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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  April 13, 2021 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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hello, i'm nuala mcgovern. this is outside source. the female police officer who shot dead the young black men daunte wright resigns as the victim's family hires the civil rights attorney representing george floyd's family. that a police officer would shoot and kill another unarmed black man. less than 16km away from where daunte wright was shot dead — the trial of derek chauvin is under way. he's the police officer accused of killing george floyd. today the defence is introducing its witnesses. there was a crowd and yes the crowd
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was becoming loud and aggressive, a lot of yelling across the street. did that cause you any concern? concern — did that cause you any concern? concern for— did that cause you any concern? concern for the officers, yes. also in the programme — thejohnson &johnson vaccine is linked to blood clots — american health experts want a pause in its roll—out, the company is delaying its distribution in the eu — and south africa temporarily suspends its use. we are going to speak to a health expert. here in the uk a new cluster of the south african variant of the coronavirus is found in south london — everybody in the area is being asked to get a test. we start in minneapolis — where two big stories are playing out in parallel. in a moment we'll have the latest on the george floyd murder trial against former police officer derek chauvin. first — the family of a 20—year—old
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black man who was shot dead by a police officer on sunday has hired the civil rights attorney representing george floyd's family. and they've just held a press conference. here's lawyer, ben crump. almost a year ago, they were facing the unimaginable. they were facing the unbelievable. they were facing the agony of losing a family member to police excessive force. and it is unbelievable. i mean, it isjust... ..something i could not fathom. that in minneapolis, minnesota, a suburb ten miles from where the chauvin trial
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regarding george floyd was taking place, that a police officer will shoot and kill another place, that a police officer would shoot and kill another unarmed black man. george floyd's death in may last year sparked the world wide black lives matter protests. focus has now shifted to the death of 20—year—old daunte wright, who was shot by police on sunday. and the lawyer that you were just hearing ben crump, he told the police that daunte wright was not a threat at the time he was killed. when you think about the fact that daunte was trying to get away, he was not a threat to them. was it the best decision? no, but young people don't always make the best decisions.
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let's recap on what happened. let's hear from george let's hearfrom george floyd's brother rodney on his theories. the olice brother rodney on his theories. tue: police were brother rodney on his theories. tte: police were saying that the young man was running from them. but what i saw on that man's face was a scared young kid. terrified. as black folks, we have been here 400 plus years. and that young man, we have been running ever since from these police officers from trying to kill us, they called it the slave patrols and then they called it the police. patrols and then they called it the olice. �* , patrols and then they called it the olice. v . ~ . patrols and then they called it the olice. �*, ., ~ ., ., ., , police. let's take a moment to recap on exactly what _ police. let's take a moment to recap on exactly what happened _ police. let's take a moment to recap on exactly what happened and - police. let's take a moment to recap on exactly what happened and what. police. let's take a moment to recap l on exactly what happened and what we know so far. 20—year—old daunte wright was killed in brooklyn center, minneapolis. police say the officer had intended to use her taser — and that the shooting was "accidental". we showed you this body—cam video of the incident last night. if you were with us. this was the moment mr wright was pulled over for a minor traffic violation. police then determined that daunte wright had an outstanding
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arrest warrant after he failed to attend a court appearance for carrying a pistol without a permit. they attempted to handcuff him, and when he tried to re—enter his vehicle, an officer yelled, "taser, taser, "taser" before he was shot. family members of daunte have rejected the notion that it was an accident and have denounced the police as "trigger happy". so how could an officer mistake a hand gun for a taser? the new york times has compared two models commonly used by police — and reports that tasers look and feel different from pistols in a number of ways. as you can see, the weapons differ in appearance, size and grip. tasers are often produced in bright colours, to distinguish them from pistols, and pistols normally weigh significantly more than tasers. most police forces also have protocols in place to prevent mix—ups. the brooklyn center police department dictates that officers wear their guns on their dominant
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side and tasers on the opposite side, to reduce the risk of confusion. as you can see from the footage from the scene, kim potter's fellow officer's gun can be seen here on the right of his body. moments later when he switches position, his taser can be seen on the left side of his body — it's holstered so that either weapon can easily be grabbed by the dominant hand. us media is reporting that the officer who fired the handgun, 48—year—old kimberly potter, has resigned. she's been in the police force for 26 years. live to our correspondent larry madowo — he's in minneapolis. very good to have you back with us. it has been i suppose such a tumultuous day as more details begin to come out, tell us a little of what you have heard today. the
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defence what you have heard today. tte: defence began their case what you have heard today. tt9 defence began their case today after the prosecution rested, they called some witnesses who were also at the scene, one of them, shawanda hill was in the same car as george floyd but something that the fence one to do from the outset was to introduce an arrest video from 2019 about a year before george floyd died and the reason they wanted to do so was to show that he had a pattern of drug use and thejudge to show that he had a pattern of drug use and the judge warned the jury drug use and the judge warned the jury that this was not to be taken to the sign of the character of george floyd but specifically about the impact of drug use on his system, so he allowed limited video to be shunned and we saw a much longer body —— cam and body one camera from police officer 0fficer chang who responded to the scene who responded to the first radio calls when the first officers responding came to the scene and the whole big picture here is that the defence is trying to show that george floyd was
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a big drug user and also he had underlying health problems and that is what led to his death, that is why they're introducing this new video and bringing back witnesses like paramedic kimberly who was initially called last week by the prosecution. t initially called last week by the prosecution-— initially called last week by the rosecution. :, ., ., . prosecution. i found it and watched uuite a bit prosecution. i found it and watched quite a bit of _ prosecution. i found it and watched quite a bit of it _ prosecution. i found it and watched quite a bit of it today _ prosecution. i found it and watched quite a bit of it today larry - prosecution. i found it and watched quite a bit of it today larry is - quite a bit of it today larry is well and it is disturbing at times what we see, also at times very compelling. and i wonder is the rest of america also has engaged in this story as they were during the protests of black lives matter? ibm;e protests of black lives matter? en; week three, attention is a to ship and attention is shifting to the other big store in america right now this is the press conference still happening just spaces away from where i'm happening to him the families of george floyd and daunte wright addressing the press conference who we heard a short moment ago from his mother who is distraught, she could not speak for long. we heard from the mother of his son, her two—year—old son that he had, we heard from his cousins,
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from his grandmother, from his aunt, they are all in tears. it is such a painful moment for them and these two stories are not interconnected, that of george floyd and daunte wright and the attorney ben crump was representing both families and saying this is the side of a wider problem in policing in america and the systemic racism that exists there so that is where most of the attention has now shifted and what happened moments ago here in the announcements moments ago that the officer who shot daunte wright kim porter and tim again at the police chief in that northern suburb of minnesota called brooklyn center, he has also resigned. haw minnesota called brooklyn center, he has also resigned.— has also resigned. how significant do ou has also resigned. how significant do you think _ has also resigned. how significant do you think it _ has also resigned. how significant do you think it is _ has also resigned. how significant do you think it is larry _ has also resigned. how significant do you think it is larry that - do you think it is larry that benjamin crump has decided to also take on the case of daunte, the two families coming together in that way did you describe? this families coming together in that way did you describe?— did you describe? this is something that he's become _ did you describe? this is something that he's become probably - did you describe? this is something that he's become probably the - did you describe? this is something that he's become probably the best|
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that he's become probably the best known for, i spoke to ben compass —— ben crump three weeks ago in louisville because he reps as the family of breonna taylor, the paramedic who was killed by police in louisville in kentucky when they were executing an arrest warrant for drugs that were not found at her apartment. he represents many of these cases in america, the families know her and the moment when something dramatic like this has happened and you are trying to deal with their own grief and funeral arrangements and lawyers at all that, it is easy to fall back to somebody you already know, somebody you have seen on tv and in many cases for many black americans, that person is ben crump but he also has a history of getting at least a sizeable payment in a civil suit he got the family of breonna taylor $12 million from the city of louisville and he got the family of george floyd here $27 million and a civil settlement from the city of minneapolis.— settlement from the city of minneapolis. settlement from the city of minneaolis. :, , :, ., ~ settlement from the city of minneaolis. :, , :, ., minneapolis. larry modelo, thank you ve much minneapolis. larry modelo, thank you very much speaking — minneapolis. larry modelo, thank you very much speaking to _
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minneapolis. larry modelo, thank you very much speaking to us _ minneapolis. larry modelo, thank you very much speaking to us from - very much speaking to us from minneapolis. —— very madowo. in the past half an hour south africa has suspended its roll—out of the johnson and johnson vaccine — after us regulators called for a pause in america. that's because six people who've had it then developed rare severe blood clots. 6.8 million americans have received this jab so far. it's a single—shot vaccine. here's dr fauci, the chief medical adviser to the president. this is a really rare event. if you look at what we know so far, there have been six out of the 6.85 million doses, which is less than one in a million. next, here's peter marks from the us food and drugs administration, which monitors vaccine safety.
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that was a joint media called that they had announcing these changes. these six cases of severe blood clots were all in women under 50. they appear to be similar to those linked to the astrazeneca vaccine in europe. it involves the rare combination of a clot in the brain combined with low blood platelets. anne schuchat from the us public health agency spoke about why they were recommending the pause. in other words the pause is to make sure doctors are looking out for these rare blood clots. next let's hearfrom our
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medical editor fergus walsh. we've seen similar cases in the uk with the oxford/astrazeneca vaccine. both are highly effective, both give a lot of protection against covid and for the vast majority of us, that is a much greater risk than any side effects from the vaccine. both vaccines use a similar kind of technology. they both use this disabled common cold virus, and scientists are investigating whether this is prompting some kind of very rare side effect. here, people under 30 are going to be offered either the pfizer or moderna jab when their turn comes. thejohnson and johnson jab, which is also known as janssen, isn't yet being used in europe. but it's one of three being used in the united states, along with pfizer and moderna. this graph shows how many doses of each have been administered. as you can seejohnson and johnson, there at the bottom, is a much smaller part
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of the roll—out compared with the other two. natalie dean is assistant professor of biostatistics at the university of florida. lovely to have you with us. how do you see this? thejohnson &johnson seems like a great plan, a one—shot deal, a lot of people were hoping to get it and now yet again this pause. do you think it's the right thing to do? �* , :, do you think it's the right thing to do? �* , ., ., , do you think it's the right thing to do? . ': do you think it's the right thing to do? m do? it's a really difficult decision but it reflects _ do? it's a really difficult decision but it reflects the _ do? it's a really difficult decision but it reflects the fda's - do? it's a really difficult decision but it reflects the fda's caution l but it reflects the fda's caution when anything has to do with vaccine safety. and it pretends —— presents an opportunity for us to gather more information and hopefully understand maybe some common factors involved with who is experiencing these severe outcomes and maybe we can develop more targeted policy and also inform clinicians about the best way to treat these patients when they do emerge. find best way to treat these patients when they do emerge.— best way to treat these patients when they do emerge. and with that i was mentioning _ when they do emerge. and with that i was mentioning the _ when they do emerge. and with that i was mentioning the astrazeneca - when they do emerge. and with that i l was mentioning the astrazeneca which
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we have spoken about much more i think in recent weeks and we have aboutjohnson &johnson, i was reading that there a more rugged type vaccine. in lehmans terms how can you explain how those two vaccines are more similar than how the moderna and pfizer vaccine was created? we the moderna and pfizer vaccine was created? ~ :, ' the moderna and pfizer vaccine was created? ~ :, , , , , the moderna and pfizer vaccine was created? ~ :, ' , , , :, created? we have different types of vaccine technologies, _ created? we have different types of vaccine technologies, pfizer - created? we have different types of vaccine technologies, pfizer and - vaccine technologies, pfizer and moderna use the mrna technology which is fairly recent and recently developed. and johnson &johnson and astrazeneca and also the sputnik vaccine out of russia use the adenovirus —based vaccine. so it is based on a common cold virus. 50 based on a common cold virus. so with that, the numbers we are talking about our tiny when it comes to these blood clots and i think many people will know somebody who has had a blood clot perhaps related to something else whether it is a birth control pill or travelling on a plane for example. but with this, will they be able to drill down on
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who might be most at risk? that is definitely the _ who might be most at risk? that is definitely the hope _ who might be most at risk? that is definitely the hope and _ who might be most at risk? that is definitely the hope and it - who might be most at risk? that is definitely the hope and it is - who might be most at risk? that is definitely the hope and it is a - definitely the hope and it is a fairly unique constellation of symptoms and so the idea and because they are also predominately appearing in younger women, maybe we can identify some common factor and also identifying the best treatment. 0ne also identifying the best treatment. one of the common treatments used for blood clots may actually be counterproductive and worsen symptoms for this particular constellation of symptoms, conveying that to the medical community so they know the best way to treat these cases as they come in as rare as they may be, we want to make sure that we can even further lessen that risk profile. t that we can even further lessen that risk rofile. :, that we can even further lessen that risk profile-— risk profile. i have seen many days 15,000 vaccines _ risk profile. i have seen many days 15,000 vaccines counseled - risk profile. i have seen many days 15,000 vaccines counseled due - risk profile. i have seen many days 15,000 vaccines counseled due to | 15,000 vaccines counseled due to concerns over astrazeneca in one country, how much do these stories and these risks however minimal effect the more global solution for the pandemic? people need vaccines
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and if we have to that are put in question, does that hamper solving or getting to the end of this pandemic?— or getting to the end of this pandemic? it's an extremely difficult situation, _ pandemic? it's an extremely difficult situation, people - pandemic? it's an extremely| difficult situation, people are pandemic? it's an extremely - difficult situation, people are very sensitive to vaccine safety. vaccines are something that we give to healthy people. we really need an immaculate risk—benefit profile and there is an enormous risk or not with how much transmission is spreading, the different risk—benefit profile i think for younger women and so that is why there is a little bit of attention paid here and it is challenging. we want to be transparent at all possible situations and so i don't think that conducting these types of investigations and private is necessarily the better solution. natalie dean, thank you very much for speaking to us, a story that a lot of people are talking about today. let us say with current affairs here in england. here in england — hundreds of thousands of people in london are being urged to get coronavirus tests just a day after
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restrictions were eased. it's an effort to stop an outbreak of the south african variant, which has been found in the capital. 44 cases have been confirmed in the south london areas of lambeth and wandsworth. ruth hutt is director of public health for lambeth. we have an outbreak that we're aware of in a local care home, but we also know that there has been some spread to the wider community. we've been testing and tracing contacts from that outbreak, but what we want to do now is check that there's no further spread. the reason for this response is the south african variant is more contagious than the "original" coronavirus. there's also evidence that vaccines may not be as effective against it. officials are hoping to keep it contained while the vaccine roll—out continues. all adults in the uk's nine main priority groups have now been offered a jab. professor stephen powis is medical director for the national health service in england. we know that this virus mutates
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like all viruses, and in the uk, we're keeping a very, very close eye on these new variants. we have a lot of ability to sequence these viruses, so we will know when these variants emerge. but the vaccination programme is really the key way to getting us out of this crisis. we know that the current vaccines do have some effectiveness against new variants, and of course, there is the ability to adapt the vaccines as we go forward, as we do with the flu vaccine programme every year. 0ur health correspondentjim reed has more from one of the testing sites in south london. half a million people across to london boroughs are being asked to come to testing centres like this or to order a test to be delivered to the front door and that is all to try to stamp down on the spread of this so—called south african variant. there is a particular
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concern about that virus because there is some evidence that hasn't been proven yet that it may make vaccines slightly less effective. that's why you are seeing this search testing going on in areas like this. now the bbc has seen documents in the last few hours about the outbreak in south london. and they showed that the working theory at the moment is that it was spread by international travel, someone coming here from abroad in february and passing it on to their household and then spread to this care home in south london where we understand 23 people have been infected with the south african variant. the authorities have been cracking down on this trying to trace the people involved. they are confident they've got to the bottom of this at the moment for some extra testing has been asked for to try to make sure this has not been spread any further. thanks tojim reed fare. 0ne more coronavirus update for you. the german government has agreed to
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controversial changes. this is to their national infections controlled law, so what they are going to do is hand to prevent more power to impose tougher restrictions to him to microcontroller the virus but to bring a little bit of a chancellor angle of merkel on why. translation: we are implementing the emergency brake nationwide where the incidences over 100, regulation will apply in the future. the emergency brake is no longer a measure of interpretation but applies automatically. for things to get better for us to break the third wave, the previous consultations between the federal government and the regions alone are no longer enough. our pandemic response must become more vigorous and consistent. the draft while still has to be agreed by the parliament however some opposition politicians say they will not support it. here is damon mcinnis in berlin. german chancellor angela merkel will have to fight to get this built the parliament. that
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is because it _ get this built the parliament. that is because it is _ get this built the parliament. tngt is because it is incredibly controversial. regional leaders have called it a power grab by berlin. but that is because usually it is the regions that would be responsible for implementing lockdown measures such as closing schools or shutting shops. but here in this proposed law, central government will effectively be able to tell the regions to go back into full lock down once infection rates go above a certain level. that is why some opposition mps say they are going to try and block it in parliament but angela merkel says it is important that restrictions are implemented nationwide. at the moment, each region has interpreted their agreement with central government over lockdown in a different way so across germany we have a patchwork, a quite confusing different rules, the government says this is making it difficult for people to know what is going on and to have faith in lockdown measures. as a result, angela merkel is firmly
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behind the national measures that are understandable for people and that will get those infection rates down. with that she gets that through parliament though or what this draft becomes a law is another matter of timing.— this draft becomes a law is another matter of timing. let's go back to the us — where another big story is developing. an official has confirmed joe biden is withdrawing all us forces from afghanistan by september the 11th. that will be the 20th anniversary of 9/11. officially there are 2,500 american troops. our chief international correspondent lyse doucetjoins us iam i am wondering how this announcement will be seen by regular afghans. there have been so many attacks i feel over the past weeks and months, it doesn't feel like a secure situation. it doesn't feel like a secure situation-— it doesn't feel like a secure situation. : :, , ., ., it doesn't feel like a secure situation. : :, , ., :, , situation. afghans are worried. they have been worried _ situation. afghans are worried. they have been worried for _ situation. afghans are worried. they have been worried for a _ situation. afghans are worried. they have been worried for a very - situation. afghans are worried. they have been worried for a very long i have been worried for a very long time. they have been buried for years as the violence continues to intensify. there was a rare moment
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of hope when peace talks with the tower band finally began last september. —— with the fed band. but they have made very little progress and now the americans have said they are pulling out. without any conditions that they will not wait for there to be a joint effort by the taliban to negotiate peace and that they will not wait for a reduction in violence. so afghans are going to be worried. there will be a hope that these next six months, there is a window for the taliban and afghanistan as international partners including the united states to try to make a bigger push to get all sides of the table and to move towards peace rather than towards greater war. that is the hope but there is a fear that this will just lead that is the hope but there is a fear that this willjust lead to more war and will get even worse once the last of some 10,000 us and other nato forces move on. we last of some 10,000 us and other nato forces move on.— last of some 10,000 us and other nato forces move on. we have 'ust about 45 seconds i nato forces move on. we have 'ust about 45 seconds mi
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nato forces move on. we have 'ust about 45 seconds or so i nato forces move on. we have 'ust about 45 seconds or so but i nato forces move on. we have 'ust about 45 seconds or so but i h nato forces move on. we have just about 45 seconds or so but i was i about 45 seconds or so but i was just thinking of those young female journalists that were killed in an attack, some people worried about the role or progress of women within afghanistan and perhaps with this withdrawal. you afghanistan and perhaps with this withdrawal. :, ~' :, afghanistan and perhaps with this withdrawal. :, ,, :, , :, withdrawal. you think of the young aft hans withdrawal. you think of the young afghans who _ withdrawal. you think of the young afghans who came _ withdrawal. you think of the young afghans who came of _ withdrawal. you think of the young afghans who came of age - withdrawal. you think of the young afghans who came of age after - withdrawal. you think of the young afghans who came of age after the taliban were top within 2001 when the americans and other nato forces went in, they took all the best that afghanistan in the world has to offer, education, jobs, hopes, dreams, talk of peace and democracy. now they are really worried. fiur now they are really worried. our chief international correspondent lease doucet, thank you so much we will be filing this in detail for us at that story out of afghanistan and the united states. do follow lyse doucet on twitter. you can find me and the team. we would love to hear from you, do you stay with us here on the bbc, more stories to come. i'm @bbcnuala.
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hello, and if you're spending a bit more time than normal outdoors at the moment, i'm sure a dry weather outlook will be welcome but perhaps not so if you're trying to grow anything in your garden. rain has been in short supply lately. it stays largely if not completely dry through the next few days. rather cool as well, and another bit of bad news for gardeners, frost will continue to feature in the forecast. now, i show you the satellite picture to point out that all of the main rain—bearing weather systems are well away from our shores. high pressure is fending them off and keeping us largely dry but not completely dry. we have seen some showers that managed to pop up during today and we'll see some more of those during tomorrow but for the time being, the showers are fading. so, many spots overnight will be dry with long, clear spells. a bit of patchy cloud and some mist
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and fog patches developing as well. temperatures for many spots not quite as low as they were last night but —6 looks quite likely in the coldest parts of north east scotland. so into tomorrow, a cold start, one or two mist and fog patches around but for the majority, it's a fine looking day with patchy cloud and sunny spells. but again like today, we will see just one or two showers popping up. now on first glance, the winds don't look like much of a feature. they will be very light in most places but close to the east coast, the winds you'll notice will be coming straight off the chilly waters of the north sea. so, temperatures across the east coast of scotland and england really will struggle, just 7, 8 or 9 celsius. and quite a noticeable breeze actually for coasts of norfolk, suffolk, essex and kent — so feeling really chilly here. but come further west, a bit of shelter, it will be a little bit warmer — 12 celsius for glasgow, 13 in cardiff and in plymouth. now through wednesday night into thursday, high pressure will remain in charge. frost looks set to be a feature once
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again into thursday morning, and the orientation of this high means that eastern areas will continue to see a feed of cold airfrom the north sea. it also looks like we'll see this little line of showers skipping in from the north sea affecting parts of eastern and south—eastern england but many places again through thursday, dry with some spells of sunshine. highest temperatures out west, parts of northern ireland and western scotland could be looking at values of 14 or 15 celsius. stays dry for most for the end of the week and temperatures will begin to creep upwards as well, just some rain in the far north—west.
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hello, i'm nuala mcgovern. this is outside source. the female police officer who shot dead the unarmed mac plan —— black man donte wright resigned as his family hires the attorney representing george floyd's family. a police officer would shoot and kill another unarmed black man. less than 16 km away from where he was — black man. less than 16 km away from where he was shot _ black man. less than 16 km away from where he was shot dead, _ black man. less than 16 km away from where he was shot dead, the - black man. less than 16 km away from where he was shot dead, the trial- black man. less than 16 km away from where he was shot dead, the trial of. where he was shot dead, the trial of derek �*s open is taking place. the defence is introducing its witnesses.—
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defence is introducing its witnesses. , :, , ., , witnesses. did that cause you any concern? concern _ witnesses. did that cause you any concern? concern from _ witnesses. did that cause you any concern? concern from the - witnesses. did that cause you any l concern? concern from the officers. us regulars — concern? concern from the officers. us regulars want — concern? concern from the officers. us regulars want a _ concern? concern from the officers. us regulars want a because - concern? concern from the officers. us regulars want a because in - concern? concern from the officers. us regulars want a because in the l us regulars want a because in the johnson &johnson vaccine roll—out. south africa temporarily suspends its use. here in the uk, a new cluster of the so—called south african variants of the virus is found in south london. everybody in those areas are being out to get a test. we're going to turn to the conflict in eastern ukraine. —— united states. the defence is calling witnesses. currently on the stand is buried. he is a former
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police officer and this is the first time the defence has called their own expert on the use of force. before we go to the courtroom, just a warning that there may be graphic video or details in the evidence which people may find distracting. we are not in control of that picture feed, so it's worth remembering as you watch. what circumstances, _ remembering as you watch. what circumstances, what _ remembering as you watch. what circumstances, what was - remembering as you watch. what circumstances, what was the - remembering as you watch. “gar“ngt circumstances, what was the suspect doing? what were onlookers doing? where their environment hazards? try to put yourself in the officers' choose to see the decisions they made. 50 choose to see the decisions they made, ,:, choose to see the decisions they made, y:, ., :, made. so you agree with the other --eole made. so you agree with the other people who _ made. so you agree with the other people who have — made. so you agree with the other people who have testified - made. so you agree with the other people who have testified in - made. so you agree with the other people who have testified in this . people who have testified in this case? _ people who have testified in this case? , :, people who have testified in this case?_ based - people who have testified in this case?_ based on - people who have testified in this case?_ based on the l case? yes, i do. based on the totality of _ case? yes, i do. based on the totality of circumstances - case? yes, i do. based on the totality of circumstances of. case? yes, i do. based on the. totality of circumstances of this casen _ totality of circumstances of this case,. , totality of circumstances of this case,. r , , ., case,. they were present to the officer at the _ case,. they were present to the officer at the time. _ case,. they were present to the officer at the time. of _ case,. they were present to the officer at the time. of you - case,. they were present to the officer at the time. of you from | case,. they were present to the l officer at the time. of you from a reasonable _ officer at the time. of you from a reasonable police _ officer at the time. of you from a reasonable police officer- officer at the time. of you from a reasonable police officer on - officer at the time. of you from a reasonable police officer on the l reasonable police officer on the scene — reasonable police officer on the
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scene. yes. it�*s reasonable police officer on the scene- yes-— reasonable police officer on the scene. yes. it's easier to sit and 'ud . e in scene. yes. it's easier to sit and judge in an _ scene. yes. it's easier to sit and judge in an office _ scene. yes. it's easier to sit and judge in an office on _ scene. yes. it's easier to sit and judge in an office on an - scene. yes. it's easier to sit and judge in an office on an officer's| judge in an office on an officer's conduct. it's more of a challenge to put yourself in the officers' choose to make an evaluation through what they're feeling, what they're sensing, the fear they have to make a determination. bud sensing, the fear they have to make a determination.— a determination. and does that rohibit a a determination. and does that prohibit a review— a determination. and does that prohibit a review of _ a determination. and does that prohibit a review of a _ a determination. and does that prohibit a review of a police - prohibit a review of a police officer's— prohibit a review of a police officer's conduct?— prohibit a review of a police officer's conduct? :, :, ., officer's conduct? no, not a review of. when officer's conduct? no, not a review of- when you _ officer's conduct? no, not a review of. when you approach _ officer's conduct? no, not a review of. when you approach a _ officer's conduct? no, not a review of. when you approach a use - officer's conduct? no, not a review of. when you approach a use of. officer's conduct? no, not a review i of. when you approach a use of forts case such as — of. when you approach a use of forts case such as this, _ of. when you approach a use of forts case such as this, do _ of. when you approach a use of forts case such as this, do you _ of. when you approach a use of forts case such as this, do you apply - of. when you approach a use of forts case such as this, do you apply a - case such as this, do you apply a particular— case such as this, do you apply a particular methodology in order to analyse _ particular methodology in order to analyse those factors? i particular methodology in order to analyse those factors?— particular methodology in order to analyse those factors? i do. can you exlain analyse those factors? i do. can you explain for — analyse those factors? i do. can you explain for the _ analyse those factors? i do. can you explain for the jury _ analyse those factors? t n can you explain for the jury the methodology that was— explain for the jury the methodology that was used in your previous cases or in your— that was used in your previous cases or in your career? it�*s that was used in your previous cases or in your career?— or in your career? it's a pretty simle or in your career? it's a pretty simple review. _ or in your career? it's a pretty simple review. i— or in your career? it's a pretty simple review. i look- or in your career? it's a pretty simple review. i look at - or in your career? it's a pretty simple review. i look at when | or in your career? it's a pretty . simple review. i look at when the officer contacted the individual, did the officer have legal authority for a detention? so, talk about a
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traffic stop. if somebody runs a stop sign, a police officer has a right to detain you, to conduct an investigation, issue a citation. you as the person running the stop sign don't have the right to resist the officer. so, anything that would involve a lawful detention, the officer has certain rights to continue the investigation. now, a detention... to make an arrest, you need probable cause. when you look at look at force cases, i want to make sure the officer had lawful right to detain or probable cause to arrest. th right to detain or probable cause to arrest. . right to detain or probable cause to arrest. , :, ., , arrest. in terms of the lawful right to detain, arrest. in terms of the lawful right to detain. you _ arrest. in terms of the lawful right to detain, you use _ arrest. in terms of the lawful right to detain, you use the _ arrest. in terms of the lawful right to detain, you use the term, - arrest. in terms of the lawful right to detain, you use the term, what| to detain, you use the term, what was the _ to detain, you use the term, what was the term? reasonable suspicion? reasonable _ was the term? reasonable suspicion? reasonable suspicion to detain. what constitutes generally reasonable suspicion to detain?—
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constitutes generally reasonable suspicion to detain? infraction or misdemeanor— suspicion to detain? infraction or misdemeanor or _ suspicion to detain? infraction or misdemeanor or felony, - suspicion to detain? infraction or misdemeanor or felony, and - suspicion to detain? infraction or misdemeanor or felony, and the | misdemeanor or felony, and the person you're going to detain, you have a reasonable suspicion that they've committed infraction or another crime.— another crime. and in terms of robable another crime. and in terms of probable cause _ another crime. and in terms of probable cause to _ another crime. and in terms of probable cause to arrest, - another crime. and in terms of probable cause to arrest, howl another crime. and in terms of - probable cause to arrest, how would you define _ probable cause to arrest, how would you define that? it�*s probable cause to arrest, how would you define that?— you define that? it's pretty much as a statement — you define that? it's pretty much as a statement says, _ you define that? it's pretty much as a statement says, that _ you define that? it's pretty much as a statement says, that the - you define that? it's pretty much as a statement says, that the person l a statement says, that the person probably committed the crime. so officers, when they make an arrest, they base it on probable cause. th they base it on probable cause. in terms of putting a suspect in handcuffs, is that automatically an arrest? _ handcuffs, is that automatically an arrest? :, handcuffs, is that automatically an arrest? no. can it be a detention? could be arrest? can it be a detention? could be a arrest? tt9. can it be a detention? could be a detention. arrest? no. can it be a detention? could be a detention. just - arrest? no. can it be a detention? could be a detention. just to - arrest? no. can it be a detention? j could be a detention. just to make sure i understand _ could be a detention. just to make sure i understand your— could be a detention. just to make l sure i understand your testimony, . .. sure i understand your testimony,... what's _ sure i understand your testimony,... what's the _ sure i understand your testimony,... what's the second part of your analysis? _ what's the second part of your anal sis? :, :, , , , , . analysis? how does the suspect resond analysis? how does the suspect respond to _ analysis? how does the suspect respond to the _ analysis? how does the suspect respond to the officer _ analysis? how does the suspect respond to the officer if - analysis? how does the suspect
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respond to the officer if it's - analysis? how does the suspect respond to the officer if it's an l respond to the officer if it's an arrest situation. that's good. if they begin to resist, then i look at what the officer did you overcome that resistance.— that resistance. let's talk briefly in the second _ that resistance. let's talk briefly in the second problem _ that resistance. let's talk briefly in the second problem about - that resistance. let's talk brieflyj in the second problem about the different— in the second problem about the different resistance that the suspect— different resistance that the suspect could use. can you describe the levels _ suspect could use. can you describe the levels of resistance? no resistance — the levels of resistance? tt9 resistance would be compliance. the next level would be passive resistance, where a suspect, you turn them to turn around and they don't, they're not resisting you. they're just being physically noncompliant, yet without any type
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of physical strength or any type of manoeuvres they might try to do. the next level would be active resistance. i go to put you in my hand cup and you pull your hands away or you struggle with me —— handcuffs. where you use energy to prevent an officer from a publishing their goal. pulls away from me and they swing at me, that's active aggression. all those cues allow me to escalate up the ladder of options available to me.— available to me. now, in terms of our available to me. now, in terms of your experience — available to me. now, in terms of your experience in _ available to me. now, in terms of your experience in various - your experience in various jurisdictions, do use of force policies _ jurisdictions, do use of force policies differ from city to city, state _ policies differ from city to city, state to — policies differ from city to city, state to state? it policies differ from city to city, state to state ?_ policies differ from city to city, state to state? it differs slightly. usin: state to state? it differs slightly. using deadly _ state to state? it differs slightly. using deadly force _ state to state? it differs slightly. using deadly force policy - state to state? it differs slightly. using deadly force policy are - state to state? it differs slightly. | using deadly force policy are fairly
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consistent. some agencies have more liberal use of force policy than others. some are starting to adopt policies that you can't shoot at a moving vehicle if the only weapon is the vehicle itself. there's a little bit of a learning curve there for agencies. bit of a learning curve there for auencies. , :, i. agencies. so, in terms of your, auain, agencies. so, in terms of your, again, analysis, _ agencies. so, in terms of your, again, analysis, the _ agencies. so, in terms of your, again, analysis, the first - agencies. so, in terms of your, again, analysis, the first one i agencies. so, in terms of your, - again, analysis, the first one being whether— again, analysis, the first one being whether there was a justification for the _ whether there was a justification for the detention, the second being the level— for the detention, the second being the level of resistance exhibited by the level of resistance exhibited by the suspect. what's the third? what the suspect. what's the third? what the officer did _ the suspect. what's the third? what the officer did to _ the suspect. what's the third? “lia“ngt the officer did to overcome that resistance. so, if somebody pulled away from you and are actively resisting, is the officer pulling out there baton and striking them in the head. that to me would be excessive. the head. that to me would be excessive-— the head. that to me would be excessive. ~ . �*, , m excessive. was the officer's use use of force proportionate. _
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excessive. was the officer's use use of force proportionate. objectively l of force proportionate. ob'ectively reasonable? * of force proportionate. ob'ectively reasonable? yes. h of force proportionate. ob'ectively reasonable? yes. in _ of force proportionate. objectively reasonable? yes. in terms - of force proportionate. objectively reasonable? yes. in terms of - of force proportionate. objectively reasonable? yes. in terms of yourj reasonable? yes. in terms of your three part — reasonable? yes. in terms of your three part analysis, _ reasonable? t9; in terms of your three part analysis, did you apply that to _ three part analysis, did you apply that to this case? | three part analysis, did you apply that to this case?_ in - three part analysis, did you apply that to this case? i did. in your oinion, that to this case? i did. in your opinion. was— that to this case? i did. in your opinion, was this _ that to this case? i did. in your opinion, was this a _ that to this case? i did. in your opinion, was this a use - that to this case? i did. in your opinion, was this a use of- that to this case? t c c in your opinion, was this a use of deadly force? _ opinion, was this a use of deadly force? it— opinion, was this a use of deadly force? it was not. -- opinion, was this a use of deadly force? it was not.— force? it was not. -- it was not. officers respond _ force? it was not. -- it was not. officers respond to _ force? it was not. -- it was not. officers respond to domestic - officers respond to domestic violence situation. the suspect is still there. and he fights with the officers and the officers are justified in using a taser to overcome this person's noncompliance. they take the individual and the individual falls to the ground and strikes their head and dies. so, that isn't an incident of deadly force, that the incident of deadly force, that the incident of an accidental death. in my review, i would look to see whether the suspect�*s resistance to justify the suspect�*s resistance to justify the use of the taser was acceptable.
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can you describe what you would call control— can you describe what you would call control tactics?— control tactics? control techniques are me putting _ control tactics? control techniques are me putting my _ control tactics? control techniques are me putting my hands - control tactics? control techniques are me putting my hands on - control tactics? control techniques are me putting my hands on you. i control tactics? control techniques i are me putting my hands on you. and it could be an escort position, where i put my hand above your elbow and my hand on your wrist, it could be compliance techniques, which means i'm doing somejoint manipulation on various parts of your body. if you're doing what i ask you to do, it doesn't hurt. if you don't do what i'm asking you to do, that can motivate your compliance through pain compliance. now, in terms of your analysis, i think— now, in terms of your analysis, i think you — now, in terms of your analysis, i think you described this a little bit. think you described this a little bit did — think you described this a little bit. did you refer to an increase of level— bit. did you refer to an increase of level of— bit. did you refer to an increase of level of force to overcome the
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resistance, how would you describe that? _ resistance, how would you describe that? , ., , , resistance, how would you describe that? , :,::,':, that? one upmanship. police officers don't have to — that? one upmanship. police officers don't have to fight _ that? one upmanship. police officers don't have to fight fair. _ that? one upmanship. police officers don't have to fight fair. they're i don't have to fight fair. they're allowed to overcome your resistance by going up a level. or resorting to a different force option to let them accomplish the goal of getting you to comply. share accomplish the goal of getting you tocoml.: . , accomplish the goal of getting you tocoml.: . ., to comply. are officers off also reuuired to comply. are officers off also required to _ to comply. are officers off also required to de-escalate - to comply. are officers off also required to de-escalate in i to comply. are officers off also i required to de-escalate in certain required to de—escalate in certain circumstances? required to de-escalate in certain circumstances?— required to de—escalate in certain circumstances? yes. can you describe the process — circumstances? yes. can you describe the process of— circumstances? t9; can you describe the process of moving up or down that use _ the process of moving up or down that use of— the process of moving up or down that use of force? it�*s the process of moving up or down that use of force?— that use of force? it's always in resonse that use of force? it's always in response to _ that use of force? it's always in response to what _ that use of force? it's always in response to what a _ that use of force? it's always in response to what a suspect i that use of force? it's always in response to what a suspect is l that use of force? it's always in i response to what a suspect is doing. you're trying to control them. once they're controlled, you reduce your justified levels of force, yet you're still in control of the person. anybody you take into custody, you have to maintain control of. custody, you have to maintain control of-_ custody, you have to maintain control of. : :, , :,
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control of. again, in terms of the use of force. _ control of. again, in terms of the use of force, what _ control of. again, in terms of the use of force, what relevance i control of. again, in terms of the | use of force, what relevance does possible _ use of force, what relevance does possible drug influence have in that analysis? _ possible drug influence have in that analysis? it possible drug influence have in that anal sis? :. . possible drug influence have in that anal sis? :, , ., ., analysis? it has quite a large im act, analysis? it has quite a large impact. in — analysis? it has quite a large impact. in my _ analysis? it has quite a large impact, in my opinion. i analysis? it has quite a large| impact, in my opinion. house analysis? it has quite a large i impact, in my opinion. house so? peole impact, in my opinion. house so? people under _ impact, in my opinion. house so? people under the _ impact, in my opinion. house so? people under the influence - impact, in my opinion. house so? people under the influence of- impact, in my opinion. house so? i people under the influence of drugs may not be hearing what you're trying to ask them to do. they may not understand. they may have erratic behaviour, they may have... they may not feel pain. techniques you would normally used to make somebody comply, they're not feeling. they may have superhuman strength or they may have an ability to go from compliant to extreme noncompliance in a heartbeat. [30 to go from compliant to extreme noncompliance in a heartbeat. do you train officers — noncompliance in a heartbeat. do you train officers to _ noncompliance in a heartbeat. do you train officers to keep _ noncompliance in a heartbeat. do you train officers to keep drug _ train officers to keep drug influenced suspect handcuffed. | train officers to keep drug influenced suspect handcuffed. i do. wh ? influenced suspect handcuffed. i do. why? there — influenced suspect handcuffed. i do. why? there are _ influenced suspect handcuffed. i do. why? there are many— influenced suspect handcuffed. i do. why? there are many instances i influenced suspect handcuffed. i do. i why? there are many instances where handcuffs are —
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why? there are many instances where handcuffs are removed _ why? there are many instances where handcuffs are removed from _ why? there are many instances where handcuffs are removed from us - why? there are many instances where handcuffs are removed from us both i handcuffs are removed from us both spec and ensues and they were —— as they were removed from a drug suspect, the person's right back to fighting you and you are in a fight for your life. fighting you and you are in a fight foryour life. i've fighting you and you are in a fight for your life. i've trained and i've been trained that when you deal with drug influence persons, they stay handcuffed until they're taken to a medical facility if that's what the case may be an put in softer restraint on the gurney so they can be treated. flan restraint on the gurney so they can be treated-— be treated. can you describe situational _ be treated. can you describe situational awareness? i be treated. can you describe situational awareness? yes. | be treated. can you describe | situational awareness? yes. i be treated. can you describe - situational awareness? yes. i break it down that — situational awareness? yes. i break it down that a _ situational awareness? yes. i break it down that a police... _ situational awareness? yes. i break it down that a police... most - it down that a police... most people's heads should be on a swivel. if you're walking down a street and you hear somebody running up street and you hear somebody running up behind you, your mind process shouldn't be, "what if they tackle me?" no, it your head is on a swivel which means you're cognizant of your awareness, see things that may be a threat to you, plan for them, and especially as a police officer in
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uniform, stands for certain things. unfortunately, criminals don't wear uniforms, so officers don't have the luxury of being able to look at somebody and automatically determine they're going to be a threat or risk. , . , :, risk. does the concept of situational _ risk. does the concept of situational awareness i risk. does the concept of. situational awareness come risk. does the concept of- situational awareness come into or factor— situational awareness come into or factor into— situational awareness come into or factor into your analysis? it situational awareness come into or factor into your analysis?— factor into your analysis? it does. how so? what — factor into your analysis? it does. how so? what other _ factor into your analysis? it does. how so? what other threats i factor into your analysis? it does. how so? what other threats are l how so? what other threats are resent how so? what other threats are present sides — how so? what other threats are present sides the _ how so? what other threats are present sides the person - how so? what other threats are present sides the person we'rel present sides the person we're dealing with? are there environmental hazards? or is there track of it, is there onlookers, people to people focused on the arrest? the officer's exhaustion level, what are other officers doing, things of that nature. ts level, what are other officers doing, things of that nature. is an officer entitled _ doing, things of that nature. is an officer entitled to _ doing, things of that nature. is an officer entitled to rely _ doing, things of that nature. is an officer entitled to rely on - officer entitled to rely on information he or she receives from dispatch— information he or she receives from dispatch in— information he or she receives from dispatch in formulating whether they will use _ dispatch in formulating whether they
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will use force? in dispatch in formulating whether they will use force?— will use force? in 'ustifying force, i would say _ will use force? in 'ustifying force, i would say no. i will use force? in justifying force, i would say no. in _ will use force? in justifying force, i would say no. in preparing i will use force? in justifying force, i would say no. in preparing to i will use force? in justifying force, i i would say no. in preparing to deal with the situation you're being sent to buy dispatch, then i would say yes. to buy dispatch, then i would say es. :, to buy dispatch, then i would say es, :, :, , :, to buy dispatch, then i would say es. ., ., ' to buy dispatch, then i would say es. :, ., , an yes. how does that differ? an officer has _ yes. how does that differ? an officer has to _ yes. how does that differ? an officer has to take _ yes. how does that differ? an officer has to take into - yes. how does that differ? an | officer has to take into account what they see on the scene. dispatchers do the bestjob they can, but usually only get information over the telephone. the information over the telephone. the information may be inaccurate, may be false, may be exaggerated, so it's up for the officer on the street to determine what is the best course of action.— course of action. have you reviewed officer chauvin's _ course of action. have you reviewed officer chauvin's use _ course of action. have you reviewed officer chauvin's use of _ course of action. have you reviewed officer chauvin's use of force - course of action. have you reviewed officer chauvin's use of force in i officer chauvin's use of force in this case, — officer chauvin's use of force in this case, taking into consideration your analysis as well as some of the concepts— your analysis as well as some of the concepts we've talked about? | your analysis as well as some of the concepts we've talked about? i have. and let's talk — concepts we've talked about? i have. and let's talk about _ concepts we've talked about? i have. and let's talk about mr _ concepts we've talked about? i have. and let's talk about mr chauvin's i and let's talk about mr chauvin's uses _ and let's talk about mr chauvin's uses of— and let's talk about mr chauvin's uses of force. where would you say the first _ uses of force. where would you say the first use — uses of force. where would you say the first use of force that mr chauvin—
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the first use of force that mr chauvin engaged in occurred? when he 'oined chauvin engaged in occurred? when he joined officer— chauvin engaged in occurred? when he joined officer keung _ chauvin engaged in occurred? when he joined officer keung trying _ chauvin engaged in occurred? when he joined officer keung trying to _ chauvin engaged in occurred? when he joined officer keung trying to put i joined officer keung trying to put mr floyd in the car. th joined officer keung trying to put mr floyd in the car.— joined officer keung trying to put mr floyd in the car. in your view of vast use of— mr floyd in the car. in your view of vast use of force, _ mr floyd in the car. in your view of vast use of force, what _ mr floyd in the car. in your view of vast use of force, what is - mr floyd in the car. in your view of vast use of force, what is your i vast use of force, what is your perspective?— vast use of force, what is your --ersective? :, ~ �*, perspective? that mr floyd's level of resistance _ perspective? that mr floyd's level of resistance was _ perspective? that mr floyd's level of resistance was objectively i of resistance was objectively reasonable for those officers to do the techniques that they were doing. i felt that level of resistance exhibited by mr floyd justified the officers and higher level of force. if an officer chooses not to use a higher— if an officer chooses not to use a higher level of force, is that an element — higher level of force, is that an element of de—escalation? higher level of force, is that an element of de-escalation? rephrase a. how element of de-escalation? rephrase a- how does — element of de-escalation? rephrase a- how does an _ element of de-escalation? rephrase a. how does an officer's _ element of de-escalation? rephrase a. how does an officer's decision i element of de-escalation? rephrase a. how does an officer's decision to i a. how does an officer's decision to use less force _ a. how does an officer's decision to use less force factor _ a. how does an officer's decision to use less force factor into _ a. how does an officer's decision to use less force factor into an - use less force factor into an analysis— use less force factor into an analysis of de—escalation tactics? so, analysis of de—escalation tactics?
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so. an— analysis of de—escalation tactics? so, an officer sees an incident, feels it has this justification to use these tools, which is due to the personality and the makeup of the officer. they try to expire a lesser technique to see if it will work, and if it doesn't, they escalate. now, you testified you watched the videos _ now, you testified you watched the videos in _ now, you testified you watched the videos in this case.— now, you testified you watched the videos in this case. yes. does that include the — videos in this case. yes. does that include the body _ videos in this case. t9; does that include the body cameras of the minneapolis police officers involved?— minneapolis police officers involved?- did i minneapolis police officers involved?- did it i minneapolis police officers i involved?- did it include involved? ended. did it include vafious involved? ended. did it include various bystanders? _ involved? ended. did it include various bystanders? yes. i involved? ended. did it include various bystanders? yes. and | various bystanders? yes. and surveillance — various bystanders? yes. and surveillance videos _ various bystanders? t9; and surveillance videos from stores? yes _ surveillance videos from stores? yes. :, , :, surveillance videos from stores? yes. :, , ,,. surveillance videos from stores? yes. :, , ., ., yes. from your perspective, what are some of the--- _ yes. from your perspective, what are some of the. .. camera _ yes. from your perspective, what are some of the. .. camera analysis i yes. from your perspective, what are some of the. .. camera analysis was? | some of the... camera analysis was? body— some of the... camera analysis was? body cameras — some of the... camera analysis was? body cameras show what the camera is pointing at. it doesn't include and
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officer's peripheral vision or show what they see through their hands. a body can shutter response to lighting situations quicker than human... :, .,, lighting situations quicker than human... :, , ., about human... your last statement. about the shutter — human... your last statement. about the shutter released _ human... your last statement. about the shutter released on _ human... your last statement. about the shutter released on the _ human... your last statement. about the shutter released on the body i the shutter released on the body cam? it's quicker to lighting situations.— cam? it's quicker to lighting situations. :, , :, situations. now, in terms of the initial uses _ situations. now, in terms of the initial uses of _ situations. now, in terms of the initial uses of force _ situations. now, in terms of the initial uses of force and - situations. now, in terms of the initial uses of force and officer i initial uses of force and officer 's' efforts _ initial uses of force and officer 's' efforts to get mr floyd into the car, you _ 's' efforts to get mr floyd into the car, you felt they were objectively reasonable? | car, you felt they were ob'ectively reasonabreafi car, you felt they were ob'ectively reasonable?- did i car, you felt they were objectively reasonable? i did. did the use of force continue _ reasonable? i did. did the use of force continue after— reasonable? i did. did the use of force continue after mr _ reasonable? t c c did the use of force continue after mr floyd was restrained — force continue after mr floyd was restrained on the ground? i force continue after mr floyd was restrained on the ground?- restrained on the ground? i don't consider control _ restrained on the ground? i don't consider control as _ restrained on the ground? i don't
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consider control as a _ restrained on the ground? i don't consider control as a use - restrained on the ground? i don't consider control as a use of- restrained on the ground? i don't| consider control as a use of force. let's back up just a second. the let's back upjust a second. the removal— let's back upjust a second. the removal of— let's back upjust a second. the removal of mr floyd's getting out of the vehicle, however that was, does that constitute the use of force? the manhandling or the three officers taking mr floyd out of the car, yes. officers taking mr floyd out of the car, es. ~ :. . officers taking mr floyd out of the car, es. 9 :, , , :, car, yes. was it 'ustified or objectivery_ car, yes. was itjustified or objectively reasonable i car, yes. was itjustified or objectively reasonable in i car, yes. was itjustified or i objectively reasonable in this car, yes. was itjustified or - objectively reasonable in this case? yes. ~ , , :, :, yes. when they brought him to the round, yes. when they brought him to the ground. are — yes. when they brought him to the ground. are you — yes. when they brought him to the ground, are you saying _ yes. when they brought him to the ground, are you saying you - yes. when they brought him to the ground, are you saying you don't i ground, are you saying you don't consider— ground, are you saying you don't consider that to be a use of force? up consider that to be a use of force? up to _ consider that to be a use of force? up to that— consider that to be a use of force? up to that point, it was a use of force. : ~ , :, force. once mr floyd is on the round, force. once mr floyd is on the ground. does _ force. once mr floyd is on the ground, does there _ force. once mr floyd is on the ground, does there continue i force. once mr floyd is on the| ground, does there continue to force. once mr floyd is on the i ground, does there continue to be some _ ground, does there continue to be some level— ground, does there continue to be some level of resistance by mr floyd? — some level of resistance by mr flo d? , some level of resistance by mr floyd?- how _ some level of resistance by mr floyd?- how would - some level of resistance by mr floyd? yes. how would you describe it? active resistance. _ floyd? yes. how would you describe it? active resistance. he _ floyd? yes. how would you describe it? active resistance. he was - floyd? yes. how would you describe it? active resistance. he was still. it? active resistance. he was still stru: calin it? active resistance. he was still struggling against _ it? active resistance. he was still struggling against the _ it? active resistance. he was still struggling against the efforts i it? active resistance. he was still struggling against the efforts of i struggling against the efforts of the officers. i saw on one of the
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body cam videos that mr floyd of appeared to kick at officer lane. ts appeared to kick at officer lane. is appeared to kick at officer lane. is a reason they would take a suspect to the _ a reason they would take a suspect to the ground?— a reason they would take a suspect to the ground? yes. why? a reason they would take a suspect to the ground?- why?- to the ground? yes. why? officers are trained — to the ground? yes. why? officers are trained that _ to the ground? yes. why? officers are trained that any _ to the ground? yes. why? officers are trained that any time _ to the ground? yes. why? officers are trained that any time you i to the ground? yes. why? officers are trained that any time you get i are trained that any time you get resistance from a suspect, or you deal with a high—risk suspect, it's saferfor deal with a high—risk suspect, it's safer for you officer deal with a high—risk suspect, it's saferfor you officer and deal with a high—risk suspect, it's safer for you officer and for the suspect to put him on the ground, face down for a variety of reason. some of which are, it makes the suspect�*s mobility diminish. they can't get up and run as quick. it takes away some of the use of their hands, so they can't grab you without turning their body. that would give an officer time to react. it limits what they can do with their feet. it limits what they can do with theirfeet. they it limits what they can do with their feet. they can still kick, but they don't have as much mobility or power that they would if they were
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standing. th power that they would if they were standin: . . power that they would if they were standin: . , :, power that they would if they were standinu. , :, , standing. in terms of this particular— standing. in terms of this particular case, _ standing. in terms of this particular case, we i standing. in terms of this - particular case, we understand mr floyd _ particular case, we understand mr floyd was— particular case, we understand mr floyd was handcuffed. yes. does the fact that mr— floyd was handcuffed. fez does the fact that mr floyd floyd was handcuffed. ies does the fact that mr floyd was floyd was handcuffed. ij:3 does the fact that mr floyd was handcuffed somehow come into the analysis as to whether_ somehow come into the analysis as to whether or— somehow come into the analysis as to whether or not... the position? know, _ whether or not... the position? know, any— whether or not... the position? know, any resistor, should go to the ground. flan know, any resistor, should go to the round. . ,, know, any resistor, should go to the round. ., i. ,. , know, any resistor, should go to the round. . ,, ,. , ., , ground. can you describe generally what ou ground. can you describe generally what you mean _ ground. can you describe generally what you mean as _ ground. can you describe generally what you mean as a _ ground. can you describe generally what you mean as a control- what you mean as a control positionalthough it's where the either— positionalthough it's where the either in — positionalthough it's where the either in this case handcuffed, placed — either in this case handcuffed, placed on— either in this case handcuffed, placed on their stomach and their chests, officers _ placed on their stomach and their chests, officers are _ placed on their stomach and their chests, officers are in _ placed on their stomach and their chests, officers are in a _ placed on their stomach and their chests, officers are in a position i chests, officers are in a position to apply body weight to keep the suspect on the ground and to keep them mobilised. would it be common practice in that situation _ would it be common practice in that situation to —
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would it be common practice in that situation to employee an mrt or restraint? — situation to employee an mrt or restraint? ., . ., situation to employee an mrt or restraint?_ what - situation to employee an mrt or| restraint?_ what would situation to employee an mrt or- restraint?_ what would be restraint? you could. what would be the factors to _ restraint? you could. what would be the factors to determine _ restraint? you could. what would be the factors to determine whether - restraint? you could. what would be the factors to determine whether or| the factors to determine whether or not an— the factors to determine whether or not an officer would employ such a technique? — not an officer would employ such a technique? can not an officer would employ such a techniuue? ., not an officer would employ such a techniuue? . .g . , technique? can the officers controlled _ technique? can the officers controlled the _ technique? can the officers controlled the person's - technique? can the officers l controlled the person's legs? technique? can the officers - controlled the person's legs? does the person need to have their legs controlled? in the situation, they did. could officer lane be successful in trying to control the legs? in successful in trying to control the le . s? , successful in trying to control the lens? , ., , ., successful in trying to control the lens? ,., ., ., legs? in terms of your familiar officers in _ legs? in terms of your familiar officers in this _ legs? in terms of your familiar officers in this particular - legs? in terms of your familiar officers in this particular case, | officers in this particular case, considering the use of the mrt? they did. and considering the use of the mrt? they did- and they — considering the use of the mrt? they did. and they ultimately _ considering the use of the mrt? they did. and they ultimately decided - did. and they ultimately decided a . ainst it? did. and they ultimately decided against it? that's _ did. and they ultimately decided against it? that's correct. - did. and they ultimately decided against it? that's correct. howl did. and they ultimately decided . against it? that's correct. how does that factor into _ against it? that's correct. how does that factor into the _ against it? that's correct. how does that factor into the decision - against it? that's correct. how does that factor into the decision to - against it? that's correct. how does that factor into the decision to not l that factor into the decision to not employ— that factor into the decision to not employ the mrt factor into the analysis? employ the mrt factor into the anal sis? �* , ., employ the mrt factor into the anal sis? �*, ., , ., ., analysis? it's a situation where they were _ analysis? it's a situation where they were justified _ analysis? it's a situation where they were justified in _ analysis? it's a situation where they were justified in the - analysis? it's a situation where - they were justified in the maximum restraint and chose not to, so why
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they have that decision making, i'm not sure. maybe mr floyd made comments about being claustrophobic, and i know in the teaching i've done, if you leg restrained somebody in training that is claustrophobic, it creates a reaction.— it creates a reaction. studio: we are watching _ it creates a reaction. studio: we are watching the - it creates a reaction. studio: we are watching the derek. it creates a reaction. studio: - we are watching the derek chauvin trial. barry was being questioned by eric, the lawyer of mr chauvin. let's bring in our larry madowo. it's a really important part. this first witness that has been brought in by the defence. trying to determine what was reasonable or appropriate. that's correct. he said unequivocally _ appropriate. that's correct. he said unequivocally that _ appropriate. that's correct. he said unequivocally that the _ appropriate. that's correct. he said unequivocally that the use - appropriate. that's correct. he said unequivocally that the use of - appropriate. that's correct. he said unequivocally that the use of force | unequivocally that the use of force was reasonable. the reasonableness
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has been brought up again and again on both sides. the prosecution had their own use of force experts. the sergeant last week and then this week, they have had a another expert who agreed the use of force was excessive. now we were promised a band of experts in this trial. the medical experts and the police de—escalation experts, use of force experts, and now we see this. barry brodd delivering for the defence here. i brodd delivering for the defence here. , , ,.,, brodd delivering for the defence here. , ., , here. i suppose in a way, he is the advocate of _ here. i suppose in a way, he is the advocate of derek _ here. i suppose in a way, he is the advocate of derek chauvin, - advocate of derek chauvin, describing the actions that a police officer may take. are we any closer to whether derek chauvin might testify as well in his own words? we
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don't testify as well in his own words? : don't know, that's the short answer. the longer answer is there's a possibility, a slim possibility, but still a chance that derek chauvin himself might take the stand. it might be tomorrow or thursday. the attorneys usually want to keep that open because they want to see if he can make a case with the jury about who he is, especially for derek chauvin, because this case had such a public outcry across the world. he's become a picture of a bad cop. the disadvantage is a he would get cross—examined, and he could get brutalfor him. —— that cross—examined, and he could get brutal for him. —— that could cross—examined, and he could get brutalfor him. —— that could get brutal. i brutal for him. -- that could get brutal. , ., , ., , brutal. i understand tension is so hi . h brutal. i understand tension is so high where _ brutal. i understand tension is so high where you — brutal. i understand tension is so high where you are. _ brutal. i understand tension is so high where you are. larry - brutal. i understand tension is so | high where you are. larry madowo brutal. i understand tension is so . high where you are. larry madowo is following, and also the shooting of daunte wright. thank you so much, larry. do stay with us here on bbc. you can get in touch with me on
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twitter. of the team on twitter — i'm @bbcnuala hello, and if you're spending a bit more time than normal outdoors at the moment, i'm sure a dry weather outlook will be welcome but perhaps not so if you're trying to grow anything in your garden. rain has been in short supply lately. it stays largely if not completely dry through the next few days. rather cool as well, and another hit of bad news for gardeners, frost will continue to feature in the forecast. now, i show you the satellite picture to point out that all of the main rain—bearing weather systems are well away from our shores. high pressure is fending them off and keeping us largely dry but not completely dry. we have seen some showers that managed to pop up during today and we'll see some more of those during tomorrow but for the time being, the showers are fading. so, many spots overnight will be dry with long, clear spells. a bit of patchy cloud and some mist and fog patches developing as well.
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temperatures for many spots not quite as low as they were last night but —6 looks quite likely in the coldest parts of north east scotland. 50 into tomorrow, a cold start, one or two mist and fog patches around but for the majority, it's a fine looking day with patchy cloud and sunny spells. but again like today, we will see just one or two showers popping up. now on first glance, the winds don't look like much of a feature. they will be very light in most places but close to the east coast, the winds you'll notice will be coming straight off the chilly waters of the north sea. so, temperatures across the east coast of scotland and england really will struggle, just 7, 8 or 9 celsius. and quite a noticeable breeze actually for coasts of norfolk, suffolk, essex and kent — so feeling really chilly here. but come further west, a bit of shelter, it will be a little bit warmer — i2 celsius for glasgow, 13 in cardiff and in plymouth. now through wednesday night into thursday, high pressure will remain in charge. frost looks set to be a feature once again into thursday morning,
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and the orientation of this high means that eastern areas will continue to see a feed of cold airfrom the north sea. it also looks like we'll see this little line of showers skipping in from the north sea affecting parts of eastern and south—eastern england but many places again through thursday, dry with some spells of sunshine. highest temperatures out west, parts of northern ireland and western scotland could be looking at values of ii: or 15 celsius. stays dry for most for the end of the week and temperatures will begin to creep upwards as well, just some rain in the far north—west.
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this is bbc news i'mjames reynolds. the headlines at 8 o'clock. if you're over 45 and in england you can now book a covid jab. the government says it's ahead of its target — everyone in the top 9 priority groups has now been offered a first vaccine. we're going now to the 45 to 49 group, they are being asked to come forward. a new cluster of the south african variant in south london — everybody in the area is being asked to get a test. university students in england can return to campuses from mid—may. travelling around scotland will be allowed from friday — 10 days earlier than planned. now the johnson & johnson vaccine is linked to blood clots — american health experts want a pause in its roll—out, and the company is delaying its distribution in the eu.
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the prime minister insists the review he's

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