Skip to main content

tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  April 14, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

1:00 pm
pressure builds on david cameron as mps prepare to vote on a parliamentary inquiry into the former prime minister's lobbying. labour claims there's a revolving door between government and paid lobbyists. i do think it is a good idea in principle that top civil servants should be able to engage with business and should have experience of the private sector. when i look at the accounts i'm reading today, it's not clear that those boundaries had been properly understood. the greens and scandal is just the top of the iceberg. dodgy contracts, privileged access, jobs for their mates. this is the return of tory
1:01 pm
sleaze. we'll be live from westminster as the mps' debate gets under way. also this lunchtime... a uk covid trial testing different types of vaccine for the first and second dose is being expanded to include new vaccines and more volunteers. an inquest into the death of jack merrick and saskia jones has heard from another victim who was also stabbed at fishmongers' hall in 2019. climate talks between the world's two biggest polluters — us envoyjohn kerry hopes to persuade beijing to agree new targets on cutting greenhouse gas emissions. and the charity shop boom — record sales as shoppers return to the high street, but some goodwill stores are being overwhelmed with donations. and coming up in sport on the bbc news channel... northern ireland's women can start preparing for a major finals for the first time — after beating ukraine to reach next year's european championship.
1:02 pm
good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. mps will vote this afternoon on whether there should be a parliamentary inquiry into the lobbying activities of the former prime minister david cameron. labour says a government investigation into mr cameron's work for the collapsed firm greensill capital is insufficient. at prime minister's questions in the past hour, borisjohnson admitted it wasn't clear the boundaries between whitehall and business had been properly understood. the labour leader keir starmer told the commons that tory sleaze had returned. our political correspondent jonathan blake reports.
1:03 pm
catch it, it appears, around a campfire in saudi arabia. david cameron and less retail, close professional relationship now at the centre of a growing row about access to people in power. is centre of a growing row about access to peeple in power-— to people in power. is there a roblem to people in power. is there a problem with _ to people in power. is there a problem with sleaze - to people in power. is there a problem with sleaze in - to people in power. is there a problem with sleaze in your. problem with sleaze in your government, prime minister? boris johnson government, prime minister? boris johnson has — government, prime minister? boris johnson has promised _ government, prime minister? boris johnson has promised to _ government, prime minister? boris johnson has promised to give free rein to a lawyer investigating the class company and the government was the questions keep coming.— the questions keep coming. questions to the prime — the questions keep coming. questions to the prime minister. _ the questions keep coming. questions to the prime minister. for— the questions keep coming. questions to the prime minister. for labour- the questions keep coming. questions to the prime minister. for labour -- l to the prime minister. for labour -- from labour— to the prime minister. for labour -- from labour a _ to the prime minister. for labour -- from labour a full _ to the prime minister. for labour -- from labour a full inquiry _ to the prime minister. for labour -- from labour a full inquiry including l from labour a full inquiry including a reset around lobbying. does from labour a full inquiry including a reset around lobbying.— a reset around lobbying. does the prime minister _ a reset around lobbying. does the prime minister believe _ a reset around lobbying. does the prime minister believe that - a reset around lobbying. does the | prime minister believe that current lobbying also fit purpose? tap prime minister believe that current lobbying also fit purpose?- lobbying also fit purpose? top civil servants should _ lobbying also fit purpose? top civil servants should be _ lobbying also fit purpose? top civil servants should be able _ lobbying also fit purpose? top civil servants should be able to - lobbying also fit purpose? top civil servants should be able to engage | servants should be able to engage with business and should have experience of the private sector. when _ experience of the private sector. when i _ experience of the private sector. when i looked at the accounts i'm reading _ when i looked at the accounts i'm reading today and it is not clear those _ reading today and it is not clear those boundaries have been properly understood. ., . ., .,
1:04 pm
understood. labour charge that links between business _ understood. labour charge that links between business and _ understood. labour charge that links between business and government i understood. labour charge that links i between business and government are to close. , ~ , to close. does the prime minister acce -t to close. does the prime minister accept there _ to close. does the prime minister accept there is _ to close. does the prime minister accept there is a _ to close. does the prime minister accept there is a revolving - to close. does the prime minister accept there is a revolving door, l accept there is a revolving door, indeed an open door, between his conservative government and paid lobbyists? mr conservative government and paid lobb ists? ~ .,~ , conservative government and paid lobbists? ~ , , conservative government and paid lobb ists? ~ .,~ , , ., lobbyists? mr speaker, this is a government _ lobbyists? mr speaker, this is a government and _ lobbyists? mr speaker, this is a government and a _ lobbyists? mr speaker, this is a government and a party - lobbyists? mr speaker, this is a government and a party that . lobbyists? mr speaker, this is a | government and a party that has lobbyists? mr speaker, this is a - government and a party that has been consistently tough on lobbying and adv introduced legislation saying they should be no taxpayer funded lobbying, — they should be no taxpayer funded lobbying, we put in a register for lobbyists— lobbying, we put in a register for lobbyists and the one party that actually — lobbyists and the one party that actually voted to repeal the 2014 lobbying — actually voted to repeal the 2014 lobbying act, that was the labour party _ lobbying act, that was the labour pa . ., , , , ,. , party. that greensill simplicity will be asked _ party. that greensill simplicity will be asked back. _ party. that greensill simplicity will be asked back. dodgy - party. that greensill simplicity - will be asked back. dodgy contracts, privileged access, jobs for their mates. this is the return of tory sleaze. . , , mates. this is the return of tory sleaze. ., , , ., , sleaze. that is why we are putting an independent _ sleaze. that is why we are putting an independent review. _ sleaze. that is why we are putting an independent review. boris - sleaze. that is why we are putting - an independent review. boris johnson acute labour— an independent review. boris johnson acute labour opposing _ an independent review. boris johnson acute labour opposing previous -
1:05 pm
acute labour opposing previous attempts to tighten the rules ought to at least try to answer the question. lex greensill�*s involvement it came began in 2018 his company was giving work and hired by the former prime minister. the next year david cameron arranged a private drink with matt hancock and lex greensill last year he texted rishi sunak seeking access for greensill to a coronavirus support scheme. officials as well as ministers are defending the accident actions. will crothers began working part—time for greensill in 2013 when still a civil servant, a move he says was approved and not uncommon. politicians are also sides at westminster accept there is a problem that needs fixing but there are not many ready solutions to be found. and we can speak tojonathan now. the debate getting under way. how do
1:06 pm
you assess the town, the mood in the house at the moment? i you assess the town, the mood in the house at the moment?— house at the moment? i think what boris house at the moment? i think what itoris johnson _ house at the moment? i think what boris johnson said _ house at the moment? i think what boris johnson said at _ house at the moment? i think what boris johnson said at prime - borisjohnson said at prime minister's questions is the first suggestion from him, first acceptance from him that there are some questions that really do need answering here about lex greensill, his company greensill capital, and its links and involvement with government. he said he is not clear those boundaries have been properly understood. but the government's focus is still very much specifically on that question of greensill capital and through david cameron working as a lobbyist for the firm its links with government. labour are pushing hard for a much wider look at lobbying in general and a reset of the rules around it, so we will see this afternoon the opposition forcing a vote in the house of commons and with forcing the government's hand, not to take action themselves but to oppose what labour are trying to do, which is to
1:07 pm
set up a cross—party of mps in parliament to look at lobbying in general. isuppose parliament to look at lobbying in general. i suppose the bigger question is whether this moment begins a process of change and start to reformat what many people here at westminster feel needs to happen and the system around lobbying and changing in a wholesale way, or it just comes and goes, there is another row over at lobbying which has affected governments on both sides over many years.— has affected governments on both sides over many years. thank you, jonathan iirlake _ sides over many years. thank you, jonathan blake very _ sides over many years. thank you, jonathan blake very noisy - jonathan blake very noisy westminster. a major uk trial, which is assessing whether people can safely be given different makes of a covid vaccine for their first and second dose, is being expanded. the trial will now include the moderna and novovax jabs. people over the age of 50 who've had a first dose of either the pfizer or astrazeneca vaccine, can apply to take part. our health correspondent dominic hughes reports. currently, the nhs offers people an identical covid—19 vaccine
1:08 pm
for their first and second doses. but some experts believe switching to a different brand of vaccine for the second dose might give broader and longer lasting protection against the pandemic virus and new variants of it, as well as offering more flexibility to vaccine roll out. because all of the vaccines that are currently licensed are all directed against the same part of the virus, they are all engineered to target the 5 protein, the spike protein, then they all will elicit a very similar immune response. so it makes a lot of sense to test this combination of vaccines, and we think that we may be able to get an enhanced immune response by combining different types of vaccines. more than 800 people have already signed up to help researchers. they have received two doses of either pfizer, astrazeneca, or a combination of both, to see what works best for immunity. dosing with one, then dosing with the other. and that would give a lot more flexibility if there was any
1:09 pm
problems with supply for one vaccine, for example. or changes in recommendations for different age groups. then if someone has been primed with one vaccine, they are not locked in to getting the same vaccine for the second dose. and we will be testing those combinations against the new variants as they come through. so the blood tests we obtain, we will test them against the new variants to see potentially if they offer any broader protection against multiple different strains. volunteers need to have already had one covid jab on the nhs in the past few months, and be willing to travel to a regional nhs hospital trust site in england to take part. they will have blood taken to check how well vaccines trigger an immune response. the vaccination programme has gone as well as anyone could have hoped so far and the idea of mixing and matching vaccines is it gives a bit of added flexibility. the way it works is that if you give a second booster dose that uses a slightly different method to prompt an immune response, that can be more effective. and in fact, it's something that's already done with hepatitis jabs,
1:10 pm
for example, or vaccines that are commonly given to children, like polio, measles, mumps and rubella. investigators now hope to recruit around 1000 people aged 50 or older to take part and test more vaccines in different combinations. that includes the new moderna vaccine and the novavax jab that is expected to be approved soon for use in the uk. and the findings could have implications for what might lie ahead. we will be able to potentially use different vaccines for booster campaigns in the autumn and in fact mixed schedules may, and this is a big may, but they may give better longer term protection and that would be very interesting to see. so very exciting stuff. the study will run for a year but the first results should be available byjune orjuly and they will shape how the uk and the world continues to protect populations against this deadly virus. dominic hughes, bbc news. our medical editor
1:11 pm
fergus walsh is here. lets start with that trial we were hearing about, the interesting idea that you might be able to have one dose from one brand at the second from another. tell us more about that trial and why it is important to. i that trial and why it is important to. ~ , that trial and why it is important to. ~' , ., to. i think it is important because if ou can to. i think it is important because if you can mix _ to. i think it is important because if you can mix the _ to. i think it is important because if you can mix the vaccines - to. i think it is important because if you can mix the vaccines it - to. i think it is important because if you can mix the vaccines it will| if you can mix the vaccines it will give more flexibility. we have seen there had been problems with supplies over the last three months and if you get a lot of. one vaccine, much easier to say you can have this one. i don't think there is going to be any safety concerns but you have to do a trial like this just to rule that out. and quite good scientific theoretical evidence that, actually, it will boost your immunity. i would that, actually, it will boost your immunity. iwould predict that, actually, it will boost your immunity. i would predict that maybe a year from now the immunity. i would predict that maybe a yearfrom now the idea of mixing and matching will actually be accepted. i was there in february in london the daily trials began, and huge enthusiasm from the volunteers. this is going to be a hot ticket, a
1:12 pm
lot of people will want to sign up for the trial.— for the trial. that is interesting. there is another _ for the trial. that is interesting. there is another study - for the trial. that is interesting. there is another study out - for the trial. that is interesting. | there is another study out today comparing looking at the pfizer vaccine on one hand and the astrazeneca. that vaccine on one hand and the astrazeneca.— vaccine on one hand and the astrazeneca. �* , , ., astrazeneca. at the university of birmingham _ astrazeneca. at the university of birmingham trial— astrazeneca. at the university of birmingham trialjust _ astrazeneca. at the university of birmingham trialjust out. - astrazeneca. at the university of birmingham trialjust out. 165 - birmingham trialjust out. 165 people aged 18 plus. normally as we get older our immune systems decline and become less effective —— 80 plus. the news that a single dose at either pfizer or the astrazeneca vaccine prompted a very strong immune response after five weeks. then it looked at another part of the immune system, the cellular response, that the levels were higher within a single dose of astrazeneca, but we know from a previous study after two doses of pfizer you also get a very strong cellular response. selby message format is definitely having a second dose and also they found that people who have had a previous infection with covid have a dramatically
1:13 pm
higher, stronger immune response. really, i think the take—home message is that we now have three very good effective covid vaccines, so whichever one you are offered, take the jab. so whichever one you are offered, take the jab-— take the 'ab. fergus walsh, thank ou. a woman has described being stabbed in the neck by the man who killed two people in the fishmonger�*s hall attack in london in november 2019. jack merritt and saskia jones were stabbed by a convicted terrorist usman khan during a prisoner rehabilitation conference. giving evidence this morning at the inquests, isobel rowbotham said it felt as if khan had intended to kill her, too. our home affairs correspondent tom symonds reports. the attack within the ornate rooms of fishmonger�*s hall on the banks of the river thames was over in a few bloody minutes. this inquest will spend weeks examining those seconds in close detail. isobel rowbotham
1:14 pm
worked for the prison rehabilitation charity which helps the event where it happened. she told the inquest she saw jack merritt covered in blood, shouting that he had been stabbed. then osman he came at her across this reception room, kitchen knife in his hand, moving purposely. she said, please, no, don't. but saskia jones was fatally stabbed. she volunteered at the charity which was dedicated to turning around the lives of former prisoners, including their name usman khan. usman khan was forced out of the building by a group of
1:15 pm
men. they fought him on london bridge using improvised weapons before armed police arrived and fired the first shots. the inquest will explain his death and those of his victims. it will also examine what was known about the threat that ten proposed in the year before the events of that day. tom symonds, bbc news. the queen has returned to royal duties, just days after the death of the duke of edinburgh. as preparations continue for his funeral on saturday afternoon, her majesty hosted a ceremony at windsor castle last night to mark the retirement of her household's most senior official, the lord chamberlain. the us climate envoy, john kerry, is travelling to china to try to persuade beijing to agree to new targets on cutting greenhouse gas emissions. he's the first senior official from the biden administration to visit the country. the us wants china to stop building coal—fired power stations and to end the financing
1:16 pm
of overseas coal projects. here's our environment and energy analyst, roger harrabin. superpowers and super—polluters. the world can't address climate change unless both are willing to turn away from fossil fuels and both are ready to cooperate. that's the mission of the us climate envoy, john kerry, visiting china in the hope that the rivals can pause their political discord for the sake of the planet. china has as much coal—fired power capacity as the rest of the world put together. it's offering, informally, to freeze emissions by 2030 and stop all carbon emissions by 2060. at the moment, we are seeing that countries like south korea and japan, and also china,
1:17 pm
are funcing a lot of — funding a lot of the new coal—power development in the region. obviously, they are one of the big drivers of coal emissions, of carbon emissions, in the world. so the us will likely raise this in the meeting. though, what about the usa? historically, the top polluter. china wants america to adopt much tougher limits on emissions, and it wants the us to give much more cash to poorer nations to tackle climate change. with goodwill on both sides, i think there's a lot to gain here. and the precedent was set in the early years. before president trump came in, there was a very active suite of collaborative measures between the us and china, and many of them continued at a state level and at a city level. so the framework is there. the world looks on, as the superpowers discuss how far they are willing to change their economies and lifestyles to stabilise the climate.
1:18 pm
the poorest will suffer most from climate heating. they have no voice at the talks today. roger harrabin, bbc news. our correspondent robin brant is in shanghai. what brant is in shanghai. sort of reception asjohn kerr�* going what sort of reception asjohn kerry going to get? he what sort of reception as john kerry going to get?— going to get? he is coming here to shanahai going to get? he is coming here to shanghai and _ going to get? he is coming here to shanghai and arriving _ going to get? he is coming here to shanghai and arriving this - going to get? he is coming here toj shanghai and arriving this evening, a city of 24 million people i have to say the air pollution has not been good in the past week but he has come to show that the us is engaging again after five years of stepping back under donald trump. it is going to be a significant visit and a substantial one as he is here for two days and will meet a very important people and them a man who is his chinese counterpart and he has been brought out of retirement by beijing because he knowsjohn kerry and that gives you an idea of
1:19 pm
how significant they think the personal relationship can be. in terms of climate change and environment it is important both for joe biden is a big election issue and for president xi jinping dirty air and water has been a huge problem in china and he is trying to shift the economy towards a more sustainable one where growth is of a much higher quality and bluntly where it is not going to be killing people unnecessarily so important for both men but as roger touched on the us and china are crucial to any kind of progress when it comes to cutting carbon emissions. health of the coal butter into the world is burned here in this country and china is responsible for around 30% of carbon emissions as things stand at the moment. the other challenge forjohn kerry is to kind of silo at this issue and partition it from other areas were china and the us have more contentious disagreement at the moment. other genocide for example and things like hong kong so that will be his biggest challenge to try to keep the separate from other areas where things between
1:20 pm
china and the us are not so good. robin, thank you. our top story this lunchtime. pressure builds on david cameron, as mp's prepare to vote on a parliamentary inquiry into the former prime minister's lobbying. and coming up — 100 days before the tokyo olympics begin — why support for the postponed games remains low injapan. coming up in sport on the bbc news channel... 2—1 up from the first leg, manchester city prepare to reach the semi finals for the first time under pep. in the united states, there's been a third night of protests after an unarmed black man was shot dead by a white police officer in minneapolis. the officer who shot daunte wright has now resigned, along with the city's police chief. tensions are already high in the city, as the trial
1:21 pm
of the officer accused of murdering george floyd continues. our north america correspondent barbara plett—usher reports. for a third night, police drove back protesters venting their anger over the shooting of another black man, hit in the chest by a policewoman who confused her gun with her taser. in the middle of the trial for the officer accused of killing george floyd. do you know the difference between a gun and a taser? under pressure, the policewoman resigned. she was a 26 year veteran of the force, followed by the police chief. we're here and we will fight forjustice for this family, just like we're fighting for our brother. george floyd's family has come together in solidarity with the relatives of the dead man, daunte wright, sharing their quest forjustice and their loss.
1:22 pm
i thought somebody was playing a joke on me. it hurt me to my heart. daunte was a beautiful child. he might not have been an angel, but he was our angel. our angel. he belonged to us. he belonged to us! testimony here will be the truth and nothing but the truth... inside the courtroom, the defence took over after the prosecution rested its case. more footage of george floyd from police body cameras was shown tojurors. the defence is arguing that it was a drug overdose which caused his death rather than excessive force by the officer who restrained him by kneeling on his neck. testimony is expected to wrap by the end of the week and the jury will begin deliberations shortly after that. there's a lot at stake
1:23 pm
in what it decides. the authorities are bracing for the possibility of further unrest once there's a verdict. they were hoping that the resignation of the police officials would help to diffuse the anger, but so far that has failed to stop the protests. barbara plett usher, bbc news, minneapolis. it's100 days to the opening ceremony of the tokyo olympics — after the games were put back a year because of the covid19 pandemic. the organisers insist the games are full steam ahead — the torch relay is underway and athletes all over the world back in training. but injapan, support for the olympics and paralympics remains low because of concerns about coronavirus. from tokyo rupert wingfield hayes reports. if the latest opinion polls are to be believed, these people in tokyo demanding the olympics be cancelled are just the tip of a very large iceberg. with coronavirus infections surging
1:24 pm
across western japan, 72% now say the olympics must be postponed or cancelled. one of them is nobuko shimizu, who is worried about the threat to her elderly mother. we can't have the olympics. my mother is 91. so she is very vulnerable to the covid things. i think maybe i would take her to the countryside for maybe two or three weeks, away from tokyo. it's more safe. japan doesn'tjust have a large number of elderly, they have only started getting covid vaccines this week. while the uk and us surge ahead, japan lies far behind, with fewer vaccinations per capita than any other developed country. experts say this makes it extremely vulnerable. i think it is a very stupid idea to hold the olympic games this summer in tokyo. it is.
1:25 pm
but that doesn't necessarily mean it is impossible. if you ignore all the surrounding risks of gathering people together at the same time in one city, in the middle of the pandemic, it is not a good idea, scientifically or ethically. with just 100 days to go, japan is still struggling to hold olympic test events. today, this stadium behind me should have been bustling with activity, holding a big olympic preparatory event. instead, it is empty. why this event has been called off is not clear. but what we do know is that, two weeks ago, seven members of the japan men's water polo team, who should have been competing here today, tested positive for covid—19. this week, as the olympic torch relay reached osaka, surging covid infections there forced the cancellation of all public events. instead, runners carried the torch around an empty park, waving to no—one.
1:26 pm
it could be a foretaste of what is to come. rupert wingfield—hayes, tokyo. the scottish green party has launched its manifesto for next month's holyrood elections. the party says it would introduce a windfall tax on large companies that have made extraordinary profits during the pandemic. the greens also want to introduce a levy forfrequent flyers, and roll out an infrastructure programme, worth £7.5 billion, which they say would create 100,000 jobs across scotland. we will invest in scotland — createjobs, revive industry, and build the modern infrastructure the country urgently needs. it is a programme of change because, in the face of the climate emergency and the economic fallout from the pandemic, we need change. but it is a programme that will bring everyone along — no—one left behind. tesco says it has seen "exceptionally strong sales"
1:27 pm
through the coronavirus pandemic. the supermarket firm says online sales in the uk soared by 77% for the year to february. but business costs incurred by the pandemic led to a fall in pre—tax profits. tesco hired almost 50,000 temporary workers last year, about 20,000 of whom have joined the retailer permanently. whether it's unwanted clothes, books or toys — many people have used lockdown as a chance to have a big clearout. lots of the items will be taken to charity shops which reopened this week in england and wales. many have reported record sales in the past few days. but some stores have stopped accepting donations — or set limits — because of the sheer volume of items arriving. our consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith reports. the long lockdown winter months have been a chance for a clearout. but what to do with all this stuff? there's clothes...
1:28 pm
..jumpers — all sorts! this shop's open to customers, but not for donations yet, as they've got so much already. so there's no chance of getting rid of this lot today. i'm going to have to hold onto it, i think, yeah. our phone is constantly ringing, asking when we're taking donations, are we taking donations? it's just, i don't think our shop's big enough to take everything at the once. so that's why we've done our two days a week. with limited numbers allowed inside the store, sarah needs all the space possible for shoppers. the head of the charity retail association says shops up and down the country have been making different plans to safely receive a deluge of donations over the coming weeks. some of our members have actually been donated extra storage facilities. people have been doing things like hiring vans and portakabins in their car parks. so actually, the systems are all in place, and donors shouldn't be worried about that. the advice is to ring ahead,
1:29 pm
to check when and where you can drop donations. suzanne in hull has a pile of stuff she's desperate to get rid of. i've got a suitcase of clothes, shoes, badminton rackets and shuttlecocks. i've got one bottom and i've got three bikes, so i don't need three. i've heard that charity shops are quite full. and a lot of my stuff's quite nice. she's decided to try doing a car boot sale first, and then take anything left to a charity shop when they've more room. i'm excited that things might get another life, really. it's notjust those doing a clearout who've been desperate for charity shops to reopen. this last year has been really tough for so many households, with more redundancies, with squeezed incomes on furlough. buying online is simply too expensive for lots of people — having to buy the big brands, and having to pay delivery charges. so, seeing charity shops open up again is a lifeline for lots and lots of households. we need them.
1:30 pm
we can't get to places likejohn lewis and pay them prices any more. they've got out of reach. we have shopped in them before, and the kids get lots of games out of there, don't you? yeah. lots of board games and stuff. it's good for them to be back open. it's been too long, hasn't it? with storerooms bursting at the seams, shoppers can cash in on the windfall. colletta smith, bbc news. time for a look at the weather. good afternoon. we have quite whether at the moment and high pressure in charge keeping most parts of the country fine and dry. we have called out trapped across the uk and france to start this morning but there is a bit of warmth coming through in any sunshine today. the cloud has been bubbling up today. the cloud has been bubbling up just threatening a few showers
1:31 pm
here and there perhaps in the

23 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on