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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 13, 2021 11:00pm-11:31pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. president biden postpones the withdrawal of us forces from afghanistan until september. turkey's government is criticised for the country coming under the grip of a brutal third wave of coronavirus. the police officer who fatally shot a twenty—year—old black man near minneapolis on sunday resigns. tensions are high in minneapolis as the defence begins in the george floyd murder trial. one expert witness saying the neck restraint on floyd was a reasonable use of force. i felt that derek shelving was justified with acting with objective reasonableness. johnson &johnson becomes the second covid—19 vaccine linked to blood clots. us authorities recommend pausing
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the rollout of the jab. the us will withdraw all american troops from afghistan by the 11th september this year. white house officials say presidentjoe biden will make an official announcement on wednesday. this means america will miss a may deadline for a pull—out agreed with the taliban by the trump administration. in response, the taliban has said they will not attend a summit on the country's future in turkey later this month, until all foreign forces have left the country. secunder kermani is in kabul and sent us this report on how the announcement has been recieved in afghanistan. many here will see this as a boost for the tele— band despite the technically being a breach of the deadline that they have been adhered to. some in the afghan government were hoping they would adopt a more
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conditions —based approach to the peace process but instead that is been specifically ruled over the september deadline. it seems unlikely that taliban want to jeopardise this withdrawal plan with nato forces over the coming months, but the slow pace of this so far suggests it will be very difficult for them to reach a deal on a power—sharing arrangement by september and many are sceptical and they fear the taliban will simply wait out this withdrawal and have a military victory or dominate this. the officials say that they will be able to hold out militarily against the tele— band for a number of years, but even without international assistance, international assistance, international assistance, international assistance has been crucial in the fight up until now —— taliban. and even more fragmented conflicts loom. this is not with the
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united states would want, we have a disastrous legacy to leave behind after so much bloodshed and will have to see what kind of leverage they and the afghanistan government have left. i'm joined now by the bbc�*s chief international correspondent, lyse doucet, in london. we saw him give a very good estimation over the next few months will be like, a wider take from you. where does the last 20 years of direct us military involvement fit in afghanistan is wider history? there is a lot of history now and unfortunately it is a very dark shadow. for many many months now, ever since the united states under president trump really start focusing on the withdrawal of its last few thousand us troops, afghanistan and foreigners alike gifts said we have to avoid the mistakes of history. in other words, it was an echo of the severe troop
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withdrawal of 1989 which sadly pave the way to the collapse of the government in kabul and a civil war which then paved the way for the taliban. so many have said we cannot repeat the mistakes of the past and this is a legacy that afghanistan wants to ensure it doesn't happen again. but beyond all expectations, here, afghanistan is again withdrawal in the last of 10,000 us led nato forces leaving, the taliban points to return to power and those that have been speaking to following the announcement was revealed in the sphere again a civil war and had hoped against hope that there would be some conditions attached to the troop withdrawal but the senior us administration and briefjournalists administration and brief journalists was administration and briefjournalists was adamant the conditions based on the last 20 years have not worked
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and it is time for america to close the book on this 20 year war. what the book on this 20 year war. what lessons, the book on this 20 year war. what lessons. if — the book on this 20 year war. what lessons. if any. _ the book on this 20 year war. what lessons, if any, have _ the book on this 20 year war. what lessons, if any, have people learned over the past 20 years? i lessons, if any, have people learned over the past 20 years?— over the past 20 years? i remember askin: over the past 20 years? i remember asking about — over the past 20 years? i remember asking about ten _ over the past 20 years? i remember asking about ten years _ over the past 20 years? i remember asking about ten years ago - over the past 20 years? i remember asking about ten years ago when - over the past 20 years? i remember i asking about ten years ago when what it turned out to be unbelievably, the halfway point for the forces in afghanistan. and what was often said it was by aid workers, diplomats, soldiers, what we should've listened to them and i've found it to be an astonishingly simple but equally profound at the same time that too often, foreign military powers and the worlds biggest donors going to countries where they have very little knowledge or understanding and assume and sometimes the best of intentions, that they know best and instead, they find and you see in afghanistan, although afghanistan is
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a completely different country than it was in 2001 when the tele— band were in power, it is still struggling to build a strong democracy, build prosperity, find a way for all the different elements and groups in afghanistan society to live together and they have made mistakes too. they're looking at each other and saying well, the americans are leaving now now it is “p americans are leaving now now it is up to us and it is up to our political leaders to ensure that unlike the severe troop withdrawal, there isn't a grab for power which ends in a total collapse and the deaths in shredding of an entire society. deaths in shredding of an entire socie . ., ~ , ., deaths in shredding of an entire socie . ., ~ . let's get some of the day's other news. us presidentjoe biden has proposed a meeting with russian president vladimir putin, in order to de—escalate tensions over ukraine. russia has continued a large military build up on the ukrainian border, amid a spike in violence between the ukrainian army and seperatist forces in ukraine's donbass region.
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mr biden also sought to strengthen the commitment to europe by cancelling a trump era plan to slash troop numbers in germany. the trump administration announced last year it would be withdrawing 12,000 troops from germany. presdient biden will instead bolster troops numbers by an additional 500 servicemen and women. and with covid infection surging in germany, chancellor angela merkel has sought additional powerfrom parliament in order to impose strict distancing measures. ms merkel wants the federal government to be able to enforce local lockdowns if a district or city sees over 100 new infections per 100,00 residents, for 3 consecutive days. turkey is now third in the world in terms of new cases of the coronavirus with close to 55,000 more per day — the highest levels ever seen in the country. the turkish doctors union has told the bbc the government has consistently ignored their advice to impose stricter measures.
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restrictions have now been tightened for the islamic fasting month of ramada — which began on monday — but doctors say the damage has been done. 0rla gurenin reports. another life hanging in the balance. turkey is gripped by a brutal third wave of covid—19. this is the intensive care unit in marmara university hospital, one of the biggest in istanbul. we found dr ali exhausted and scared. as cases soared last
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month, president erdogan appeared unconcerned. no social distancing for his supporters in ankara. "i greet you at this meeting where snowfall kills all germs," he said. ajoke, but look inside. the venue packed to the rafters for a congress of his justice and development party. attendees had to have a negative test. but doctors called it a congress of all the covid variants in turkey. and here at the funeral of an islamic scholar, turkey's health minister fahrettin koca, of all people, ignoring his own advice. he later apologised, saying everyone knows the pandemic spreads much faster in crowds.
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it spread fivefold after the government eased restrictions on march 1st. watch the red zones seep across this map reduced across this map produced by an independent data analyst. the turkish doctors union tells us it was like giving people an appointment to get the virus. they say the government has blood on its hands. even sometimes we lose young people. it is a very big sadness for us. and then we cannot, how we say, prevent our fears. it could be prevented by government and then it was not prevented. for this reason we call this situation a social murder. poor neighbourhoods are especially hard—hit, like tarlabasi in istanbul, where many live hand to mouth. no pandemic payments here providing an income. from her windowsill,
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zehra tells us she has covid. this is her social safety net, food delivered by neighbours. doctors are calling for support for the poor to stay home and for all workplaces to close. that's not happening, but there are more restrictions on the horizon for the coming weeks, including a ban on indoor gatherings and an earlier start to the nightly curfew. but will this be enough to halt the alarming surge in cases? 0rla guerin, bbc news, istanbul. the white policewoman who fatally shot a 20—year— old black man near minneapolis on sunday has resigned from the force, as has the police chief of brooklyn center, the town where it happened. the town's mayor has said he hoped the resignations of kim potter and tim gannon would bring some calm to the community where daunte wright
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was killed during a struggle with police after a traffic stop. the killing has sparked two nights of unrest. from minneapolis — nick byrant sent this report and a warning that it contains some distressing images. it's a uniquely american story we've told many times before. yet another police station besieged by yet another protest after yet another shooting of an unarmed african—american. there was fury on the streets of brooklyn center last night. america's latest racial flashpointjust ten miles away from where the trial is taking place of the white police officer accused of murdering george floyd. chanting: hands up, don't shoot! it began as a boisterous but non—violent demonstration. a response to the police shooting of a 20—year—old black man, daunte wright, by a female officer who claims to have mistaken her handgun for a taser. do you know the difference
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between a gun and a taser? yeah! the police were determined to enforce a curfew that came into effect as dusk turned into night. and determined to force the protesters off the streets. it's a police department very much on the defensive, not that you'd have thought it last night. may i have your attention, please? we see these confrontations year after year. america, as ever, fractured along its anguished fault line of race. this was the moment daunte wright was pulled overfor a minor infraction, and the police realised there was a warrant out for his arrest. in the scuffle that followed, the officerfired her gun and immediately realised her fatal error. ijust shot him. tonight, after 26 years in uniform, the officer kim potter resigned, and so too did the chief of the brooklyn center police.
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today the mother of daunte wright described how her son telephoned her up after being stopped by the police, then there was a second call with a friend he'd been driving with. she was crying and screaming and she said that they had shot him and then she pointed the phone towards the driver's seat and my son was laying there unresponsive. that was the last time that i seen my son. that's the last time i heard from my son and i've had no explanation since then. there was more looting last night just yards from the police station. another urban battlefield in the ongoing struggle over policing and over race. nick bryant, bbc news, minnesota. protests in minneapolis have taken place just a few miles away from the courtroom where the high—profile george floyd murder trial continues. defence lawyers have
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begun calling witnesses — and a �*use of force' expert has said that chauvin acted with proportionate force — and his acts were justified. his level of resistance was, he was objectively reasonable for those of to do the techniques that they were doing. ifelt that to do the techniques that they were doing. i felt that level of resistance, exhibited by mr floyd justified the officers and higher levels use of force that they chose not to... live to our correspondent larry madowo — he's in minneapolis. we just heard from him that the use of force expert was saying that the use of force was proportionate, how did the prosecution respond to this examination? the did the prosecution respond to this examination?—
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did the prosecution respond to this examination? the last thing the “my heard today was fl examination? the last thing the “my heard today was the i examination? the last thing the “my heard today was the redirect i examination? the last thing the “my heard today was the redirect of h examination? the last thing the jury heard today was the redirect of the l heard today was the redirect of the prosecution trying to take the witness to the direction they wanted him to go and something that they suggested when examining his witness was the part of the reason why george flick was on his stomach was to protect them from the traffic and people there and when cross—examining this expert, he said you do not believe that he was on the ground to protect them from the traffic in the witness said, no. and thatis traffic in the witness said, no. and that is something the jury took with them. his big picture and testimony was that yes, according to him, what derek chauvin did was completely reasonable and online with accepted standards and that it is not necessarily dangerous. some of the witnesses were _ necessarily dangerous. some of the witnesses were very _ necessarily dangerous. some of the witnesses were very brief, - necessarily dangerous. some of the witnesses were very brief, one - necessarily dangerous. some of the witnesses were very brief, one of. witnesses were very brief, one of the people who was in the card with
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mr floyd —— in the car. what do they want to reveal with those witnesses? they have been building up to it from the trial for two weeks but today, the defence finally had an opportunity to put george floyd drug use on trial, they are trying to find all the excuses defined for george floyd, other than the subdural and restraint that led to his death. the route it is a homicide and in plain language, someone else was responsible for it and in opening statements, the prosecution said they want you to believe your eyes. the defence is trying to say don't believe your eyes, but there's more to this and we were promised a bit of experts, we were promised a bit of experts, we are going to be hearing for
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medical experts to convince the jury that george floyd died because he was a drug user and he had many other health problems. ten miles from where _ other health problems. ten miles from where you _ other health problems. ten miles from where you are _ other health problems. ten miles from where you are was - other health problems. ten miles from where you are was the - other health problems. ten miles from where you are was the case | other health problems. ten miles l from where you are was the case of daunte and reporting on the protests, has that case influence the atmosphere around the trail that you are covering? the the atmosphere around the trail that you are covering?— you are covering? the case of the death of daunte _ you are covering? the case of the death of daunte in _ you are covering? the case of the death of daunte in the _ you are covering? the case of the death of daunte in the trial - you are covering? the case of the death of daunte in the trial of - death of daunte in the trial of derek chauvin and george floyd are not interconnected because it is one attorney that is representing both of them, he is connecting those two cases and the word he used his murder. he sees this as another sign of racist policing system. across the state, emotions are all high. not that he make his family today gave a heartbreaking press
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conference there were lots of tears and emotions and he said that the police, his blood is on their hands. the police chief has resigned and the officer who shot him, a 26 year veteran of the police centre has also resigned but in the family's mind, it is impossible that you could be in the police force for 26 years that you could mistake a gun for a taser. and will be hearing closing arguments on monday and the defence fears that the emotion in public spectacle will influence the jury public spectacle will influence the jury when they have to return the verdict. recommending postponing the roll—out of the job.
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pol pot, one of the century's greatest mass murderers, has reported to have died of natural causes. he and the khmer rouge movement he led were responsible for the deaths of an estimated 1.7 million cambodians. there have been violent protests in indonesia, where playboy has gone on sale for the first time. traditionalist muslim leaders have expressed disgust. the magazines officers have been attacked, and its editorial staff have gone into hiding. it was clear that paula's only contest was with the clock. and as for a sporting legacy, paula radcliffe's competitors will be chasing her new world best time for years to come. quite quietly but quicker. and quicker, she assumed to just slide away under i the surface and disappear.
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this is bbc news. the latest headlines: the united states is to withdraw all of its troops from afghanistan by september 11 this year — exactly 20 years since the 9/11 attacks on new york and washington by al-qaeda. the white policewoman who fatally shot a 20—year—old black man near minneapolis on sunday has resigned from the force. japan is facing intense criticism from its neighbours over plans to release millions of tonnes of contaminated water from the stricken fukushima nuclear plant into the sea. china called japan's decision extremely irresponsible, while south korea expressed its deep regret. the local fishing industry has already expressed fierce opposition. however, tokyo said the water would be treated to ensure that radiation levels were below those set for drinking water and the the international atomic energy agency commended tokyo's proposal. i'm joined by azby brown, lead researcher at safecast — a volunteer—based organization
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created in the days immediately following the start of the fukushima disaster seeking to aggregate available radiation data. is japan's plan safe? after the treatment _ is japan's plan safe? after the treatment into _ is japan's plan safe? after the treatment into the _ is japan's plan safe? after the treatment into the ocean - is japan's plan safe? after the treatment into the ocean may| is japan's plan safe? after the - treatment into the ocean may well and truly be the safest of options that investigated but this issue is that investigated but this issue is that this is a transnational release and as such, it shall be done unilaterally, it should be done with consultation and the involvement of all stakeholders and with nations as well. also a robust plan of third party monitoring needs to be put in place. we cannot be expected to take their word at this because they have a historical record of lack of transparency in bad faith and i will point out specifically regarding this water problem because for years, they claimed that the
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treatment system was able to remove all of that except for tritium but except for 2018, they admitted that 75% of her so 50,000 of the water actually other radionuclides, which are much more dangerous but they have never allowed any third parties to verify what is in these tanks and they have not actually performed any sort of thorough environmental assessment over the possible consequences so our issue is a lack of transparency surrounding it. the other issue is that it sets a precedent. ifjapan is allowed other issue is that it sets a precedent. if japan is allowed to release this water in defiance of opposition of the nations, what is to prevent other nations from doing the same thing, such as if russia wanted to release polluted water into the arctic where if china wanted to do something similar into this pacific at the south china sea. these are some the big issues. i5
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these are some the big issues. is there a legal obligation forjapan to do any of this?— to do any of this? there are existin: to do any of this? there are existing agreements - to do any of this? there are existing agreements from l to do any of this? there are l existing agreements from the to do any of this? there are - existing agreements from the london treaty from the maritime organisation that do govern the release of this, in the consultation. in china and south korea are within their rights to demand consultation.- korea are within their rights to demand consultation. thank you so much forjoining — demand consultation. thank you so much forjoining us. _ developing a rare disorder involving blood clots after two weeks of vaccinations. currently reviewing the blood clots. here is doctor anthony, the chief medical advisory speaking at the white house. safetaf speaking at the white house. safety is the important _ speaking at the white house. safety is the important issue _ speaking at the white house. safety is the important issue here. - speaking at the white house. safety is the important issue here. we - speaking at the white house. $th is the important issue here. we are totally aware this is a very rare
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event we want to get this worked out as quickly as we possibly can and thatis as quickly as we possibly can and that is why you see the word, pause, hold off for a bit and we may go back to that, maybe with some conditions. but we want to leave that to the fda to investigate this. potential blood clot risks reported by the united states and that is according to the health minister. a small town in france found that life really is a bit unfair — after its facebook account was removed by censors who mistakenly thought its name was an insult. the mayor of the northeastern town of ville de bitche said the page disappeared for being in violation of facebook�*s rules on offensive language. despite weeks of complaining to the social media giant, it wasn't until news of the suspension spread that facebook admitted to an incorrect analysis by its algorithms
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and reinstated the account. for those of you — like me — that don't speak old german, bitche means "table". hello. april so far has been colder and drier than average, and the weather for now is in no mood to change that pattern. so, plenty of dry weather continuing for the next few days, but of course the thing which has got most of us talking is just how chilly it feels. there's more of that to come as well and more of those frosty nights. it is high pressure. whenever you see this, you think, "well, it's dry." however, as we saw on tuesday, there were showers around. and there will still be a few in the day ahead, though most will stay dry after what is another widespread frost to start the day, another hard frost in parts of scotland — down to —6, for example, in the northeast. one or two mist and fog patches. they will clear and we're left with quite bit of sunshine. just some areas of patchy cloud
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around and, you canjust see it here, one or two showers developing, more especially towards the western side of the uk. now, the winds for the most part are light, but look at the arrows here pushing in towards that north sea coast of scotland and down the eastern side of england, coming in from the sea, which is quite chilly at this time of year, and that's why these temperatures are just showing 7, 8 or 9 celsius. so with the onset of that northeasterly breeze, eastern areas will actually be colder, whereas we're 13 in cardiff and plymouth and 13 probably towards western parts of northern ireland. any showers that have popped up will fade away as we get on into the evening. we have another largely clear and cold night to come into thursday morning, and again one or two mist and fog patches around. and there will be another widespread frost, although we're not expecting it to be quite as hard as it's been over recent nights. how's thursday shaping up? most dry with sunny spells, but on that northeasterly breeze, we will bring in a few showers
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to parts of eastern england, into the southeast, perhaps the east midlands as well. if anything, that breeze will be a touch fresher, too. for the most part, though, elsewhere, the winds are light. there is warmth in the sunshine if you get some of that. you certainly feel it as temperatures, away from the chilly east, will be close to the average for the time of year. big picture going friday into the weekend, there are weather fronts trying to move in from the atlantic towards northern ireland and scotland, initially perhapsjust bringing a bit more cloud. but deeper on into the weekend, more especially on sunday, there is a chance that, here, we could see a bit of rain, whereas elsewhere it stays dry.
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this is bbc news. the headlines:
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the united states is to withdraw all of its troops from afghanistan by september 11 this year. presidentjoe biden is expected to make an official announcement of the move on wednesday. the police officer who shot dead 20—year—old daunte wright in a minneapolis suburb on sunday has resigned from the force. kim potter quit a day after the police chief said she appeared to have shot wright accidentally, after mistaking her gun for her taser. defence lawyers have begun calling witnesses in the murder trial of derek chauvin, the former minneapolis police officer charged with killing george floyd last year. the defence has not revealed whether mr chauvin himself will take the stand. the us drugs regulator is recommending suspending the use of the johnson & johnson vaccine because several recipients have developed rare and severe blood clots. johnson &johnson now say it'll delay the roll—out of the vaccine in europe.

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