up here and there but i think it
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will be a sunnier day on saturday through the midlands and eastern parts of england. for much of the country, temperatures will be a degree or two higher than they were doing yesterday, making 1a to 15 degrees a little bit more widely. into the evening and overnight, those temperatures will fall away quickly as the sky starts to clear, except in northern ireland and western scotland where the weather fronts in the atlantic are moving in here to bring patchy rain and they keep the temperature is up. 0therwise, patchy frost but not as cold as it has been during recent mornings. that weather front hanging around out in the northwest and bringing a bit of a change in the weather for some spots of scotland and northern ireland. for england and wales, it remains fine and dry. it looks like it'll be cloudy with patchy and light rain for northern ireland and now it is more likely to be damp across western scotland, further east it will be dry and bright with sunshine and some sometime for england and wales and patchy cloud for wales in the southwest and sunshine a bit hazy in eastern parts of england. through the midlands and eastern england, temperatures looking to reach 1a
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or 15 degrees. warming up for these areas in particular. into monday, this rainjust does not want to move in across the uk. it will be sitting away from scotland so it looks dry here on monday. more sunshine across england and wales as well and those temperatures continuing to rise around 16 or even 17 degrees. warming up at long last. however, while we might see a little bit of rain coming in on tuesday into early wednesday, the winds turn northerly by midweek and it gets colder again.
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this is bbc world news. the headlines. russia is expelling ten us diplomats and blacklisting eight top american officials, in response to sanctions imposed by washington on thursday. russia's foreign minister sergei lavrov said moscow was also tightening restrictions on us diplomats travelling within russia. raul castro has announced that he is standing down as the head of the cuban communist party at the party's congress in havana. the move ends his family's domination of the island's politics which began in 1959. china has said it is willing to co—operate more with some european countries over the challenges of climate change. president xijinping made the pledge during a video summit with the leaders of germany and france. final preparations are under way for the duke of edinburgh's funeral at windsor castle on saturday. the ceremony is reported to have been planned by the duke, and will reflect his life and interests.

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