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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 14, 2021 9:00am-10:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to bbc news, i'm victoria derbyshire, here are the headlines. if you're young and black, you've been hit hardest by unemployment during the pandemic. according to new research, 35% of young black people are out of work. if that's your experience, please get in touch. more than 1,000 extra volunteers are being recruited to take part in a study looking at whether a mix of covid vaccines can be used for the first and second doses. it would allow for a lot more flexibility if there were issues with supply or you can have different recommendations for different recommendations for different age groups. the row over the lobbying activities
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of the former prime minister david cameron for the collapsed firm greensill capital — mps vote today on whether to hold a parliamentary inquiry. the family of a pregnant nurse who died with covid—19 hasn't received any money from a fundraising campaign which is now at £186,000, even though it was set up to support her husband and children. young black people have been hit hardest by unemployment during the covid pandemic, according to new research. the resolution foundation think tank said that over the past year, the jobless rate for young black people rose by more than a third to 35%, compared with 24% for young people of asian descent and 13% for young white people. the foundation said that covid had widened existing gaps between ethnic groups.
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it added that young people had borne the brunt ofjob losses in lockdown: between the second and third quarters of 2020 the unemployment rate among 18—24 year olds rose from 11.5% to 13.6%. i can now speak to kathleen henehan, who's a research and policy analyst at the resolution foundation. thanks at the resolution foundation. for talking to us, tel more thanks for talking to us, tell us more about these figures. sure, 13 months on from the start of the crisis, unemployment has risen less than anticipated, thanks in large part to the furlough scheme, but the rise that did transpire was unevenly distributed, so our research shows that black young people have been particularly hard hit. they have seen the unemployment rate rise by
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about 9% since the start of the crisis, compared tojust about 9% since the start of the crisis, compared to just 83% rise among white young people since the start the crisis. so some uneven impacts that i wasn't pre—existing inequalities. 50 impacts that i wasn't pre-existing inequalities-_ inequalities. so we already had these gaps _ inequalities. so we already had these gaps before _ inequalities. so we already had these gaps before the - inequalities. so we already had l these gaps before the pandemic, inequalities. so we already had - these gaps before the pandemic, what covid has done is make the gap wider. , ., , ., wider. yes, indeed, indeed, and, you know, wider. yes, indeed, indeed, and, you know. there — wider. yes, indeed, indeed, and, you know, there are _ wider. yes, indeed, indeed, and, you know, there are a _ wider. yes, indeed, indeed, and, you know, there are a number— wider. yes, indeed, indeed, and, you know, there are a number of- wider. yes, indeed, indeed, and, you know, there are a number of reasons| know, there are a number of reasons for this, some of it may be down to the sectors that people work in, so before the crisis young people on average we are likely to work in hard—hit sectors, and to a slight extent, black young people were more likely to work in those sectors, even compared to young white counterparts. but there are still big questions about why the impact of the crisis in those sectors has been so badly distributed. yes. of the crisis in those sectors has been so badly distributed. yes, in terms of this _ been so badly distributed. yes, in terms of this particular _ been so badly distributed. yes, in | terms of this particular generation, the class of 2020, we call them, the impact of covid is massive, isn't
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it? ., impact of covid is massive, isn't it? c, a, , , c, it? yeah, it really is. one of the thins it? yeah, it really is. one of the things we _ it? yeah, it really is. one of the things we were _ it? yeah, it really is. one of the things we were particularly - it? yeah, it really is. one of the i things we were particularly worried about last year, we had a whole cohort of young people leaving full—time education for the first time, entering into a labour market, large parts of which which were essentially on ice. we are starting to see the effects of that, so the unemployment rate among this group is up about three points from last year. even with that group, it is those young people whose pre—pandemic positions were weakest about our now worst affected, so one in—form recent education leaders who are black are now unemployed. —— one in four up. so again, are black are now unemployed. —— one infour up. so again, a are black are now unemployed. —— one in four up. so again, a double disadvantage, as it were. thank you very much. — disadvantage, as it were. thank you very much, kathleen, _ disadvantage, as it were. thank you very much, kathleen, kathleen - very much, kathleen, kathleen henehan from the resolution foundation. if that reflects your experience, do get in touch. a major uk trial looking at whether covid vaccines can be mixed, meaning different ones are used for first and second doses,
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is being expanded. adults over 50 who have already had a first dose of pfizer or astrazeneca can apply to take part in the study, as our health reporter michelle roberts explains. currently, the nhs offers people an identical covid—19 vaccine for their first and second doses, but some experts believe switching to a different brand of vaccine for the second dose might give broader and longer—lasting protection against the pandemic virus and new variants of it, as well as offer more flexibility to vaccine roll—out. more than 800 people have been helping researchers investigate this in a trial called com—cov. they've received two doses of either pfizer, astrazeneca or a combination of both to see which works best for immunity. results from this first stage are expected next month, but the investigators now hope to recruit around 1,000 people aged 50 or older to take part and test more vaccines in different combinations. that includes the new moderna vaccine and the novavax one that's expected to be
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approved soon in the uk. dosing with one, then dosing with the other. and that would give a lot more flexibility if there was any problems with supply for one vaccine, for example, or changes in recommendations for different age groups. then if someone's been primed with one vaccine, they're not locked into getting the same vaccine for the second dose. and we will be testing those combinations against the new variants as they come through. so the blood tests we obtained, we'll test them against the new variants to see potentially if they offer any broader protection against the multiple different strains. volunteers need to have already had one covid jab on the nhs in the past few months and be willing to travel to a regional nhs hospital trust site in england to take part. they'll have blood taken to check how well vaccines trigger an immune response. the study will run for a year, but there should be some reportable findings byjune orjuly to shape how the uk and the world continues to protect populations against this deadly virus. michelle roberts, bbc news.
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professor matthew snape is associate professor in paediatrics and vaccinology at oxford vaccine group, university of oxford. he's the chief investigator for the study. hello to you. so the aim of this is to see if a mix of vaccines can still give us good efficacy, good protection against covid. that is ri . ht, protection against covid. that is right. that _ protection against covid. that is right. that is — protection against covid. that is right, that is the _ protection against covid. that is right, that is the starting - protection against covid. that is right, that is the starting point, | right, that is the starting point, does giving a different vaccine for the second taos gave as good immune response, and is as well tolerated, and that is the starting point, it would give us a lot more flexibility and resilience. i5 would give us a lot more flexibility and resilience. is it would give us a lot more flexibility and resilience.— and resilience. is it a possibility that a combination _ and resilience. is it a possibility that a combination of _ and resilience. is it a possibility that a combination of vaccines i and resilience. is it a possibility- that a combination of vaccines could give us better immunity? that that a combination of vaccines could give us better immunity?— give us better immunity? that is theoretically _ give us better immunity? that is theoretically the _
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give us better immunity? that is theoretically the case, _ give us better immunity? that is theoretically the case, and - give us better immunity? that is theoretically the case, and there give us better immunity? that is. theoretically the case, and there is animal data from mouse studies, they looked at, for example, the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine in combination with an rna vaccine, and found that some combinations gave a better immune response in some aspects of the immune system. so thatis aspects of the immune system. so that is encouraging, but we have to see what it looks like in humans first. 50 see what it looks like in humans first, ., ., see what it looks like in humans first. ., ., ., first. so who are you looking for and how can _ first. so who are you looking for and how can they _ first. so who are you looking for and how can they apply? - first. so who are you looking for and how can they apply? we - first. so who are you looking forj and how can they apply? we are lookin: and how can they apply? we are looking for— and how can they apply? we are looking for people _ and how can they apply? we are looking for people 50 _ and how can they apply? we are looking for people 50 years - and how can they apply? we are looking for people 50 years and | looking for people 50 years and above who have received their first dose of pfizer or astrazeneca vaccines between the end of january and the middle of march, so 8—12 weeks ago. if they are interested in taking part, they can visit the website, orthe taking part, they can visit the website, or the oxford vaccine group website, or the oxford vaccine group website and follow through, or they can sign up to the vaccine registry, which is one of the way we are inviting people to take part. hagar inviting people to take part. how soon could _
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inviting people to take part. how soon could the _ inviting people to take part. how soon could the impact of your study be felt? ., , , , be felt? from the first study, with the astrazeneca _ be felt? from the first study, with the astrazeneca and _ be felt? from the first study, with the astrazeneca and pfizer - be felt? from the first study, with i the astrazeneca and pfizer vaccines, we will be getting first results over the next month or two, so quite soon. the results from this study, we will be getting those in summer, so this is looking more at people getting the vaccines, their first dose of the vaccine is around now, and getting their second doses in 8-12 and getting their second doses in 8—12 weeks' time, and we could be influencing that. but it is important globally as well, because there are still many countries around the world which are still catching up with their first doses, and so this type of information will speed up the implementation of these vaccines globally.— vaccines globally. obviously you have to do _ vaccines globally. obviously you have to do the _ vaccines globally. obviously you have to do the study _ vaccines globally. obviously you have to do the study on - vaccines globally. obviously you have to do the study on humanl have to do the study on human beings, but when you think about it logically, any vaccine will give you antibodies, so it should be ok? well, that is actually the guidance that we have at the moment, that if there is no alternative but to give
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somebody a different vaccine, then actually they will likely have a good immune response. all the immune responses are targeted against the spike protein that is the target of the immune response, and so, yes, we do think these combinations should generate as good an immune response, and we hope that will be the case. ultimately, it is the same target they are looking at.— ultimately, it is the same target they are looking at. thank you very much, they are looking at. thank you very much. thanks _ they are looking at. thank you very much, thanks for— they are looking at. thank you very much, thanks for talking _ they are looking at. thank you very much, thanks for talking to - they are looking at. thank you very much, thanks for talking to us. - there will be a debate in parliament today to decide if there should be a parliament—run inquiry into the links between the former prime minister david cameron and the failed finance firm greensill capital and mr cameron's lobbying of current ministers and how they responded. borisjohnson insists the independent inquiry he's ordered into mr cameron's lobbying will have carte blanche to talk to anyone. but labour says the review "has all the hallmarks of a cover—up." 0ur political correspondent
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damian grammaticas reports. the actions of a former prime minister and those of current ministers. labour says they've brought the shadow of a scandal that parliament must investigate, or it fears the review borisjohnson has set up will be a whitehall whitewash. day by day, new revelations are coming out about greensill capital. we need a proper inquiry to get to the bottom of this, not the half—hearted inquiry that the government have announced so far. the latest revelations, that the former head of government procurement began working part—time at greensill capital while he was still a civil servant. bill carruthers says his move in 2015 followed established procedure, was approved, and he believes not uncommon. labour says the real questions are for the conservatives — how in 2011 the financier lex greensill became an advisor to the government,
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and his company hired david cameron, now out of office, who next year arranged a private drink with the matt hancock, the health secretary, and mr greensill. and last year he texted chancellor rishi sunak seeking access for greensill for government funds. this was david cameron and matt hancock working for him ten years ago. mr cameron has said he broke no rules, mr hancock that he reported his meeting with greensill and acted properly. the chancellor says he has been open too. he has released private texts he sent to mr cameron in which he says he pushed the treasury to help greensill, and the government says its inquiry can ask anybody whatever it needs. but labour insists what happens behind closed doors was cronyism and an independent inquiry is needed. damian grammaticas, bbc news, westminster. we can speak now to shadow cabinet
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office minister rachel reeves. just to say, we did ask the government for a spokesperson, they haven't provided one, and we tried several conservative mps separately who either did not come back to us all said no. the prime minister says the tuesday overseeing this inquiry will be able to speak to anyone and ask any questions, why is that not enough? —— the 0c. ask any questions, why is that not enough? -- the qc.— ask any questions, why is that not enough? -- the qc. what the prime minister has — enough? -- the qc. what the prime minister has announced _ enough? -- the qc. what the prime minister has announced is _ enough? -- the qc. what the prime minister has announced is not - enough? -- the qc. what the prime minister has announced is not a - minister has announced is not a proper inquiry and is not independent. the rematch that he has given for the inquiry he has set up is very narrow, to look narrowly at what happened at greensill, when we know the issues around lobbying and access go much wider than that. it also the con max have hand—picked the chairman of this inquiry, and they have hand—picked a close friend of the conservative party with close links to them. someone who is a
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current nonexecutive director at the department of energy, business and industrial strategy, which was responsible for some of the loans that greensill were looking to access, and also for the steel industry, where thousands ofjobs are now on the line because of the collapse of greensill, so that is not a proper independent inquiry. we want something that is independent, that has a broader remit and will take evidence in public so we can get to the bottom of all of these issues and, crucially, ensure that nothing like this is ever able to happen again. nothing like this is ever able to happen again-— nothing like this is ever able to ha en auain.~ ., ., ,, , nothing like this is ever able to hauenaaain.~ ., ., , happen again. who do you believe has done something _ happen again. who do you believe has done something wrong _ happen again. who do you believe has done something wrong here? - happen again. who do you believe has done something wrong here? and - happen again. who do you believe has| done something wrong here? and what evidence do you have? fine done something wrong here? and what evidence do you have?— evidence do you have? one of the reasons we _ evidence do you have? one of the reasons we want _ evidence do you have? one of the reasons we want an _ evidence do you have? one of the reasons we want an inquiry - evidence do you have? one of the reasons we want an inquiry is - evidence do you have? one of the reasons we want an inquiry is to i reasons we want an inquiry is to establish all of the facts, who did what and when, but also how the rules can be toughened up in the future, because at the moment what david cameron is saying, there is nothing to see here because i was employed directly by greensill, i could do all the lobbying i wanted. if he had been employed as a consultant lobbyist, he would have
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had to register at a lobbyist and declare all the meetings and correspondence that took place, and so we want to see those rules extended. we argued for this in 2014 when the actor came in, so that all forms of business lobbying, for private gain, are included in this register, because if no rules were broken, well, frankly, that tells you something about the rules. and what we have seen in the last few days with david cameron, with access to private drinks with the health secretary, with private messages to the private telephone number of rishi sunak, but also with a senior official when david cameron was prime minister being paid by the taxpayer, and also by greensill at the same time, there is something very, very wrong with the rules. if it is allowing this cronyism and this sleazy behaviour to go unchecked.— this sleazy behaviour to go unchecked. ., ., ., , unchecked. you are right, it does tell ou unchecked. you are right, it does tell you something _ unchecked. you are right, it does tell you something about - unchecked. you are right, it does tell you something about the - unchecked. you are right, it does l tell you something about the rules, and labour had a chance after tony
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blair personally intervened to secure an exemption for formula 1 from the tobacco advertising ban hours after the sport's boss, bernie ecclestone, had met with the prime minister, according to whitehall documents. i minister, according to whitehall documents-— minister, according to whitehall documents. ., �* ., ., , , ., ., documents. i don't want any stone to no and documents. i don't want any stone to go and turned — documents. i don't want any stone to go and turned in _ documents. i don't want any stone to go and turned in this _ documents. i don't want any stone to go and turned in this education. - documents. i don't want any stone to go and turned in this education. we l go and turned in this education. we have got to put these rules right so that nothing like this can ever happen again. i that nothing like this can ever happen again-— that nothing like this can ever happen again. that nothing like this can ever ha en aaain. ., ., ,, happen again. i am asking you, when labour had happen again. i am asking you, when labour had a — happen again. i am asking you, when labour had a chance _ happen again. i am asking you, when labour had a chance to _ happen again. i am asking you, when labour had a chance to change - happen again. i am asking you, when labour had a chance to change the i labour had a chance to change the rules, when in government, they didn't? ~ , , rules, when in government, they didn't? , , , ., , rules, when in government, they didn't? , , , ., ., didn't? well, 'ust seven years ago, labour didn't? well, just seven years ago, labour tabled _ didn't? well, just seven years ago, labour tabled amendments - didn't? well, just seven years ago, labour tabled amendments to - didn't? well, just seven years ago, labour tabled amendments to the l labour tabled amendments to the lobbying act which would have brought in—house lobbying... you brought in-house lobbying... you weren't in — brought in-house lobbying. .. you weren't in power— brought in—house lobbying... you weren't in power then. brought in-house lobbying... you weren't in power then. we - brought in-house lobbying... you| weren't in power then. we argued brought in-house lobbying... you - weren't in power then. we argued for that seven years _ weren't in power then. we argued for that seven years ago, _ weren't in power then. we argued for that seven years ago, we _ weren't in power then. we argued for that seven years ago, we argue - weren't in power then. we argued for that seven years ago, we argue for i that seven years ago, we argue for it now, the rules need to be toughened up so that nothing like this can never happen again, because our democracy is a precious thing, and so is public service, and it is being undermined by the actions of a view. but also we've got tens of thousands ofjobs on the line because of the collapse of
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greensill, including in the british steel industry, from hartlepool to rotherham and beyond, and people's lives and jobs are at stake because of the actions of a view, and so it is essential we get to the bottom of what happened with greensill, but also toughening up the rules so that the £2 billion that have been handed out to friends and donors from the tory party in the last year, when matt hancock's pub landlord get a crucial pandemic contract, and where david cameron can text and have private drinks with serving government ministers to get special deals forfirms that government ministers to get special deals for firms that he was being paid for, where he has sought to exercise share options for tens of millions of pounds, is just not right. it is not the access that other businesses are able to access, using contacts in a sleazy way to access power. is it beyond the realms of possibility that david cameron was lobbying the chancellor
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because he was concerned that thousands and thousands ofjobs linked to greensill might be lost during the pandemic? that is one interpretation, but another would be that he was sitting on share options with tens of millions of pounds. if on share options with tens of millions of pounds.— on share options with tens of millions of pounds. if he wants to act on the — millions of pounds. if he wants to act on the national _ millions of pounds. if he wants to act on the national interest, - millions of pounds. if he wants to act on the national interest, he i act on the national interest, he doesn't need to be paid tens of millions of pounds to do it. that is the problem here, that he was looking after his own interests, rather than the national interest, and he was seeking that access to enrich himself, and that isjust wrong. i5 enrich himself, and that is 'ust wronu. , , ., ., , wrong. is this government any sleazier than _ wrong. is this government any sleazier than the _ wrong. is this government any sleazier than the last - wrong. is this government any sleazier than the last labour. sleazier than the last labour government? i sleazier than the last labour government?— sleazier than the last labour rovernment? ~ , ., government? i think this government is a slavery as — government? i think this government is a slavery as the _ government? i think this government is a slavery as the tory _ government? i think this government is a slavery as the tory governmentsl is a slavery as the tory governments of the 1990s, and it was sleaze that brought down the tories then, and it is sleaze that is engulfing the tory party today, and if the government have got nothing to hide, and if they want to turn a corner and to stop brushing stuff under the carpet, they should vote for the labour motion today that would set “p labour motion today that would set up a proper independent inquiry to get to the bottom of what happened
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at greensill, with government cronyism and lobbying, and to put in proper rules so that nothing like this can never happen again. thank ou ve this can never happen again. thank you very much _ this can never happen again. thank you very much for _ this can never happen again. thank you very much for talking _ this can never happen again. thank you very much for talking to - this can never happen again. thank you very much for talking to us, . you very much for talking to us, rachel reeves from labour. the headlines on bbc news... if you're young and black, you've been hit hardest hit by unemployment during the pandemic; according to new research, 35% of young black people are out of work. more than a thousand extra volunteers are being recruited to take part in a study looking at whether a mix of covid vaccines can be used for the first and second doses. the row over the lobbying activities of the former prime minister david cameron for the collapsed firm greensill capital — mps vote today on whether to hold a parliamentary inquiry. the family of a nurse who died a year ago from covid—19 haven't received any money from an online campaign which raised nearly £200,000 for them. mary agyapong, who was 28, died just days after giving birth at luton and dunstable hospital, where she worked. jon ironmonger reports.
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the death of nurse mary agyapong is among the cruelest of the pandemic. she contracted covid—19 while pregnant and didn't live to know her daughter, who was born safely. heartbroken, her husband ernest focused his attention on the burial and was unaware as nearly 10,000 donations began pouring in online. i really actually remain very grateful, you know, for the love, support and the generosity of the public. in just a few days, £186,000 was raised through a gofundme page set up by rhoda asiedu, a family friend living in birmingham, expressly to support mary's husband and the couple's children, aj and baby mary, during this heavy and trying time. but one year on, the beneficiaries still haven't received a penny, and lawyers suspect
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the fundraisers of playing loose with a custom at ghanian funerals. normally, when such donations are collected, it is given to the spouse, to almost reimburse him of such costs, and then to look after the child, things like pampers, baby food. mary never had the opportunity to bless her daughter, so there's been a lot of expenses that he's had to carry on all by himself. the money raised was paid to ms asiedu's legal team, blue trinity, who said it had been placed on trust for the education of mary's children and that 80% of it would be released when they turn 21. that's a 20—year wait for baby mary, and ernest, who's studying law, says the family is struggling now. i just try to keep my head above the water. i find it very, very surprising that i've not been asked or involved, you know, with this gofundme money, it's beyond my understanding.
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gofundme said it was always clear the money would be placed in a trust. but we found an archived snapshot of the web page on april 16th with £117,000 of donations and no reference to a trust at all. ms asiedu? i'd like to talk to you about the gofundme page that you set up for ernest boateng and his children. is that 0k? can ijust ask you, you know, why has he not been made a trustee of the fund? when shall i call you? 0k, all right. i think it's clear you don't want to talk. we didn't hear back from ms asiedu or her legal team. on monday, ernest and the children marked the first anniversary
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of mary's death. life without her is getting no easier. john ironmonger, bbc news. the us climate envoy john kerry will become the biden administration's most senior official to visit china today. he'll be arriving in shanghai shortly, to discuss international efforts to tackle global warming. mr kerry says current political tensions between washington and beijing must be set aside, so the climate emergency can be addressed. i'm joined now by our china correspondent robin brant. how significant is this visit? well, look, how significant is this visit? well, look. victoria. — how significant is this visit? well, look, victoria, i _ how significant is this visit? well, look, victoria, ithink— how significant is this visit? well, look, victoria, i think it _ how significant is this visit? well, look, victoria, i think it is - look, victoria, i think it is significant for two reasons, the shared interest of dealing with the global emergency that is climate change, it was big in terms of the election campaign for candidate biden last year, it has been a very serious ongoing issue for xi jinping here, the pollution of land, water and air is a terrible problem in
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china. so there is a shared initiative that both men share domestically, and of course they are the world's two biggest polluters, so if any agreement is to be reached on trying to get targets, on cutting carbon emissions, china and the us have to be round the table, they have to be round the table, they have to be players in that. on the other side of it, there is the bilateral relationship between the us and china, it is in a very bad place. diplomatic officials from the biden administration met with their chinese counterparts a few weeks ago in alaska, that was very frosty, that was not really a good start, purely in terms of the optics, purely in terms of the optics, purely in terms of the optics, purely in terms of it being friendly. so i think they hope is that this will be different, john kerry knows his chinese counterpart here, the two men know how to get on, they have a bit of a history, and also i thinkjohn kerry's primary aim is two things — to re—engage with the chinese, to show that after years of donald trump,
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who stepped back, the biden administration is now committed and wants to engage, but also to silo off this issue. they don't want a contentious confrontation over hong kong, xinjiang, the cotton there, the use of the word genocide to describe what the us administration thinks is going on in xinjiang, they don't want that to spoil any chance of any progress between china and the us over reaching a deal on climate change, so he will try to partition that today, i think. thank ou ve partition that today, i think. thank you very much. — partition that today, i think. thank you very much, robin _ partition that today, i think. thank you very much, robin brant - you very much, robin brant reporting. the uk's biggest retailer, tesco, has reported a 20% drop in annual profits despite a surge in sales. in the uk and ireland, sales grew by 8.6%, but profit was down on the year, due to nearly £900m worth of extra payroll costs as a result of the coronavirus. tesco said it expected a strong recovery, as most of the costs incurred in the pandemic would not be repeated. our business presenter is alice baxter.
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this alice, tell us more. hi, victoria, yes, one of these strange sets of numbers that seems to contradict each other, but not really so, yes, tesco had these huge strong rise in revenue, it grew by 7% to £53.4 billion, what the supermarket chain is describing as exceptionally strong revenue, but yes, you are right, victoria, that pre—tax profit for the year fell by nearly 20%, and that is due to all of the cost that the supermarket had to incur in order to comply with covid regulations, and also helping to put staff on sick leave or help them to shield, so many costs related to helping make the supermarket covid compliant. yeah, full year profits, after spending nearly £900 million to carry on trading through the pandemic. so what the supermarket is saying is that they foresee happening is
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perhaps some of that revenue to drop away, but also the costs related to being covid compliant as well. what they also say they saw is this huge surge in online sales, boosted by 77% during the covid pandemic as well. it also is saying that it was one of the retailers that did benefit throughout the pandemic, primarily because other nonessential shops had to shut, pubs and restaurants had to shout, so tesco, along with the other major supermarkets, benefiting from that. but yes, these results show in this sharp rise in revenue, but also this fall in pre—tax profits. but forecasting for the rest of the going forward, they expect perhaps some of that revenue to fall away, perhaps a slight dip in that huge surge we saw in online sales, but decreasing cost in those covered compliant regulations.
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let's bring you a look at the weather, still freezing, carol kirkwood can tell us if it is going to warm up. high pressure remaining in charge for the next few days, so chilly nights and frost as well, today a lot of dry weather, a lot of sunshine, cloud bubbling up through the day, fair weather cloud, showers across the north and west will be slow moving, as there is not much of a breeze, as indicated by these circles. but on the north sea coastline, it will feel cooler, especially the north sea coastline of england, looking at 8—9. inland, 11-13 . of england, looking at 8—9. inland, 11—13 . those temperatures will fall away rapidly under clear skies overnight, most showers fighting, but by the end of the night further showers across the southeast. mist and fog patches forming, locally a touch of frost, with temperatures hovering around freezing. tomorrow, then, a cold start, mist and fog lifting quickly, a lot of dry
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weather, but from lincolnshire towards kent, some showers pushing on land through the course of the day. the highest of the temperatures in the west.
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hello, this is bbc news with victoria derbyshire. the headlines... if you're young and black, you've been hit hardest hit by unemployment during the pandemic; according to new research, 35% of young black people are out of work. (00v)more than a thousand extra volunteers are being recruited to take part in a study looking at whether a mix of covid more than a thousand extra volunteers are being recruited to take part in a study looking at whether a mix of covid vaccines can be used for the first and second doses. it would be beneficial if we can use different vaccines for both different vaccines for both different doses. the row over the lobbying activities of the former prime minister, david cameron, for the collapsed firm, greensill capital — mps vote today on whether to hold a parliamentary inquiry. the family of a pregnant nurse who died with covid—19 — hasn't recieved any money from a fundraising campaign which is now at 186,000 pounds — even though it was set up to support her husband and children.
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sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's sally good morning. it was a huge night in belfast for northern ireland, their women's side making it to their first major finals. they beat ukraine in their play—off, 2—1 on the night, 4—1 overall, to qualify for next year's european championship. nicola mccarthy reports. a historic night for northern ireland sparked by the veteran marisa callaghan with the cliftonville midfielder�*s early goal in the second half settling the nerves. ., ._ in the second half settling the nerves. ., , in the second half settling the nerves. . , ., nerves. that may be the goal that sends northern _ nerves. that may be the goal that sends northern ireland _ nerves. that may be the goal that sends northern ireland to - nerves. that may be the goal that sends northern ireland to the - nerves. that may be the goal that i sends northern ireland to the euros. 31 down, the onus was now on ukraine, ranked 25 basis above, to respond. but they lost their heads towards the end. and 19 caldwell sealed a memorable victory.
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sometimes dreams do come true, northern— sometimes dreams do come true, northern ireland are heading to the euros _ northern ireland are heading to the euros |_ northern ireland are heading to the euros. , ., , , , northern ireland are heading to the euros. , . , , , , . euros. i will be able ripple effect for ears euros. i will be able ripple effect for years to _ euros. i will be able ripple effect for years to come _ euros. i will be able ripple effect for years to come and _ euros. i will be able ripple effect for years to come and with i euros. i will be able ripple effect for years to come and with us, i for years to come and with us, qualifying for the euros. right mike they have set the form book in both they have set the form book in both the group stages and now in the play—offs. and have truly earned their place in the finals in england next summer. the very first time northern ireland's women have qualified for a major championship with the celebration to your long and loud. england were beaten for the second time in four days — interim boss hege riise said individual mistakes that "you can never predict" were to blame for their 2—nil defeat to canada in stoke. after a defensive error led to the canadians�* first goal, keeper karen bardsley was at fault, when nichelle prince scored their second. england lost to france last week. and wales came from a goal down to draw 1—all at home to denmark — jess fish—lock with the equaliser.
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thomas tuchel has had a huge impact since he took over at chelsea. just one domestic defeat, and now they're through to the semi—finals of the champions league for the first time in seven years, after beating porto 2—1 on aggregate. the were already 2—0 up from the first leg and there was a bit of a scare in seville, when mehdi taremi scored a stunning goalfor porto deep into injury time but it's chelsea who'll now face either liverpool or real madrid. but the defending champions bayern munich are out, despite beating paris saint germain 1—0 last night, the tie finished 3—3 — and bayern go out on the away goals rule. psg will face manchester city or borussia dortmund in the semi—finals. england all—rounder ben stokes has a broken finger and he'll miss the rest of the indian premier league. he was injured taking a catch
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for rajasthan royals in their first game of the season. he said it was "just devatating". england's next match is the first test against new zealand, starting on the 2nd ofjune. it's 100 days to go until the start of the olympic games in tokyo — and the build up has been unusual, to say the least. a year's delay, and doubts over whether it would go ahead at all. for the athletes, it's been incredibly unsettling — and double 0lympic taekwondo championjadejones knows she'll have a very different experience in tokyo. my my family have travelled to every 0lympics, even the youth 0lympics when i first started and every time i come up to five, i see their faces, the stream of them during your lender does make a difference to me, it kind of showsjust how big this pandemic is, but i'm just seeing it as how amazing it would be to come running through the door and bring that gold medal home to all my
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family, and i know they will be cheering me on and willing me on, and just being a big buzz to the country, and to my family as well, to come back with that gold medal. that's all the sport for now. every year, over 600 young and seemingly healthy people die suddenly and unexpectedly from a condition known as "�*sudden death.�* it's the third biggest killer of young adults in the uk but 40% of parents say they wouldn't know what to do if they witnessed their child collapsing suddenly from a heart attack. sam richards�* 22—year—old son died suddenly two years ago from an undiagnosed heart condition. to raise awareness of the risk, sam has co—produced a documentary which tells the story of the mead family, who also lost a child, lauren, at the age of 19. their experience is told through the "eyes" of lauren�*s brother, patrick, in the following clip.
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are you talking to anyone? not really. wouldn�*t know where to start i suppose. really. wouldn't know where to start i su ose. ~ ., really. wouldn't know where to start i su ose. . . ., really. wouldn't know where to start |su..ose_ . ., i suppose. what about with your arents? i suppose. what about with your parents? i _ i suppose. what about with your parents? i don't _ i suppose. what about with your parents? i don't feel— i suppose. what about with your parents? i don't feel like - i suppose. what about with your parents? i don't feel like i'd i i suppose. what about with yourj parents? i don't feel like i'd feel comfortable _ parents? i don't feel like i'd feel comfortable talking _ parents? i don't feel like i'd feel comfortable talking to _ parents? i don't feel like i'd feel comfortable talking to them i parents? i don't feel like i'd feel i comfortable talking to them about it. ., , just comfortable talking to them about it.- just because _ comfortable talking to them about it.- just because it's. .. i it. really? just because it's. .. the 've it. really? just because it's. .. they've got — it. really? just because it's. .. they've got their _ it. really? just because it's. .. they've got their stuff - it. really? just because it's. .. they've got their stuff going i it. really? just because it's. .. l they've got their stuff going on it. really? just because it's. .. i they've got their stuff going on as they�*ve got their stuff going on as well, so it�*s pretty unfairfor them to have to process my stuff as well. yeah. sorry. i to have to process my stuff as well. yeah- sorry-— yeah. sorry. i 'ust so you sat there and i 'ust yeah. sorry. ijust so you sat there and ijust remember— yeah. sorry. ijust so you sat there and i just remember that - yeah. sorry. ijust so you sat there and i just remember that morning | and ijust remember that morning when i came over to your house and you had that same look on your face then. i mean... i�*m right back in it. it must be... i can�*t imagine how difficult it is for you. yeah.
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but if you do need to talk about it at some time. if you don�*t. —— might you do need to talk about it at some time. if you don�*t, your emotional life will stay where it is. that is a clip from the documentary. i�*m sorry. well, i�*m joined now by sam richards and by katie frampton, an inherited cardiac conditions nurse specialist who features in the film. sam, you lost toby two years ago from an undiagnosed heart condition. what can you tell us? what do you know about the circumstances surrounding his death?- know about the circumstances surrounding his death? good morning and thank you — surrounding his death? good morning and thank you for _ surrounding his death? good morning and thank you for covering _ surrounding his death? good morning and thank you for covering this - and thank you for covering this really important story. toby was 22, incredibly healthy, fit young man and he was training very hard, he was undergoing training tojoin and he was training very hard, he was undergoing training to join the marines commando programme, and i found toby on a tuesday afternoon,
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dead at home. it appeared he had just been working out. those are the circumstances of toby�*s death. he was incredibly fit and healthy. he and his mother, when they were growing up, we always felt so blessed, they never had any serious childhood illnesses, toby went to hospital once. he fell off his bike and had to have stitches. we had absolutely no idea what has happened to toby. you absolutely no idea what has happened to tob . ., . absolutely no idea what has happened to tob. ., ., i. absolutely no idea what has happened totob. ., ., . ., to toby. you and your son decided to net to toby. you and your son decided to get screening. _ to toby. you and your son decided to get screening, didn't _ to toby. you and your son decided to get screening, didn't you? _ to toby. you and your son decided to get screening, didn't you? if - to toby. you and your son decided to get screening, didn't you? if lucky i get screening, didn't you? if lucky is the right — get screening, didn't you? if lucky is the right word, _ get screening, didn't you? if lucky is the right word, we _ get screening, didn't you? if lucky is the right word, we were - get screening, didn't you? if lucky is the right word, we were very i is the right word, we were very fortunate that the borrower that we live in, the corridor we were assigned work saint georges and the heart went to professor mary shepard who is in ourfilm and then we
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heart went to professor mary shepard who is in our film and then we were introduced to cardiac risk in the young to have a referral test and specialist unit that katie works in, and so when i say lucky, it is not joined up in the whole country, not everybody... patrick�*s family, who we followed in the film, were so brave in allowing us to follow like us, what on earth happened to patrick�*s sister lauren. it was just such an incredible shock when someone who is so young and so help he dies, you don�*t know what to do and when i say we were lucky, we were trapped into this system that was able to help us understand a little bit better what the syndrome is and —— sudden arrhythmic death
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syndrome is and we can see that at least 70% of these same sums are genetic. least 70% of these same sums are renetic. ~ ., .., least 70% of these same sums are renetic. ~ . .. , genetic. what can we do? if parents of mm: genetic. what can we do? if parents of young people _ genetic. what can we do? if parents of young people are _ genetic. what can we do? if parents of young people are watching i genetic. what can we do? if parents of young people are watching now, | of young people are watching now, what can you do if there was an undiagnosed heart condition? this is one of the reasons _ undiagnosed heart condition? this is one of the reasons why _ undiagnosed heart condition? this is one of the reasons why we _ undiagnosed heart condition? this is one of the reasons why we wanted i undiagnosed heart condition? this is| one of the reasons why we wanted to make the film is because i think firstly, as with anything in life, knowledge is power and i had never even heard of sads and so on raising awareness that this condition exists, is apparent, as a mum, guilt comes that and immediately i kept thinking, what could i have done? what could i have done with toby? i should have got him tested, but i didn�*t know anything, so at least people have awareness of it and toby is someone who is very fit but wasn�*t exercising to the intensity
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he was at the time of his death, and if he had had an ecg, and katie will speak to you about this because it�*s not always the case that everything can be picked up but i thought if toby was about to do all the exercise, i could have taken him to have an ecg if something ticked up and he definitely wouldn�*t have been able to have been working out that intensely, so if you know that these things exist and you can go and get tested and something does show up, you can work out how you can manage that condition clinically in life without it having resulting in death. ., without it having resulting in death. . , ., ., without it having resulting in death. . ., ., death. katie, explain what you do in our role death. katie, explain what you do in your role as — death. katie, explain what you do in your role as a _ death. katie, explain what you do in your role as a cardiac _ death. katie, explain what you do in your role as a cardiac nurse - your role as a cardiac nurse specialist. i your role as a cardiac nurse specialist-— your role as a cardiac nurse secialist. ., ., ~ ., ., , specialist. i look after families who have _ specialist. i look after families who have experienced - specialist. i look after families who have experienced death i specialist. i look after families | who have experienced death in specialist. i look after families i who have experienced death in the family and guide them through the journey to get some answers as to what has happened and why. and to
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ensure that no other family members are at risk of sudden death and if we do find a condition in another family member, we�*ll look after them and manage their condition to prevent cardiac arrest in that person as well.— prevent cardiac arrest in that person as well. prevent cardiac arrest in that erson as well. . , ., , ., person as well. can you explain the difference between _ person as well. can you explain the difference between sudden - person as well. can you explain the difference between sudden cardiac| difference between sudden cardiac death and saddened adult death? sudden cardiac death is a death that happens due to a cardiac cause and we would know that from a postmortem. with sudden adult death or what is known as sudden a rhythmic death syndrome, we cannot find a cause on the postmortem so the heart looks complete normal and there is no other cause found, and we suspect there has been an electrical fault in the heart which
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due to inherited cardiac condition. if someone is watching and wondering if maybe have this condition, what would you advise them to do? fifteh would you advise them to do? often there is no warning _ would you advise them to do? digital there is no warning symptoms unfortunately and the people who are most at risk are those who have already had a family member either have a sudden cardiac arrest and have a sudden cardiac arrest and have been diagnosed or who have sadly died due to sads and those people can be screened at specialist centres. there are charities such as cardiac risk in the young who do these checks for people aged up to 45 and that information can be found in cardiac risk in the young�*s website. in cardiac risk in the young's website. ., ., in cardiac risk in the young's website. ., ,, , ., , . ., in cardiac risk in the young's website. ., ,, , . ., website. thank you very much to both of ou. if website. thank you very much to both of you- if people _ website. thank you very much to both of you. if people want _ website. thank you very much to both of you. if people want to _ website. thank you very much to both of you. if people want to watch - website. thank you very much to both of you. if people want to watch it, i of you. if people want to watch it, it is on bbc one tonight. it is called sudden death. —— it is called
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sudden death: my sister�*s silent killer. thank you very much. protesters have clashed with police in minneapolis for the third night in a row — after a black man was shot dead on sunday. the policewoman who fatally shot daunte wright has resigned — along with the police chief. it comes as the trial of the officer accused of killing george floyd in the same city, begins hearing from defence witnesses. 0ur north america correspondent barbara plett—usher reports. gunshot. for a third night police drove back protesters venting their anger over the shooting of another black man. hit in the chest by a policewoman who confused her gun with her taser, in the middle of the trial of the officer accused of killing george floyd. do you know the difference between a gun and a taser? under pressure, the policewoman resigned. she was a 26—year veteran of the force. she was followed by the police chief. we are here and we will fight forjustice for this family,
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just like we are fighting for our brothers. george floyd�*s family has come together in solidarity with the relatives of the dead man, daunte wright. sharing their quest forjustice and their loss. i thought somebody was playing a joke on me. it hurt me to my heart. daunte was a beautiful child. he might not have been an angel, but he was our angel. 0ur angel. he belonged to us. inside the courtroom, the defence took over after the prosecution rested its case. more footage of george floyd from police body cameras was shown tojurors. the defence is arguing that it was a drug overdose which caused his death rather than excessive force by the officer who restrained him by kneeling on his neck. testimony is expected to wrap by the end of the week, and the jury will begin
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deliberations shortly after that. there is a lot at stake in what it decides. the authorities are bracing for the possibility of further unrest once there is a verdict. they were hoping that the resignation of the police officials would help to defuse the anger, but so far that has failed to stop the protests. barbara plett usher, bbc news, minneapolis. the headlines on bbc news... if you�*re young and black, you�*ve been hit hardest hit by unemployment during the pandemic; according to new research, 35% of young black people are out of work. (00v)more than a thousand extra volunteers are being recruited more than a thousand extra volunteers are being recruited to take part in a study looking
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at whether a mix of covid vaccines can be used for the first and second doses. the row over the lobbying activities of the former prime minister, david cameron, for the collapsed firm greensill capital — mps vote today on whether to hold a parliamentary inquiry. if you are young and black and have lost your job if you are young and black and have lost yourjob in the last year, do get in touch with us with our correspondence. marcus said he is currently unemployed and cannot find employment. so there was a time late last year when he had a friend in an accent on a joint company, gave him his be to give to the appropriate will internally, he came back a weekend a bit later and said the overhead management talking and according to him, they said we don�*t need any more black people disrupting the balance, plus we already have four of them so we�*ve met our quota. i guess, after that,
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i�*vejust lost faith, met our quota. i guess, after that, i�*ve just lost faith, says marcus and when i apply forjobs, shot in my name so it doesn�*t appear black. to get in touch, send me an e—mail. you can dm me as well. people have used lockdown to clear out. many of us used lockdown to have a clear out of old things cluttering the home. it�*s meant a bonanza for charity shops, who are reporting record sales as they open for the first time in months. but some stores have stopped accepting donations because of the huge amount coming to them. colletta smith reports. many of us used lockdown to have a clear out of old things cluttering the home. it�*s meant a bonanza for charity shops, who are reporting record sales as they open for the first time in months. but some stores have stopped accepting donations because of the huge amount coming to them. colletta smith reports. the long lockdown winter months have been a chance for a clearout.
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but what to do with all this stuff? there�*s clothes... ..jumpers — all sorts! this shop�*s open to customers, but not for donations yet, as they�*ve got so much already. so there�*s no chance of getting rid of this lot today. i�*m going to have to hold onto it, i think, yeah. our phone is constantly ringing, asking when we�*re taking donations, are we taking donations? it�*s just, i don�*t think our shop�*s big enough to take everything at the once. so that�*s why we�*ve done our two days a week. with limited numbers allowed inside the store, sarah needs all the space possible for shoppers. from next week we�*ve asked donors to come to the back door, where we�*ll take their donations. we all have our ppe on, so we�*re nice and safe. we just don�*t want to lose trade by them coming through the front door. the head of the charity retail association says shops up and down the country have been making different plans to safely receive a deluge of donations over the coming weeks. some of our members have actually been donated extra storage facilities. people have been doing things like hiring vans and portakabins in theircar parks. so actually, the systems are all in place, and donors shouldn't be worried about that. the advice is to ring ahead, to check when and where you can drop donations. and there�*s one more caveat. be thoughtful about the sorts
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of stuff that you're taking. is this stuff that you would be prepared to buy in a different context yourself? that�*s what suzanne�*s been doing in hull. hi. nice to see you. she�*s coming down with stuff she�*s desperate to get rid of now. i�*ve got a suitcase of clothes, shoes, badminton rackets and shuttlecocks. i�*ve got one bottom and i�*ve got three bikes, so i don�*t need three. i�*ve heard that charity shops are quite full. and a lot of my stuff�*s quite nice. she�*s decided to try doing a car boot sale first, and then take anything left to a charity shop when they�*ve more room. to have the space again, the space under my bed, space in my wardrobe, and to not have to keep going up into the loft and battle everything as i go in and take it off. so, i�*m excited that things might get another life, really. it�*s notjust those doing a clearout who�*ve been desperate for charity shops to reopen. this last year has been really tough for so many households, with more redundancies, with squeezed
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incomes on furlough. buying online is simply too expensive for lots of people — having to buy the big brands, and having to pay delivery charges. so, seeing charity shops open up again is a lifeline for lots and lots of households. we need them. we can�*t get to places likejohn lewis and pay them prices any more. they�*re out of reach. you know, it�*s just not feasible, you know, to spend all that money. we have shopped in them before, and the kids get lots of games out of there, don't you? yeah _ lots of board games and stuff. it's good for them to be back open. it's been too long, hasn't it? sarah says just like the big high street names, they�*ve seen a real rush of shoppers. we were like a miniature version. there was a lady at the door before we�*d opened, nine o�*clock, waiting to come in with her two children. and we had queues throughout the day. we had to have somebody at the door to, you know, keep it flowing, keep it at, you know, maximum numbers. and it was great, it was just great.
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who needs primark anyway?! with storerooms bursting at the seams, shoppers can cash in on the windfall. colletta smith, bbc news. a third actor from the hit australian soap opera, neighbours, has gone public with allegations of racism. in a statement, sharonjohal said she had faced racist taunts from white castmates, and felt further targeted when she asked for help. sharonjohal, who has indian heritage, left the show in march after four years. in response, production company fremantle media said it would hold a review into the allegations. 0ur australia correspondent shaima khalil has more she said she had experienced direct, indirect and casual racism but did not name names or name anyone in
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particular but she did say there were incidents were a former colleague had compared her to a bobble head toy that as the mimicked the problematic character of apu from the simpsons that complains about tones of racism in that despite sharon asking the person to stop many times. she also said when she went to management with her complaints that they were sympathetic but not helpful, and they didn�*t do anything to stop this from occurring and i voted other cast members which left her feeling isolated and marginalised. she is the third to come through, saying she felt a moral obligation after two former aboriginal stars came through with their own experiences, and that onset raises the allegation was first raised by two aboriginal
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former cast members and one actually said in a statement that they found it traumatising to work in what they described as a culturally unsafe environment and she herself has praised sharonjohalfor environment and she herself has praised sharonjohal for coming environment and she herself has praised sharonjohalfor coming out praised sharon johal for coming out and praised sharonjohalfor coming out and saying this. it is a fixture and and saying this. it is a fixture and a stable for millions, notjust in australia but in the uk, so quite an unsettling moment really for them but the production is that they are looking into it as a spokesperson for channel five, the channel which carries the programme into the uk, said they condemn racism and take issues of discrimination really seriously. what has sir mick jagger what has sir mickjagger been doing during lockdown? i know it�*s a question you ask recently. as difficult as lockdown may have been — for some it�*s been an opportunity to flex their creative muscles. many took up painting —
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others began writing that novel they�*d always had in mind. but if you�*re a legendary rock—star — like sir mickjagger — you�*re only going to express yourself in one way — as tim allman explains. he was once an exile on main street, now he�*s a legend in lockdown. sir mickjagger, stuck at home like the rest of us, decided to turn his experience into song, easy sleazy, a tale about a zoom calls, tick—tock videos and too much television. it�*s a transatlantic co—production made with another rock god of a younger vintage. —— zoom calls and tiktok. mick said... dave�*s for response... it's it�*s actually been quite a busy period for the rolling stones lead singer. last year, the band wants their first store in singer. last year, the band wants theirfirst store in london�*s carnaby street. now a rocker
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celebrating a hopeful return to normality. we are heading back to paradise, he sings. some satisfaction at last. now it�*s time for a look at the weather. hello again, as we go through the day, things will not necessarily be bone dry. chilly nights, chilly days, overnight frost and fog, temperatures picking up to the end of the week, so here is the high pressure, you�*re moving around in a clockwise direction so for the next couple of days, along the east coast, the wind will be coming off the cold north sea so it will feel cooler. into the afternoon, continuing with dry and sunny weather, showers across the west and the south, some slow—moving because
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there�*s not much of a breeze inland to move them along from the white circles which indicates the sustained wind speeds and that is the direction of the wind coming in from the chilly north sea that makes it feel cool along the coastline of england where we are looking at 8-9 c england where we are looking at 8—9 c top temperature so bear that in mind if you are heading out for a stroll later on and then we have the showers of up temperatures to the west away from the north sea coastline between 11—13 c. through this evening and overnight, the temperatures will follow quite clearly, showers also fade and there will be bits of his apache mist and fog forming as well, and by the end of the night, some showers across the south—eastern corner. temperatures generallyjust the south—eastern corner. temperatures generally just above the south—eastern corner. temperatures generallyjust above or just below freezing so locally there will be a touch of frost. a chilly start to the day tomorrow, less than that right mist and fog rapidly rising and a lot of sunshine but in
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the south—eastern corner, east anglia into kent, we see some showers and some of them pushing further inland towards the midland for central southern england and some of the merging, for the rest of us, light breezes and also a lot of dry and sunny conditions. temperature wise, cool again along this north sea coast line and across the corner, and as we move to the west and the sunshine, highs of 14 celsius. then for the weekend, we have this ridge of high pressure upon us, whetherfront have this ridge of high pressure upon us, whether front is trying to come in from the west will eventually introduce some rain into northern ireland and north—west scotland, how far south that gets, still open to question but once again, we are looking at some sunshine in between and highs of 14 celsius.
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hello. this is bbc news. i�*m victoria derbyshire. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. more than a thousand extra volunteers in the uk are being recruited to take part in a study looking at whether a mix of covid vaccines can be used for the first and second doses. that would give a lot more flexibility if there was any problems with supply with one vaccine, for example, or a change in recommendations for different age groups. if you�*re young and black, you�*ve been hit hardest hit by unemployment during the pandemic; according to new research, 35% of young black people are out of work in the uk. if that�*s your experience please get in touch —
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its @vicderbyshire on twitter and instagram or victoria@bbc.co.uk

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