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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 14, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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hello. this is bbc news. i'm victoria derbyshire. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. more than a thousand extra volunteers in the uk are being recruited to take part in a study looking at whether a mix of covid vaccines can be used for the first and second doses. that would give a lot more flexibility if there was any problems with supply with one vaccine, for example, or a change in recommendations for different age groups. if you're young and black, you've been hit hardest hit by unemployment during the pandemic; according to new research, 35% of young black people are out of work in the uk. if that's your experience please get in touch —
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its @vicderbyshire on twitter and instagram or victoria@bbc.co.uk police and protesters clash for a third night in the us city of minneapolis — after an unarmed young black man daunte wright was shot dead by a white police officer. mps in the uk vote today on whether to hold a parliamentary inquiry into the lobbying activities of the former prime minister, david cameron, for the collapsed firm greensill capital — and how government minsters responded to him the family of a pregnant nurse who died with covid—19 in the uk hasn't received any money from a fundraising campaign which is now at £186,000, even though it was set up to support her husband and children. and the countdown is on: it's 100 days until the opening of the summer olympic games in tokyo. we'll be speaking to one athlete who's preparing for the games, and a former olympic gold medallist.
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hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. a big uk trial looking at whether covid vaccines can be mixed meaning different ones are used for first and second doses, is being expanded. adults over 50 who have already had a first dose of pfizer or astrazeneca can apply to take part in the study, as our health reporter michelle roberts explains. currently, the nhs offers people an identical covid—19 vaccine for their first and second doses, but some experts believe switching to a different brand of vaccine for the second dose might give broader and longer—lasting protection against the pandemic virus and new variants of it, as well as offer more flexibility to vaccine roll—out. more than 800 people have been helping researchers investigate this in a trial called com—cov.
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they've received two doses of either pfizer, astrazeneca or a combination of both to see which works best for immunity. results from this first stage are expected next month, but the investigators now hope to recruit around a thousand people aged 50 or older to take part and test more vaccines in different combinations. that includes the new moderna vaccine and the novavax one that's expected to be approved soon in the uk. dosing with one, then dosing with the other. and that would give a lot more flexibility if there was any problems with supply for one vaccine, for example, or changes in recommendations for different age groups. then if someone�*s been primed with one vaccine, they're not locked into getting the same vaccine for the second dose. and we will be testing those combinations against the new variants as they come through. so the blood tests we obtained, we'll test them against the new variants to see potentially if they offer any broader protection against the multiple different strains.
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volunteers need to have already had one covid jab on the nhs in the past few months and be willing to travel to a regional nhs hospital trust site in england to take part. they'll have blood taken to check how well vaccines trigger an immune response. the study will run for a year, but there should be some reportable findings byjune orjuly to shape how the uk and the world continues to protect populations against this deadly virus. michelle roberts, bbc news. dr lindsay broadbent is an epidemiologist at queens university in belfast what do you think of this trial, the expansion of this trial, i should say? expansion of this trial, i should sa ? , ., , expansion of this trial, i should sa ? ., , , expansion of this trial, i should sa ? ., , say? good morning. this is an incredibly _ say? good morning. this is an incredibly interesting - say? good morning. this is an incredibly interesting and - say? good morning. this is an - incredibly interesting and important trial, because as we just heard, it offers an awful lot of flexibility with the vaccine roll—out, and expanding this trial to include the new vaccines that have been licensed, or ones that hopefully will be licensed soon, will offer
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even more flexibility with the roll—out programme. i even more flexibility with the roll-out programme. i wonder if it seems kind _ roll-out programme. i wonder if it seems kind of— roll-out programme. i wonder if it seems kind of logical _ roll-out programme. i wonder if it seems kind of logical that, - seems kind of logical that, irrespective of which vaccines you use, obviously you have to test them in humans and see what side—effects might be, but every vaccine gives you protection against the virus. {iii you protection against the virus. of course, and because all of the vaccines that are currently licensed are all directed against the same part of the virus, they are all engineered to target the s part of the virus, they are all engineered to target the 5 protein, the spike protein, they will all produce the similar immune response, so it makes sense to test a combination. we may be able to get an enhanced immune response by combining different types of vaccines. ., ,., ., combining different types of vaccines. ., ., ~ vaccines. how soon do you think we miaht be vaccines. how soon do you think we might be able _ vaccines. how soon do you think we might be able to _ vaccines. how soon do you think we might be able to feel— vaccines. how soon do you think we might be able to feel the _ vaccines. how soon do you think we might be able to feel the impact - vaccines. how soon do you think we might be able to feel the impact of| might be able to feel the impact of this study? 50 might be able to feel the impact of this stud ? , , , this study? so the study is scheduled _ this study? so the study is scheduled to _ this study? so the study is scheduled to last - this study? so the study is scheduled to last for - this study? so the study is scheduled to last for 13 - this study? so the study is - scheduled to last for 13 months from the initial enrolment, which was in february, but we will start to see
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results next month hopefully for the initial combination of astrazeneca and pfizer. and then the current enrolment to include the moderna and novavax vaccines will be several months down the line for that. so we are not talking about any changes to the vaccine programme in the near future, but this could mean fantastic things towards autumn, towards the end of this year. we re orted towards the end of this year. we reported yesterday about the pausing of thejohnson reported yesterday about the pausing of the johnson & johnson vaccine reported yesterday about the pausing of thejohnson &johnson vaccine in the united states, six or so blood clots have been reported, 7 million people have had the vaccine. what is your view on the pausing of that? it is certainly done with an abundance of caution, and i think the openness with which it is done is fantastic. we know that these incidents are incredibly rare. they are quite literally one in a million, but of course with any new medication, any
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new vaccine, we need to be careful, and we need to make sure that any possible association is thoroughly investigated. possible association is thoroughly investigated-— possible association is thoroughly investiuated. . ~ , . investigated. thank you very much, doctor broadbent, _ investigated. thank you very much, doctor broadbent, thank _ investigated. thank you very much, doctor broadbent, thank you - investigated. thank you very much, doctor broadbent, thank you for - doctor broadbent, thank you for talking to us from queen's university in belfast. in the uk, young black people have been hit hardest by unemployment during the covid pandemic, according to new research. (take during the covid pandemic, according to new research. the resolution foundation think tank said that over the past year, thejobless rate for young black people in the uk rose by more than a third to 35% — compared with 24% for young people of asian descent and i3% for young white people. the foundation said that covid had widened existing gaps between ethnic groups. it added that young people in britain had borne the brunt ofjob losses in lockdown. between the second and third quarters of 2020 the unemployment rate among 18—24 year olds rose from 11.5%to13.6%.
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kathleen henehan is a research and policy analyst at the resolution foundation. she told me more about the findings. 13 months on from the start of the crisis, overall employment has risen less than anticipated, but that was thanks in part to the furlough scheme. but the rise in unemployment was unfairly distributed across age groups. black young people and recent education levers in general have been hard hit. black young people have seen unemployment rise by nine percentage points since the start of the crisis as opposed to just a three percentage points in young people, so we are really seeing some uneven impacts so far, and they have actuallyjust worsened pre—existing inequalities. so and they have actuallyjust worsened pre-existing inequalities.— pre-existing inequalities. so we already had _ pre-existing inequalities. so we already had these _ pre-existing inequalities. so we already had these gaps - pre-existing inequalities. so we already had these gaps before l pre-existing inequalities. so we l already had these gaps before the pandemic. what covid has done is make the gap wider? yes pandemic. what covid has done is make the gap wider?— make the gap wider? yes indeed. there is a number— make the gap wider? yes indeed. there is a number of— make the gap wider? yes indeed. there is a number of reasons - make the gap wider? yes indeed. there is a number of reasons forl there is a number of reasons for this. some of it might be down to
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the sectors that people work in, so before the crisis, young people on average were substantially more likely to work in hard—hit sectors, and to a slight extent black young people were also more likely to work at those hard—hit sectors even compared to their young white counterparts. but there are still big questions as to why the impact of the crisis among those young people working in those sectors has been so badly distributed. yes. people working in those sectors has been so badly distributed.— been so badly distributed. yes. in terms of this _ been so badly distributed. yes. in terms of this particular _ been so badly distributed. yes. in | terms of this particular generation, the class of 2020, we call them, the impact of covid is massive, isn't it? it impact of covid is massive, isn't it? ., , impact of covid is massive, isn't it? . , , ., , it? it really is. one of the things we were particularly _ it? it really is. one of the things we were particularly worried - it? it really is. one of the things l we were particularly worried about last year as we had a whole cohort of young people, graduates leaving full—time education for the first time and entering into a labour market large parts of which were essentially on ice, and we are starting to see the effects of that. the unemployment rate among recent education leavers is up three points from last year, but even within that
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group, it is again those young people whose pre—pandemic positions were weakest two our now worst affected, so nearly one in four recent education leavers who are black are now unemployed, so it is this double disadvantage, as it were. thank you for your messages about this. calvin says, thank you for highlighting this in the news. i'm struggling to getjobs and support from my family. i am a graduate civil engineer in leeds. i was working for a company in york and last year in october i was offered six k to leave myjob or risk being fired. i had moved across the country to settle in york, and it was only me who was laid off and i think it was because of my race. and marlon says, thank you for raising this topic for young black people facing unemployment, but i do think theissueis facing unemployment, but i do think the issue is currently moving right across the different age groups. i
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have applied for numerous scientific roles and positions, i have got 20 years plus of pharmaceutical experience, and i can't find work. thank you for those. the us climate envoy john kerry will become the biden administration's most senior official to visit china today. he'll be arriving in shanghai shortly to discuss international efforts to tackle global warming. mr kerry says current political tensions between washington and beijing must be set aside so the climate emergency can be addressed. 0ur china correspondent robin brant explained the importance of the talks. it is significant for two reasons, the shared interest of dealing with the shared interest of dealing with the global emergency that is climate change. it was big in terms of the election campaign for candidate biden as he was last year. that has been a very serious ongoing issue for president xijinping here, pollution of land, water, air is a terrible problem here in china. so there is the shared initiatives that both men share domestically, and of
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course they are the world's two biggest polluters, so if there is any consensus on reducing emissions, china and the us have to be around the table. then there is the bilateral relationship between the us and china which is in a very bad place. diplomatic officials from the biden administration met with their chinese counterparts for a few weeks ago in alaska, and that was a very, very frosty, it wasn't a good start purely in terms of the optics and it being friendly. so i think the hope is that this will be different. john kerry comes here, he knows his chinese counterparts here. the men know how to get on, they have a bit of history. and i thinkjohn kerry's primary aim here is to things, to re—engage with the chinese, to show that after the years of donald trump who stepped back, the biden administration is now committed and wants to engage, but also to try to
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sort of silo off this issue. they don't want a contentious confrontation over hong kong, she jang, the use of the word genocide to describe what the us administration thinks is going on. they don't want that to spoil any chance of any progress between china and the us over reaching a deal on climate change, so he will try to partition that today, i think. protesters have clashed with police in minneapolis for the third night in a row — after a black man was shot dead on sunday. the policewoman who fatally shot daunte wright has resigned, along with the police chief. it comes as the trial of the officer accused of killing george floyd in the same city, begins hearing from defence witnesses. 0ur north america correspondent barbara plett usher reports. gunshot. for a third night police drove back protesters venting their anger over the shooting of another black man. hit in the chest by a policewoman who confused her gun with her taser,
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in the middle of the trial of the officer accused of killing george floyd. do you know the difference between a gun and a taser? under pressure, the policewoman resigned. she was a 26—year veteran of the force. she was followed by the police chief. we are here and we will fight forjustice for this family, just like we are fighting for our brothers. george floyd's family has come together in solidarity with the relatives of the dead man, daunte wright. sharing their quest forjustice and their loss. i thought somebody was playing a joke on me. it hurt me to my heart. daunte was a beautiful child. he might not have been an angel, but he was our angel. 0ur angel. he belonged to us.
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inside the courtroom, the defence took over after the prosecution rested its case. more footage of george floyd from police body cameras was shown tojurors. the defence is arguing that it was a drug overdose which caused his death rather than excessive force by the officer who restrained him by kneeling on his neck. testimony is expected to wrap by the end of the week, and the jury will begin deliberations shortly after that. there is a lot at stake in what it decides. the authorities are bracing for the possibility of further unrest once there is a verdict. they were hoping that the resignation of the police officials would help to defuse the anger, but so far that has failed to stop the protests. barbara plett usher, bbc news, minneapolis. the headlines on bbc news.
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more than a thousand extra volunteers in the uk are being recruited to take part in a study looking at whether a mix of covid vaccines can be used for the first and second doses. if you're young and black, you've been hit hardest hit by unemployment during the pandemic; according to new research, 35% of young black people are out of work in the uk. police and protesters clash for a third night in the us city of minneapolis, after an unarmed young black man daunte wright was shot dead by a white police officer. there will be a debate in the uk parliament today, to decide if there should be a parliament—run inquiry into the links between the former british prime minister david cameron and the failed finance firm greensill capital, and mr cameron's lobbying of current ministers and how they responded. prime minister borisjohnson insists
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the independent inquiry he's ordered into mr cameron's lobbying will have carte blanche to talk to anyone. but labour says the review has all the hallmarks of a cover—up. 0ur political correspondent damian grammaticas reports. the actions of a former prime minister and those of current ministers. labour says they've brought the shadow of a scandal that parliament must investigate, or it fears the review borisjohnson has set up will be a whitehall whitewash. day by day, new revelations are coming out about greensill capital. we need a proper inquiry to get to the bottom of this, not the half—hearted inquiry that the government have announced so far. the latest revelations, that the former head of government procurement began working part—time at greensill capital while he was still a civil servant. bill carruthers says his move in 2015 followed established procedure, was approved and he believes not uncommon. labour says the real questions are for the conservatives.
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how in 2011 a financier lex greensill became an unpaid advisor to the government. and his company hired david cameron, now out of office, who next year arranged a private drink with the matt hancock, the health secretary, and mr green seal. and last year he texted chancellor rishi sunak seeking access for greensill for government funds. mr cameron has said he broke no rules, mr hancock that he reported his meeting with greensill and acted properly. the chancellor says he has been open too. he has released private texts he sent to mr cameron in which he says he pushed the treasury to help greensill, and the government says its inquiry can ask anybody whatever it needs. but labour insists what happens behind closed doors was cronyism, and an independent inquiry
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is needed. damian grammaticas, bbc news, westminster. for more i'm nowjoined by our political correspondent, jonathan blake. what is the point of the vote today? labour was never likely to win this vote, which it is staging as part of an opposition debate in the house of commons. but what it will do is force the conservatives to come out and vote against it to stop it passing, and if it had passed, it would have enabled parliament to set “p would have enabled parliament to set up a new cross—party committee of mps to look into not only david cameron's links with greensill and his approach to government as a lobbyist but also the wider issue of lobbying in the rules around it here at westminster as a whole. so, in forcing an effect the conservatives to come and vote down this attempt to come and vote down this attempt to set up a committee of mps by labour, it leaves the conservatives open to the criticism from labour
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that they are directly blocking and resisting attempts to get a grip on theissue resisting attempts to get a grip on the issue of lobbying and resisting transparency in principle. so that is what is at play here today, and nothing will materially have changed by the end of the day, and a lot of debate in parliament this afternoon, but it will be, if you like, a forcing of the conservatives' hand, to block labour's attempt here to set up this new committee of mps. and in the process, and prime minister's questions at lunchtime and the debate and has a commons after that, they will be claim and counterclaim about who is responsible for what and whether the government is taking the right approach, whether ministers follow the rules and acted properly at all times, which those implicated in this row have insisted that they have done. but it is really a continuation of the debate here at westminster today about what the best approaches to tackle the of
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lobbying, which many agree has got out of hand, and needs to be looked at again. whether it is the government's specific inquiry into david cameron's links to greensill, and greensill�*s activities within government, orwhether and greensill�*s activities within government, or whether it is what labour wants to do, and set up a broader inquiry with a larger scope to look at the rules around lobbying as a whole. . ~ to look at the rules around lobbying as a whole-— as a whole. thank you very much, jonathan. — as a whole. thank you very much, jonathan, thank _ as a whole. thank you very much, jonathan, thank you. _ this voter here in the uk has resigned, he says you can have as many inquiries as you want, you will never stop greedy people from twisting the system for their own financial benefit, be a conservative, liberal, labour, however. the general public are sick and tired of being lied to, deceived by untreated like idiots by politicians from all quarters. right, let's talk about the family
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of nurse who died a year from covid—19. they say they haven't received any money from an online campaign which raised nearly two hundred thousand pounds for them. mary agyapong, who was 28, died just days after giving birth at luton and dunstable hospital, where she worked. jon ironmonger reports. the death of nurse mary agyapong is among the cruelest of the pandemic. she contracted covid—19 while pregnant and didn't live to know her daughter, who was born safely. heartbroken, her husband ernest focused his attention on the burial and was unaware as nearly 10,000 donations began pouring in online. i really actually remain very grateful, you know, for the love, support and the generosity of the public. in just a few days, £186,000 was raised through a gofundme page set up by rhoda asiedu, a family friend living in birmingham, expressly to support mary's husband and the couple's
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children, aj and baby mary, during this heavy and trying time. but one year on, the beneficiaries still haven't received a penny, and lawyers suspect the fundraisers of playing loose with a custom at ghanaian funerals. normally, when such donations are collected, it is given to the spouse, to almost reimburse him of such costs, and then to look after the children, things like pampers, baby food. mary never had the opportunity to bless her daughter, so there's been a lot of expenses that he's had to carry on all by himself. the money raised was paid to ms asiedu's legal team, blue trinity, who said it had been placed on trust for the education of mary's children and that 80% of it would be released when they turn 21. that's a 20—year wait for baby mary, and ernest, who's studying law, says the family is struggling now. i just try to keep my head above the water. ifind it very, very
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surprising that i've not been asked or involved, you know, with this gofundme money, it's beyond my understanding. gofundme said it was always clear the money would be placed in a trust. but we found an archived snapshot of the web page on april 16th with £117,000 of donations and no reference to a trust at all. ms asiedu? i'd like to talk to you about the gofundme page that you set up for ernest boateng and his children. is that 0k? can ijust ask you, you know, why has he not been made a trustee of the fund? when shall i call you? 0k, all right. i think it's clear
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you don't want to talk. we didn't hear back from ms asiedu or her legal team. on monday, ernest and the children marked the first anniversary of mary's death. life without her is getting no easier. jon ironmonger, bbc news. the countdown to the tokyo olympics is on — with 100 days to go. delayed by a year due to the pandemic, it'll still be an 0lympics with a difference. no international fans will be permitted to travel to japan, and it's not yet clear if the venues will have fans at all. and when the athletes arrive they'll be tested and have to follow strict quarantine rules. let's speak to one athlete who's preparing for the games and a former olympic gold medallist who knows what it takes to succeed at the pinnacle of their sport. joining me is british kayaker kimberley woods and gold medal winner at the 2000 sydney 0lympics denise lewis. welcome both of you, and thank you for talking to us. kimberly, what did you do this morning?-
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for talking to us. kimberly, what did you do this morning? some full runs, so did you do this morning? some full runs. so quite _ did you do this morning? some full runs, so quite similar _ did you do this morning? some full runs, so quite similar to _ did you do this morning? some full runs, so quite similar to a - did you do this morning? some full runs, so quite similar to a race, - runs, so quite similar to a race, and i'm pretty tired, to say the least. �* ., ., , least. and what do those full runs involve, least. and what do those full runs involve. for _ least. and what do those full runs involve, for people _ least. and what do those full runs involve, for people who _ least. and what do those full runs involve, for people who want - least. and what do those full runs involve, for people who want to l involve, for people who want to learn more about your sport? it is 'ust auoin learn more about your sport? it is just going from — learn more about your sport? it 3 just going from the top of the course to the bottom of the court in the fastest time possible, navigating some red and green gates, red and green for upstream and downstream.— red and green for upstream and downstream. �* , ., , ., downstream. and in terms of your preparations _ downstream. and in terms of your preparations for _ downstream. and in terms of your preparations for these _ downstream. and in terms of your preparations for these olympics, | preparations for these 0lympics, what has that been like? it preparations for these olympics, what has that been like?- preparations for these olympics, what has that been like? it has been like a roller-coaster. _ what has that been like? it has been like a roller-coaster. this _ what has that been like? it has been like a roller-coaster. this time - like a roller—coaster. this time last year when we were in lockdown funding at the postponement, and just trying to keep fit and healthy, and when we were allowed back onto the water, it was in full swing. haven't had any racing yet, but hoping to get on the race start line next month. but it is just taking one week at a time. so next month. but it is 'ust taking one week at a time._ next month. but it is 'ust taking one week at a time. so you haven't done any actual— one week at a time. so you haven't done any actual competitions, - one week at a time. so you haven't done any actual competitions, is i done any actual competitions, is that right? done any actual competitions, is that riuht? . done any actual competitions, is that right?— that right? yes, i haven't raced since the _ that right? yes, i haven't raced since the tokyo _ that right? yes, i haven't raced since the tokyo test _
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that right? yes, i haven't raced since the tokyo test event - that right? yes, i haven't raced since the tokyo test event in i that right? yes, i haven't racedl since the tokyo test event in the end of october 2019, so it has been a while. �* .., . end of october 2019, so it has been awhile. �* . , . end of october 2019, so it has been awhile. �* , , , , a while. and i can see denise lewis shakin: a while. and i can see denise lewis shaking her— a while. and i can see denise lewis shaking her head. _ a while. and i can see denise lewis shaking her head. that _ a while. and i can see denise lewis shaking her head. that is _ a while. and i can see denise lewis shaking her head. that is a - a while. and i can see denise lewis shaking her head. that is a big - a while. and i can see denise lewisj shaking her head. that is a big deal for athletes, shaking her head. that is a big deal forathletes, denise, shaking her head. that is a big deal for athletes, denise, yes? shaking her head. that is a big deal forathletes, denise, yes? it is shaking her head. that is a big deal for athletes, denise, yes?- for athletes, denise, yes? it is a hue for athletes, denise, yes? it is a huge deal. _ for athletes, denise, yes? it is a huge deal. and _ for athletes, denise, yes? it is a huge deal, and you _ for athletes, denise, yes? it is a huge deal, and you can - for athletes, denise, yes? it is a huge deal, and you can hear - for athletes, denise, yes? it is a huge deal, and you can hear the | huge deal, and you can hear the stories_ huge deal, and you can hear the stories up— huge deal, and you can hear the stories up and down the country, and it really— stories up and down the country, and it really does vary from sport to sport. _ it really does vary from sport to sport. the — it really does vary from sport to sport, the experience the athletes have faced during the pandemic. and that is— have faced during the pandemic. and that is upsetting, it really is. you know, _ that is upsetting, it really is. you know. it — that is upsetting, it really is. you know. it is — that is upsetting, it really is. you know, it is having that mental, as you said. — know, it is having that mental, as you said, fortitude and strength to know_ you said, fortitude and strength to know that — you said, fortitude and strength to know that i — you said, fortitude and strength to know that i haven't competed, but you are _ know that i haven't competed, but you are just — know that i haven't competed, but you are just hoping the body will remember. but invariably, athletes take confidence from repetition, from _ take confidence from repetition, from doing what they do to gain confidence. from doing what they do to gain confidence-— from doing what they do to gain confidence. , , ., , ., confidence. kimberly, how is that auoin confidence. kimberly, how is that aoian to confidence. kimberly, how is that going to affect — confidence. kimberly, how is that going to affect you, _ confidence. kimberly, how is that going to affect you, not _ confidence. kimberly, how is that going to affect you, not having i confidence. kimberly, how is that i going to affect you, not having been in a competitive race since 2019? i'm hoping it won't affect me too much. i thrive on competition and i take a lot of confidence from competing. we haven't even her
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bandit any national races, which was disappointing but it was for safety. i will take each fall run as it comes and each training session and try to ramp up the pressure in training. try to ramp up the pressure in trainina. , , ., ., ,., training. dernies, what would you sa to her training. dernies, what would you say to her about _ training. dernies, what would you say to her about the _ training. dernies, what would you say to her about the olympic i say to her about the olympic experience? it say to her about the olympic exoerience?_ say to her about the olympic experience? it is really hard, victoria. _ experience? it is really hard, victoria. to _ experience? it is really hard, victoria, to talk _ experience? it is really hard, victoria, to talk about i experience? it is really hard, victoria, to talk about the i experience? it is really hard, i victoria, to talk about the olympic experience — victoria, to talk about the olympic experience when we know tokyo is going _ experience when we know tokyo is going to _ experience when we know tokyo is going to look so very different for the athletes. those even that have had olympic experience, it won't look the — had olympic experience, it won't look the same. for those coming in are new_ look the same. for those coming in are new to— look the same. for those coming in are new to the games, they are going to have _ are new to the games, they are going to have to— are new to the games, they are going to have to get their head around 'ust to have to get their head around just the — to have to get their head around just the changes and everything that is still— just the changes and everything that is still a _ just the changes and everything that is still a little uncertain right now — is still a little uncertain right now but _ is still a little uncertain right now. but you just know that it will be watched by billions. there are still medals up for grabs. so athletes _ still medals up for grabs. so athletes at the moment like kimberly willjust_ athletes at the moment like kimberly willjust focus on doing what you're doing. _ willjust focus on doing what you're doing, which is making sure that you're _ doing, which is making sure that you're getting the best out of a recession _ you're getting the best out of a recession. i noticed you playing down _ recession. i noticed you playing down how— recession. i noticed you playing down how tough that session was this morning. _ down how tough that session was this morning, but i can imagine it was
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gruelling, — morning, but i can imagine it was gruelling, and it isjust taking heart — gruelling, and it isjust taking heart from completing, ticking down another— heart from completing, ticking down another session done, another session— another session done, another session done, qualification and getting — session done, qualification and getting on that plane to tokyo. is getting on that plane to tokyo. is that getting on that plane to tokyo. that fair, getting on that plane to tokyo. is that fair, kimberly? definitely. i getting on that plane to tokyo. is. that fair, kimberly? definitely. we are both fortunate _ that fair, kimberly? definitely. we are both fortunate to _ that fair, kimberly? definitely. we are both fortunate to already i that fair, kimberly? definitely. we are both fortunate to already have | are both fortunate to already have our qualifications done, and that means we canjust our qualifications done, and that means we can just focus on the olympics now. means we can 'ust focus on the orymprcs now.— means we can 'ust focus on the olympics now. means we can 'ust focus on the olm-icsnow. , , 11, ., ., olympics now. denise, 20 years ago ou won olympics now. denise, 20 years ago you won the — olympics now. denise, 20 years ago you won the gold — olympics now. denise, 20 years ago you won the gold medal— olympics now. denise, 20 years ago you won the gold medal at _ olympics now. denise, 20 years ago you won the gold medal at sydney. | olympics now. denise, 20 years ago you won the gold medal at sydney. i cannot believe it's 20 years. you literally do not look a day older, i am serious. but if i remember rightly, when you actually won the gold, where there not many spectators in that stadium? am i remembering this correctly? was it late? ., ., , , late? you are completely right. the announcement _ late? you are completely right. the announcement for _ late? you are completely right. the announcement for the _ late? you are completely right. the announcement for the medal i late? you are completely right. the i announcement for the medal ceremony originally— announcement for the medal ceremony originally went out that it was going — originally went out that it was going to — originally went out that it was going to be the next day, and then there _ going to be the next day, and then there was— going to be the next day, and then there was a — going to be the next day, and then there was a last—minute change of plan and _ there was a last—minute change of plan and the announce that the heptathlon medals were going to be presented that evening. and the stadium — presented that evening. and the stadium had already started to vacate, — stadium had already started to vacate, and it was literally, it was count _ vacate, and it was literally, it was count in— vacate, and it was literally, it was count in the —
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vacate, and it was literally, it was count in the stadium. a little disappointing, but that medal made up disappointing, but that medal made up for— disappointing, but that medal made up for a _ disappointing, but that medal made up for a multitude of disappointments, and it wasjust the most fabulous experience, and even now _ most fabulous experience, and even now. i_ most fabulous experience, and even now. i take — most fabulous experience, and even now, i take great heart and great pleasure — now, i take great heart and great pleasure that we are 100 days to go, because _ pleasure that we are 100 days to go, because once you are an olympian, that feeling — because once you are an olympian, that feeling always comes back to your moment when things, your experiences and what went well. kimberly, — experiences and what went well. kimberly, are you bothered about the fact that there may not be spectators? i don't know what it's like when you are in a kayak racing from the top of a fast moving water to the bottom. are you aware of anyone watching anyway? change it really does help you as you get further down the course and it will be a shame to not have any spectators at all. we hope the japanese will be there and they are
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incredible support anyway, they will go crazy over anything, so we hope that we will have some spectators, but i'm just going to be looking to get from the top to the bottom as quickly as i can. i know you've spoken before openly about how you were bullied you said that lead to feelings of low self—esteem and depression. i wonder what you would say to any kid, some of them still in the easter holidays, watching now, you might have ambitions like yours but might feel quashed by may be what is going on at school or online. what would you say to them? try and take strength from well you are unique. i know some kid hate being unique and being that stand out person. ijust thought, do you know what? i can be really good at several i am doing and i thinkjust try to be open with everyone around
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you, do not be scared. whatever is going on, if you're struggling with homework, it isjust going on, if you're struggling with homework, it is just trying to get out and be active, that can really help with your mental health. fine help with your mental health. one more question _ help with your mental health. one more question to _ help with your mental health. one more question to you, denise, how did you cope with the pressure on you therefore you won gold at sydney? i you therefore you won gold at s dne ? ~ . you therefore you won gold at s dne ? ~ , , ., ., sydney? i think trusting in your own abilities, trying _ sydney? i think trusting in your own abilities, trying to _ sydney? i think trusting in your own abilities, trying to block— sydney? i think trusting in your own abilities, trying to block out - sydney? i think trusting in your own abilities, trying to block out any i abilities, trying to block out any negative chatter because i couldn't tell you and i think what everyone has shown great fortitude in getting through this pandemic itself is that you have to quash the negative chatter. your mind can play huge tricks on you so it is focusing on the positive, staying in the heptathlon, taking one event at a time and you can literally go in your own little bubble and focus and
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rehearse on the things you know you can do well. i rehearse on the things you know you can do well-— can do well. i can see some trophies behind you. — can do well. i can see some trophies behind you. in _ can do well. i can see some trophies behind you, in various _ can do well. i can see some trophies behind you, in various photographs. behind you, in various photographs but where is the gold medal? i am not tellina but where is the gold medal? i am not telling you- — but where is the gold medal? i am not telling you. that _ but where is the gold medal? i am not telling you. that is _ but where is the gold medal? i am not telling you. that is fair - but where is the gold medal? i am not telling you. that is fair enough but i not telling you. that is fair enough but i cannot _ not telling you. that is fair enough but i cannot see _ not telling you. that is fair enough but i cannot see it _ not telling you. that is fair enough but i cannot see it and _ not telling you. that is fair enough but i cannot see it and that - not telling you. that is fair enough but i cannot see it and that is i but i cannot see it and that is rprising. but i cannot see it and that is r-raisin. ., ., , m rprising. yeah, actually, here! no. that would — rprising. yeah, actually, here! no. that would be _ rprising. yeah, actually, here! no. that would be cool— rprising. yeah, actually, here! no. that would be cool if _ rprising. yeah, actually, here! no. that would be cool if you're - rprising. yeah, actually, here! no. that would be cool if you're still i that would be cool if you're still wearing it 20 years later. it is really nice to talk to you, wish you so much lock but pounds from your training that there is a bit of what you need on the day but you have put the practice in, so fingers crossed. thank you. the practice in, so fingers crossed. thank you-— the practice in, so fingers crossed. thank ou. ., ,, , . thank you. thank you very much, both of ou, thank you. thank you very much, both of you. appreciate _ thank you. thank you very much, both of you, appreciate it. _ the headlines on bbc news... more than a thousand extra volunteers in the uk are being recruited to take part in a study looking at whether a mix of covid vaccines can be used for the first and second doses. if you're young and black, you've been hit hardest hit
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by unemployment during the pandemic; according to new research, 35% of young black people are out of work in the uk. police and protesters clash for a third night in the us city of minneapolis — after an unarmed young black man daunte wright was shot dead by a white police officer. mps in the uk vote today on whether to hold a parliamentary inquiry into the lobbying activities of the former prime minister, david cameron, for the collapsed firm greensill capital — and how gov minsters responded to him the family of a pregnant nurse who died with covid—19 in the uk — hasn't recieved any money from a fundraising campaign which is now at 186 thousand pounds — even though it was set up to support her husband and children. president biden says he will withdraw all us forces from afghanistan by 11th september — the twentieth anniversary of the 9/11 terror attacks. the trump administration had previously decided on a complete military exit by may, following negotiations with the taliban. here's our chief international
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correspondent lyse doucet. for many months now, president trump really started focusing on the withdrawal of his last few thousand us troops. afghans and foreigners alike said, we've got to avoid the mistakes of history, and there was an echo of the soviet troop withdrawal in 1989 which sadly paved the way to the collapse of the government and a civil war which went then pave the way to the taliban, and for so many, they were saying we cannot repeat the mistakes of the past and this is really a legacy that afghanistan wants to ensure that doesn't happen again but
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beyond all expectations, your afghanistan is again a withdrawal of the last 10,000 us led nato forces leaving the taliban poised to return to power and the afghans i've been speaking to after the announcement was first revealed are all saying they fear again a civil war and had hoped there would be some conditions attached to the true withdrawal but the senior us administration officialjournalist was the senior us administration official journalist was adamant the conditions up to last through two years have not worked her boots home for america to close the book on this 20 year war. white the uk's biggest retailer, tesco, has reported a 20% drop in annual profits despite a surge in sales. in the uk and ireland sales grew by 8.6% — but profit was down on the year — due to nearly £900m worth of extra payroll costs as a result of the coronavirus. our business correspondent is alice baxter.
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it's one of these strange set of numbers that seem to contradict each other, but not really. so tesco have this huge, strong rise in revenue, up by 7% to £53.4 billion, what the supermarket chain is describing as extraction strong revenue. but you are right, profit for the year fell by nearly 20%, and that's due to all of the costs that the supermarket had to incur in order to comply with covid regulations, and also helping to put staff on sick leave or helping them to shield, so many costs relating to making the supermarket covid compliant. yeah, falling profits after spending nearly £900 million to carry on trading
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through the pandemic. so what the supermarket is saying that they can what they also say they saw as this huge surge in online sales boosted by 77% during the covid pandemic as well. it also is saying that it was one of the retailers that did benefit throughout the pandemic, primarily because other nonessential shops had to shut, restaurants had to shut, so tesco along with the other major supermarkets benefiting from that. but yes, these results showing a sharp rise in revenue, but also this fall in pre—tax profits. better forecasting for
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the rest of the year going forward, they expect perhaps some of that revenue to fall away, perhaps a slight dip in that surge we saw in online sales, but again a decrease in costs in those covid preparations. a third actor from the hit australian soap opera, neighbours, has gone public with allegations of racism. in a statement, sharonjohal said she had faced racist taunts from white castmates, and felt further targeted when she asked for help. sharonjohal, who has indian heritage, left the show in march after four years. in response, production company fremantle media said it would hold a review into the allegations. our australia correspondent shaima khalil has more. she said she had experienced direct, indirect and casual racism but did not name names or name anyone in particular but she did say there were incidents were a former colleague had compared her to a bobble head toy that as the mimicked the problematic character of apu
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from the simpsons which got complains of racism in that. despite sharon asking the person to stop many times. she also said when she went to management with her complaints that they were sympathetic but not helpful, and they didn't do anything to stop this from occurring and i voted other — neither did other cast members which left her feeling isolated and marginalised. sharonjohal is the third to come through, saying she felt a moral obligation after two former aboriginal stars came through with their own experiences, and that onset raises the allegation was first raised by two aboriginal former cast members and one actually said in a statement that they found it traumatising to work in what they described as a culturally unsafe environment and she herself has praised sharonjohal for coming out and saying this. it is a fixture and a stable for millions, notjust in australia but in the uk, so quite an unsettling moment really for them but the production is that they are looking into it as a spokesperson for channel five, the channel which carries the programme into the uk, said they condemn racism and take issues of discrimination
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really seriously. japan is facing intense criticism from its neighbours over plans to release more than a million tonnes of contaminated water from the stricken fukushima nuclear plant into the sea. china called japan's decision extremely irresponsible and south korea's president moon is pressing for the issue to be raised with the international tribunal for the law of the sea. courtney bembridge reports. it's been more than a decade since disaster struck at fukushima. during the nuclear meltdown, more than a million tonnes of water was used to cool the reactors. it's been stored in tanks ever since, butjapan has just approved a plan to slowly release it into the ocean. it says the water will be treated undiluted so radiation levels are below those set for drinking water. but it hasn't stopped
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protests like this in fukushima. translation: such a decision is completely irresponsible. i i don't think people with common sense will do such a thing. the country's fishing and tourism industries have also argued against it. suzuki yoshinaga runs a guesthouse in iwaki city. it's the only ones still standing in the area, and he worried this will drive tourists away for good. translation: i will have to live l with it for the rest of my life. | tourists will not say explicitly that they are not travelling here because of the release of the nuclear waste water, but i think people just naturally will not come here. china says the decision is extremely irresponsible. translation: despite doubts and opposition | from home and abroad, and _ without sufficient consultation with neighbouring countries, the japanese site has unilaterally decided.
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south korea has also expressed concern. these protests were in seoul this week. but the united nations nuclear watchdog has backed the plan. they will discharge the water in a controlled way. there is no harm, there is no activity either in fish or the sediment or the water. the process is expected to take decades to complete. courtney bembridge, bbc news. with the easing of restrictions in england — tanning salons opened on monday — which prompted a warning from campaigners of the risk of melanoma. the skin cancer is often sometimes caused by too much exposure to the sun — and the charity that represents suffers in the uk says not enough is being done on social media to educate those who want to use sunbeds — which they say could lead to severe problems for the nhs.
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well we can speak now to gillian nuttall from melanoma uk and anthea smith — who suffers from melanoma cancer. we can now speak to gary lipman who is chairman of the sunbed association. what has happened since then? sadly it has progressed, in stage four, do not know how long i have to live. it spread from my head and neck to my right along, my bowels, my site, my spine on both sides of my brain. left and right sides of my brain, so, yeah, could not really be any worse, sadly. i’m so, yeah, could not really be any worse. sadly-— worse, sadly. i'm really, really, really sorry _ worse, sadly. i'm really, really, really sorry to _ worse, sadly. i'm really, really, really sorry to hear _ worse, sadly. i'm really, really, really sorry to hear that. - worse, sadly. i'm really, really, really sorry to hear that. the i really sorry to hear that. the reason you want to talk to us today is to talk to our audience about the use of sunbeds. you used them from teenage years, is that right is mike i did, from around the age of 1a, because there was no restrictions
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then, and we have some mild restrictions now. i did use them, i got addicted to them, as people each day do. you will get addicted to having that time, this proven links now addiction to a tan is as strong as a link to the addiction to other things with people getting addicted to having that tan and tand, which is extremely dangerous. really dangerous. is extremely dangerous. really dangerous-— dangerous. you describe the restrictions _ dangerous. you describe the restrictions is _ dangerous. you describe the restrictions is mild, - dangerous. you describe the restrictions is mild, we i dangerous. you describe the restrictions is mild, we have| dangerous. you describe the i restrictions is mild, we have the under 18 is not being able to use them. are you absolutely clear it is because of the sunbeds you use that lead to you having malignant melanoma?— lead to you having malignant melanoma? ., ., ,~ ., melanoma? categorically clear. eve one melanoma? categorically clear. everyone of— melanoma? categorically clear. everyone of the _ melanoma? categorically clear. everyone of the consultants i'mj everyone of the consultants i'm under each asked me if i used sunbeds in all of my consultations
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and the british association of dermatologists, the world health organization, the nhs, cancer research uk, they are categorical evidence not like the evidence is there. like i say, everyone of my consultants at me that an the many people i support as a proud ambassadorfor melanoma uk people i support as a proud ambassador for melanoma uk sadly also the evidence is there. i will brina in also the evidence is there. i will bring in gillian _ also the evidence is there. i will bring in gillian not _ also the evidence is there. i will bring in gillian not all, - also the evidence is there. i will bring in gillian not all, the i also the evidence is there. i will bring in gillian not all, the ceo of melanoma uk. hello. what do you want to say to an about her diagnosis? hello, good morning. anthea hasjust been an absolute star for us over the last couple of years or so and i'm devastated that she is your telling your story in many respects i wish andy and i had never met because we wouldn't be having this
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conversation today and she'd be fine but i just want to say thank you to anthea for doing what you're doing and doing your best to get your messages out and help our organisation to try to make people aware and that little bit safer. what is your message, anthea, to people? mr; what is your message, anthea, to neale? r, , what is your message, anthea, to --eole? y , ., ., what is your message, anthea, to a-eole? g , ., ., , people? my messages do not use them. the evidence — people? my messages do not use them. the evidence is — people? my messages do not use them. the evidence is there _ people? my messages do not use them. the evidence is there and _ people? my messages do not use them. the evidence is there and self— people? my messages do not use them. the evidence is there and self tans i the evidence is there and self tans and spray tans these days are absolutely amazing, and they are a safe way. in an ideal world, i'd like people to feel comfortable in their own skin and i think it's ironic we have people... people in this country bleaching their skin because they want to be lighter because they want to be lighter because they want to be lighter because they don't want to have a dark skin and we also have massive population of people who are desperately dying... literally dying, i'm literally dying because of a tan, to want to get that darker
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skin. the things we've seen on social media, the nonessential sunbed shops open again on monday and the queues of people, and the queues of social media that i've seen of images of people burnt yet the sunbed association would have you believe people cannot burn on a sunbed or establishments don't let that happen when you only need to dip into social media and you can see that damage. ijust dip into social media and you can see that damage. i just find dip into social media and you can see that damage. ijust find it really distressing. i'm 45 years old and i've had to add conversations with my husband and my two sons about my prognosis, nobody should have that conversation but the now 18, 19, 20 using the sunbed queueing up 18, 19, 20 using the sunbed queueing up and they will be a jungle with than even they have to have that conversation and its devastating, absolutely devastating. back conversation and its devastating, absolutely devastating.— absolutely devastating. back to gillian, the _ absolutely devastating. back to gillian, the sunbed _ absolutely devastating. back to gillian, the sunbed association | absolutely devastating. back to i gillian, the sunbed association said the members operate to a strict code
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of actors which requires trained staff to ensure customers are screened prior to using the sunbeds and they are given the correct advice and information about tanning responsibly and learning must also break always be avoided. is that not enough? a, break always be avoided. is that not enanh? �* .., , break always be avoided. is that not enanh? �* , ., break always be avoided. is that not enanh? ~ , ., , .,, break always be avoided. is that not enanh? ~ , ., , ., ., enough? a couple of years ago, we issued several _ enough? a couple of years ago, we issued several freedom _ enough? a couple of years ago, we issued several freedom of - issued several freedom of information request throughout the uk, hundreds of them, and very few councils came back to say anything had been done. we also had a mystery shop were instructed a private company to do that for us and i think it was 60% of salons belonging to the association giving the information so i don't think it an off and i have to make it clear if you would allow me just to say the association put out a series of
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posts yesterday to say... they were talking with the anti—tanning interviewees, it makes it sound like we are cranks, we are not and tie anything, we say if people want to be tanned, get a spray tan, it's easy enough, our organisation was set up by a family friend and we are here to support melanoma patients, theirfamilies and help here to support melanoma patients, their families and help fund research so we are not anti—anything at all, and i think if they can use social media to put out that kind of message, then... stand social media to put out that kind of message, then. . ._ social media to put out that kind of message, then... and they also use social media. _ message, then... and they also use social media, to _ message, then... and they also use social media, to be _ message, then. .. and they also use social media, to be fair— message, then... and they also use social media, to be fair to _ message, then... and they also use social media, to be fair to them, i social media, to be fair to them, run responsible tanning campaigns as they say, they did that in 2018, 19, 20 20 and this year saying they produced two videos for the members to use, social media platforms to advise consumers, post lockdown. i think if that case, they remember
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those. for example, a young girl has posted a picture saying to 15 minutes sunbeds and i'm burnt, i look like a lobster, three sunbed yesterday. someone has message them and set in different salons? she said yes. how can this be responsible? we are talking about complete irresponsibility year, there is nothing responsible about that. what is your message to people watching? mr; that. what is your message to people watchina ? g ,,., that. what is your message to people watchina? g , that. what is your message to people watchina ? g , , that. what is your message to people watchina? g , , ., that. what is your message to people watchina ? g , , ., ., watching? my message is look at what has happened — watching? my message is look at what has happened to _ watching? my message is look at what has happened to anthea _ watching? my message is look at what has happened to anthea and _ watching? my message is look at what has happened to anthea and if - watching? my message is look at what has happened to anthea and if you i has happened to anthea and if you are going to get a tan, use a spray tan. it was said earlier, the world health organization, nhs england, there are no reputable or who say sunbeds are safe and our message is
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please have a look at anthea and think about what you're doing. anthea, i want to apologise to viewers, i was waving because i want to know if the sunbed association is “p to know if the sunbed association is up yet, we are having technical problems. how often did use sunbeds? you spoke about an addiction, were you addicted and what does that mean? i you addicted and what does that mean? . you addicted and what does that mean? , ., , , ., mean? i use them, initially, prior to aoain mean? i use them, initially, prior to going on _ mean? i use them, initially, prior to going on holiday _ mean? i use them, initially, prior to going on holiday or _ mean? i use them, initially, prior to going on holiday or initially i i to going on holiday or initially i had a work experience in a salon and the sunbed was in the salon and that was used to thank me for working but thatis was used to thank me for working but that is where the addiction began and it would be three or four times and it would be three or four times a week, but then it would be... into was a dull day, you would think i will go on again and have a blast. i was never stop. i tanned and a founder member sunbed association salon and i was never asked about my in town, my skin type, i had a car
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that i prepaid, the sunbed association will have believe that they don't recommend anyone use them more than 60 times a year but i was never told to use and less than that and it was the opposite, i was encouraged to buy more minute to actually save more money. health and safety recommend they don't recommend or advise accelerators to be used or the sunbed association salons are selling accelerators. it is an accelerator white to black. and it has already cost the damage. to change your skin white to black when they say from the health and safety association, accelerator should not be used and should not be promoted. they are all selling accelerators which then further
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damaged the skin that is already damaged. a tan skin is a brown skin. already. irate damaged. a tan skin is a brown skin. alread . ~ ., damaged. a tan skin is a brown skin. alread . . ., . already. we have some technical -roblems already. we have some technical problems which _ already. we have some technical problems which means _ already. we have some technical problems which means we i already. we have some technical problems which means we are i already. we have some technical| problems which means we are not already. we have some technical- problems which means we are not able to talk to the chairman of the sunbed association right now, we have been trying, believe me. what they also point out is that the kind of level at a bias and information that they say their members do give a people who want to you sunbeds is way more than what happens when people tan in the sunshine. i'm going to thank you for your time, thank you very much, anthea, we appreciate your message and gillian not all, thank you as well. what has sir mickjagger been doing during lockdwon? —— what has sir mickjagger been doing during lockdown? he's been writing music, of course, as tim allman explains.
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he was once an exile on main street, now he's a legend in lockdown. sir mickjagger, stuck at home like the rest of us, decided to turn his experience into song, easy sleazy, a tale about a zoom calls, tiktok videos and too much television. it's a transatlantic co—production made with another rock god of a younger vintage. mick said... dave's response... it's actually been quite a busy period for the rolling stones lead singer. last year, the band launched their first store
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in london's carnaby street. now a rocker celebrating a hopeful return to normality. "we are heading back to paradise," he sings. some satisfaction at last. you're watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. hello again. as we go through the next few days, pressure. things relatively settled and not necessarily bone dry and we are looking at chilly nights, chilly days overnight frost and fog with temperatures picking up towards the end of the week. here is the high pressure, air moving around is in a clockwise direction is over the next couple of days, along the east coast, when we'll be calling off the north sea and that will cool it. a
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lot of dry and sunny weather continuing across the west in the south, some of its slow moving because there was not much of a breeze and land to move them along as you can from the white circles, indicating the sustained wind speeds what it is the direction of the wind coming in from the chilly north sea that will make it feel cool. along the coastline of england, 8—9 celsius at the top bill that in mind as you —— you if you're heading out for a stroll. temperatures out towards the west, away from the north sea coastline, 11—13 c. through the evening and overnight, the temperatures will follow and the showers fade. cloud around, patching with them for forming and temperatures generallyjust with them for forming and temperatures generally just above with them for forming and temperatures generallyjust above or just below freezing. a touch of frost, chilly start. then a lot of
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dry weather, sunshine but in the south—eastern corner from lincolnshire, east anglia into kent, we see some showers, some of them pushing further inland ones, southern england and some of the marriage. forthe southern england and some of the marriage. for the 0s southern england and some of the marriage. for the os that was, light breezes and a lot of dry and sunny conditions. temperature wise, cool again along the coast line but as we move towards the west and the sunshine, looking at highs of up to 14 sunshine, looking at highs of up to 1a celsius. then for that weekend, ridge of high pressure upon us, the trying to come in from the west will eventually introduce some rain into northern ireland and not gotland with how far south that get, once again looking at sunshine in between and ties celsius —— and highs of celsius
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stop —— and highs of 1a celsius
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this is bbc news. i'm annita mcveigh. the headlines at 11am: more than 1,000 extra volunteers are being recruited to take part in a study looking at whether a mix of covid vaccines can be used for the first and second doses. that would give a lot more flexibility if there was any problems with supply with one vaccine, for example, or a change in recommendations for different age groups. young black people have been hardest hit by unemployment during the pandemic. according to new research, 35% of young black people don't have a job. mps vote today on whether to hold a parliamentary inquiry into the lobbying activities of the former prime minister, david cameron, for the collapsed firm greensill capital and how government minsters responded to him. the family of a pregnant nurse who died with covid—19
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hasn't received any money from a fundraising campaign which is now at £186,000, even though it was set up to support her husband and children. and after supplies were flown in, every adult on the uk's most remote inhabited island — fair isle — has now been vaccinated against covid—19. hello and welcome to bbc news. a major uk trial looking at whether covid vaccines can be mixed, meaning different ones are used for first and second doses, is being expanded. adults over 50 who have already had a first dose of pfizer or astrazeneca can apply to take part in the study, as our health reporter michelle roberts explains. currently, the nhs offers people
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an identical covid—19 vaccine for their first and second doses, but some experts believe switching to a different brand of vaccine for the second dose might give broader and longer—lasting protection against the pandemic virus and new variants of it, as well as offer more flexibility to vaccine roll—out. more than 800 people have been helping researchers investigate this in a trial called com—cov. they've received two doses of either pfizer, astrazeneca or a combination of both to see which works best for immunity. results from this first stage are expected next month, but the investigators now hope to recruit around a thousand people aged 50 or older to take part and test more vaccines in different combinations. that includes the new moderna vaccine and the novavax one that's expected to be approved soon in the uk. dosing with one, then dosing with the other. and that would give a lot more flexibility if there was any problems with supply for one vaccine, for example,
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or changes in recommendations for different age groups. then if someone's been primed with one vaccine, they're not locked into getting the same vaccine for the second dose. and we will be testing those combinations against the new variants as they come through. so the blood tests we obtained, we'll test them against the new variants to see potentially if they offer any broader protection against the multiple different strains. volunteers need to have already had one covid jab on the nhs in the past few months and be willing to travel to a regional nhs hospital trust site in england to take part. they'll have blood taken to check how well vaccines trigger an immune response. the study will run for a year, but there should be some reportable findings byjune orjuly to shape how the uk and the world continues to protect populations against this deadly virus. michelle roberts, bbc news. dr lindsay broadbent is an epidemiologist at queen's university in belfast. she told my colleague victoria derbyshire about the significance of the trial.
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this is an incredibly interesting and important trial, because as we just heard, it offers an awful lot of flexibility with the vaccine roll—out, and expanding this trial to include the new vaccines that have been licensed, or ones that hopefully will be licensed soon, will offer even more flexibility with the roll—out programme. i wonder if it seems kind of logical that, irrespective of which vaccines you use, obviously you have to test them in humans and see what side—effects might be, but every vaccine gives you protection against the virus. of course, and because all of the vaccines that are currently licensed are all directed against the same part of the virus, they are all engineered to target the s protein, the spike protein, they will all produce the similar immune response, so it makes sense to test a combination. we may be able to get an enhanced
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immune response by combining different types of vaccines. how soon do you think we might be able to feel the impact of this study? so the study is scheduled to last for 13 months from the initial enrolment, which was in february, but we will start to see results next month hopefully for the initial combination of astrazeneca and pfizer. and then the current enrolment to include the moderna and novavax vaccines will be several months down the line for that. so we are not talking about any changes to the vaccine programme in the nearfuture, but this could mean fantastic things towards autumn, towards the end of this year. we reported yesterday about the pausing of thejohnson &johnson vaccine in the united states, six or so blood clots have been reported, 7 million people have had the vaccine. what is your view on the pausing of that?
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it is certainly done with an abundance of caution, and i think the openness with which it is done is fantastic. we know that these incidents are incredibly rare. they are quite literally one in a million, but of course with any new medication, any new vaccine, we need to be careful, and we need to make sure that any possible association is thoroughly investigated. mps will vote this afternoon on whether to establish a parliamentary inquiry into the lobbying activities of the former prime minister, david cameron. labour says a government investigation into mr cameron's work for the collapsed firm, greensill capital, and the responses of current ministers, is insufficient. tory mps have accused labour of political opportunism. our political correspondent damian grammaticas reports. the actions of a former prime minister and those of current ministers. labour says they've brought
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the shadow of a scandal that parliament must investigate, or it fears the review borisjohnson has set up will be a whitehall whitewash. day by day, new revelations are coming out about greensill capital. we need a proper inquiry to get to the bottom of this, not the half—hearted inquiry that the government have announced so far. the latest revelations, that the former head of government procurement began working part—time at greensill capital while he was still a civil servant. bill carruthers says his move in 2015 followed established procedure, was approved and he believes not uncommon. labour says the real questions are for the conservatives. how in 2011 a financier lex greensill became an advisor to the government. labour says the real questions are for the conservatives.
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how in 2011 a financier lex greensill became an advisor to the government. and his company hired david cameron, now out of office, who next year arranged a private drink with the matt hancock, the health secretary, and mr green seal. the health secretary, and mr greensill. and last year he texted chancellor rishi sunak seeking access for greensill for government funds. mr cameron has said he broke no rules, mr hancock that he reported his meeting with greensill and acted properly. the chancellor says he has been open too. he has released private texts he sent to mr cameron in which he says he pushed the treasury to help greensill, and the government says its inquiry can ask anybody whatever it needs. but labour insists what happens behind closed doors was cronyism, and an independent inquiry is needed. damian grammaticas, bbc news, westminster. our political correspondent jonathan blake told me more about the vote. labour was never likely to win this vote, which it is staging as part
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of an opposition debate in the house of commons. but what it will do is force the conservatives to come out and vote against it to stop it passing, and if it had passed, it would have enabled parliament to set up a new cross—party committee of mps to look into not only david cameron's links with greensill and his approach to government as a lobbyist but also the wider issue of lobbying in the rules around it here at westminster as a whole. so, in forcing in effect the conservatives to come and vote down this attempt to set up that committee of mps by labour, it leaves the conservatives open to the criticism from labour that they are directly blocking and resisting attempts to get a grip on the issue of lobbying and resisting transparency in principle. so that is what is at play here today, and nothing
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will materially have changed by the end of the day, and a lot of debate in parliament this afternoon, but it will be, if you like, a forcing of the conservatives' hand, to block labour's attempt here to set up this new committee of mps. and in the process, at prime minister's questions at lunchtime and the debate in the house of commons after that, there will be claim and counterclaim about who is responsible for what and whether the government is taking the right approach, whether ministers followed the rules and acted properly at all times, which those implicated in this row have insisted that they have done. but it is really a continuation of the debate here at westminster today about what the best approaches to tackle the of lobbying, which many agree has got out of hand, and needs to be looked at again. whether it is the government's specific inquiry into david cameron's links to greensill, and greensill�*s activities within government,
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or whether it is what labour wants to do, and set up a broader inquiry with a larger scope to look at the rules around lobbying as a whole. and you can watch coverage of that debate in parliament here on the news channel, and on bbc parliament from around 12:a5pm. protesters have clashed with police in minneapolis for the third night in a row, after a black man was shot dead on sunday. the policewoman who fatally shot daunte wright has resigned, along with the police chief. it comes as the trial of the officer accused of killing george floyd in the same city, begins hearing from defence witnesses. our north america correspondent barbara plett usher reports. gunshot. for a third night police drove back protesters venting their anger over the shooting of another black man. hit in the chest by a policewoman who confused her gun with her taser, in the middle of the trial of the officer accused of killing george floyd.
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do you know the difference between a gun and a taser? under pressure, the policewoman resigned. she was a 26—year veteran of the force. she was followed by the police chief. we are here and we will fight forjustice for this family, just like we are fighting for our brothers. george floyd's family has come together in solidarity with the relatives of the dead man, daunte wright. sharing their quest forjustice and their loss. i thought somebody was playing a joke on me. it hurt me to my heart. daunte was a beautiful child. he might not have been an angel, but he was our angel. our angel. he belonged to us.
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inside the courtroom, the defence took over after the prosecution rested its case. more footage of george floyd from police body cameras was shown tojurors. the defence is arguing that it was a drug overdose which caused his death rather than excessive force by the officer who restrained him by kneeling on his neck. testimony is expected to wrap by the end of the week, and the jury will begin deliberations shortly after that. there is a lot at stake in what it decides. the authorities are bracing for the possibility of further unrest once there is a verdict. they were hoping that the resignation of the police officials would help to defuse the anger, but so far that has failed to stop the protests. barbara plett usher, bbc news, minneapolis.
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now we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. the us climate envoy john kerry will become the biden administration's most senior official to visit china today. he'll be arriving in shanghai shortly, to discuss international efforts to tackle global warming. mr kerry says current political tensions between washington and beijing must be set aside, so the climate emergency can be addressed. byford tsang is a senior policy analyst at a climate change think tank. good to have you with us today. john kerry acknowledging the big disagreements on some issues between the us and china, but saying that
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climate has to stand alone. how receptive do you think china will be to that particular message? i receptive do you think china will be to that particular message?- to that particular message? i think china is definitely _ to that particular message? i think china is definitely receptive - to that particular message? i think china is definitely receptive to i to that particular message? i think china is definitely receptive to the | china is definitely receptive to the message because of me look at the frosty meeting in alaska a couple of weeks ago between the two countries, weeks ago between the two countries, we see that climate change was being discussed. the chinese were expecting to set up a joint working group with the us on climate change, so they are obviously receptive. this meeting were expecting tomorrow is very significant because it's the first official visit by the biden administration to china since the president took office. both sides are sending their top climate envoy, so it shows there is weight in this topic. china are hoping to smooth over the relationship after the previous frosty relationship in
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alaska. ., , previous frosty relationship in alaska. ., _ ., , alaska. one of the things john kerry is countertop _ alaska. one of the things john kerry is countertop -- _ alaska. one of the things john kerry is countertop -- keen _ alaska. one of the things john kerry is countertop -- keen to _ alaska. one of the things john kerry is countertop -- keen to talk - alaska. one of the things john kerry is countertop -- keen to talk to i is countertop —— keen to talk to china about is what is known as the call and belt initiative, a big infrastructure programme where china is investing in coal powered programmes like building roads, bridges, ports etc. is there any sense that china is prepared to change its direction on that? i don't think there is a clear signal we have seen in terms of china changing course on this infrastructure programme initiative. we are seeing the size of the programme has been reduced quite a bit in the past couple of years because of the uncertainties of the trade war between the us and china and other uncertainties at home. but in terms of coming back to this meeting tomorrow, the initiative will be on the agenda and one of the
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key things they will discuss is chinese funding of coal power plants overseas, especially in southeast asia. so at the moment we seeing that countries like south korea, and korea have new coal power development in the region. there are one of the main drivers of coal emissions, of carbon emissions, in the world. so the us will likely raise this in the meeting and we are also seen that the us has been talking to japan and south korea on theissue talking to japan and south korea on the issue and the expect to make some announcements next week, during the summit hosted byjohn kerry in washington, virtually, and it is expected that japan and south korea will stop funding coal projects overseas, so china would be left as the sole funder. so i think that
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will be one of the issues on the agenda. i will be one of the issues on the a a enda. . will be one of the issues on the aaenda. , ., , , agenda. i will be really interesting to watch because _ agenda. i will be really interesting to watch because of _ agenda. i will be really interesting to watch because of course - agenda. i will be really interesting to watch because of course both i to watch because of course both sides, as you say, sending their senior climate people to this. they will want to have something very positive to show for it. in terms of china's domestic use of coal, we talked about coal powered programmes abroad, the domestic use of coal, it has been closing older coal powered plants and investing in your plants, hasn't it? presumably they are relatively speaking greener and cleaner? ., ., �* , ., cleaner? yeah, that's right. china has been closing _ cleaner? yeah, that's right. china has been closing a _ cleaner? yeah, that's right. china has been closing a lot _ cleaner? yeah, that's right. china has been closing a lot of - cleaner? yeah, that's right. china has been closing a lot of old, i has been closing a lot of old, inefficient plants. the coal powered fleet in china is among the world's most efficient and is less polluting in terms of emissions, but still it is a main driver of the country's carbon emissions. if china is serious in showing that they are
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meeting climate targets, ambitious targets were announced last year, to achieve net zero carbon emissions by 2060... achieve net zero carbon emissions by 2060. .. , achieve net zero carbon emissions by 2060... , ., , 2060. .. does china see meeting those taraets 2060. .. does china see meeting those tara ets as 2060. .. does china see meeting those targets as absolutely _ 2060. .. does china see meeting those targets as absolutely essential - 2060. .. does china see meeting those targets as absolutely essential to i targets as absolutely essential to building influence abroad? yes. targets as absolutely essential to building influence abroad?- building influence abroad? yes. i mean, building influence abroad? yes. i mean. china _ building influence abroad? yes. i mean, china will— building influence abroad? yes. i mean, china will see _ building influence abroad? yes. i mean, china will see that - building influence abroad? yes. i mean, china will see that as i mean, china will see that as essential for two reasons. firstly, building influence abroad and the position as a leader in international affairs through climate change. but also addressing climate change. but also addressing climate change. but also addressing climate change is important to national security because climate change will affect its coastal region and food production. at the moment, china operates half of the world's coal fleet, contributing to a a significant amount of emissions. it will be one of the key issues on the agenda at the meeting tomorrow, but at the moment we have not seen
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any signs of china moving on this issue. so, watch this space, i think. ., ., , ., , ., think. potentially lots of interesting _ think. potentially lots of. interesting developments think. potentially lots of i interesting developments over think. potentially lots of _ interesting developments over the next week or so. thank you very much for your time today. next week or so. thank you very much for your time today.— the headlines on bbc news... more than 1,000 extra volunteers are being recruited to take part in a study looking at whether a mix of covid vaccines can be used for the first and second doses. young black people have been hardest hit by unemployment during the pandemic. according to new research, 35% of young black people don't have a job. mps m ps vote mps vote today on whether to hold a parliamentary enquiry into the activities of david cameron regarding lobbying for collapsed firm greensill capital and how mps responded to him. this morning, the transport
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committee has been taking evidence into the global travel taskforce report which has been looking at safe and sustainable international travel in and out of the uk. last week, the report announced foreign holidays would resume on 17 may at the earliest. mark tanzer, chief executive, abta — the travel association, was giving evidence this morning and joins us now. we said that we regard this as a step forward but the devil will be in the detail. people are obviously very hungry to know which countries will be in which traffic light category so we can make plans for the summer. some of the ideas put forward were about vaccination certificates. there needs to be a lot of work before they can become operational. we've missed a lot of this your�*s travel already through lockdown. the summer season is absolutely critical. weeks lost
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matter to customers and the industry. i? matter to customers and the indust . ' a, matter to customers and the indust .' , matter to customers and the indust . ' , ., ., industry. 17 may is the date that it ho -ed industry. 17 may is the date that it hoped for. — industry. 17 may is the date that it hoped for. the _ industry. 17 may is the date that it hoped for, the reopening - industry. 17 may is the date that it hoped for, the reopening of- hoped for, the reopening of international travel, potentially, but it's not guaranteed yet. in practice, how much reasonable notice to think the industry really needs to think the industry really needs to actually get ready for that? the more, the to actually get ready for that? iie more, the better. we to actually get ready for that? "iie more, the better. we have to actually get ready for that? i“ie more, the better. we have been to actually get ready for that? iie more, the better. we have been told early may we will be given an idea of which countries are in which categories, but that is short time. people need to book holidays and the aviation industry needs to get in gear. there is always a lack. we need to get an idea of how changes might work through the summer so we can anticipate plans and people can book with confidence. that can anticipate plans and people can book with confidence.— book with confidence. that is critical. let's _ book with confidence. that is critical. let's talk _ book with confidence. that is critical. let's talk about i book with confidence. that is l critical. let's talk about testing with regards to travel. we spoke about pcr testing versus lateral
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flow last week. we are told pcr will be required even if it is a green country with good vaccination and a relatively low rate of covid. a big push back from the industry regarding the use of pcr due to the cost. one company saying the cost will be reduced to £60 if they travel with a partner airline. what travel with a partner airline. what is our travel with a partner airline. what is your response _ travel with a partner airline. what is your response to _ travel with a partner airline. what is your response to that? - travel with a partner airline. mast is your response to that? that travel with a partner airline. ““igisgt is your response to that? that is welcome as we are twice the cost of other places in europe, but even £60 for a family is a lot of money. we would say £60 is beyond what is needed. if we could have a cheap test or a lateral flow test as an initial test or on return, that would be more appropriate. but of course the ultimate goal is to have
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no restrictions. you course the ultimate goal is to have no restrictions.— no restrictions. you talk about aenomic no restrictions. you talk about genomic testing _ no restrictions. you talk about genomic testing and _ no restrictions. you talk about genomic testing and so i no restrictions. you talk about genomic testing and so forth l no restrictions. you talk about i genomic testing and so forth which can be done if someone has a pcr test, but if someone comes back from even a green country and we want to be absolutely sure they are not carrying some sort of variant into the uk, isn“t carrying some sort of variant into the uk, isn't it the pcr, unfortunately more expensive, but it's the test that's needed? yes. it's the test that's needed? yes, but i it's the test that's needed? yes, but i think _ it's the test that's needed? yes, but | think the _ it's the test that's needed? yes, but i think the lateral _ it's the test that's needed? yes, but i think the lateral flow i it's the test that's needed? ia: but i think the lateral flow test gives you an indication of whether you've got any covid symptoms or infection which you could then test for variation on top of that. we have to take a certain amount of risk if we want international travel to start again, which is important from a social and an economic point of view. you need to accept there are possibilities that new variants can enter the country, but we are doing this on top of the population in the uk which has been increasingly vaccinated. we need a medical understanding to say, does
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the vaccine protect you against new variants of concern? what are the impacts on transmissibility? a lot of work needs to happen in parallel streams over the summer to get people moving again. the watchword is caution from a government point of view and we understand that. at a certain point, we need to allow the industry and people to breathe more freely. in industry and people to breathe more freel . , ., i, , i freely. in terms of the traffic li u ht freely. in terms of the traffic light system. _ freely. in terms of the traffic light system, it's _ freely. in terms of the traffic light system, it's difficult - freely. in terms of the traffic light system, it's difficult to | freely. in terms of the traffic - light system, it's difficult to talk about dates because we don't know where different countries exactly will be as we move closer towards the main summer holiday period, but when do you hope or expect to get more detail on how countries will be falling into the green, amber or red lists? and very importantly, how they might move between those parts of the traffic light system? weill. of the traffic light system? well, the re ort of the traffic light system? well, the report has — of the traffic light system? well, the report has given _ of the traffic light system? well, the report has given very - of the traffic light system? in the report has given very general criteria for how categories will be assessed, so it's to do with the vaccination level in the country, the infection rate, with quality of
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data and genomic sequencing there as well as any difference in variants. all of that work will be assessed. the more information we get about how the criteria is applied, the better. customers can then book with confidence as they look at their summer holidays. so we wait to see this process and progress. the review dates have been set and the first one is at the end ofjune. we need to know how frequently assessments will be made. we don't want them so frequently that we are chopping and changing every week, but we need to reflect the reality is that countries will likely move into a green category.— is that countries will likely move into a green category. thank you very much _ into a green category. thank you very much for— into a green category. thank you very much for that. _ young black people have been hit
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hardest by unemployment during the covid pandemic, according to new research. the resolution foundation think tank said that over the past year, thejobless rate for young black people in the uk rose by more than a third to 35%, compared with 24% for young people of asian descent and 13% for young white people. the foundation said that covid had widened existing gaps young black people have been hit hardest by unemployment during the covid pandemic, according to new research. the resolution foundation think tank said that over the past year, thejobless rate for young black people in the uk rose by more than a third to 35%, compared with 24% for young people of asian descent and 13% for young white people. the foundation said that covid had widened existing gaps between ethnic groups. it added that young people in britain had borne the brunt ofjob losses in lockdown. between the second and third quarters of 2020 the unemployment rate among 18—24 year olds rose from 11.5% to 13.6%. i can now speak to mary ibiyemi who's 21. she lost herjob working
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in a takeaway last year. mary, thanks very much forjoining us today on bbc news to talk about this. how long were you working on the takeaway? i this. how long were you working on the takeaway?— the takeaway? i was working in the takeaway for _ the takeaway? i was working in the takeaway for six _ the takeaway? i was working in the takeaway for six months. _ the takeaway? i was working in the takeaway for six months. we - the takeaway? i was working in the takeaway for six months. we just l takeaway for six months. we 'ust lost the sound i takeaway for six months. we 'ust lost the sound slightly, �* takeaway for six months. we just lost the sound slightly, hopefullyi lost the sound slightly, hopefully we can establish a clear line with you. you are working there for six months? , i, �* , you. you are working there for six months? , i, �*, i you. you are working there for six months?— andi months? yes, that's correct. and before that. _ months? yes, that's correct. and before that, had _ months? yes, that's correct. and before that, had you _ months? yes, that's correct. and before that, had you been - months? yes, that's correct. and - before that, had you been employed? yes, before that i was employed. that was a year and nine months. 50. that was a year and nine months. so, in the takeaway, did you have some warning, some notice that perhaps you are going to lose yourjob? mat you are going to lose your “ob? not reall you are going to lose yourjob? iirrt really because i was told that i would still be there, but it wasn't until later that same week that i had to be let go.— until later that same week that i had to be let go. ok, so was there any discussion _ had to be let go. ok, so was there any discussion around _ had to be let go. ok, so was there any discussion around you - had to be let go. ok, so was there any discussion around you being i any discussion around you being furloughed or anything like that? there was, but it didn't amount to anything. 50 there was, but it didn't amount to an him, ,., there was, but it didn't amount to an hina. ., , ., ., anything. so you have been without a 'ob now for anything. so you have been without a job now for how— anything. so you have been without a job now for how long? _ anything. so you have been without a job now for how long? eight - anything. so you have been without a
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job now for how long? eight months. | job now for how long? eight months. and tell us about _ job now for how long? eight months. and tell us about the _ job now for how long? eight months. and tell us about the process - job now for how long? eight months. and tell us about the process after . and tell us about the process after losing the job and tell us about the process after losing thejob in and tell us about the process after losing the job in the takeaway and looking for new work.— losing the job in the takeaway and looking for new work. well, it was extremely difficult _ looking for new work. well, it was extremely difficult because - looking for new work. well, it was extremely difficult because a - looking for new work. well, it was extremely difficult because a lot l looking for new work. well, it was | extremely difficult because a lot of job applications, they wanted experience. but although i had experience. but although i had experience in what they were asking, it wasn't enough. and when applying forjobs, you don't really hear back from them. some don't even send an e—mail to say you have been rejected. somejust e—mail to say you have been rejected. some just leave a e—mail to say you have been rejected. somejust leave a person wondering. rejected. some 'ust leave a person wonderinu. . �* , rejected. some 'ust leave a person wonderin-. ., �*, ., , , wondering. that's really interesting because i was _ wondering. that's really interesting because i was about _ wondering. that's really interesting because i was about to _ wondering. that's really interesting because i was about to ask - wondering. that's really interesting because i was about to ask you - wondering. that's really interesting because i was about to ask you if i because i was about to ask you if you had any feedback about any of those applications. trio. you had any feedback about any of those applications.— those applications. no, not really. it was 'ust those applications. no, not really. it was just more _ those applications. no, not really. it was just more other _ those applications. no, not really. it wasjust more other people - those applications. no, not really. | it wasjust more other people have it was just more other people have had the experience that they are looking for and it wasn't like, this is what you need to improve on our this is what you need to do, there is none of that. it was just
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straight rejection letters. and straight re'ection letters. and currentl straight rejection letters. and currently are _ straight rejection letters. and currently are you _ straight rejection letters. and currently are you still looking for work? i currently are you still looking for work? ., ., , ., ., “ currently are you still looking for work? ., ., , ., work? i am not still looking for work. work? i am not still looking for work- tell _ work? i am not still looking for work. tell us _ work? i am not still looking for work. tell us about _ work? i am not still looking for work. tell us about what - work? i am not still looking for work. tell us about what you i work? i am not still looking for. work. tell us about what you are doinu. i work. tell us about what you are doing- i am _ work. tell us about what you are doing. i am working _ work. tell us about what you are doing. i am working in _ work. tell us about what you are doing. i am working in a - doing. i am working in a supermarket. _ doing. i am working in a supermarket. boy, - doing. i am working in a supermarket. boy, do i doing. i am working in a. supermarket. boy, do we doing. i am working in a - supermarket. boy, do we need doing. i am working in a _ supermarket. boy, do we need people in supermarkets _ supermarket. boy, do we need people in supermarkets just _ supermarket. boy, do we need people in supermarketsjust now. _ supermarket. boy, do we need people in supermarketsjust now. we - supermarket. boy, do we need people in supermarketsjust now. we are - in supermarkets just now. we are really relied on them over the past year. ijust wonder what really relied on them over the past year. i just wonder what your reaction is. you struggle to find a job, you've been in and out of a couple ofjobs, i wonder what your reaction is to this report from the resolution foundation saying the jobless rate for young black people rose to 35%, compared to 24% for young people of asian descent, 13% for young white people. does that ring true to you, considering the people you know in your circles? yes, it does, because a lot of the people i know, they were also in my
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position and it was up to all of us to try to help one another. we didn't know what we needed to do. we didn't know what we needed to do. we didn't have feedback. we didn't know what was going wrong. even just online, scrolling through, ifound that within the black community, they feel that the either need to not disclose their race orjust change their name a bit so they can get more calls, more interviews. which is not something we should be doing because it is the 21st—century. and everything... everyone should be feeling included. so you and your friends, a lot of you feel you need to somehow change in the application process, not hint that you are black? in order to actually get through to the interviews stage?- actually get through to the interviews stage? actually get through to the
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interviews sta . e? . . �* , ., interviews stage? yeah, that's what we have been _ interviews stage? yeah, that's what we have been saying _ interviews stage? yeah, that's what we have been saying online. - interviews stage? yeah, that's what we have been saying online. peoplei we have been saying online. people that i know are friends of friends, really. that i know are friends of friends, reall . �* ., �* , really. and... i mean, it's ridiculous _ really. and... i mean, it's ridiculous that _ really. and... i mean, it's ridiculous that someone l really. and... i mean, it's. ridiculous that someone has really. and... i mean, it's- ridiculous that someone has to hide something about themselves, to feel they need to do that, to get through to an interview. i mean, what you think needs to be done to change that, to address the imbalance when we look at how unemployment is hitting young people, of course affecting all young people, but young black people in particular? i young black people in particular? i feel they should be more inclusive. i think the main worry is usually, how are we going to pronounce this name? if they are willing to take the effort and the time to continually focus on getting a persons name right and even getting to know the person without disregarding them because you cannot pronounce the name, let'sjust disregarding them because you cannot pronounce the name, let's just get by this. just the fact that they
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should be wanting more and more people from different backgrounds, that should matter alone, other than we can't pronounce this are we are not sure this person has what it takes. they should not base it on that. everyone should get that chance and the opportunity to just be able to progress, even if it's just an interview or work experience. all those things are important for a persons self esteem. absolutely, absolutely. many, thank you so much for talking to us and i'm happy to hear you have now found a job. we appreciate your time today. thank you very much. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. high pressure remaining in charge for the next few days, so chilly nights and frost as well, today a lot of dry weather, a lot of sunshine, cloud
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bubbling up through the day, fairweather cloud, showers across the north and west will be slow moving, as there is not much of a breeze, as indicated by these circles. but on the north sea coastline, it will feel cooler, especially the north sea coastline of england, looking at 8—9. inland, 11—13 . those temperatures will fall away rapidly under clear skies overnight, most showers fading, but by the end of the night further showers across the southeast. mist and fog patches forming, locally a touch of frost, with temperatures hovering around freezing. tomorrow, then, a cold start, mist and fog lifting quickly, a lot of dry weather, but from lincolnshire towards kent, some showers pushing inland through the course of the day. the highest of the temperatures in the west. hello, this is bbc news with annita mcveigh. the headlines... more than a thousand extra
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volunteers are being recruited to take part in a study looking at whether a mix of covid vaccines can be used for the first and second doses. young black people have been hardest hit by unemployment during the pandemic — according to new research, 35% of young black people don't have a job. mps vote today on whether to hold a parliamentary inquiry into the lobbying activities of the former prime minister, david cameron, for the collapsed firm greensill capital — and how government minsters responded to him. the family of a pregnant nurse who died with covid—i9 hasn't received any money from a fundraising campaign which is now at £186,000 — even though it was set up to support her husband and children. and after supplies were flown in, now every adult on the remote island fair isle has now been vaccinated against covid—i9. let's catch up with all the
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developments in the sport. good morning. northern ireland's women can start preparing for a major finals for the first time. they have reached next years european chat widget after beating ukraine in a play—off, already leading from the away leg, they won two nil in belfast. 4—1 on aggregate at the side ranked 25 places above them, an incredible achievement for a side made up mostly of part—timers and a team that only reform 17 years ago. there are no words to describe it, to be a part of this with this group of girls, it is one of the best days of girls, it is one of the best days of my life. the character and fight and determination shown from everybody involved tonight shows what we are about. it wasn't the prettiest of games by any means, but we knew what we had to do tonight and we got the job over the line and now we have european finals to look forward to, so bring it on. it on.
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manchester city's preparations for this evening's champions league quarterfinal in germany were hampered last night after a series of fireworks were let off outside their team hotel. the clubs says on two occassions players and staff were woken up before a third attempt was stopped by their own security. city are 2—1 up against borussia dortmund from the first leg and are chasing what would be a historic quadruple. the champions league is the only major trophy pep guardiola is yet to win at the club, something he's well aware of. this is a business, and a business is business and business is to win. if we don't win i will be a failure, and if we win, it will be how good is pep? the six—time winners liverpool have much more to do than city if they're to reach the semifinals, where chelsea await. they go into tonight's second leg against real madrid at anfield 3—1 down from the first game. after six straight defeats at home, liverpool did manage to return to winning ways against aston villa at the weekend. there've been miracle comebacks at anfield before — most recently in 2019 when they came from 3—0 down to knock barcelona out of the tournament,
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but there won't be any fans to roar them on this evening. you don't get a comeback because you didn't have a comeback in the past, you only can have a chance if you pay really good football in the present and that is what we have to do. the best situation will be if we don't bring ourselves in a situation that we need to come back, but obviously that is not worth talking about now, but the situation is clear, that is why this competition is so interesting. and it's 100 days to go until the start of the olympic games in tokyo — and the build up has been unusual, to say the least. a year's delay, and doubts over whether it would go ahead at all. for the athletes, it's been incredibly unsettling, and with no overseas spectators allowed, double 0lympic taekwondo championjadejones says it'll be a very different experience in tokyo. my my family have travelled to every 0lympics, even the youth 0lympics when it first started, and every
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time i come out to fight i see their faces screaming for me and cheering me on that really does make a difference to me. it kind of shows just how big this pandemic is, but i'm just seeing it as how amazing would it be to come running through the door and bring that gold medal home to all the family. i know they will be cheering me on and willing me on, and itjust brings a big buzz to the country, to my family as well, to come back with that third gold medal. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you later. i thoroughly approve of your first story today, northern ireland boss michael women. well done to them. covid—i9 vaccination efforts are continuing at pace, with people over 45 now being offered the jab. but there are concerns about the impact of variants of the virus could have on infections. residents of two south london boroughs have been asked to get tested even if they don't have
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symptoms, after a cluster of cases of the south african variant were found. some of those affected are thought to have had their first vaccine doses. let's get more on all of this from adam finn, professor in paediatrics at university of bristol, and a member of the government'sjoint committee on vaccination and immunisation. good to see you again. ijust want to begin today by talking about this trial into a mixed vaccine schedule, so in other words if someone is given pfizer for the first jab getting astrazeneca for the second. i have been told different things about this. a few months ago i remember experts saying to me, definitely this is a good idea, it could build a stronger immunity, and more recently people scenting not so sure about it. what is your view on whether this could work was yellow entirely open actually. i whether this could work was yellow entirely open actually.— entirely open actually. i think there is any _ entirely open actually. i think there is any reason _ entirely open actually. i think there is any reason to - entirely open actually. i think| there is any reason to imagine entirely open actually. i think. there is any reason to imagine it will be at least as good and it could be better or slightly less good, but there is clearly something
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we want to be able to do if we can stop both here in this country but also around the world, having the flexibility to use different vaccines in combination in the same person would enable things to be done much more easily and to deal with some constraints when these crop up. i think there is every reason we need expected to work 0k. reason we need expected to work ok. in theory the idea of using two different vaccines to treat something, the theory behind that is perfectly sound, is it?— perfectly sound, is it? perfectly sound. perfectly sound, is it? perfectly sound- all— perfectly sound, is it? perfectly sound. all of _ perfectly sound, is it? perfectly sound. all of these _ perfectly sound, is it? perfectly sound. all of these vaccines - perfectly sound, is it? perfectly sound. all of these vaccines at | perfectly sound, is it? perfectly i sound. all of these vaccines at the moment include the coronavirus spike protein as the main antigen, so you are in effect stink with the same fundamental stimulus —— boosting. we have seen plenty of examples in the past of actually getting bigger immune responses or broader or more long lasting responses when you give a slightly different formulation of the same antigen. no reason to think there will be a problem. in
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practical terms how soon potentially could this be used? could we see this being rolled out in the uk where someone gets a differentjab for the second dose? irate where someone gets a different 'ab for the second dose?d where someone gets a different 'ab for the second dose? we already have some reaction. _ for the second dose? we already have some reaction, there _ for the second dose? we already have some reaction, there are _ for the second dose? we already have some reaction, there are two - for the second dose? we already have some reaction, there are two things i some reaction, there are two things to this, whether or not you see were side effects, if there are much higher rates you would be disinclined to use a combination, but also we need to see the antibody responses when the two different vaccines are used. we should get some results on the second part as soon as may orjune time, so we could easily see this being introduced in the summer. trier? introduced in the summer. very interesting- _ introduced in the summer. very interesting. let's _ introduced in the summer. very interesting. let's talk _ introduced in the summer. very interesting. let's talk about the variant, the cases of the south african variant found in two london boroughs and the efficacy of existing vaccines with regard to that variant. there is some suggestion that the astrazeneca vaccine which is being widely used in the uk, that the variant may not be as susceptible to that as two
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other vaccines. where are we on our knowledge of that?— knowledge of that? actually over vaccines where _ knowledge of that? actually over vaccines where we _ knowledge of that? actually over vaccines where we have - knowledge of that? actually over vaccines where we have any - vaccines where we have any information on this variant suggest to some degree a reduction in the degree of protection. the study you are alluding to with astrazeneca it was done in south africa, a very small study, so the results of it, we can't really be that confident about. i think we all feel there is about. i think we all feel there is a chance that this variant will be able to resist the immunity induced by the present vaccines at least to some extent. the one reassuring thing is that so far it looks like all the vaccines still protect against serious disease caused by this variant, but we would have you seen much prefer it if they also prevented milder disease and transmission. so i think efforts to try and avoid the emergence of this variant are very important at this stage so that we can really get
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maximum benefit from the immunisation programme that we are using at the moment. white do you think the use of pcr tests in those boroughs, that it is not because people it seems are able to go about their daily lives now people it seems are able to go about their daily lives nov— their daily lives now bearing in mind is restrictions _ their daily lives now bearing in mind is restrictions have - their daily lives now bearing in | mind is restrictions have eased their daily lives now bearing in i mind is restrictions have eased in those areas, and book a test, but is that enough?— that enough? time will tell. certainly — that enough? time will tell. certainly when _ that enough? time will tell. certainly when we _ that enough? time will tell. certainly when we have - that enough? time will tell. certainly when we have had| that enough? time will tell. - certainly when we have had other variants including in bristol, the surge testing seems to have resulted in the disappearance of those strains over time. i think that maybe in part due to the fact that the dominant strain we have got in this country at the moment is actually a very infectious strain so it is quite, competing over variants. you are right that people are mixing more now as he looked down has been relaxed to an extent and that may mean it is more difficult to stop further spread. the general principle with these
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things though is if you can stomp on them quickly and get them under control at the beginning, it is much more feasible to get on top of it thanif more feasible to get on top of it than if you let it spread further, and... , . , than if you let it spread further, and... , ., , ., ., and... there is a little bit of a ramble and... there is a little bit of a gamble isn't _ and... there is a little bit of a gamble isn't there? _ and... there is a little bit of a gamble isn't there? in - and... there is a little bit of a gamble isn't there? in the - and... there is a little bit of a i gamble isn't there? in the sense that the lockdown _ gamble isn't there? in the sense that the lockdown relaxation i gamble isn't there? in the sense i that the lockdown relaxation happens to be happening at this time, i guess there is a gamble. but on the other hand i think a lot of people are going to be being tested so hopefully there is good public buy in to get some control. i will hopefully there is good public buy in to get some control.— in to get some control. i will have a word with _ in to get some control. i will have a word with you _ in to get some control. i will have a word with you on _ in to get some control. i will have a word with you on the _ in to get some control. i will have a word with you on the roll-out i in to get some control. i will have a word with you on the roll-out of a word with you on the roll—out of the johnson & johnson vaccine a word with you on the roll—out of thejohnson &johnson vaccine which our viewers may well know has been posed in the uk —— us, and elsewhere, over concerns about extremely rare blood clotting incidents. what we know about this particular vaccine, how it works, and just put those rare incidences into context for us because we are looking at very few cases compared to a number ofjabs
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initiated. cases compared to a number of 'abs initiated. , ., . . , cases compared to a number of 'abs initiated. , , , , initiated. this vaccine is broadly similar to the _ initiated. this vaccine is broadly i similar to the oxford-astrazeneca similar to the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine in the sense that it uses a weakened common cold virus to smuggle the gene for the coronavirus spike protein into the vaccine into your arm, spike protein into the vaccine into yourarm, but spike protein into the vaccine into your arm, but it is quite a different one from the one in the oxford vaccine. we still don't know quite whether that is the reason that these two vaccines are showing these rare cases. there are six cases reported from the united states. they all have this characteristic low platelet count as well as serious thrombosis. and they have given nearly 7 million doses of the vaccine. once again very rare events, but they do sound very familiar in the sense that they have got the same characteristics as the ones we have seen in astrazeneca. good to talk to you, thank you very much, professoradam good to talk to you, thank you very much, professor adam then there, a member of the governmentsjoint
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member of the governments joint committee member of the governmentsjoint committee on vaccination and immunisation. an inquest into the fishmongers hall terror attack has been hearing evidence from eye witnesses this morning. convicted terrorist usman khan stabbed jack merritt and saskia jones at a prisoner rehabilitation conference on 29 november 2019. our correspondent zoe conway has been following the inquest. tell us about the evidence that has been heard this morning. irate tell us about the evidence that has been heard this morning.— been heard this morning. we have been heard this morning. we have been hearing _ been heard this morning. we have been hearing powerful— been heard this morning. we have been hearing powerful testimony i been heard this morning. we have i been hearing powerful testimony here this morning. we heard from the housekeeping supervisor at fishmongers hole who came face—to—face with the attacker as mum can. —— whole. she described the anger in its place as he emerged from the gentleman stylus. he was just a few feet away from her. he had his right hand raised to head height. with his left hand he put his finger to his mouth, gesturing to her to be quiet, she says, so that she wouldn't scream. he moved
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towards her, she backed away. he then got distracted and he stabbed another woman and as he did so, she says he was speaking in arabic. she believes he was quoting the koran. we also heard from a retired judge john samuels who saw saskia jones, 23—year—old saskia jones who had been stabbed, lying at the foot of the stairs. he said, i noted particular herface was the stairs. he said, i noted particular her face was chalk white. she appeared unconscious to make, or perhaps even dead. he described the confusion they at fishmongers hall. we talked about doctor amy ludlow, one of the organisers of the event, shouting into her mobile phone, police, ambulance, now! and someone shouted, there is a bomb! there was also an incredibly poignant moment this morning when we were shown images of 25—year—old jack merritt, who died that day. in those photographs we saw a smiling and
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very happy man. photographs we saw a smiling and very happy man-— photographs we saw a smiling and ve ha-- man. . , . very happy man. thank you very much for that update. _ hundreds of hindu devotees, including nine saints, have tested positive for covid—19 in india's haridwar city, where huge crowds have gathered to participate in the kumbh mela festival. more than three million people bathed in the ganges river yesterday to mark one of the most auspicious days of the festival. hindus believe the ganges is holy, and taking a dip in the water will cleanse them of their sins. india reported more than 184,000 new cases of covid yesterday — its highest daily spike yet. many have criticised the government for allowing the festival to go ahead amid a raging pandemic. the japanese company which owns the cargo ship which blocked the suez canal says it is negotiating with egyptian authorities, after being asked to pay 900 million dollars in compensation. the ever given has been impounded since being released. egypt says the 900 million dollar figure is needed to cover the costs
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of refloating the ever given, and meeting the other losses incurred. the family of a nurse who died a year ago from covid—19 haven't received any money from an online campaign which raised nearly 200,000 pounds for them. mary agyapong, who was 28, died just days after giving birth at luton and dunstable hospital, where she worked. jon ironmonger reports. the death of nurse mary agyapong is among the cruelest of the pandemic. she contracted covid—19 while pregnant and didn't live to know her daughter, who was born safely. heartbroken, her husband ernest focused his attention on the burial and was unaware as nearly 10,000 donations began pouring in online. i really actually remain very grateful, you know, for the love, support and the generosity of the public. in just a few days, £186,000
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was raised through a gofundme page set up by rhoda asiedu, a family friend living in birmingham, expressly to support mary's husband and the couple's children, a] and baby mary, during this heavy and trying time. but one year on, the beneficiaries still haven't received a penny, and lawyers suspect the fundraisers of playing loose with a custom at ghanaian funerals. normally, when such donations are collected, it is given to the spouse, to almost reimburse him of such costs, and then to look after the children, things like pampers, baby food. mary never had the opportunity to bless her daughter, so there's been a lot of expenses that he's had to carry on all by himself. the money raised was paid to ms asiedu's legal team, blue trinity, who said it had been placed on trust for the education of mary's children and that 80% of it would be released when they turn 21.
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that's a 20—year wait for baby mary, and ernest, who's studying law, says the family is struggling now. i just try to keep my head above the water. ifind it very, very surprising that i've not been asked or involved, you know, with this gofundme money, it's beyond my understanding. gofundme said it was always clear the money would be placed in a trust. but we found an archived snapshot of the web page on april 16th with £117,000 of donations and no reference to a trust at all. ms asiedu? i'd like to talk to you about the gofundme page that you set up for ernest boateng and his children. is that 0k? can ijust ask you, you know, why has he not been made a trustee of the fund?
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when shall i call you? ok, all right. i think it's clear you don't want to talk. we didn't hear back from ms asiedu or her legal team. on monday, ernest and the children marked the first anniversary of mary's death. life without her is getting no easier. jon ironmonger, bbc news. it's one of the uk's most remote communities and tiny fair isle — with a population ofjust1r8 people — can now also claim to be one of its safest. the scottish island — located between orkney and shetland — is well known for its knitwear. this week, vials of astrazeneca vaccine were flown in on a small plane, meaning every adult on the island was able to have their second dose. jen stout reports. touchdown.
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the lifeline plane reaches fairisle with a very special cargo. enough vials of vaccine to give the whole adult population a second dose. shop scratch. from 18 to 85, everyone is covered. it's probably one of the safest places in the country, really. you know, we can decide whether people come in or not. there is no visitors come on the boat. and as i say, they have been very good about controlling it, keeping people from coming on the plane. with fairisle being 25 miles from mainland shetland, the decision was taken to fly in the vaccine doses. fairisle was one of those areas of the uk where there were no confirmed covid cases, so we felt it was really important to maintain that. we were very keen that we went in and we took the vaccination programme for all those that were entitled in one go. it is a big relief for
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the 48 strong population. i wasn't aware of anything, just stuck it in and that was that. delighted. we're getting everyone that wants i it, and it has been great for us, i great for the island as a whole. i it will give us more confidence. as we stuck to hopefully get back towards a bit more of a normal life. it's been great because we've had ten days without a boat, so the boat managed to come in yesterday, so we then had the boat and a full shop, and we have had a second vaccination today, so the sun is out and the lambs are coming, so they have been over the moon. it is a glimmer of hope for this most welcoming of islands, looking to better more sociable times ahead. jen stout, bbc news, fairisle. prime minister's questions will be starting in the commons shortly.
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it's talk to damian grammaticas. a busy weekend, also the greensill debate following on the heels of prime minister's questions. this is what we expeet — prime minister's questions. this is what we expect much _ prime minister's questions. this is what we expect much of— prime minister's questions. this is what we expect much of prime i what we expect much of prime minister's questions are about to see to focus around this question of lex greensill, the financier, his firm then collapsed but his links with the conservative party, with david cameron as her minister, did mr cameron cosmic efforts to lobby on behalf of the firm, but we know the labour party this afternoon is having a debate in parliament because it believes needs to a much wider inquiry that looks more broadly at lobbying in general, we know the shadow cabinet office minister rachel reeves has been saying that the government if they had nothing to hide they should vote for that inquiry, but the government itself is saying that the review they announced this week into mr
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greensill, into his firm, into the lobbying around that, it is enough, the government says they will have carte blanche look into those events. laboursays carte blanche look into those events. labour says it should look into the behaviour of the ministers who took the goals of the lobbying, we went to meetings and should look at tightening up the rules in general because it's as if nothing, if no rules were broken, that shows the rules need to be changed. thank ou. we the rules need to be changed. thank yon we will — the rules need to be changed. thank yon we will be _ the rules need to be changed. thank you. we will be in _ the rules need to be changed. thank you. we will be in the _ the rules need to be changed. thank you. we will be in the house - the rules need to be changed. thank you. we will be in the house of i you. we will be in the house of commons very shortly. now it is time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. high pressure remains firmly in charge. not necessarily bone dry. chilly nights, chilly days, overnight frost and fog, temperatures picking up to the end of the week, so here is the high pressure, air moving around in a clockwise direction so for the next couple of days, along the east coast, the wind will be coming off the cold north sea so it will feel cooler. into the afternoon, continuing with dry and sunny weather,
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showers across the west and the south, some slow—moving because there's not much of a breeze inland to move them along from the white circles which indicates the sustained wind speeds and that is the direction of the wind coming in from the chilly north sea that makes it feel cool along the coastline of england where we are looking at 8—9 c top temperature, so bear that in mind if you are heading out for a stroll later on, and then we have the showers, temperatures to the west away from the north sea coastline between 11—13 c. through this evening and overnight, the temperatures will fall quite clearly, showers also fade and there will be bits cloud, mist and fog forming as well, and by the end of the night, some showers across the south—eastern corner. temperatures generallyjust above orjust below freezing so locally there will be a touch of frost.
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a chilly start to the day tomorrow, mist and fog rapidly rising and a lot of sunshine but in the south—eastern corner, east anglia into kent, we see some showers and some of them pushing further inland towards the midlands or central southern england and some of them merging, for the rest of us, light breezes and also a lot of dry and sunny conditions. temperature wise, cool again along this north sea coast line and across the corner, and as we move to the west and the sunshine, highs of 1a celsius. then for the weekend, we have this ridge of high pressure upon us, weather fronts trying to come in from the west will eventually introduce some rain into northern ireland and north—west scotland, how far south that gets, still open to question but once again, we are looking at some sunshine in between and highs of 1a celsius.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: more than 1,000 extra volunteers are being recruited to take part in a study looking at whether a mix of covid vaccines can be used for the first and second doses. that would give a lot more flexibility if there was any problems with supply with one vaccine, for example, or a change in recommendations for different age groups. young black people have been hardest hit by unemployment during the pandemic. according to new research, 35% of young black people don't have a job. mps will debate and vote on whether to hold a parliamentary inquiry into the lobbying activities of the former prime minister, david cameron, for the collapsed firm greensill capital. and mps will be interrogating borisjohnson at prime minister's questions shortly. we'll be going over live
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to the house of commons for that. let's go live now to the house of commons where prime minister's questions is about to start. such meetings later today. dame che l such meetings later today. dame cheryl represented _ such meetings later today. dame cheryl represented her _ such meetings later today. dene: cheryl represented her constituents with considerable effectiveness for nearly 29 years and is already sorely missed in this place. especially by many of the newer members as she was so kind to us in ourfirst months in members as she was so kind to us in our first months in this members as she was so kind to us in ourfirst months in this place. one of her passions was the protection of her passions was the protection of chalk streams, in particular the river chair —— which passes through south west hertfordshire. many mps are increasingly concerned about partially treated sewage being released into our rivers with a
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health impacts for both humans and animals. can my right honourable friend reassure this house that this government will actively protect our rivers and streams? mr; government will actively protect our rivers and streams?— rivers and streams? my honourable friend is entirely _ rivers and streams? my honourable friend is entirely right _ rivers and streams? my honourable friend is entirely right to _ rivers and streams? my honourable friend is entirely right to raise i friend is entirely right to raise the concern that we fully share about sewage overflow from into rivers, and that is why we have set “p rivers, and that is why we have set up the storm overflows task force to address the matter, working with the water industry regulators and environmental groups, and last month we announced legislation to address this very issue. we announced legislation to address this very issue-— this very issue. thank you mr seaker this very issue. thank you mr speaker and _ this very issue. thank you mr speaker and can _ this very issue. thank you mr speaker and can i _ this very issue. thank you mr speaker and can i join - this very issue. thank you mr speaker and can i join the i this very issue. thank you mr i speaker and can ijoin the prime minister in his remarks about dame cheryl gillan, who i worked with on a cross—party basis and remember with fondness, and ian gibson, who also passed away this week, those who commanded respect on all sides of this house and will be sadly
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missed. can i also paid tribute to shirley williams. she was a great parliamentarian, a formidable minister and cabinet minister. she loved this house, the other place and frankly anywhere where she could debate ideas and politics. for many years, she was labour�*s loss, and today she is britain's loss, and my thoughts are with her family and loved ones. mr speaker, does the prime minister believe that the current lobbying rules are fit for purpose? i current lobbying rules are fit for --urose? ., ., ., .,, purpose? i 'oin the right honourable aentleman purpose? ijoin the right honourable gentleman in — purpose? ijoin the right honourable gentleman in what _ purpose? ijoin the right honourable gentleman in what he _ purpose? ijoin the right honourable gentleman in what he said _ purpose? ijoin the right honourable gentleman in what he said about ian | gentleman in what he said about ian gibson, and indeed, ishare the widespread concern about some of the stuff that we are reading at the moment, and i know that the cabinet secretary shares my concern as well. i do think it is a good idea, in
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principle, that top civil servant should be able to engage with business and should have experience of the private sector. when i look at the accounts i am reading to date, and it's not clear that those boundaries have been properly understood, and i have asked for a proper independent review of the arrangements that we have to be conducted by nigel boardman, and he will be reporting injune, and if he has any representations he wishes to make on the subject he should do so to mr boardman.! make on the subject he should do so to mr boardman.— to mr boardman. i know the prime minister is — to mr boardman. i know the prime minister is launching _ to mr boardman. i know the prime minister is launching an _ to mr boardman. i know the prime minister is launching an enquiry. i minister is launching an enquiry. that enquiry is not even looking at the lobbying rules. i'm not sure it's looking at very much at all. because every day there is further evidence of the sleaze that is now at the heart of this conservative government. let'sjust look, you can shake your heads, but let's just look at the latest scandal. a
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wealthy businessman, lex greensill, was hired as a senior adviser to david cameron when he was prime minister and we have all seen the business card. after he left office, cameron became a paid lobbyist for lex greensill. next thing we know, cameron arranged access for greensill with cabinet ministers, ministers and senior officials. and he lobbied for taxpayer money on behalf of greensill capital. we also know that the chancellor pushed officials. we know that the health secretary met cameron and greensill. we know that senior officials met greensill capital regularly, and now, even more unbelievably, we know that the government's former head of procurement, no less, became a greensill adviser while he was still a civil servant. does the prime minister accept that there is a revolving door, indeed an open door,
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between his conservative government and paid lobbyists? this between his conservative government and paid lobbyists?— and paid lobbyists? this is a government _ and paid lobbyists? this is a government and _ and paid lobbyists? this is a government and a _ and paid lobbyists? this is a government and a party i and paid lobbyists? this is a| government and a party that and paid lobbyists? this is a i government and a party that has and paid lobbyists? this is a - government and a party that has been consistently tough on lobbying, and indeed we introduced legislation saying that there should be no taxpayer funded lobbying, saying that there should be no taxpayerfunded lobbying, that taxpayer funded lobbying, that quangos taxpayerfunded lobbying, that quangos should not be used to get involved with lobbying. we put in the register for lobbyists, involved with lobbying. we put in the registerfor lobbyists, and the register for lobbyists, and there the registerfor lobbyists, and there is one party that voted to repeal the 2014 lobbying act, and that was the labour party in their historic 2019 election manifesto which he is yet to repudiate. they did so because they thought it was unfair and was restricting people's abilities to make representations to politicians. i think that is absurd. will he say it is now absurd to repeal the 2014 lobbying act? he talks repeal the 2014 lobbying act? he: talks of the lobbying act. who was it who introduced that legislation? david cameron. who was it who voted
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for the legislation? half the conservative front bench. we said it wouldn't be tough enough, and where did that legislation lead? two years later, david cameron, camping out in a saudi desert with lex greensill having a cup of tea. i rest my case in relation to that legislation. let me try another simple question. is the prime minister aware of any other government official who had commercial links with greensill? or any other lobbying role while working in government? if he any other lobbying role while working in government? if he has any such information, _ working in government? if he has any such information, he _ working in government? if he has any such information, he should - working in government? if he has any such information, he should of- such information, he should of course make it available to mr boardman, that is the point of his review. it's an independent review and it will be coming to me byjune and it will be coming to me byjune and it will be coming to me byjune and it will be placed in the library the house of commons. talking about
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lobbying, he is being advised by lord mandelson of global council limited, so maybe in the interest of full transparency, lord mandelson could be encouraged to disclose his other clients, mr speaker. i could be encouraged to disclose his other clients, mr speaker. i haven't heard a defence _ other clients, mr speaker. i haven't heard a defence that _ other clients, mr speaker. i haven't heard a defence that ridiculous i heard a defence that ridiculous since my last days in the crown court. it's called the shoplifters defence. everyone else is nicking stuff, so why can't i? it never worked. i will remind the prime minister that i not only prosecuted shoplifters, i prosecuted mps over the mps expenses scandal, so i stand on my record. that linejust the mps expenses scandal, so i stand on my record. that line just isn't going to wash with me. it was a former prime minister, and i suspect now former lobbyist, who once said, this isn't a minor issue with minor consequences. government contracts, potentially worth hundreds of billions of pounds are at stake. so can the prime minister now answer the question that the chancellor has been ducking for weeks? how was it
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that greensill capital, a company employing david cameron, got the green light to give hundreds of millions of pounds of taxpayer backed loans?— backed loans? whilst he was prosecuting _ backed loans? whilst he was prosecuting mps, _ backed loans? whilst he was prosecuting mps, i _ backed loans? whilst he was prosecuting mps, i was i backed loans? whilst he was i prosecuting mps, i was cutting backed loans? whilst he was - prosecuting mps, i was cutting crime prosecuting mp5, i was cutting crime in london by 23% and cutting the murder rate by 50%, and he asks about lobbying on behalf of greensill, and again, i don't wish to embarrass the right honourable gentleman but he doesn't have far to look. there was one person asking for the greensill bank to use the coronavirus business interruption loans scheme, and that was the shadow defence secretary, mr speaker. it shadow defence secretary, mr seaker. , ., ~ ., shadow defence secretary, mr seaker. , . ~ ., ., ~ speaker. it gets weaker and weaker. it does speaker. it gets weaker and weaker. it does take — speaker. it gets weaker and weaker. it does take me _ speaker. it gets weaker and weaker. it does take me back— speaker. it gets weaker and weaker. it does take me back to _ speaker. it gets weaker and weaker. it does take me back to my - speaker. it gets weaker and weaker. it does take me back to my defence | it does take me back to my defence daysin it does take me back to my defence days in the crown court. just ridiculous. the shadow defence secretary, it really wasn't a good point, if you think that was a good
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point, if you think that was a good point, you've got real problems. the shadow defence secretary was speaking for his constituents and for localjobs. that1 million miles away from being a paid lobbyist texting friends in government. the prime minister says there will be an enquiry, but the person he has appointed work for the same law firm which lobbied to loosen lobbying laws. you couldn't make it up. what we need is to overhaul the whole broken system. this afternoon, the labour motion calls for a proper parliamentary enquiry into the scandal. if the prime minister is so concerned about this, he should welcome the motion. after all, to quote david cameron, his old school friend, sunlight is the best disinfectant. so will the prime minister vote with labour today for a full, transparent, independent enquiry? i
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a full, transparent, independent ennui ? ~' ., ., , enquiry? i think he would have been better off supporting _ enquiry? i think he would have been better off supporting the _ enquiry? i think he would have been better off supporting the lobbying i better off supporting the lobbying act and the labour party would have been better off not campaigning to get rid of it. it toughens up our laws, and i think that his own proposal is simply to have yet again to have politicians marking their own homework. what the country wants. that's what he wants, committee of mps to look at it and it won't do a blind bit of good and that's why we are having a proper, independent review and if he has any representations or allegations to make about what has taken place, he should make them to the eminent lawyer who has been asked to do it and will be reporting to us byjune. the prime minister should be voting with us, not blocking a proper enquiry. the greensill scandal is just the tip of the iceberg. dodgy contracts, privileged access, jobs for their mates. this is the return of tory sleaze. it is now so
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ingrained in this conservative government. we don't need another conservative party appointees marking their own homework. actually, the more i listen to the prime minister, the more i think that ted hastings of ac 12 will be needed to get to the bottom of this one. mr speaker, we know the prime minister will not act against sleaze, but this house can. so can i urge all memos of this house to come together this afternoon, to back labour�*s motion and start to clean up labour�*s motion and start to clean up the sleaze and cronyism that is at the heart of this conservative government?— at the heart of this conservative government? that is why we are -auttin in government? that is why we are putting in an _ government? that is why we are putting in an independent - government? that is why we are l putting in an independent review, its putting in an independent review, it's why we have tougher laws on lobbying, and a great shame that labour opposed them, and yes, we are getting on with rooting out bent coppers, and we are also appointing and hiring thousands more police officers. we are fighting crime on the streets of our cities, whilst they oppose the police and crime
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bill which would have put in tougher sentences for serious sexual and violent offenders. and then they encourage people who went out and demonstrated to kill the bill stop we are getting on with protecting the public. that is absolutely correct. we are getting on with protecting the public of this country from crime of all kinds. we are getting on with the job of running this country, of rolling out a vaccination programme... order. prime minister _ a vaccination programme... order. prime minister i _ a vaccination programme... order. prime minister i think— a vaccination programme... order. prime minister i think you - a vaccination programme... order. prime minister i think you ought i a vaccination programme... order. prime minister i think you ought to at least _ prime minister i think you ought to at least try— prime minister i think you ought to at least try and address the question. it at least try and address the question-— at least try and address the question. at least try and address the cuestion. . , , ., , ., , question. it has been a year this week since _ question. it has been a year this week since i _ question. it has been a year this week since i had _ question. it has been a year this week since i had the _ question. it has been a year this week since i had the privilege i question. it has been a year this week since i had the privilege of starting to volunteer at watford general hospital, and over this time i have been fortunate and privileged to work alongside some inspirational and selfless volunteers, so as the nation reflects this week on the importance of schemes to support young people, may! importance of schemes to support young people, may i ask the prime minister if he would meet with me to explore the creation of an nhs cadet scheme to pay tribute to those who have already volunteered over the
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past year and also create a lasting legacy for generations to come? yes. legacy for generations to come? yes, indeed, legacy for generations to come? yes, indeed. and — legacy for generations to come? yes, indeed. and i — legacy for generations to come? yes, indeed, and i thank _ legacy for generations to come? yes, indeed, and i thank my _ legacy for generations to come? yes, indeed, and i thank my honourable friend for what he is doing. i thank everybody at watford general hospital for the support they have given throughout the pandemic, and particularly the volunteers who play a massive part in our vaccination roll—out programme, and ifully support the nhs cadet scheme, part of the work to establish a volunteering legacy for young people from the pandemic. can i volunteering legacy for young people from the pandemic.— from the pandemic. can i associate m self from the pandemic. can i associate myself with — from the pandemic. can i associate myself with the _ from the pandemic. can i associate myself with the remarks _ from the pandemic. can i associate myself with the remarks from i from the pandemic. can i associate myself with the remarks from the l myself with the remarks from the prime minister and leader of the opposition on cheryl gillan and shirley williams. mr speaker, the scottish government has passed landmark legislation embedding the un convention on the rights of the child into scottish law. a real revolution in children's rights. every party in the scottish parliament supported it, even the
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scottish tories. it has been welcomed everywhere, except here in westminster. instead of supporting this new law, the uk government is shamefully taking the scottish parliament to court in order to strike it down. apparently the only basis of the uk government's legal case is that the law constrains westminster powers. so, prime minster, can you do everyone a favour by explaining how protecting children's rights in scotland threatens the tory government in london? mr speaker, this is complete nonsense. the government of the united kingdom ratified the un convention on the rights of the child 30 years ago. we all supported. it is nothing to do with the rights of vulnerable children, which we all protect. this is simply an attempt by the snp to stir up
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constitutional chaos and create another fictitious bone of contention between themselves and the rest of the country. if they cared about the rights of the child, they would do more to improve education in scotland, where they are so lamentably failing, mr speaker. are so lamentably failing, mr seaker. . �* ., . ~ ., are so lamentably failing, mr speaker._ the. are so lamentably failing, mr- speaker._ the rights speaker. ian blackford. the rights ofthe speaker. ian blackford. the rights of the child. _ speaker. ian blackford. the rights of the child, an _ speaker. ian blackford. the rights of the child, an act _ speaker. ian blackford. the rights of the child, an act supported i speaker. ian blackford. the rights of the child, an act supported by l of the child, an act supported by every party, passed by the scottish parliament, and his parliament is taking our government to court. there is nothing technical about this, and the westminster government wants to strip away the rights of children in scotland. this is a tale of two governments. we have an snp scottish government delivering the baby box, doubling the scottish child payment and providing free school meals to every primary school child. at the same time, this tory government is robbing children of their rights in scotland, and quite simply, mr speaker, the snp scottish government has and will continue to work to ensure scotland is the best
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place for a child to grow up. this legal challenge threatens that. it is wrong and it is morally repugnant, prime minister. will he commit to withdrawing his legal challenge today? if not, we will see you in court. challenge today? if not, we will see you in court-— you in court. well, the best thing the can you in court. well, the best thing they can do _ you in court. well, the best thing they can do for — you in court. well, the best thing they can do for the _ you in court. well, the best thing they can do for the rights - you in court. well, the best thing they can do for the rights of i you in court. well, the best thing they can do for the rights of the i they can do for the rights of the child, as i say, is to improve their shameful record on education and to tackle the issues that matter to the people of scotland. to tackle the tax regime that they put in place, to do better on fighting crime and drug addiction in scotland. they should be looking at the issues that really matter, in my view, to the people of scotland, and instead they are going into the elections next month yet again on a campaign to break up this country. that's all they can think of. break up this country, call for a recommend, they can think of. break up this country, call fora recommend, break up country, call fora recommend, break up this country, destroy our country and call a referendum in a way that i think is completely irresponsible
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at a very difficult time when we want to bounce back stronger together. thank you, mr speaker. the a55 expressway is of huge importance to north_ expressway is of huge importance to north wales, linking the region to the main — north wales, linking the region to the main motorway network. it is alsoi _ the main motorway network. it is also, as— the main motorway network. it is also, as was— the main motorway network. it is also, as was noted in the recent interim — also, as was noted in the recent interim report on the union connectivity review, the principal freight— connectivity review, the principal freight artery for the port of holyhead. the road is in desperate need _ holyhead. the road is in desperate need of— holyhead. the road is in desperate need of improvement and has been for many— need of improvement and has been for many years _ need of improvement and has been for many years. will my right honourable friend _ many years. will my right honourable friend confirmed that the government will make _ friend confirmed that the government will make it a priority to use its powers — will make it a priority to use its powers under the uk internal market act to _ powers under the uk internal market act to upgrade the road for the benefit — act to upgrade the road for the benefit of the people of north wales? — benefit of the people of north wales? . ~' , ., benefit of the people of north wales? ., ~ , ., ., ~ , wales? thank you. i thank my right honourable — wales? thank you. i thank my right honourable friend. _ wales? thank you. i thank my right honourable friend. he _ wales? thank you. i thank my right honourable friend. he is _ wales? thank you. i thank my right honourable friend. he is completely right, and sir peter hendy has rightly identified the potential of the a55, and i think the best thing the a55, and i think the best thing the people of wales can do to
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guarantee these vital upgrades is to elect a welsh conservative government on may the 6th. brute elect a welsh conservative government on may the 6th. we now go to vicky foxcroft- _ government on may the 6th. we now go to vicky foxcroft. i _ government on may the 6th. we now go to vicky foxcroft. i understand - government on may the 6th. we now go to vicky foxcroft. i understand you i to vicky foxcroft. i understand you will sign _ to vicky foxcroft. i understand you will sign can— to vicky foxcroft. i understand you will sign can you— to vicky foxcroft. i understand you will sign. can you speak _ to vicky foxcroft. i understand you will sign. can you speak and - to vicky foxcroft. i understand you will sign. can you speak and stand| will sign. can you speak and stand at the _ will sign. can you speak and stand at the same — will sign. can you speak and stand at the same time? _ thank you, mr speaker. and if the prime minister doesn't understand, imagine those who rely on british sign language feel at his press briefings. two million spent on the new press room, yet still no interpreter. what message does he think this sense to disabled people? —— this sends. i am grateful to the honourable lady, and gratefulfor the way i am grateful to the honourable lady, and grateful for the way she has set out her question. i will
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revert to her as soon as i can. thank you, mr speaker. does my right honourable _ thank you, mr speaker. does my right honourable friend agree with me that it is thanks _ honourable friend agree with me that it is thanks to the sacrifice of the british— it is thanks to the sacrifice of the british people during lockdown and the great _ british people during lockdown and the great success of the vaccination programme that lots of small businesses across the whole country and in _ businesses across the whole country and in my— businesses across the whole country and in my constituency in derbyshire dales. _ and in my constituency in derbyshire dales. like _ and in my constituency in derbyshire dales, like brocklehurst, who supplied _ dales, like brocklehurst, who supplied clothing to prince philip, can remain open? will he join with me in— can remain open? will he join with me in a _ can remain open? will he join with me in a campaign to shop local as we come _ me in a campaign to shop local as we come out _ me in a campaign to shop local as we come out of— me in a campaign to shop local as we come out of lockdown? | me in a campaign to shop local as we come out of lockdown?— come out of lockdown? i thank my honourable — come out of lockdown? i thank my honourable friend, _ come out of lockdown? i thank my honourable friend, and _ come out of lockdown? i thank my honourable friend, and i _ come out of lockdown? i thank my honourable friend, and i can i come out of lockdown? i thank my honourable friend, and i can tell . honourable friend, and i can tell her that, yes, honourable friend, and i can tell herthat, yes, i honourable friend, and i can tell her that, yes, i certainly will encourage her and everybody else to shop local as we come out of lockdown, and as i very much hope we will be able to do, and my right honourable friend the communities secretary has announced £800 million of funding from the future high streets fund have been allocated to areas including her own in order to encourage that shopping that we all
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hope we want to see. thank you. may i extend my condolences and those of my constituents to the queen and the royal family for their constituents to the queen and the royalfamily for their sad loss, and royal family for their sad loss, and also royalfamily for their sad loss, and also to the families and colleagues of gerald gilham and shirley williams. —— cheryl gillan. will the prime minister tell this house when he last spoke to former prime minister david cameron? the honest truth... i cannot remember when i last spoke to dave, but if she wants to know whether i have had any contact with him about any of the matters that have been in the press, the answer is no. mr speaker, those who helped to devewp. — mr speaker, those who helped to develop, to test, to improve and manufacture the vaccines deserve our praise~ _ manufacture the vaccines deserve our praise~ will_ manufacture the vaccines deserve our praise. will he also recognised the successful— praise. will he also recognised the successful roll—out of the vaccination programme based on the
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dedication_ vaccination programme based on the dedication of the nhs staff on the merit _ dedication of the nhs staff on the merit of— dedication of the nhs staff on the merit of volunteers who made the process _ merit of volunteers who made the process so — merit of volunteers who made the process so easy for so many people? my right _ process so easy for so many people? my right honourable friend is completely right. this has been a colossal team effort. it has been led by the nhs, with gps very often doing the lion's share of the work, but they have been supported by the army, by local council officials, who have also been absolutely magnificent, and thus colleagues have said earlier, by volunteers as well. ~ ., ., ., have said earlier, by volunteers as well. ., ., ., , , well. we go to doctorjames davis. thank you. — well. we go to doctorjames davis. thank you. mr _ well. we go to doctorjames davis. thank you, mr speaker. _ well. we go to doctorjames davis. thank you, mr speaker. the - well. we go to doctorjames davis. | thank you, mr speaker. the interim findings of saint peter hendy�*s union connectivity review are very much to be welcomed. he highlights the improvements that need to be made to the railways in north wales, linking up with merseyside and manchester, as well as the a55. these, of course, can help to level “p these, of course, can help to level up the region. will my right
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honourable friend confirmed that the identified projects within sir peter hendy�*s work in north wales will receive a fair chunk of the £20 million of development funding as part of the agenda? and will he commit to implementing the findings of sir peter hendy�*s final report when it is released in the summer? i thank my honourable friend, and we will look at what sir peter has to say. i think he has come up with some very interesting interim proposals, particularly about improving connectivity along the north wales coastline, the routes into merseyside, and on the a55, i repeat what i said to my right honourable friend earlier, there is a great opportunity to do that if people will vote conservative and vote for a welsh conservative government and made the sixth. let's go to hywel williams. thank ou, mr let's go to hywel williams. thank you, mr speaker. _ let's go to hywel williams. thank you, mr speaker. in _ let's go to hywel williams. thank you, mr speaker. in 2007, - let's go to hywel williams. thank
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you, mr speaker. in 2007, my . let's go to hywel williams. thank. you, mr speaker. in 2007, my friend adam price, then the memberfor carmarthen east, proposed and elected representatives prohibition of deception bill. at this distance and time, it would be unkind to quiz the prime minister on the detail, because he is seen as a big thinker, so today, perhaps, he could tell the house what he thinks of the principle of that bill, that on important matters of public policy, politicians must not lie.— politicians must not lie. well, i totally agree- _ politicians must not lie. well, i totally agree. i _ politicians must not lie. well, i totally agree. i have _ politicians must not lie. well, i totally agree. i have a - politicians must not lie. well, i totally agree. i have a high - politicians must not lie. well, i i totally agree. i have a high regard for the honourable gentleman and in deed, i remember happy times with his colleague adam price. i don't remember the details of his bill, but i think we all concur with the basic principle that he has just enunciated. basic principle that he has 'ust enunciated.�* basic principle that he has 'ust enunciated. ., ,, ~ .,~ enunciated. thank you, mr speaker. former police _ enunciated. thank you, mr speaker. former police inspector _ enunciated. thank you, mr speaker. former police inspector cash - enunciated. thank you, mr speaker.
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former police inspector cash sing i former police inspector cash sing set up _ former police inspector cash sing set up one — former police inspector cash sing set up one britain 0ne former police inspector cash sing set up one britain one nation to bring _ set up one britain one nation to bring together all classes, ethnicities, races and religions to celebrate — ethnicities, races and religions to celebrate being british. the celebration is held injune, but next _ celebration is held injune, but next week— celebration is held injune, but next week in april 22, it will see the launch— next week in april 22, it will see the launch a school in bradford. will the — the launch a school in bradford. will the prime ministerjoin me in congratulating l for his fantastic initiative — congratulating l for his fantastic initiative for all to come together initiative for all to come together in a common pride in being british, and will— in a common pride in being british, and will he — in a common pride in being british, and will he make a message for the launch— and will he make a message for the launch next— and will he make a message for the launch next week? —— cash singh. a fully launch next week? —— cash singh. fully congratulate him on his work, and it is fully incredible at this time, that there are people who want to split this country at rather than bring us together. i think it is an absolute tragedy that they still think like that. i think they're going to change, but i wish everybody all the very best.
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thank you, mr speaker. and contrary to the conclusions of the recent ethnic disparity report, institutional racism still exists. 40 institutional racism still exists. a0 years since the liverpool eight appraisers, black communities continue to suffer racial injustice. the report downplays the structural inequalities that still exist. the resolution foundation announced today the unemployment rate for young black people rose by 35% compared to 30% for their white counterparts. can the prime minister confirmed the allegations that downing street redrafted the report to change the narrative, does he agree with me that this report should now be withdrawn? i think the honourable lady, but actually, when you look at the report and read it in detail, not everything that this government is going to agree with is in there. of course not. there are interesting observations and interesting ways of looking at things. and we will be responding in due course. but what
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we say is that nobody should be in any doubt as to the reality of racism and to the reality of the struggle that too many people face, and we are going to do everything we can to stamp it out, and particularly to help young black people get the job is, particularly to help young black people get thejob is, the education, that they need. people get the job is, the education, that they need. thank ou, mr education, that they need. thank you, mr speaker. _ education, that they need. thank you, mr speaker. as _ education, that they need. thank you, mr speaker. as my - education, that they need. thank i you, mr speaker. as my honourable friend _ you, mr speaker. as my honourable friend witi— you, mr speaker. as my honourable friend will know, as we build back better, _ friend will know, as we build back better, we — friend will know, as we build back better, we need to inspire the next generation— better, we need to inspire the next generation of scientists and engineers. will he therefore agreed to work— engineers. will he therefore agreed to work with engineering uk and big band digital to provide an online introduction to this year's event to reinforce _ introduction to this year's event to reinforce the message that a career in engineering is rewarding, creative. _ in engineering is rewarding, creative, and can transform the world _ creative, and can transform the world around us for the better? and wittie _ world around us for the better? and willie recognise the extraordinary contribution engineers have made and are making _ contribution engineers have made and are making in our battle against covid? — are making in our battle against covid? -- — are making in our battle against covid? —— will he recognise? | are making in our battle against covid? -- will he recognise? i thank him, covid? -- will he recognise? i thank him. because _ covid? -- will he recognise? i thank him, because engineers _ covid? -- will he recognise? i thank him, because engineers have i him, because engineers have obviously been crucial, and in the
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fight against covid, and this is the moment to become or work towards becoming an engineer. we are putting a huge investment into the infrastructure of this country over the next few years. we will need skilled young people to be going into engineering. that's why we put into engineering. that's why we put in the t levels. i congratulate my honourable friend on his initiative. i will do my best to support him. thank you. given his ancestry, the prime _ thank you. given his ancestry, the prime minister will be more than familiar— prime minister will be more than familiar with the phrase a fish rots from _ familiar with the phrase a fish rots from the _ familiar with the phrase a fish rots from the head down it is. from the head down it it familiar with the phrase a fish rots from the head down it it is a turkish _ from the head down it it is a turkish proverb. put simply, since he became — turkish proverb. put simply, since he became the prime minister, the sound _ he became the prime minister, the sound of— he became the prime minister, the sound of big ben's bongs has been replaced _ sound of big ben's bongs has been replaced by the sound of cash till hungs _ replaced by the sound of cash till bungs. last summer, we had the case of richard _ bungs. last summer, we had the case of richard desmond in the community sector _ of richard desmond in the community sector. recently, we had ministers dishing _ sector. recently, we had ministers dishing the — sector. recently, we had ministers dishing the dosh between community constituencies, and the health secretary handing, or involved in a contract _ secretary handing, or involved in a contract with his pub landlord for ppe _ contract with his pub landlord for ppe now— contract with his pub landlord for ppe. now we have a chancellor and
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health _ ppe. now we have a chancellor and health secretary who have sought to grease _ health secretary who have sought to grease the wheels of involvement with greensill and david cameron. what _ with greensill and david cameron. what does — with greensill and david cameron. what does this say about the prime minister'sleadership of his government?— minister'sleadership of his government? minister'sleadership of his covernment? �* . . , , _ government? i'm afraid he is simply wron: in government? i'm afraid he is simply wrong in what _ government? i'm afraid he is simply wrong in what he _ government? i'm afraid he is simply wrong in what he says, _ government? i'm afraid he is simply wrong in what he says, and - wrong in what he says, and particularly in what he says about the chancellor and the health secretary, and i don't believe that he should have spoken in those terms, mr speaker. but what i will say is that there is one party in this place that brought in tough rules on lobbying and there is another party that campaigned at the last election to get rid of those rules, because of their relationship with the trades unions, mr speaker, because they wanted them to continue in the obscure, opaque way they were being run and because they wanted people to be able to continue lobbying parliamentarians as they always have. look at their 2019 manifesto. if he repudiates it now, why not go ahead and do so?
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thank you. for the last few months, number— thank you. for the last few months, number of— thank you. for the last few months, number of my constituents have taken to the _ number of my constituents have taken to the streets to help tackle the prohtem — to the streets to help tackle the problem of littering, and i pay particular— problem of littering, and i pay particular to those constituents who i particular to those constituents who i met _ particular to those constituents who i met with _ particular to those constituents who i met with recently. will he join me in tracking — i met with recently. will he join me in backing the grantham journal spring _ in backing the grantham journal spring clean campaign, and assure us that the _ spring clean campaign, and assure us that the government is doing all it can to _ that the government is doing all it can to tackle littering? i share his indignation about litter and it's one of the things on which the whole of the country, and i hope the whole of the country, and i hope the whole of the country, and i hope the whole house is united. that is why we are doing the respect of the outdoors campaign to encourage people to follow the country code, pick up their litter and a lot of people are meeting outdoors at the moment because of the pandemic and they must obey the basic laws of respect for other people and pick up their litter. we are putting money into new litter bins, and yes, we are increasing fines, on the spot fines for littering. i know there
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will be many libertarians in this place who think that is unfair and draconian, but personally i think it's the right thing to do. i abhor litter and i urge anyone who sees anyone throwing away a crisp packet to tick them off and that next business the speaker refers to is what we expect to start in the next few minutes. mps debating and voting later on to whether to hold a parliamentary inquiry into the lobbying activities of the former prime minister david cameron in relation to the firm greensill capital, the collapsed firm, it was not subject to take up much of the discussion during prime minister's questions, among the questions from the leader of the opposition keir starmer for the prime minister, does the prime minister believe the current lobbying rules are fit for purpose.
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he also asked does the premise except does he accept there is a revolving door between conservative government and paid lobbyists. and he said it wasn't entirely clear where the boundaries were understood, fully, and he referred to the independent inquiry he has set up but that is going to be the subject of the debate and vote coming up in the house of commons very shortly and we will return that when it begins. before then, some of the key stories. protesters have clashed with police in minneapolis for the third night in a row — after a black man was the policewoman who fatally shot daunte wright has resigned — along with the police chief. it comes as the trial of the former officer accused of killing george floyd in the same city, begins hearing from defence witnesses. our north america correspondent
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barbara plett usher reports. gunshot. for a third night police drove back protesters venting their anger over the shooting of another black man. hit in the chest by a policewoman who confused her gun with her taser, in the middle of the trial of the officer accused of killing george floyd. do you know the difference between a gun and a taser? under pressure, the policewoman resigned. she was a 26—year veteran of the force. she was followed by the police chief. we are here and we will fight forjustice for this family, just like we are fighting for our brother. george floyd's family has come together in solidarity with the relatives of the dead man, daunte wright. sharing their quest forjustice and their loss. i thought somebody was playing a joke on me. it hurt me to my heart.
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daunte was a beautiful child. he might not have been an angel, but he was our angel. our angel. he belonged to us. inside the courtroom, the defence took over after the prosecution rested its case. more footage of george floyd from police body cameras was shown tojurors. the defence is arguing that it was a drug overdose which caused his death rather than excessive force by the officer who restrained him by kneeling on his neck. testimony is expected to wrap by the end of the week, and the jury will begin deliberations shortly after that. there is a lot at stake in what it decides. the authorities are bracing for the possibility of further unrest once there is a verdict. they were hoping that the resignation of the police
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officials would help to defuse the anger, but so far that has failed to stop the protests. barbara plett usher, bbc news, minneapolis. japan is facing intense criticism from its neighbours over plans to release more than a million tonnes of contaminated water from the stricken fukushima nuclear plant into the sea. china called japan's decision extremely irresponsible and south korea's president moon is pressing for the issue to be raised with the international tribunal for the law of the sea. courtney bembridge reports. it's been more than a decade since disaster struck at fukushima. during the nuclear meltdown, more than a million tonnes of water was used to cool the reactors. it's been stored in tanks ever since, butjapan hasjust approved a plan to slowly release it into the ocean. it says the water will be treated undiluted so radiation levels are below those set for drinking water. but it hasn't stopped protests like this in fukushima.
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translation: such a decision is completely irresponsible. i i don't think people with common sense will do such a thing. the country's fishing and tourism industries have also argued against it. suzuki yoshinaga runs a guesthouse in iwaki city. it's the only ones still standing in the area, and he worried this will drive tourists away for good. translation: i will have to live l with it for the rest of my life. | tourists will not say explicitly that they are not travelling here because of the release of the nuclear waste water, but i think people just naturally will not come here. china says the decision is extremely irresponsible. translation: despite doubts - and opposition from home and abroad, and without sufficient consultation with neighbouring countries, the japanese site has unilaterally decided. south korea has also expressed concern. these protests were in seoul this week. but the united nations nuclear
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watchdog has backed the plan. they will discharge the water in a controlled way. there is no harm, there is no activity either in fish or the sediment or the water. the process is expected to take decades to complete. courtney bembridge, bbc news. president biden says he will withdraw all us forces from afghanistan by 11th september — the twentieth anniversary of the 9/11 terror attacks. the trump administration had previously decided on a complete military exit by may, following negotiations with the taliban. here's our chief international correspondent lyse doucet(tx sot for many months, ever since the united states focused on withdrawing the last few thousand us troops, afghans and foreigners alike said we have got to avoid the mistakes of
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history, there was an echo of the soviet troop withdrawal in 1989, which sadly paved the way to the collapse of the government and a civil war which then paved the way to the taliban. so many were saying we cannot repeat the mistakes of the past, and this is really a legacy i —— afghanistan wants to ensure doesn't want to happen again but beyond all expectations afghanistan is again, withdrawal of the last 10,000 us led nato forces leaving, the taliban poised to return to power and the afghans i have been speaking to after the announcement was first revealed are all saying they fear again a civil war and had hoped against hope there would be some conditions attached to the troop withdrawal, but the senior us administration official who briefed journalists was adamant the
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conditions based on the us 20 years hasn't worked, it is time for america to close the book on this 20 year work. hundreds of hindu devotees, including nine saints, have tested positive for covid—i9 in india's haridwar city, where huge crowds have gathered to participate in the kumbh mela festival. more than three million people bathed in the ganges river yesterday to mark one of the most auspicious days of the festival. hindus believe the ganges is holy, and taking a dip in the water will cleanse them of their sins. india reported more than i8a,000 new cases of covid yesterday — its highest daily spike yet. many have criticised the government for allowing the festival to go ahead amid a raging pandemic. the japanese company which owns the cargo ship which blocked the suez canal says it is negotiating with egyptian authorities, after being asked to pay 900 million dollars in compensation. the ever given has been impounded since being released. egypt says the 900 million dollar figure is needed to cover the costs
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of refloating the ever given, and meeting the other losses incurred. a third actor from the hit australian soap opera, neighbours, has gone public with allegations of racism. in a statement, sharonjohal said she had faced racist taunts from white castmates, and felt further targeted when she asked for help. sharonjohal, who has indian heritage, left the show in march after four years. in response, production company fremantle media said it would hold a review into the allegations. our australia correspondent shaima khalil has more she had she had experienced direct and indirect racism. she didn't mention names. she said there were incidents where a former colleague had compared her to a bobble head toy that mimicked the indian
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character from the simpsons, a problematic character in its own right where the simpsons got complaints about tones of racism. despite sharon asking the person to stop many times. she also said when she went to management with her complaints that they were sympathetic but not helpful, and they didn't do anything to stop this from occurring and i voted other — neither did other cast members which left her feeling isolated and marginalised. sharonjohal is the third to come through, saying she felt a moral obligation after two former aboriginal stars came through with their own experiences, and that onset raises the allegation was first raised by two aboriginal former cast members and one actually said in a statement that they found it traumatising to work in what they described as a culturally unsafe environment and she herself has praised sharonjohal for coming out and saying this.
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it is a fixture and a stable for millions, notjust in australia but in the uk, so quite an unsettling moment really for them but the production is that they are looking into it as a spokesperson for channel five, the channel which carries the programme into the uk, said they condemn racism and take issues of discrimination really seriously. figures released by the office for national statistics is antibody positivity, which suggests that someone has had a covid infection in the past or has been vaccinated has levelled off in people in england, wales and scotland. an estimated 5a.9% of people in private households in england are likely to have tested positive for antibodies in the week to master 28. that is compared to a9.i% in wales and a6% of people in scotland. in northern ireland an estimated 5a.5% of people
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were likely to have antibodies, up from 50% in the previous week. it may be one of the uk's most remote communities but tiny fair isle — with a population ofjust a8 people — can now claim to be one of the safest. the scottish island — located between orkney and shetland — is well known for its knitwear. this week, vials of astrazeneca vaccine were flown in on a small plane, meaning every adult on the island was able to have their second dose. on the island was able jen stout reports... on the island was able touchdown. on the island was able the lifeline plane reaches fairisle with a very special cargo. enough vials of vaccine to give the whole adult population a second dose. sharp scratch. from 18 to 85, everyone is covered. it's probably one of the safest places in the country, really. you know, we can decide whether people come in or not. there is no visitors
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come on the boat. and as i say, they have been very good about controlling it, keeping people from coming on the plane. with fairisle being 25 miles from mainland shetland, the decision was taken to fly in the vaccine doses. fairisle was one of those areas of the uk where there were no confirmed covid cases, so we felt it was really important to maintain that. we were very keen that we went in and we took the vaccination programme for all those that were entitled in one go. it is a big relief for the a8 strong population. i wasn't aware of anything, just stuck it in and that was that. delighted. we're getting everyone that wants i it, and it has been great for us, i great for the island as a whole. i it will give us more confidence. as we stuck to hopefully get back towards a bit more of a normal life. it's been great because we've had ten days without a boat, so the boat managed to come
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in yesterday, so we then had the boat and a full shop, and we have had a second vaccination today, so the sun is out and the lambs are coming, so they have been over the moon. it is a glimmer of hope for this most welcoming of islands, looking to better more sociable times ahead. jen stout, bbc news, fairisle. the family of a nurse who died a year ago from covid—i9 haven't received any money from an online campaign which raised nearly 200,000 pounds for them. mary agyapong, who was 28, died just days after giving birth at luton and dunstable hospital, where she worked. jon ironmonger reports. the death of nurse mary agyapong is among the cruelest of the pandemic. she contracted covid—i9 while pregnant and didn't live to know her daughter, who was born safely. heartbroken, her husband ernest focused his attention on the burial and was unaware as nearly 10,000 donations began pouring in online.
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i really actually remain very grateful, you know, for the love, support and the generosity of the public. in just a few days, £186,000 was raised through a gofundme page set up by rhoda asiedu, a family friend living in birmingham, expressly to support mary's husband and the couple's children, aj and baby mary, during this heavy and trying time. but one year on, the beneficiaries still haven't received a penny, and lawyers suspect the fundraisers of playing loose with a custom at ghanaian funerals. normally, when such donations are collected, it is given to the spouse, to almost reimburse him of such costs, and then to look after the children, things like pampers, baby food. mary never had the opportunity to bless her daughter, so there's been a lot of expenses that he's had to carry
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on all by himself. the money raised was paid to ms asiedu's legal team, blue trinity, who said it had been placed on trust for the education of mary's children and that 80% of it would be released when they turn 21. that's a 20—year wait for baby mary, and ernest, who's studying law, says the family is struggling now. i just try to keep my head above the water. ifind it very, very surprising that i've not been asked or involved, you know, with this gofundme money, it's beyond my understanding. gofundme said it was always clear the money would be placed in a trust. but we found an archived snapshot of the web page on april 16th with £117,000 of donations and no reference to a trust at all. ms asiedu? i'd like to talk to you about the gofundme page that you set up
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for ernest boateng and his children. is that 0k? can ijust ask you, you know, why has he not been made a trustee of the fund? when shall i call you? ok, all right. i think it's clear you don't want to talk. we didn't hear back from ms asiedu or her legal team. on monday, ernest and the children marked the first anniversary of mary's death. life without her is getting no easier. jon ironmonger, bbc news. it's a hundred days till the opening of the summer olympic games in tokyo. the torch relay is under way and athletes all over the world are back in training. but in the host country, support for the games remains extremely low — apathy fuelled by the pandemic. from tokyo rupert
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wingfield—hayes reports. if the latest opinion polls up to be believed these people interviewed demanding the olympics be cancelled orjust demanding the olympics be cancelled or just the demanding the olympics be cancelled orjust the tip of a very large iceberg. with coronavirus infection surging across western japan, 72% now say the olympics must be postponed or cancelled. one of them is worried about the threat to her elderly mother. mr; is worried about the threat to her elderly mother.— is worried about the threat to her elderl mother. g ., , ' ' ,, elderly mother. my mother is 91. she is very vulnerable _ elderly mother. my mother is 91. she is very vulnerable to _ elderly mother. my mother is 91. she is very vulnerable to covid. _ elderly mother. my mother is 91. she is very vulnerable to covid. i - elderly mother. my mother is 91. she is very vulnerable to covid. i think i is very vulnerable to covid. i think maybe i will take her to the countryside, two or three weeks. japan doesn'tjust have a large number of elderly.
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they have only started getting covid vaccines this week. while the uk and us surge ahead, japan lies far behind, with fewer vaccinations per capita than any other developed country. experts say this makes it extremely vulnerable. i think it is a very stupid idea to hold the olympic games this summer in tokyo. it is. but that doesn't necessarily mean it is impossible. if you ignore all the surrounding risks of gathering people together at the same time in one city, in the middle of the pandemic, it is not a good idea, scientifically or ethically. with100 days to go, japan is still struggling to hold olympic test events. today, this stadium behind me should have been bustling with activity, holding a big olympic preparatory event. instead it is empty. why this event has been called off is not clear. but what we do know is that, two weeks ago, seven members of the japan men's water polo team, who should have been competing here today, tested positive for covid—19.
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so how has this affected them? covid has forced her out of olympic competition over a year. that is taking her toe. translation: nothing is auoin the taking her toe. translation: nothing is going the way _ taking her toe. translation: nothing is going the way it _ taking her toe. translation: nothing is going the way it was _ taking her toe. translation: nothing is going the way it was planned - is going the way it was planned leading up to the olympics. competition in practice a totally different things. by not having a place to compete it is hard for athletes to maintain a rhythm. this week, as the olympic torch relay reached osaka, covid infections there forced the cancellation of all events. instead runners carried the torch around an empty park, waving to no one. it could be a foretaste of what is to come. rupert wingfield—hayes, tokyo.
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many of us used lockdown to have a clear out of old things cluttering the home. it's meant a bonanza for charity shops, who are reporting record sales as they open for the first time in months. but some stores have stopped accepting donations because of the huge amount coming to them. colletta smith reports. the long lockdown winter months have been a chance for a clearout. but what to do with all this stuff? there's clothes... ..jumpers — all sorts! this shop's open to customers, but not for donations yet, as they've got so much already. so there's no chance of getting rid of this lot today. i'm going to have to hold onto it, i think, yeah. our phone is constantly ringing, asking when we're taking donations, are we taking donations? it's just, i don't think our shop's big enough to take everything at the once. so that's why we've done our two days a week. with limited numbers allowed inside the store, sarah needs all the space possible for shoppers.
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from next week we've asked donors to come to the back door, where we'll take their donations. we all have our ppe on, so we're nice and safe. we just don't want to lose trade by them coming through the front door. the head of the charity retail association says shops up and down the country have been making different plans to safely receive a deluge of donations over the coming weeks. some of our members have actually been donated extra storage facilities. people have been doing things like hiring vans and portakabins in their car parks. so actually, the systems are all in place, and donors shouldn't be worried about that. the advice is to ring ahead, to check when and where you can drop donations. we will take you to the house of commons because a debate is getting under way on lobbying ahead of a vote on whether to establish a parliamentary inquiry into the lobbying activities of the former
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prime minister david cameron in relation to greensill capital, here is rachel reeves for labour. you mi . ht is rachel reeves for labour. you might think _ is rachel reeves for labour. you might think but _ is rachel reeves for labour. guru. might think but different date —— david cameron makes up for transfers he makes up in fortune—telling. information because the person exploiting the loopholes would be the very same david cameron. we have a conservative prime minister giving a conservative prime minister giving a company access to all areas of government. he was brought in and given privileged act says to the heart of government with the title and the business card as a senior adviser in the prime minister's office. and then what a stroke of luck. when he was no longer prime minister and just past the period where he no longer needed approval of the advisory committee on business appointments, david cameron
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joins greensill capital to lobby the conservative government full of his friends. having refused to respond to any questions at all for a0 days, david cameron chose a period of national grief hoping there would be less political criticism and less scrutiny. mr speaker, it is cynical and shabby. and the statement itself, it was token lead. he is not sorry for the text, drinks, for his conduct but he is sorry he got caught and he is sorry his shares are worthless. this is no question of why he didn't go through the correct channels. it is a question of why he was doing this at all. so let's be really clear. david cameron wasn't working in the national interest but in his own personal interest, with the hope of making millions of pounds for himself through the exercise of his share
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options. but questions cannotjust be asked of david cameron when it is current conservative ministers who have paved the way for this scandal. mr speaker, when it comes to lobbying, it takes two to tango. for every former minister lobbying, there is someone in power being lobbied, and this is why this scandal isn'tjust lobbied, and this is why this scandal isn't just about the conduct of david cameron during his time as prime minister and in the years afterwards. this is about who he lobbied in the current government and how they responded. greensill was awarded a cbe by a conservative government yet his company's spectacular collapse now means over 50,000 jobs are at risk around the world, including thousands in the uk's steel communities. from hartlepool to stockbridge, from rotherham to scunthorpe and newport,
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the steel industry is crucial and the steel industry is crucial and the government must make clear that our steel industry will not pay the price for the failures at greensill and beyond. this government have set “p and beyond. this government have set up an inquiry butjust about supply chain finance and greensill. such a review is wholly inadequate. and deliberately so. they don't want to explore what needs to change in lobbying or who currently gets access to power all the wider issue of how to lift the lid, lift standards which have fallen so far in the ten years of conservative governments, they don't want public hearings they don't want the disinfectant of sunlight as david cameron once urged. theyjust want this to go away which is why they've chosen nigel boardman studio: you can continue to watch
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this debate on bbc parliament. much more on the bbc news channel throughout the afternoon. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren. hello. another chilly day today. not too bad in the sunshine and light winds but we have seen the cloud building up producing a few showers mainly across south wales and the south—west of anger. temperatures 11 or 12 or 13, a south—west of anger. temperatures 11 or12 or13, a bit south—west of anger. temperatures 11 or 12 or 13, a bit cooler around some of the north sea coast. any showers tend to fade away this evening and overnight we will have clearing skies, a few mist and fog patches. more cloud coming in from the southern north sea may be bringing the odd shower to coastal areas of east anglia and kent but another cold night. a touch of frost in many areas. the lowest temperature sooner than england and southern seven. a sunny start from many places. cloud developing but more likely to find some showers in lincolnshire, east angus, the south—east, perhaps the east midlands and down towards hampshire. elsewhere it will be fine and dry. in spite for many. a gentle breeze from the east in glasgow means the highest temperatures across western
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parts of scotland probably but the much cooler breeze coming in for east anglia and the south—east. temperatures lower than today.
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pressure builds on david cameron as mps prepare to vote on a parliamentary inquiry into the former prime minister's lobbying. labour claims there's a revolving door between government and paid lobbyists. i do think it is a good idea in principle that top civil servants should be able to engage with business and should have experience of the private sector. when i look at the accounts i'm reading today, it's not clear that those boundaries had been properly understood. the greens and scandal is just the top of the iceberg. dodgy contracts, privileged access, jobs for their mates. this is the return of tory
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sleaze.

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