Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 15, 2021 5:00pm-6:00pm BST

5:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines. as military rehearsals continue — more details are released on the duke of edinburgh's funeral. they include pictures of the land rover designed by the duke — to carry his coffin. and the guest list for saturday is announced with the duke's four children leading the funeral procession — his grandsons william and harry will not walk side by side. 4.7 million of you are waiting to start nhs hospital treatment in england — that's the highest level for m years. the nurses within the nhs are going to have to continue to work at levels beyond what you would normally expect, and that comes on top of the last
5:01 pm
year and a half where, because of covid, they have been working...going above and beyond. the conservative head of a watchdog looking at mps and civil servants working in the private sector lord pickles says the whole system needs urgent reform we need to understand completely what has gone on here. i agree thoroughly with lord pickles. and while the coronavirus pandemic has kept most of us down — it's given the animal world loads more freedom: we'll hear from david attenborough. good afternoon, and welcome to bbc news. the royalfamily have revealed more details about the funeral of the duke of edinburgh in windsor on saturday.
5:02 pm
no members of the royal family will wear military uniforms at the funeral, with all guests wearing masks throughout the service at st george's chapel. all of the music that will be played during the service was personally selected by the duke. earlier today, prince charles and the duchess of cornwall looked at some of the floral tributes that have been laid by the public for prince philip, who died on friday, aged 99. our royal correspondent daniela relph reports. buckingham palace has done its best to discourage people from leaving flowers, but hundreds of wanted to place their own tributes to the duke. the bouquets have been moved into the grounds of mull borough house, a short distance from the palace and headquarters of the commonwealth, where the prince of wales and the duchess of cornwall viewed them this morning. most are accompanied by messages paying tribute to the duke and thanking him for his years of service. there will
5:03 pm
be a strong military flavour to saturday's funeral. reflecting the duke's many military connections, with the army, navy and raf all represented. it will be what's known as a ceremonial royal funeral. represented. it will be what's known as a ceremonial royalfuneral. this one was staged for the queen mother in 2002. one significant difference on saturday, the queen has decided that the royal family will not wear military —— military uniform. the queen and the duke where on the mind of the prime minister today as he visited the naval college in dartmouth. here in this very garden, i think in 1939, the duke of edinburgh met the then princess elizabeth for the very first time. so, ourthoughts then princess elizabeth for the very first time. so, our thoughts are with her again today.—
5:04 pm
first time. so, our thoughts are with her again today. behind the walls of windsor _ with her again today. behind the walls of windsor castle, - with her again today. behind the walls of windsor castle, the - with her again today. behind the - walls of windsor castle, the grounds are being prepared for saturday's funeral. there will be no public access because of the covid restrictions. the town of windsor is quiet and police are hoping people will stay away on saturday because there will be nothing for spectators to view. this afternoon's rehearsals and windsor have focused on the ceremonial elements of the service. a gun fired by the king's troop of the royal horse artillery will signal the start and end of the minutes silence ahead of the funeral service. which is essentially a private family event because of the covid restrictions, albeit one shared with millions via television and radio, as the nation pays the duke of final farewell. daniela relph, bbc news, windsor. and, danielajoins us from windsor now. we've also seen the first pictures of the land rover that —— tell us more about the details the saturday star bill buckingham palace has released a considerable
5:05 pm
amount of information around some of the choreography of amount of information around some of the choreograph— the choreography of what the details will ha en the choreography of what the details will happen here _ the choreography of what the details will happen here in _ the choreography of what the details will happen here in windsor - the choreography of what the details will happen here in windsor in - will happen here in windsor in saturday afternoon. so it has been confirmed that nobody in the royal family will be wearing military uniform on saturday, despite this being a royal ceremonial interview. that has been decided, we are told, by the queen. and what that does is rather neatly get around both of prince harry and the prince andrew problem, both of them have stepped back from their military patronage is commander had been some discussion about what, if any, military uniform they should be allowed to wear. in deciding that there won't be any military uniform, it does get around that particular problem. again, following covid restrictions, we have been told that all of the royal family inside the chapel including the queen will be wearing masks. and we have been given more details of the line—up of the funeral procession that will
5:06 pm
walk through the castle precincts behind the duke of edinburgh's coffin. now, leaving that funeral procession will be the duke �*s eldest children, charles, prince of wales and the princess royal, princess anne. they will be at the front of that procession. behind them will be there two younger brothers, andrew the duke of york and edward the earl of wessex. they will be behind them. that is all four of the duke's children leading the funeral procession. behind them as a line—up of three grandsons. that is william, the duke of cambridge, peter phillips, the son of princess anne, and harry the duke of princess anne, and harry the duke of sussex. and i think the thing to note about that line—up is the fact that william and harry are not walking side by side. they have their cousin in between them. i think there will be a lot of discussion about that and why the two brothers are not walking alongside each other. buckingham palace quite simply would not be drawn on that. they say that these plans have been
5:07 pm
approved by the queen. they will not be drawn on what the perception is of this and what it looks like. that is how the queen wants it. {lila of this and what it looks like. that is how the queen wants it.- is how the queen wants it. ok, as ou sa , is how the queen wants it. ok, as you say. there _ is how the queen wants it. ok, as you say, there will _ is how the queen wants it. ok, as you say, there will be _ is how the queen wants it. ok, as you say, there will be so - is how the queen wants it. ok, as you say, there will be so much - you say, there will be so much conversation about that because it would've been simple for them to walk side by side. now, we have seen the first pictures of the land rover that will carry the duke's coffin. yes, that's right. we have been told of the weekend that this funeral was very much the funeral that the duke of edinburgh wanted, and that included this land rover that would carry his coffin. this land rover painted military green had been designed by the duke of edinburgh with the task of carrying his own coffin for his own funeral service. we are told it's a project that he had been working on for a number of years. and this is what he wanted. he didn't want to be carried on a gun carriage through the castle precincts to the chapel. he wanted this, land rover, and that is what will happen on saturday afternoon. it is just one of a number of personal touch as i think we're going to see on saturday. we already know that all the music will have been personally chosen by the duke of edinburgh. we have also been told that there will be a call of action station during the funeral which is a naval, and calling troops to battle on a naval worship. again, the duke of edinburgh had personally
5:08 pm
requested that that should be called at his own funeral, and also come in terms of the guest list, there are some interesting additions including three members of the duke's on family from germany. does my great nephews and a cousin. again, showing that we are told, from buckingham palace, that he wanted the widest possible family to be attending the funeral on saturday.— possible family to be attending the funeral on saturday. thank you very much, funeral on saturday. thank you very much. daniela _ funeral on saturday. thank you very much, daniela relph. _ funeral on saturday. thank you very much, daniela relph. thank- funeral on saturday. thank you very much, daniela relph. thank you. i the conservative chair of a watchdog looking at mps and civil servants working in the private sector, says the whole system needs urgent reform. lord pickles said there don't appear to be any boundaries between civil servants and the private sector. it comes as david cameron says he'll "respond positively" to any request for him to give evidence to an inquiry into the lobbying activies of the failed finance company greensill. our political correspondent greg dawson reports. what began as questions about the actions of a former prime minister advising a now collapsed finance firm has escalated into multiple investigations. lord pickles, once a government minister himself under david cameron, is now responsible for advising public servants over
5:09 pm
their work in the private sector. his assessment could hardly have been more blunt. contractors, consultants, people who arrive and offer assistance, maybe during the pandemic or maybe as mr greensill did, they are not covered at all, and i think that needs addressing. i think it needs addressing urgently. we now know three separate parliamentary committees will look into the issues surrounding greensill capital. david cameron has already insisted he didn't break any rules and says he will be happy to be questioned. there could be more revelations to come after it emerged bill crothers, who was responsible for overseeing government contracts, had been allowed to simultaneously work part—time for greensill in 2015. it has prompted the most senior civil servant in the country to order heads of all departments
5:10 pm
to declare by tomorrow if any of their officials have second jobs like this. it was david cameron himself who ordered stricter rules on lobbying when he was in downing street, but the head of one of the countries biggest lobbying companies says those reforms are part of the problem. the laws that the david cameron government rather ironically put in place in 2014 are a joke. they don't cover 80% of lobbying. it is a completely ridiculous state of affairs to see a former prime minister engaging in secret lobbying, and a former civil servant while he was a civil servant also acting for outside interests. yesterday, labour was defeated in its attempts to set up a separate parliamentary inquiry into lobbying. this morning, its leader repeated calls for tougher rules. what we are talking about here is lobbying of government for massive procurement contracts involving millions, sometimes billions of pounds. and increasingly we are seeing a murkier picture, whether it is the way contracts
5:11 pm
are handed out, the lack of due process or the lobbying, which is an open door now into government. borisjohnson insists his party have been consistently tough on lobbying. the prime minister has already ordered a lawyer—led inquiry into the links between greensill and government. the evidence will be heard privately and is expected to report back injune. greg dawson, bbc news. with me now is the mp for weston—super—mare and former conservative ministerjohn penrose — he has been personally appointed by the prime minister as his anti—corruption champion. i think that is the correct title, isn't it? good afternoon.- i think that is the correct title, isn't it? good afternoon. yes, it is. it's isn't it? good afternoon. yes, it is- it's not— isn't it? good afternoon. yes, it is- it's not a _ isn't it? good afternoon. yes, it is. it's not a watchdog, - isn't it? good afternoon. yes, it is. it's not a watchdog, but - isn't it? good afternoon. yes, it. is. it's not a watchdog, but trying to make sure that we are fixing some of the problems going forward. understood. why aren't the rules that are in place working now?
5:12 pm
you are absolutely right to say that the rules were a big step forward when they were first passed. so they are a major improvement from where we were before, but you know, that is seven years ago, the world has moved on. so there are a number of things which need to be improved upon, i would argue. in one of them, at least, is that we have all of these different registers of you know, we should designed to make it easier, transparency for people to be able to piece together the different bits of the jigsaw so you can work out whether or not this person is lobbying on behalf of that company and whether or not anybody has been involved with making donations to any political party in the past, etc. the trouble is you can't put the different bits altogether come you can't do a proper computer search on the different databases, and you need to be able to do that in order to be able to get to the truth, put every thing together and make sure the transparency, which was always envisaged them actually works in practice. envisaged them actually works in ractice. ~ , ., , .,
5:13 pm
practice. why do we need rules at all? why can't _ practice. why do we need rules at all? why can't people _ practice. why do we need rules at all? why can't people just - practice. why do we need rules at all? why can't people just behave j all? why can't people just behave appropriately? all? why can't people 'ust behave appropriatelyah all? why can't people 'ust behave appropriately? well, wouldn't it be ureat if appropriately? well, wouldn't it be . reat if we appropriately? well, wouldn't it be great if we lived _ appropriately? well, wouldn't it be great if we lived in _ appropriately? well, wouldn't it be great if we lived in that _ appropriately? well, wouldn't it be great if we lived in that kind - appropriately? well, wouldn't it be great if we lived in that kind of - great if we lived in that kind of world? sadly, while most of us are law—abiding and certainly i would argue, the vast majority of people who try to stand for election either to westminster parliament, but also to westminster parliament, but also to the devolved assemblies, to local councils as well, most people are in it for the right reasons out of a sense of public service, but you only need a few rotten apples to spoil the whole barrel. so you do need to have some rules commend the crucial thing is, as the old saying goes, it wasn't invented recently, sunlight is the best disinfectant. if you can get the transparency in place and make it work in practice, then you stand a much better chance of making this all work the way we all want it. is of making this all work the way we all want it. , ., ., ., all want it. is david cameron a rotten apple? _ all want it. is david cameron a rotten apple? no. _ all want it. is david cameron a rotten apple? no. i— all want it. is david cameron a rotten apple? no. i think- all want it. is david cameron a rotten apple? no. i think the i all want it. is david cameron a - rotten apple? no. i think the david cameron you _ rotten apple? no. i think the david cameron you know, _ rotten apple? no. i think the david cameron you know, he _ rotten apple? no. i think the david cameron you know, he is _ rotten apple? no. i think the david cameron you know, he is a - rotten apple? no. i think the david cameron you know, he is a man, i rotten apple? no. i think the david - cameron you know, he is a man, don't forget, who is responsible for not just introducing the original lobbying legislation where there was little in place at all before, he is also the person who set up the
5:14 pm
first—ever and so far i think, the only anti—corruption global conference which happened in london in 2016. so, no, idon't conference which happened in london in 2016. so, no, i don't think is a rotten apple at all, but it is important that all of us behave in the right way without getting drawn into individual cases and, you know, he will want to make sure that he is being seen to have done the right thing to. the being seen to have done the right thin to. , . , ., ., ., ., thing to. the perception from normal --eole, thing to. the perception from normal people. from — thing to. the perception from normal people, from voters, _ thing to. the perception from normal people, from voters, is _ thing to. the perception from normal people, from voters, is that - thing to. the perception from normal people, from voters, is that it - people, from voters, is that it looks like there are different rules for the political class. and looks like there are different rules for the political class.— for the political class. and facts clearly can't _ for the political class. and facts clearly can't be _ for the political class. and facts clearly can't be right, _ for the political class. and facts j clearly can't be right, kenneth? for the political class. and facts - clearly can't be right, kenneth? the appropriate thing is that you need to make sure people who are in a position to either use their position to either use their position for good or if they are wrongly motivated, using in the wrongly motivated, using in the wrong way, using it for bad, you have got to be able to see clearly that things are being done in the right way and that there is a level playing field for everybody. everybody should be equal before the law, that's the kind of fundamental piece of notjust our democracy, but most democracies across the globe. yes. but, i mean, david cameron
5:15 pm
didn't break any laws by texting his friends marie she soon, did he? it just looks bad. —— rishi sunak. if you have the right degrees of transparency, people can text their friends until the cows come home. what matters what was discussed and was anything untoward happening? of somebody texts and they are just inviting some of for supper, that's no big deal at all, but if there is something dodgy going on for me need a bit more detail behind itjust to say, hold on a second, what was discussed? what was the issue that was being discussed. who are you representing at the time? or was it just two friends meeting up? that's the crucial bit of missing information. we need to have this better information. and equally, incidentally, the disclosure rules about who ministers meet and where they meet them, that should probably be a bit broader than it is now so it isn'tjust ministers who matter, it's also the political advisers, it's also the political advisers, it's also the political advisers, it's also senior civil servants. they all have influence. they all
5:16 pm
have a voice. they are always people who are worthwhile lobbying. at the moment, some of them are caused by these rules, but not all. we probably need to rob them to include all the other players in the game as well. ., ., r' all the other players in the game as well. . . ," ., all the other players in the game as well. . ., ,~' ., _, all the other players in the game as well. . ., ., ., well. can i ask for your opinion on the fact that _ well. can i ask for your opinion on the fact that a _ well. can i ask for your opinion on the fact that a leading _ well. can i ask for your opinion on the fact that a leading civil - the fact that a leading civil servants, while still working for the government and being paid by the taxpayer was also being paid by green cell capital on a part—time basis? you raise your eyebrows to heaven then. yes, again, ishouldn't heaven then. yes, again, i shouldn't comment on individual cases. that's for the watchdogs to investigate, and i am not one of them. but what i would say is this. there are two principles at stake here. one is to make sure that there is no conflict of interest between, you know, the job they are supposed to be doing on behalf of the taxpayer and potential private gain. the second one is whether or not the taxpayer is getting good value for money, if someone is moonlighting and doing something else as well. you have to be able to answer both of those two principles income yes, the writing —— right thing has been done for the
5:17 pm
government, for the taxpayer, only if you can say yes to both of those two things, does a job become sensible and an arrangement to become sensible. i thought that eric, lord pickles, who runs the committee that is supposed to check in on these things was very strong earlier on today when he said, look, you have got to be able to have proper transparency and see what is going on. clearly that is to prevent, if this was ok or whether it wasn't to prevent those kinds of questions having to be asked at all in future. it should be clear that those two principles cannot be breached. ., those two principles cannot be breached-— those two principles cannot be breached. ., ., , breached. there are now seven different inquiries _ breached. there are now seven different inquiries into - breached. there are now seven different inquiries into this - different inquiries into this lobbying scandal. why? 50. different inquiries into this lobbying scandal. why? so, the difficulty with — lobbying scandal. why? so, the difficulty with lobbying - lobbying scandal. why? so, the difficulty with lobbying is - lobbying scandal. why? so, the difficulty with lobbying is it - lobbying scandal. why? so, the difficulty with lobbying is it isn't just about did someone move the minister? it's also about them as you havejust minister? it's also about them as you have just asked minister? it's also about them as you havejust asked me, are there any civil servants involved? have they got conflicts of interest? i mention special political advisers, and they matter as well. so there
5:18 pm
are lots of different facets to this. and so, each of those different facets may need to be looked at. so i think it's actually reassuringly healthy that there are so many different takes and different independent groups come across party groups in some cases looking at this. that means that we have got a democracy that doesn't accept that you know, questions shouldn't be asked and that answers need to be found. i think that's actually a sign of health. we need to find out what the answers are. it just shows how complicated these issues can be. just shows how complicated these issues can be— just shows how complicated these issues can be. ., i ., m ., , issues can be. how much do you worry as a conservative _ issues can be. how much do you worry as a conservative mp _ issues can be. how much do you worry as a conservative mp about _ issues can be. how much do you worry as a conservative mp about the - issues can be. how much do you worry as a conservative mp about the label. as a conservative mp about the label tory sleeves? tory sleeves ? well, tory sleeves? well, nobody wants a return to the 19905 well, nobody wants a return to the 1990s at all. and the crucial thing, and the reason why i was so reassured by the announcements in the last couple of days of independent inquiries, some of them originated by the government, some of them originated by the civil service, some of them originated by
5:19 pm
hard entry select committees. the reason why i was so reassured by those, led by the ones announced by the prime minister from the government is that everyone is really determined to make sure we don't go back to the bad old days and we make sure that people can see that they have got a government that they can trust. it's absolute essential, notjust for this government, it's essentialfor essential, notjust for this government, it's essential for any government, it's essential for any government that we have a system and democracy which, no system is every —— ever perfect, but it is at least as clean and practical as anyone can make it. ., ~ as clean and practical as anyone can make it. ., ,, , ., as clean and practical as anyone can make it. a, ~' , ., , as clean and practical as anyone can make it. ., ,, ,~/ , i as clean and practical as anyone can make it. a, ~ ,, , . ., make it. thank you very much for our make it. thank you very much for your time- _ make it. thank you very much for your time. thank _ make it. thank you very much for your time. thank you. _ the number of people waiting to start hospital treatment in england has reached a record high — of 4.7 million people. the figure, from the end of february, is the highest for 14 years — since records began in fact. there were also nearly 388 thousand patients waiting more than a year for non—urgent surgery — compared with 1,600 before the pandemic. here's our health correspondent anna collinson. zen has spent much of the pandemic
5:20 pm
in pain, waiting for an operation on his pancreas which was seen as vital but not time critical. the 23—year—old has severe learning difficulties and mental health issues, so his older brother is speaking on his behalf. zen's original surgery was planned for september 2020, that was cancelled and rescheduled for december, again it was cancelled. zen was admitted as an inpatient injanuary 2021 and he didn't have his surgery until the 26th of march. over the months his condition deteriorated. he lost weight and developed jaundice. this is him in hospital injanuary. he is shaking his head and he does that as a way to cope with things. he was in a lot of pain at that point, to the point where he was crying almost daily. treating hundreds of thousands of coronavirus patients has hit the nhs hard, with more people experiencing
5:21 pm
postponed care and prolonged pain. new figures show 4.7 million people in england were waiting for routine operations in february, the highest since records began in 2007. nearly 388,000 patients were waiting for more than a year for routine work, a striking increase to 12 months earlier when just 1600 people were on the list. nhs england says trusts have been given funds to help their recovery, but unions are still concerned about staff. the nurses within the nhs will have to continue to work at levels beyond what you would normally expect, and that comes on top of the last year—and—a—half where, because of covid, they have been going above and beyond. so it does look like a really tough picture. this hospital in croydon set up a dedicated centre for non—urgent treatment, including dental surgery and some orthopedic work. the aim is to make best
5:22 pm
use of resources to get through the backlog. by ensuring we have efficiently run lists maximising the estate we have, using our theatres six days a week, three session days, it means we will have a chance of reducing the backlog that is now building. these new figures were recorded in february when covid pressures were particularly acute. while coronavirus hospital admissions have fallen substantially since then, the virus is still a threat. surge testing for the south african variant is continuing in london to prevent its spread. on tuesday, zen finally returned home after months in hospital. his family say they are over the moon. hospitals have been under extreme pressure over the past year, is that any consolation for you and your family? i can understand that, but for someone like zen, it is not something he can understand at all.
5:23 pm
all he knows is that he's in pain. there are many indirect effects of the coronavirus which has affected people like my brother. anna collinson, bbc news. dr david wrigley is the deputy chair of the british medical association uk council. that is the main policy committee of the bma. that is the union for doctors, obviously. what do you think of this increase, the staggering increase, doctor? it is sta . . erin . staggering increase, doctor? it 3 staggering from isn't it? 4.7 million people waiting for an operation. and everyone of those 4.7 million people probably waiting in pain. they are waiting with anxiety, they hope for a phone call or a letter through the door. they are not working or supporting their family. and as a gp myself i see patients all the time who are waiting longer and longerfor their waiting longer and longer for their treatment, waiting longer and longerfor their treatment, and it really is quite staggering.
5:24 pm
treatment, and it really is quite staggering-— treatment, and it really is quite stanierin. ., ., ~ ., staggering. how do you think medics are iioin to staggering. how do you think medics are going to be _ staggering. how do you think medics are going to be able _ staggering. how do you think medics are going to be able to _ staggering. how do you think medics are going to be able to catch - staggering. how do you think medics are going to be able to catch up, - are going to be able to catch up, then? what will it take?- are going to be able to catch up, then? what will it take? that's a really good _ then? what will it take? that's a really good question. _ then? what will it take? that's a really good question. we - then? what will it take? that's a really good question. we have i then? what will it take? that's a l really good question. we have just really good question. we havejust been through such a dreadful year where all nhs staff have not really stop. they've had no time off. hopefully, we are moving to better places, but you have to wonder how we are going to make this about —— backlog any better. we've got nearly 400,000 patients who have waited more than a year for treatment. so we have got to move quickly on this. i think it's important to look at the context here. we have had ten years of salami sized cuts to the nhs. we are short 10,000 doctors, 40,000 nurses. we have vacancies in the nhs. so we started this pandemic in a difficult place. we've got one third of the number of beds as germany has per head of population for example. so we are in a tricky spot already with getting out of this. everyone has to work with all nhs staff to try
5:25 pm
to help the patients. they so desperately need that care stop with the government has given an extra billion to the nhs which is a one off because of the pandemic. so you are saying actually funding year on year has to go up, is that what you are saying? i think to get this backlog is sorted, the £1 million one really touch it. it needs much more than that. i want to make the viewer is clear that this is not the fault of nhs staff. it's not the fault of hospital colleagues who are working their socks off to get patients dealt with. you know, this is due to the lack of capacity within the nhs and we have to try to get that sorted quickly.— and we have to try to get that sorted quickly. and we have to try to get that sorted iuickl . a, ~ , l, , l sorted quickly. thank you very much. thanks for talking _ sorted quickly. thank you very much. thanks for talking to _ sorted quickly. thank you very much. thanks for talking to us, _ sorted quickly. thank you very much. thanks for talking to us, doctor - thanks for talking to us, doctor david wrigley, deputy chair of the reddish medical association uk counsel. the former police officer, derek chauvin, who is charged with murder and manslaughter — after the death of george floyd in may 2020 — has said he will not take the stand to give evidence. he said he would assert his rights under the 5th amendment to the us constitution — to refuse to answer any questions
5:26 pm
which could incriminate him. here's how he made his position clear during an exchange with the judge and his own lawyer. i have repeatedly advised you that this is your decision and your decision alone, right? correct. i- correct. i have advised you correct. — i have advised you and we have gone back and forth on the matter —— the neck i have advised you, and we have gone back and forth on the matter would be kind of an understatement, right? yes, it is. but after a lengthy meeting last night, we had some further discussion, right? correct. and have you made a decision today as to whether you intend to testify, or whether you intend to invoke your fifth amendment privilege? i will invoke my fifth amendment privilege today. mr chauvin, i'm going to address you directly because the decision on whether or not to testify is entirely yours. _ in other words, it's a personal right. i mr nelson makes a lot. of the decisions in trial — but one he cannot make for you is whether- or not you testify.
5:27 pm
and he can give you advice and you can take advice, . or reject that advice. but the decision ultimately has to be yours, and not his. - is this your decision, not to testify? - it is, your honour. all right. do you have any questions - about your right to remain silent or to testify on your own behalf? not at this time, i don't. all right, has anyone promised i anything or threatened you in any way to keep you from testifying? no promises or threats, your honour. do you feel that your decision not to testify is a voluntary one - on your behalf? it is. former police officer, derek chauvin, who is charged with murder and manslaughter — after the death of george floyd in may 2020 — there confirming he will not take the stand to give evidence in his trial. e. e, by the way, denies the charges. the inquest into the fatal stabbing of jack merritt and saskia jones at the fishmongers hall attack in 2019 has been hearing from members of the emergency medical teams who responded.
5:28 pm
our home affairs correspondent tom symonds has been following the inquest. these were the first medical teams at the scene of the fishmongers hall attack in 2019, a scene that was described by one of them as "generally messy and chaotic". one of those who had been injured was jack merritt — he had been stabbed repeatedly. but the problem was, for the teams there, that outside on the bridge was his attacker, usman khan, who had been shot by police, but police couldn't be sure if he had a real or a fake bomb vest or bomb belt. now, that made the area what is called a warm zone, designated by police when there is a risk of an ongoing terrorist attack. and so jack had to be moved by the medical teams to a place of safety, up the road, near a tube station. they did that, they attempted to treat him, he received open chest surgery in an attempt to save him. but, sadly, he had bled to death. the inquest is considering all of this because the helicopter emergency medical service, or hems, a team which also operates from cars, we were told
5:29 pm
that the enquiry this morning had never entered a warm zone — that usually is only somewhere where medical teams can go when they have the correct equipment and training, including ballistic helmets and vests. so the inquest looked very closely at this, and also will look very closely, i think, at what one of the doctors said, which was that there were no hard or fast rules for operating in that sort of zone. it is something other inquests have also looked at very closely. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren. hello there. for many parts of the country it's just some patchy, fairweather cloud today and some decent spells of sunshine, and temperatures probably peaking at 15 celsius across western parts of scotland. cooler around north sea coasts and across east anglia and the south—east, where we're seeing a few showers here. the odd sharp one is possible — could extend down towards hampshire this evening before fading away as the sun goes down. and the skies will clear
5:30 pm
for many overnight. later in the night we are going to find some patchy fog in the home counties. but with clear skies and light winds, temperatures are going to fall away very quickly this evening. it will be frosty again by friday morning — similar sort of temperatures to what we had this morning. sun out, though, early on. the fog soon clearing away from parts of south—east england, and for most it will be a dry day. a bit more patchy cloud babbling up inland across england and wales. sunshine for scotland and northern ireland, away from the north—west where we will see some rain arriving in the western isles. otherwise, it will be dry, and temperatures again generally around 11—13 celsius. goodbye. hello, this is bbc news. i'm victoria derbyshire. the headlines... as military rehearsals continue, more details are released on the duke of edinburgh's funeral. they include pictures of the land rover designed by the duke to carry his coffin.
5:31 pm
4.7 million of you are waiting to start nhs hospital treatment in england — that's the highest level for 14 years. the conservative head of a watchdog looking at mps and civil servants working in the private sector says the whole system needs urgent reform. is this your decision not to testify? it is this your decision not to testi ? , , ., is this your decision not to testi ? , ., ., the former police officer, derek chauvin, charged with murder and manslaughter after the death of george floyd will not take the stand to give evidence. and instagram says sorry after a mistake with this algorithm promoted diet content to users with eating disorders. sport now, and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here'sjohn. good evening. dan evans produced the biggest wins of his career, knocking novak djocovic out of the monte carlo masters. the british number one had never met the world number one before, and on his least favourite surface, didn't expect to cause the biggest
5:32 pm
upset of the tournament so far — asjim lumsden reports. not many gave him a chance, but evans had never played a djokovic, so anything was possible. the perfect start for the british number one, an immediate break of serve. djokovic had a lavish praise on evans this week, calling him smart, explosive, and possessing a great variety in his game. the momentum had been building for evans, a first atp title injanuary, two victories on clay this week, his first and almost four years on the red stuff. and soon, the first that was his 6-4. ., , , , ., and soon, the first that was his 6-4. ., ,, , ., 6-4. evans burns him with a past. document — 6-4. evans burns him with a past. document attempted _ 6-4. evans burns him with a past. document attempted to _ 6-4. evans burns him with a past. document attempted to regain - document attempted to regain control, sending evans around the court, but the briton looked drained but dove deep. he served for the match. evans held his nerve for the biggest win of his career, a straight sets victory over the world number two who hadn't played badly —
5:33 pm
his opponent had just been superb. jim lunsden, bbc news. 0f of course i doubted myself in those matches, in the match, you know, serving it out is not easy, you know? you've got all sorts running through your head. so i'm just happy with how it went. you know, it'll be one to savour for maybe after the tournament, to tell the kids and grandkids you beat the world number one. it's nice. great britain have named their team for friday's billiejean king cup play off tie with mexico — what is the revamped fed cup. there's a return for katie boulter in the first match. she suffered a stress fracture in her back the last time she played for britain two years ago — she's been picked ahead of the higher ranked harriet dart. there's nojohanna konta so heather watson leads the team. victory would put them through to a one—off qualifier, the winner of which competes in a new look 12—team final in april next year. manchester united hold a 2—0 advantage heading into the second
5:34 pm
leg of the europa league quarter final with grenada, with either ajax or roma waiting in the semi finals. arsenal have work to do if they're to reach the last four. they're in the czech republic for their second leg against slavia prague, which is delicately poised at 1—1. defeat for arsenal — and their inconsistency in the premier league — could mean no european football next season for the first time in 25 years. arsenal keeper bernd leno says that's unthinkable. when you think about the future without arsenal in the european competition, it doesn't feel right, and ourjob is to... don't come true. because arsenal belongs in europe, and that is our target, that is ourjob. —— belongs to europe. the draw for the first round of this year's world snooker championship, as ronnie o'sullivan begins his
5:35 pm
quest to win a record—equalling seventh world title. he'll begin the defence of the trophy against debutant markjoyce, who's ranked 46th in the world. elsewhere, uk championship winner neil robertson starts against liang wenbo, while the world number one judd trump will face liam highfield. mark cavendish's run of three consecutive stage wins at the tour for their six nations match against italy this weekend. edie for their six nations match against italy this weekend.— italy this weekend. edie gallagher comes in to _ italy this weekend. edie gallagher comes in to make _ italy this weekend. edie gallagher comes in to make her— italy this weekend. edie gallagher comes in to make her first - italy this weekend. edie gallagher comes in to make her first start i italy this weekend. edie gallagher comes in to make her first start in comes in to make herfirst start in place of malcolm. the winners on sunday will go on to meet either france or ireland in a third—fourth place play—off. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. we'll have more for you in sportsday at 6.30pm. the northern ireland protocol was designed to help the country's smooth post—break that translation. instead there is a disorder not seen since signing the good friday agreement which brought the troubles
5:36 pm
to an end more than 20 years ago. both the northern ireland secretary and the foreign secretary have been meeting with the irish foreign minister this afternoon. virgo keane has been looking at the reasons behind the recent unrest. over 20 miles of walls in northern ireland. nearly 70% of troubles killings took place within 500 yards of them. and in the two decades since the peace deal, they've been growing, not shrinking. its since the peace deal, they've been growing, not shrinking.— growing, not shrinking. its home. i've had growing, not shrinking. its home. we had four _ growing, not shrinking. its home. i've had four children _ growing, not shrinking. its home. i've had four children here - growing, not shrinking. its home. i've had four children here as - growing, not shrinking. its home. | i've had four children here as well. jean has lived on nationalist bombay street all her life. even after her family was burned out of their original spot in 1969. this is the view from the garden. i
5:37 pm
original spot in 1969. this is the view from the garden.— original spot in 1969. this is the view from the garden. i know it's terrible, view from the garden. i know it's terrible. but _ view from the garden. i know it's terrible, but it's _ view from the garden. i know it's terrible, but it's necessary. - view from the garden. i know it's terrible, but it's necessary. i- terrible, but it's necessary. i couldn't live here if that wasn't there. ~ ., ., couldn't live here if that wasn't there. . ., ., ., , , couldn't live here if that wasn't there. ~ ., ., ., ,, there there. what would happen? there would be murder. _ there. what would happen? there would be murder. the _ there. what would happen? there would be murder. the barriers - there. what would happen? therej would be murder. the barriers run throu:h would be murder. the barriers run through some _ would be murder. the barriers run through some of _ would be murder. the barriers run through some of the _ would be murder. the barriers run through some of the city's - would be murder. the barriers run through some of the city's most i through some of the city's most deprived areas. the sectarian interfaces, so volatile in times of tension. here, young protestants are writing. they think nationalist youths like these belong to a community that now has the upper hand. unionism finds itself reacting, not leading. westland estate, a protestant enclave in north belfast, is a microcosm of loyalist anxiety. over calls for a border pole, policing issues, and they say intimidation by local nationalist youth. trite they say intimidation by local nationalist youth.— they say intimidation by local nationalist youth. we don't want that trouble, _ nationalist youth. we don't want that trouble, we _ nationalist youth. we don't want that trouble, we don't _ nationalist youth. we don't want that trouble, we don't want - nationalist youth. we don't want that trouble, we don't want that | that trouble, we don't want that tension. we weren't doing anything
5:38 pm
to deserve that. if this is how we are living now, how would we be a united ireland?— are living now, how would we be a united ireland? with our identity be acce ted, united ireland? with our identity be accepted, would _ united ireland? with our identity be accepted, would we _ united ireland? with our identity be accepted, would we be _ united ireland? with our identity be accepted, would we be accepted - united ireland? with our identity be accepted, would we be accepted as| accepted, would we be accepted as british_ accepted, would we be accepted as british unionists? you're going to take what— british unionists? you're going to take what we know a way? we are only getting _ take what we know a way? we are only getting the _ take what we know a way? we are only getting the sense that liberalism... enough _ getting the sense that liberalism... enough is _ getting the sense that liberalism... enough is enough. it is getting the sense that liberalism... enough is enough.— getting the sense that liberalism... enough is enough. it is important to remember that _ enough is enough. it is important to remember that the _ enough is enough. it is important to remember that the violence - enough is enough. it is important to remember that the violence is - remember that the violence is localised. this is in a return to the troubles, certainly not to anyone with memories of gunmen crossing the city to kill. but these enduring barriers remind us that after 23 years of a peace agreement, sectarianism hasn't been eroded. these aren't just symbols sectarianism hasn't been eroded. these aren'tjust symbols of intolerance, but of political failure. loyalists feel irish nationalism once outright victory. nationalists argue they are just asserting their rights. there is little trust. i spoke with two
5:39 pm
politicians, both former paramilitary prisoners, who started out as teenagers on opposing sides here —— sides here. if you put yourselves in their shoes, loyalists see you as getting away with everything. i see you as getting away with everything-— see you as getting away with eve hini. .. , ., ., everything. i can understand that --ercetion everything. i can understand that perception because _ everything. i can understand that perception because there - everything. i can understand that perception because there is - everything. i can understand that perception because there is a - everything. i can understand that| perception because there is a shift in power relationships. but here's the key to this, they need to come to terms. that requires leadership, and they are losing their only attempt. they need to sit down and engage. attempt. they need to sit down and eniiae. . , attempt. they need to sit down and eniiae_ ., , , attempt. they need to sit down and eniiae. . , , , ., engage. that they signed up for the good friday agreement, _ engage. that they signed up for the good friday agreement, and - engage. that they signed up for the good friday agreement, and they i engage. that they signed up for the i good friday agreement, and they say it isn't— good friday agreement, and they say it isn't an _ good friday agreement, and they say it isn't an agreement, it's a step needed — it isn't an agreement, it's a step needed for— it isn't an agreement, it's a step needed for ireland. that's not all politics— needed for ireland. that's not all politics is— needed for ireland. that's not all politics is about, the politics was about _ politics is about, the politics was about stopping that division. the writin: about stopping that division. iie: writing across about stopping that division. tie: writing across these about stopping that division. ti2 writing across these peace lenses saw momentum swing to the streets —— rioting, creating an unprintable dynamic. dangerous for governments, political parties, and the people. virgo keene, bbc news, belfast.
5:40 pm
instagram has apologised, after a mistake with its algorithm promoted diet content to users with eating disorders. the search function in the app automatically recommended terms including "appetite suppressants" and "fasting" to some people. i'm joined by hope virgo, an eating disorder campaigner who is in ongoing recovery herself. how are you? good, thank you, how are ou? how are you? good, thank you, how are you? very _ how are you? good, thank you, how are you? very well, _ how are you? good, thank you, how are you? very well, thank— how are you? good, thank you, how are you? very well, thank you. - how are you? good, thank you, howj are you? very well, thank you. what do ou are you? very well, thank you. what do you think — are you? very well, thank you. what do you think about _ are you? very well, thank you. what do you think about this _ are you? very well, thank you. what do you think about this error? - are you? very well, thank you. what do you think about this error? i - do you think about this error? i think it is an appalling error that has been made. social media has so much power behind it, it has the power to influence people, to destroy lives in effect, and i think it is these types of mistakes that they cannot afford to be making. what effect might it have on those with eating disorders if instagram is automatically throwing up to them, you know, information about diets or food suppressants? it’s diets or food suppressants? it's extremely _ diets or food suppressants? it�*s extremely triggering. the brute ——
5:41 pm
people with. .. extremely triggering. the brute —— people with... failed fuel there thinking, think about what instagram is telling them to do, and they'll get into a competitive mindset. eating disorders are extremely competitive illnesses already, and when you're being thrust into that mindset with a lot of that diet culture filtering through on a day—to—day basis, it will cause you to actually want to develop more and more internet relationship in your head. , . . more internet relationship in your head. , ., ., ., more internet relationship in your head. ., ., ., , , head. instagram have apologised, is there anything _ head. instagram have apologised, is there anything else _ head. instagram have apologised, is there anything else they _ head. instagram have apologised, is there anything else they should - head. instagram have apologised, is there anything else they should be l there anything else they should be doing, in your opinion? i ieei there anything else they should be doing, in your opinion?— doing, in your opinion? i feel like there's loads _ doing, in your opinion? i feel like there's loads instagram - doing, in your opinion? i feel like there's loads instagram can - doing, in your opinion? i feel like there's loads instagram can be i there's loads instagram can be doing, if i'm honest, but the main thing for me is realising that if they have the skills and expertise to actually push out those algorithms and push that weight loss messaging, they should be pushing out much more positive information instead of having a weight loss suggestion when you click on the search bar — surely they should be
5:42 pm
having pro recovery accounts, body positivity stuff. on top of that, they need to be educating themselves on what is actually out there and where that information is coming from. over the last year, we've seen a huge number of wellness influencers popping up all over the place on instagram, and they're kind of offering their so—called expert around dieting and fitness, and i've seen this a lot in the school that i'm working in, but also with adults as well, i'm finding they get all their information on their own healthy lifestyles from these influencers online. but a lot of the information is not scientifically accurate, and again, it is extremely triggering. a lot of the time, i do believe it is this undercover content, as well, so we need to be holding these influencers to account. �* , ., , ., . account. but in terms of searching on instagram. _ account. but in terms of searching on instagram, are _ account. but in terms of searching on instagram, are you _ account. but in terms of searching on instagram, are you saying - account. but in terms of searching on instagram, are you saying if. account. but in terms of searching | on instagram, are you saying if you type in pro anna or anorexia, what
5:43 pm
should be brought up to you is body positive accounts? is that what you're saying? i positive accounts? is that what you're saying?— positive accounts? is that what you're saying? i do, even 'ust the ositive you're saying? i do, even 'ust the positive recovery * you're saying? i do, evenjust the positive recovery messaging, - you're saying? i do, even just the i positive recovery messaging, people are using instagram in a positive way and we should be shining a spotlight on those accounts instead of letting people be drawn into the negative triggering and dangerous accounts. bud negative triggering and dangerous accounts. �* .., negative triggering and dangerous accounts. �* ., negative triggering and dangerous accounts. ., accounts. and can i ask how your recovery is _ accounts. and can i ask how your recovery is going? _ accounts. and can i ask how your recovery is going? i _ accounts. and can i ask how your recovery is going? i follow - accounts. and can i ask how your recovery is going? i follow you i accounts. and can i ask how your| recovery is going? i follow you on social media so i can see that some things are good on your life.- things are good on your life. some thins are things are good on your life. some things are good. _ things are good on your life. some things are good. yeah, _ things are good on your life. some things are good. yeah, i _ things are good on your life. some things are good. yeah, i think - things are good on your life. ”he things are good. yeah, i think this year i've found quite challenging, if i'm honest. i got to a space where i had settled quite a bit in my recovery and was just coasting along, going back to a couple of odd behaviours, letting the uncertainty of covid kick in. over the last 5—6 weeks or months, i've really made a massive effort to be challenging my recovery on a day—to—day basis,
5:44 pm
trying to talk about things much more, and i believe you can make that full recovery. so i'm definitely in that final phase of my recovery at the moment, which feels terrifying but also really exciting, as well. . ~ terrifying but also really exciting, as well. ., ,, , ., terrifying but also really exciting, as well. . ~' , ., , terrifying but also really exciting, as well. ., ,, y., , . terrifying but also really exciting, as well. . ~' ,. , . . as well. thank you very much, and continue to — as well. thank you very much, and continue to make _ as well. thank you very much, and continue to make her _ as well. thank you very much, and continue to make her continued i continue to make her continued success with your recovery. the first minister is outlining the government's first road map out of... , , , , of... the virus is still with us, it is still dangerous _ of... the virus is still with us, it is still dangerous and _ of... the virus is still with us, it is still dangerous and we - of... the virus is still with us, it| is still dangerous and we cannot drop our guard. people are still infected, hospitals are still receiving patients, and unfortunately people are still at risk of serious illness and death. so we ask everyone to be mindful, to step out but stepped carefully. please continue with the public health basics, wash your hands, where your face covering, maintain distance and get fresh air around you. the executives discussed the
5:45 pm
need of strategic context of our decisions. we are incredibly proud of our vaccines programme, where they felt everyone who has responded to the invitations to take the vaccine, . .. to the invitations to take the vaccine,... please member that the vaccine,... please member that the vaccine does not give you superpowers, but it is a vital weapon in ourfight against superpowers, but it is a vital weapon in our fight against the virus. we continue to ask everyone to take up the jab when your turn comes. the logistical operations for the delivery of the vaccines are humbling and we want to thank everyone involved, from planning through to delivery. it is a truly impressive operation to which we owe a great deal. we are also mindful that schools have returned to philly this week, we recognise the efforts of everyone in the education sector, parents and our young people. this is where we need to be, children and young people engaged in their education. socialising and positive, in constructive ways, seeing their friends in safe environments, investing in their futures,
5:46 pm
friends in safe environments, investing in theirfutures, working towards their life aspirations — that's the future we all want for our young people. we've looked at the different risks and different settings, whether that be inside or outdoors. we've agreed some next steps which we trust will take us forward in a hopeful and positive direction. we have received advice from our chief medical officer and chief scientific officer, we remain grateful to them as ever for professional advice. grateful to them as ever for professionaladvice. our grateful to them as ever for professional advice. our decisions today are aimed at lifting restrictions where we can, but we cannot do everything people would want and we are sorry about that, we know it will be disappointing for some. we will pay constant attention to the steps needed to take forward, and that is an absolute commitment across the parties and the executive. the executive has agreed that alongside these decisions made today, we will also set up a series of steps which we will wish to take next if the conditions permit. we do so in the understanding that we will remain driven by dates in the
5:47 pm
knowledge that we have a commitment to this place and our citizens that we will keep these steps under review. and the knowledge that we will ratify these indicative dates only if the prevailing circumstances permit. mrspeaker, only if the prevailing circumstances permit. mr speaker, we've decided the following can resume from 23 april — driving instruction and theory tests, driving tests, close contact services including training, outdoor visitor attractions including outdoor activity centres, equine assisted therapy and learning on an indoorand equine assisted therapy and learning on an indoor and outdoor basis and gatherings of up to 30 people, outdoor sport organised by a club, individual or individuals affiliated will be extended to the squad training, and competitive outdoor sport organised by club or individual, or individuals affiliated with participation numbers not exceeding 100 and no spectators permitted. we have also agreed that static band practice or rehearsal will be permitted in
5:48 pm
outdoor locations from 23 april. from 30 april, we have agreed to increase the numbers permitted together into besic settings outdoors to 15 people from no more than three households. we open all of retail, reopen and permit overnight stays in self—contained tourist accommodation for one household only, reopen on licensed premises outdoors only with a maximum of six people from two households per table and contact details recorded, reopen licensed premises including social clubs, outdoors only, limited to six people from no more than two households and contact details recorded, remove the curfew on takeaways and off licenses, and permit individual activities in gyms, swimming pools
5:49 pm
and other large venues, including with a carer and to allow 1—1 training, coaching with social distancing. mrspeaker, training, coaching with social distancing. mr speaker, thank you forfacilitating distancing. mr speaker, thank you for facilitating the statement today. for facilitating the statement toda . . ~ for facilitating the statement toda . ., ,, ., for facilitating the statement toda. ., ,, ., , today. thank you for the opportunity today. thank you for the opportunity to u date today. thank you for the opportunity to update members— today. thank you for the opportunity to update members as _ today. thank you for the opportunity to update members as we _ today. thank you for the opportunity to update members as we take - today. thank you for the opportunity to update members as we take our. to update members as we take our next steps — to update members as we take our next steps on the journey towards recovery — next steps on the journey towards recovery. this is a good day, it if optimism — recovery. this is a good day, it if optimism where we can all look forward — optimism where we can all look forward in — optimism where we can all look forward in the hope of a brighter future _ forward in the hope of a brighter future for— forward in the hope of a brighter future for all. there is no doubt in any of— future for all. there is no doubt in any of our— future for all. there is no doubt in any of our minds that these have been _ any of our minds that these have been the — any of our minds that these have been the toughest of times for people — been the toughest of times for people and for families, for businesses, workers and communities. the restrictions have been a necessary way to suppress the virus to see _ necessary way to suppress the virus to see if— necessary way to suppress the virus to see if lives and protect your health — to see if lives and protect your health service. but they have taken their toll, _ health service. but they have taken their toll, and it is incumbent upon us all— their toll, and it is incumbent upon us all to— their toll, and it is incumbent upon us all to move forward as soon as circumstances allow. we must do so with caution — circumstances allow. we must do so with caution and have maximum medications in place to avoid the virus _ medications in place to avoid the virus. today is an important milestone _ virus. today is an important milestone that we are moving in the film milestone that we are moving in the right direction. as a package of messieurs, we believe the easements we have _ messieurs, we believe the easements we have agreed today will make a
5:50 pm
fundamental difference to people's lives in _ fundamental difference to people's lives in their well—being. we have been _ lives in their well—being. we have been under— lives in their well—being. we have been under the latest form of lockdown for 110 days. we know our people _ lockdown for 110 days. we know our people need hope and they need us to take some _ people need hope and they need us to take some steps out of her restrictions. we recognise what it has done — restrictions. we recognise what it has done to our people, not being able to— has done to our people, not being able to see — has done to our people, not being able to see their family and friends, _ able to see their family and friends, and do things that matter to us _ friends, and do things that matter to us so — friends, and do things that matter to us so it— friends, and do things that matter to us. so it is important to note the cautious first steps we've already— the cautious first steps we've already taken as an executive. colleagues know we've reopened primary— colleagues know we've reopened primary and post primary schools, increased — primary and post primary schools, increased the number who can go out from 6-10. _ increased the number who can go out from 6—10, remove the stay—at—home provision _ from 6—10, remove the stay—at—home provision in _ from 6—10, remove the stay—at—home provision in legislation, moving to a state _ provision in legislation, moving to a state local and work from home message, — a state local and work from home message, allowed contactless can resume _ message, allowed contactless can resume for nonessential retail, resume — resume for nonessential retail, resume outdoor sport for 15 people, reopened _ resume outdoor sport for 15 people, reopened outdoor retail including garden _ reopened outdoor retail including garden centres and carwashes, and
5:51 pm
we've _ garden centres and carwashes, and we've increased the numbers of people — we've increased the numbers of people permitted to attend a civil partnerships and funerals. we cannot build on _ partnerships and funerals. we cannot build on all— partnerships and funerals. we cannot build on all that and walk us into further— build on all that and walk us into further lifting of restrictions for the benefit of all in a safe and sustainable way. we need to remain mindful— sustainable way. we need to remain mindful of— sustainable way. we need to remain mindful of the covid situation and we continue to be advised on all the relevant factors. we aren't out of— all the relevant factors. we aren't out of the — all the relevant factors. we aren't out of the woods, we do face risks from _ out of the woods, we do face risks from variants of concern, we face risks _ from variants of concern, we face risks from — from variants of concern, we face risks from social gatherings, we need _ risks from social gatherings, we need to— risks from social gatherings, we need to always remain mindful of the public— need to always remain mindful of the public health guidance. wash your hands, _ public health guidance. wash your hands, fresh ventilation is part of our protection and we understand the desire _ our protection and we understand the desire to _ our protection and we understand the desire to get out and about, and we ask everyone to consider how they will make — ask everyone to consider how they will make use of the decisions that we have _ will make use of the decisions that we have taken today as an executive. take care _ we have taken today as an executive. take care of — we have taken today as an executive. take care of yourselves and each other~ _ take care of yourselves and each other~ we — take care of yourselves and each other. we have reached our decisions today— other. we have reached our decisions today very— other. we have reached our decisions today very carefully and we know that everyone out there is looking for certainty on those next steps. we cannot —
5:52 pm
for certainty on those next steps. we cannot guarantee every step towards _ we cannot guarantee every step towards the end of this, but we want towards the end of this, but we want to give _ towards the end of this, but we want to give that — towards the end of this, but we want to give that hope. we want to set out where — to give that hope. we want to set out where we wish to go next, and on that basis, _ out where we wish to go next, and on that basis, this must be kept under review— that basis, this must be kept under review and — that basis, this must be kept under review and we know people will understand that. covid unfortunately has no _ understand that. covid unfortunately has no respect for timetables or dates. _ has no respect for timetables or dates, there's no respect for plans or undertakings, so i will set out our aspirations for lifting restrictions in the coming weeks and months _ restrictions in the coming weeks and months on _ restrictions in the coming weeks and months on a — restrictions in the coming weeks and months on a basis that i know will be understood. the following is an indicative — be understood. the following is an indicative date, but a date by which we hope _ indicative date, but a date by which we hope to— indicative date, but a date by which we hope to be able to make moves, but a _ we hope to be able to make moves, but a date _ we hope to be able to make moves, but a date which will kept under review — but a date which will kept under review. from 24 may, we hope to reopen— review. from 24 may, we hope to reopen on— review. from 24 may, we hope to reopen on licensed and licensed premises — reopen on licensed and licensed premises indoor with mitigation. reopen — premises indoor with mitigation. reopen the remainder of tourist accommodation, allow visits and endured — accommodation, allow visits and endured domestic settings, reopen indoor— endured domestic settings, reopen indoor visitor attractions and resume _ indoor visitor attractions and resume indoor group exercise and training _ resume indoor group exercise and training in— resume indoor group exercise and training in numbers limited to suit the venue — training in numbers limited to suit the venue. mr speaker, we remain committed — the venue. mr speaker, we remain committed to the undertaken suite
5:53 pm
made _ committed to the undertaken suite made last— committed to the undertaken suite made last year, we will continue to act so _ made last year, we will continue to act so thank— made last year, we will continue to act so thank you for facilitating us this evening after the executive meeting — this evening after the executive meeting. i this evening after the executive meetini. ~' , , ., meeting. i think the ministers for makini meeting. i think the ministers for making their _ meeting. i think the ministers for making their statement, - meeting. i think the ministers for making their statement, and - meeting. i think the ministers for making their statement, and i i meeting. i think the ministers for| making their statement, and i will invite _ making their statement, and i will invite ministers— making their statement, and i will invite ministers one _ making their statement, and i will invite ministers one hour- making their statement, and i will invite ministers one hour for- making their statement, and i will invite ministers one hour for this i invite ministers one hour for this session. — invite ministers one hour for this session. it — invite ministers one hour for this session. it is— invite ministers one hour for this session. it is my— invite ministers one hour for this session, it is my intention - invite ministers one hour for this session, it is my intention to- invite ministers one hour for this i session, it is my intention to allow all members — session, it is my intention to allow all members who _ session, it is my intention to allow all members who wish _ session, it is my intention to allow all members who wish to - session, it is my intention to allow all members who wish to ask- all members who wish to ask questions _ all members who wish to ask questions to _ all members who wish to ask questions to do _ all members who wish to ask questions to do so. - all members who wish to ask questions to do so. there - all members who wish to ask| questions to do so. there will all members who wish to ask- questions to do so. there will also be an— questions to do so. there will also be an test— questions to do so. there will also be an test time _ questions to do so. there will also be an test time for— questions to do so. there will also be an test time for settlement - questions to do so. there will alsol be an test time for settlement trick questions. — be an test time for settlement trick questions. but— be an test time for settlement trick questions, but this _ be an test time for settlement trick questions, but this depends - be an test time for settlement trick questions, but this depends on - be an test time for settlement trick| questions, but this depends on how much _ questions, but this depends on how much numbers— questions, but this depends on how much numbers are _ questions, but this depends on how much numbers are focused - questions, but this depends on how| much numbers are focused insisting on answering — much numbers are focused insisting on answering questions. _ much numbers are focused insisting on answering questions. the - much numbers are focused insisting i on answering questions. the chairman will be _ on answering questions. the chairman will be offered — on answering questions. the chairman will be offered a _ on answering questions. the chairman will be offered a little _ on answering questions. the chairman will be offered a little more _ will be offered a little more latitude _ will be offered a little more latitude than _ will be offered a little more latitude than members - will be offered a little more latitude than members and | will be offered a little more - latitude than members and asking questions. — latitude than members and asking questions. given— latitude than members and asking questions, given her— latitude than members and asking questions, given her role, - latitude than members and asking questions, given her role, so- latitude than members and asking questions, given her role, so i- latitude than members and asking j questions, given her role, so i call kyle mcgrath _ questions, given her role, so i call kyle mcgrath-_ questions, given her role, so i call kyle mcgrath. thank you very much, mr speaker. — kyle mcgrath. thank you very much, mr speaker. and _ kyle mcgrath. thank you very much, mr speaker, and i _ kyle mcgrath. thank you very much, mr speaker, and i think _ kyle mcgrath. thank you very much, mr speaker, and i think the - mr speaker, and i think the ministers for their statement today. we are in the position today where restrictions can begin to ease for two reasons. first of all, the incredible effort from the nurses,
5:54 pm
doctors and health service staff who have worked to exhaustion to keep us safe and roll out the vaccination programme. and secondly, each and every person who has made sacrifices, some the ultimate sacrifice, in the last four months to keep themselves and their communities safe. they have created the conditions that brought us from a very difficult place to one where we can restore a bit of hope. now scrutiny isn't negativity, but i want to ask the first ministers when the executive plan was originally published, there was no detail on the indicators and the data that would be used to make the decisions on the dates that would aid restrictions. and despite promises of dates today, a lot of what has been announced is still indicative which falls short of what a lot of people would want in their sectors. so we are left in a position where we have no data in some places with no dates to move forward towards. so can the ministers commit to
5:55 pm
publishing the data and the indicators used to make these important decisions? brute indicators used to make these important decisions? we believe the oliticians important decisions? we believe the politicians of — important decisions? we believe the politicians of stormont _ important decisions? we believe the politicians of stormont there. - important decisions? we believe the politicians of stormont there. we've | politicians of stormont there. we've got the 6pm news with george in a moment. here's the weather with darren. hello, there. after that cold and frosty start this morning, at least we're seeing some sunshine across much of the country. there are still a few showers, though — the're continuing to run in across east anglia — the odd rainbow, as well, those showers pushing in to the southeast of england, too. but for western scotland, where we've got the sunshine, here we could see the highest temperatures today — round about 15 celsius or so. these are the numbers at the end of the afternoon — it's quite a bit cooler around those north sea coasts with the onshore breeze. it's also cooler where we've got the showers for east anglia and the south—east of england — a nagging north—easterly breeze here, and it'll be breezy through the english channel, as well. could be 1—2 sharp showers for a while, probably extending their way down into hampshire by the end of the day. as the sun goes down, the showers fade away, we'll have clearing skies overnight. later in the night, bit of patchy cloud for lincolnshire, and some areas of fog likely around
5:56 pm
the home counties, too, but with clear skies and light winds, the temperatures will fall away sharply and, like last night, we're going to have a frost across many parts of the country. sunny start for most, the fog shouldn't last too long towards the home counties, and then we'll see the cloud bubbling up a bit more than today across england and wales, spreading over land with more in the way of sunshine for coastal areas. sunshine for scotland and northern ireland. away from the north—west, we're going to find some rain arriving in the western isles. generally, temperatures similar to those of today — around 11—13 celsius typically. now that rain that's coming into the western isles doesn't get any further in because that weather front moves away. we've got another front coming in from the atlantic, but this is a bit further away from the uk for the time being — it's getting blocked off by that area of high pressure, keeping it dry on saturday. so the dry weather is continuing and, after a chilly start, we're going to find a fair bit of sunshine across the uk. it may well turn a bit more hazy towards the north—west, with the breeze picking up as well, but it should be a dry day, and we could find temperatures as high as 14—15 celsius —
5:57 pm
so near normal for this time of the year. second half of the weekend, the weather front is getting closer and it looks like we'll see more cloud across scotland and northern ireland on sunday. some light and patchy rain in the north west of scotland, the western side of northern ireland. some of the cloud could push into england and wales, but it's going to be dry here. there'll be more in the way of sunshine through the midlands and into eastern england, and it's here we're likely to find those temperatures rising to around 15—16 celsius — so for these areas it's quite a bit warmer than it is today.
5:58 pm
5:59 pm
6:00 pm
today at six... the nhs waiting list for treatments hits a new record — more than 4.5 million people in england. hospitals were near—breaking point just dealing with covid, and even heart patients have had their operations postponed. it's absolutely shocking, isn't it, that somebody needs to wait more than a year for heart surgery? because heart surgery is not a luxury. if you need it doing, it needs to be done. we'll be asking how nhs doctors and nurses can deal with the backlog. also tonight: it's all a question of who knows who — the web of connections at the heart of the david cameron lobbying row. prince charles sees some of the tributes to the duke of edinburgh, and the palace reveals the list of the 30 guests who will attend the service.

30 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on