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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 14, 2021 3:00am-3:31am BST

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this is a this is bbc news. i'm mike embley with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. us and european authorities pause the rollout of thejohnson &johnson jab, as it becomes the second covid vaccine linked to rare blood clots. tensions rise around russia's military build—up near ukraine and president biden suggests a summit with president putin. president biden sets the withdrawal of us forces from afghanistan for september 11th, 20 year since 9/11. japan faces criticism over plans to release treated contaminated water from the stricken fukushima nuclear plant into the sea.
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johnson &johnson has delayed the rollout of its covid vaccine in europe after regulators in the united states called for a pause because of safety concerns. six people who'd had the vaccine in the us have developed rare and severe blood clots. it's so far been given to almost seven million americans. our medical editor fergus walsh reports. an abundance of caution was cited by us health officials as the reason why they paused the use of the single—shotjohnson &johnson covid jab. the vaccine, which in europe is branded as janssen, was approved in the us in late february. since then, there have been six incidents of very rare clots in the brain, out of 6.8 million doses. so less than one case per million people immunised. all were women under 50, one of them died and one is critically ill.
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i think this is an unusual occurrence of a serious adverse event that you want to make sure before you go forward, you investigate it thoroughly. and that's exactly what they're doing. they're pausing, so that they can look at it more carefully. similar very rare clots have occurred with the oxford—astrazeneca jab and scientists are investigating whether this type of vaccine technology could be implicated. both of these vaccines used a disabled common cold virus called adenovirus to smuggle the gene from the coronavirus spike protein into the vaccine, into your arm. so they both work in broadly the same way and that raises the possibility that something about this type of vaccine could be the explanation for this kind of very rare side effect. 30 million doses of the j&j janssen vaccine are on orderfor the uk, although it is yet to be approved.
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it's hoped the delay in the roll—out won't slow the vaccination drive here. the biggest concern is globally. the plan was to immunise one billion people worldwide with the vaccine this year. if that's disrupted, it will slow efforts to finally bring the pandemic under control. fergus walsh, bbc news. i spoke to the co—director of a texas children's hospital to ask what he made of the development. i ask what he made of the development.— ask what he made of the development. i think it is probably _ development. i think it is probably related - development. i think it is probably related to - development. i think it is probably related to the l probably related to the vaccine, but an extremely rare condition. the point is it is notjust condition. the point is it is not just about blood condition. the point is it is notjust about blood clots, it is a thrombosis that is a severe life—threatening condition, it looks like it is uncommon, but the reason the
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fda took the measure to put it on hold was to alert clinicians they should be on the lookout for similar cases and alert them that they think it could be related to the vaccine. that is very important, and also the numbers might start to go up. then they can get the real numbers and percentage. it is also to talk to the european and british regulators, the mhra and the ema, because it might be a pathway for the adenovirus vector vaccines, the astrazeneca oxford, thejohnson & johnson and astrazeneca oxford, thejohnson &johnson and the russian vaccines. a few days to get their heads around it is warranted. ten years ago this would not be a big deal, but now we have a new world with a very aggressive anti—vaccine landscapes and that makes it more complicated and problematic.— more complicated and problematic. more complicated and roblematic. , . ., problematic. yes, we will come back to that _ problematic. yes, we will come back to that in _ problematic. yes, we will come back to that in the _ problematic. yes, we will come back to that in the second. - problematic. yes, we will come
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back to that in the second. it i back to that in the second. it sounds as though you expect the numbers to go up? i sounds as though you expect the numbers to go up?— numbers to go up? i think it's a possibility- _ numbers to go up? i think it's a possibility. remember- numbers to go up? i think it's a possibility. remember we l a possibility. remember we could a possibility. rememberwe could go from six to 12 cases but that is still a pretty uncommon number. the rate looking at europe might be one in 100,000, looking at europe might be one in100,000, may looking at europe might be one in 100,000, may be one in 250,000, in the us, may be one ina 250,000, in the us, may be one in a million, and we have to be very careful about the messaging. the us is in a different position. if tomorrow the us never authorised the astrazeneca oxford vaccine and shelved the johnson astrazeneca oxford vaccine and shelved thejohnson & astrazeneca oxford vaccine and shelved the johnson & johnson vaccine, shelved thejohnson &johnson vaccine, it may shelved the johnson & johnson vaccine, it may not have that much impact on the us programme because they have other options, they have procured so much of the mrna vaccines and the particle vaccine may still be there. but the problem when you look at sub—saharan africa and latin america, they are all
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adenovirus vector vaccines, and if somebody signals a problem oran if somebody signals a problem or an alarm, that could have a devastating effect on the ability of africa and latin america to fight this pandemic. so it is so important how we operate and proceed, not only thinking about the safety of the american people but thinking about the world. us presidentjoe biden has urged russian president vladimir putin to ease tensions on the ukrainian border and suggested they hold their first summit. this comes as tensions rise over russia's military build—up next to ukraine. bbc north america correspondent aleem maqbool reports. it's the biggest russian troop movement in seven years. over recent weeks, mobile phone footage has started to emerge of long columns of military vehicles heading towards the ukrainian border. now the russian defence ministry is
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proudly releasing footage of military aircraft and boats heading that way too. ukrainian president made a dramatic visit to the front line, where his country's army has been fighting russian backed rebels. it was part of an appeal for help from the outside world. and others are now seeing a need for urgency. in brussels, the us secretary of state anthony blinken and a ukrainian delegation discussed the issue, with a promise the us would increase its military presence increase its military presence in the region. nato has called the russian troop build—up unjustified and unacceptable, and warned moscow to withdraw. we are seriously concerned by ongoing developments, and nato is monitoring the situation very closely. in recent weeks, russia has moved thousands of combat ready troops to ukraine's borders. the largest
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massing of russian troops since the illegal annexation of crimea in 2014.- the illegal annexation of crimea in 2014. more than 13,000 crimea in 2014. more than 13.000 people _ crimea in 2014. more than 13,000 people have - crimea in 2014. more than 13,000 people have been| crimea in 2014. more than - 13,000 people have been killed in the conflict since 2014, but after months of relative calm, things have escalated of late. ukraine reporting troops being killed with increasing regularity. but why now? many believe this is about vladimir putin reacting to tougher language from washington and attempting to assert dominance over the biden administration. i think putin believes the west is a paper tiger with tough language but not willing to step up militarily to confront russia. so he is trying to prove the hollowness of the western words as he sees it. does he have a point to an extent? i does he have a point to an extent? ~' ., , ., ., extent? i think he does to a degree- _ extent? i think he does to a degree- it _ extent? i think he does to a degree. it is _ extent? i think he does to a degree. it is fair _ extent? i think he does to a degree. it is fair to - extent? i think he does to a degree. it is fair to say - extent? i think he does to a degree. it is fair to say no l degree. it is fair to say no one in the west wants to engage
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in a military conflict with russia about ukraine. no one is going to go to war from the west over that. for going to go to war from the west over that.— going to go to war from the west over that. for its part, the government _ west over that. for its part, the government vladimir . west over that. for its part, i the government vladimir putin says there is nothing wrong with troops, it has in fact been responding to aggression from the west. translation: , , ., translation: in response to the military threats _ translation: in response to the military threats to _ translation: in response to the military threats to russia - translation: in response to the military threats to russia we - military threats to russia we have taken appropriate have ta ken appropriate measures. have taken appropriate measures. as part of exercises during the training period, to check the combat readiness of the troops. check the combat readiness of the troupe— the troops. for years, ukraine has been _ the troops. for years, ukraine has been pushing _ the troops. for years, ukraine has been pushing to _ the troops. for years, ukraine has been pushing to join - the troops. for years, ukraine has been pushing to join nato| has been pushing tojoin nato to the annoyance of the kremlin. even if it happens, and there were no guarantees, it would take years. there is this nagging fearfor it would take years. there is this nagging fear for some that with this troop build—up, president putin might be doing more thanjust president putin might be doing more than just posturing. let's get more on this now. i know
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you are the senior adviser to the supreme allied commander in europe. could you tell us what you make of what russia is doing? you make of what russia is doinu ? , ~ , ., doing? yes, i think first of all it is possible _ doing? yes, i think first of all it is possible the - doing? yes, i think first of. all it is possible the russians are willing to conduct another military invasion into ukraine. it might be something relatively minor or it could be something major. the forces they have notjust on the border but also in crimea are a great cause for alarm. and it includes a maritime component. we have to think about the fact this is a direct challenge, of course, a test to president biden, as well as the entire west, all of the democracies against autocracies like russia and china. it is a test of the entire world is watching, and added to that the timing has
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something to do with putin's internal domestic pressures. we can talk about that.— can talk about that. some analysts _ can talk about that. some analysts have _ can talk about that. some analysts have said - can talk about that. some analysts have said to - can talk about that. some analysts have said to us i can talk about that. some i analysts have said to us that when russia went into crimea, surprise seemed to be a crucial element. here, russia has done everything possible to draw attention to what it is doing, suggesting it might be a blast, a way of testing nato and the biden administration. that is correct. —— it might be a bluff. correct. -- it might be a bluff. ~ ., , bluff. with crimea they did it very quickly. _ bluff. with crimea they did it very quickly. a _ bluff. with crimea they did it very quickly, a lightning i very quickly, a lightning operation. in contrast, this is being done in broad daylight, taunting us to respond. president biden took a very clever approach, first of all clearly calling out the russians and telling them this was counter to international law, that the ukrainians have been doing nothing to provoke it. and he deployed military
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assistance to ukraine, he deployed and consulted with allies, and then the clever thing, on the phone today, inviting vladimir putin to meet with him. in essence that was giving a carrot, dangling a carrot in front of putin. hopefully all of this will deter the russian government from taking military action. ukraine have been trying to get into nato for a while and now seeking some kind of fast track. suppose russia does go into eastern ukraine, what happens?— into eastern ukraine, what hauens? , ., ., ~ happens? first of all, i think nato membership _ happens? first of all, i think nato membership again i happens? first of all, i think nato membership again is l happens? first of all, i think. nato membership again is the ukrainian government's way of saying, please help me deter the russians and prevent this invasion. nato membership of course, if ukraine was already a member, it should not have been deterring russia... clearly getting membership overnight, it may or may not impact the dynamic right now. what they really need, and i
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have a washington post opinion piece, i have to mention that, it lays out non—military assistance ukraine, support for the air forces, maritime deterrents, and we have given them a significant amount of anti—tank equipment which they could deploy, again to show the russians that they will be a price to pay if they invade. it is not in putin's interest to have a bigger invasion and a prolonged war with heavier casualties in ukraine. the russian people do not want to fight their ukrainian brethren, we know that from how they responded in 2014 to the high body counts. that is why i fervently hope vladimir putin will not launch a significant orany will not launch a significant or any kind of military invasion into ukraine. thank ou invasion into ukraine. thank you very _ invasion into ukraine. thank you very much- _ president biden says he will withdraw all us forces from afghanistan by 11th september — the 20th
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anniversary of the 9/11 terror attacks, which started the conflict in the country. the trump administration had previously agreed to a complete military exit by may, during negotiations with the taliban last year. for many, many months now, in fact ever since the united states under president trump really started focusing on the withdrawal of its last few thousand us troops, afghans and foreigners alike said, we've got to avoid the mistakes of history. in other words, there was an echo of the soviet troop withdrawal in 1989, which sadly paved the way to the collapse of the government in kabul, and a civil war which then pave the way to the taliban. for a while, so many were saying we cannot repeat the mistakes of the past. this is really a legacy that afghanistan wants
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to ensure doesn't happen again, but beyond all expectation, here afghanistan is again, a withdrawal of the last 10,000 us led nato forces, leaving the taliban poised to return to power. the afghans i have been speaking to after the announcement was first revealed are saying they fear again a civil war, and had hoped against hope that they would be some conditions attached to the troop withdrawal. but the senior us administration official was adamant that the approach of the last 20 years has not worked and it is time for america to close the book on this 20 year war. the policewoman who fatally shot a black man in minneapolis has resigned along with her police chief. it led to two nights of unrest. we show you
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pictures from minneapolis where protesters have gathered again for a third night of protest, this time quite calmly with a vigil, but the crowds are defying the curfew and congregating outside the police headquarters. they were throwing fireworks and bottles, officers responded with tear gas and stun grenades, even though the use of tear gas was banned in the region recently. tensions are high in minneapolis with the trial of the former officer accused of killing george floyd still ongoing. stay with us on bbc news. more to come including this. lockdown legend, the rolling stones and the foo fighters calling for optimism as the pandemic eases in the uk.
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pol pot, one of the century's greatest mass murderers, is reported to have died of natural causes. he and the khmer rouge movement he led were responsible for the deaths of an estimated 1.7 million cambodians. there have been violent protests in indonesia, where playboy has gone on sale for the first time. traditionalist muslim leaders have expressed disgust. the magazine's officers have been attacked, and its editorial staff have gone into hiding. it was clear that paula's only contest was with the clock. and as for a sporting legacy, paula radcliffe's competitors will be chasing her new world best time for years to come. quite quietly but quickerl and quicker, she seemed to just slide away under i the surface and disappear.
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american and european authorities have paused the roll—out of the johnson & roll—out of thejohnson & johnson vaccine, roll—out of the johnson & johnson vaccine, the second covid jab linked to rare but sometimes fatal blood clots. turkey is now third in the world in terms of new cases of the coronavirus with close to 55,000 more per day — the highest levels ever seen in the country. restrictions have now been tightened for the islamic fasting month of ramada — which began on monday but doctors say the damage has been done. orla guerin reports. another life hanging in the balance. turkey is gripped by a brutal third wave of covid—19. this is the intensive care unit in marmara university hospital, one of the biggest in istanbul. we found dr ali exhausted and scared.
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as cases soared last month, president erdogan appeared unconcerned. no social distancing for his supporters in ankara. "i greet you at this meeting where snowfall kills all germs," he said. ajoke, but look inside. the venue packed to the rafters for a congress of hisjustice and development party. attendees had to have a negative test. but doctors called it
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a congress of all the covid variants in turkey. and here at the funeral of an islamic scholar, turkey's health minister fahrettin koca, of all people, ignoring his own advice. he later apologised, saying everyone knows the pandemic spreads much faster in crowds. it spread fivefold after the government eased restrictions on march 1st. watch the red zones seep across this map produced by an independent data analyst. the turkish doctors union tells us it was like giving people an appointment to get the virus. they say the government has blood on its hands. even sometimes we lose young people. it is a very big sadness for us. and then we cannot, how we say, prevent our fears.
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it could be prevented by government and then it was not prevented. for this reason we call this situation a social murder. poor neighbourhoods are especially hard—hit, like tarlabasi in istanbul, where many live hand to mouth. no pandemic payments here providing an income. from her windowsill, zehra tells us she has covid. this is her social safety net, food delivered by neighbours. doctors are calling for support for the poor to stay home and for all workplaces to close. that's not happening, but there are more restrictions on the horizon for the coming weeks, including a ban on indoor gatherings and an earlier start to the nightly curfew. but will this be enough to halt
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the alarming surge in cases? orla guerin, bbc news, istanbul. japan is facing intense criticism from its neighbours over plans to release more than a million tonnes of contaminated water from the stricken fukushima nuclear plant into the ocean. courtney bembridge reports. it's been more than a decade since disaster struck at fukushima. during the nuclear meltdown, more than one million tonnes of water was used to cool the reactors. it has been stored in tanks ever since butjapan hasjust approved a plan to release it into the ocean slowly. it says the water will be treated and diluted so radiation levels are below those set for drinking water, but it has led to protests like this in fukushima. such a decision is completely irresponsible. i don't think people with common sense would do such a thing.
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the country's fishing and tourism industries have also argued against it. suzuki runs a guesthouse in iwaki, the only one still standing in the area, and he is worried it will drive tourists away for good. translation: i will have to live with it for - the rest of my life. tourists will not say explicitly they are not coming here because of the release of nuclear waste water but i think people will naturally not come here. china said the decision is extremely irresponsible. translation: despite doubts and opposition | from home and abroad, and without sufficient consultation from neighbouring countries, japan has unilaterally decided. south korea has also expressed concern. these protests in seoul this week. but the un nuclear watchdog has backed the plan. they will discharge the water in a controlled way, there is no harm, no activity with fish or the sediment or the water.
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the process is expected to take decades to complete. lockdown has been a chance to flex creative muscles if you are a legend like sir mick jagger. he was once in exile on main street. now he is a legend in lockdown. sir mickjagger, stuck at home like the rest of us, decided to turn his experience into song. easy sleazy, a tale of zoom calls, tiktok videos and too much television. a transatlantic co—production made with another rock god of a younger vintage. sirmick said...
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dave's fulsome response... it's been a busy period for the rolling stones�* singer. last year they launched their first store in london's carnaby street. now the rocker is celebrating a hopeful return to normality. we are heading back to paradise, he sings. some satisfaction at last.
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much more on the bbc website. thank you for watching. hello. april so far has been colder and drier than average, and the weather for now is in no mood to change that pattern. so, plenty of dry weather continuing for the next few days, but of course the thing which has got most of us talking is just how chilly it feels. there's more of that to come as well and more of those frosty nights. it is high pressure. whenever you see this, you think, "well, it's dry." however, as we saw on tuesday, there were showers around. and there will still be a few in the day ahead, though most will stay dry after what is another widespread frost to start the day, another hard frost in parts of scotland, down to —6, for example, in the northeast. one or two mist and fog patches. they will clear and we're left with quite bit of sunshine. just some areas of patchy cloud around and, you canjust see it here, one or two
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showers developing, more especially towards the western side of the uk. now, the winds for the most part are light, but look at the arrows here, pushing in towards that north sea coast of scotland and down the eastern side of england, coming in from the sea, which is quite chilly at this time of year, and that's why these temperatures arejust showing 7, 8 or 9 celsius. so with the onset of that northeasterly breeze, eastern areas will actually be colder, whereas we're 13 in cardiff and plymouth and 13 probably towards western parts of northern ireland. any showers that have popped up will fade away into the evening. we have another largely clear and cold night to come into thursday morning, and again one or two mist and fog patches around. and there will be another widespread frost, althought we're not expecting it to be quite as hard as it's been over recent nights. how's thursday shaping up? most dry with sunny spells, but on that northeasterly breeze, we will bring in a few showers to parts of eastern england, into the southeast,
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perhaps the east midlands, too. if anything, that breeze will be a touch fresher, too. for the most part, though, elsewhere, the winds are light. there is warmth in the sunshine if you get some of that. you certainly feel it as temperatures, away from the chilly east, will be close to the average for the time of year. big picture going friday into the weekend — weather fronts trying to move in from the atlantic towards northern ireland and scotland, initially perhaps just bringing a bit more cloud. but deeper on into the weekend, more especially on sunday, there is a chance that, here, we could see a bit of rain, whereas elsewhere it stays dry.
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this is bbc news, the headlines... the roll—out of thejohnson & johnson covid jab in europe has been put on hold, american regulators calling for a halt in use as rare blood clots are investigated. six women developed clots out of 7 million people who had the vaccine, one of them has died. president biden has urged president putin to ease tensions on the ukrainian border suggesting they hold their first summit. tensions are rising over russia's military build up next to ukraine. the russian leadership say troop deployment is a response to what it calls nato threatening moves. the policewoman who fatally shot a 20—year—old black man in minneapolis on sunday has resigned. so has the local police chief. daunte wright died during
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a struggle with officers after a traffic stop and it sparked nights of protests calling for an end to police violence. now it's time for panorama. tonight, on panorama, the scandal of our polluted rivers. get ready, it's coming. 0h. here we go. you can smell it. you can see the steam coming off of it. we capture evidence of untreated sewage being dumped. it's just started to flow. just as i'm stood here talking now, i've just heard it start. we see the damage sewage causes... that is disgusting! ugh! ..and we expose the water companies breaking the law. all of this is illegal. wow! and this is a month's
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worth of data. we're looking at them spilling untreated sewage

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