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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  April 13, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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the vaccination programme in england moves to a new phase — if you're over 45 you can now book a covid jab it comes after the government said everyone in the top nine priority groups has now been offered a first vaccine — two days ahead of its target. we are going now into the 45 to 49 group. they are being asked to come forward. intensive covid testing is going on in south london where a cluster of cases of the south african variant emerged — after an outbreak in a care home we'll bring you the latest from our health editor. also this lunchtime... drinkers in pubs and bars last night said they were excited to be on a night out — — despite the freezing temperatures — as outdoor hospitality reopened in england. travelling around scotland will be allowed from friday — ten days earlier than planned.
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another night of unrest in the us city of minneapolis — after police shot a black man dead and "the polluter elite." researchers warn the world's richest people to radically change their lifestyle to tackle climate change. and coming up on the bbc news channel, a fresh perspective with new coaching faces as warren gatland announces his backroom team for the british and irish lions tour to south africa this summer. good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. if you're over 45 and in england you can now book your covid jab, as the vaccination programme enters its next phase. everyone over 50 or in a high
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risk group has now been offered a first dose, according to the government, and ministers say they're on track to offer all adults a vaccine by the end ofjuly. it comes as officals race to contain �*significant�* new cases of the south african variant in south london, where hundreds of thousands of residents have been asked to come forward for tests. the prime minister has warned infections will rise as the economy reopens, and urged people to continue to be cautious. jim reed reports. another major milestone for the vaccination programme. all over 50s and those in high—risk groups in the uk have now been offered the first dose. at this vaccination centre in reading, they will be inviting the next age group down. it's great we've managed to get
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everyone in those groups vaccinated by the deadline, we are now going to the 45-49 by the deadline, we are now going to the 45—49 group, they are being asked to come forward. all those aged 45 and up can now use the nhs website to book appointments. the site appeared to crash this morning as thousands more tried to get a slot, though it is now back up and running. overall, more than 32 million people have had at least one jab of the astrazeneca and pfizer vaccines. going forward, though, the nhs will have to get a shot to all those coming back for a second booster dose, while at the same time trying to keep first doses going for those younger age groups. are you feeling well today? today in sheffield, the firstjabs using a third vaccine, made by the american firm moderna, are being given in england following a roll—out in wales and scotland. the supply forecast gives us confidence that assuming those supplies carry on as expected, then yes, we will not only deliver on the
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april 15 milestone of everybody aged 50 and above having had the chance for a vaccine, but all adults by the end ofjuly. all this comes at an important time in this pandemic. pub gardens and shops in england are now open for the first time this year. the successful vaccine roll—out has helped to drive down infections and deaths. but scientists say the public still needs to follow the rules to avoid another wave of infections. the vaccines are only one part of the solution to the problem. people do need to continue to be careful and to avoid infecting each other. you can have this infection without realising it and so there is a risk. there are now all these tests available that people can obtain to test themselves and people should use those and i and certainly, for one, are going to continue to take a lot of care. and today another reminder of how easily this virus can spread. every resident of two london boroughs, wandsworth and lambeth,
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is being asked to take a pcr covid test. that is after a large cluster of infections caused by a variant of the virus first found in south africa. we have an outbreak that we are aware of in a local care home but we also know there has been some spread to the wider community and we've been testing and tracing contacts from that outbreak. but what we want to do now is check there is no further spread across our errors both in lambeth and wandsworth. lambeth council says it is fairly confident it has the outbreak under control, but all those living in the boroughs, plus anyone who travels through, have been told they should get tested to reduce the chance of it spreading. let's talk to jim who's at a testing centre in streatham now. what's the latest from there? hello, victoria. around half a million people across two london boroughs have been asked to come to
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testing centres like this or have been asked to get a test deliver to their front door been asked to get a test deliver to theirfront door in been asked to get a test deliver to their front door in order to try and stamp down on the spread of the so—called south african variant. scientists are particularly concerned about that version of the virus because there is some evidence and it hasn't been proven yet, that it may make vaccines slightly less effective. that's why you're seeing this surge testing going on in areas like this. the bbc has seen documents in the last few hours about the outbreak in south london. and they show that the working theory at the moment is that it was spread by international travel, someone coming here from abroad in february and then passing it onto their household and then spread to this care home south london where we understand, 23 people have been infected with the south african variant. the authorities have been cracking down on this, trying to trace the people involved. they are confident they have got to the bottom of this at the moment, extra testing has been asked for to try and make sure this hasn't spread any
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further. jim, thank you. 0ur health editor, hugh pym, is here. what is the message from the government as the vaccination roll—out continues? government as the vaccination roll-out continues?— government as the vaccination roll-out continues? victoria, there seems to be _ roll-out continues? victoria, there seems to be slightly _ roll-out continues? victoria, there seems to be slightly different - seems to be slightly different messages, on the one hand ministers are upbeat about getting through the first nine priority groups, an offer of a vaccine by the middle of april, we haven't got a precise breakdown of exactly how many of the groups have had what sort of take up though it seems to be an average of about 95%. and then moving onto the next phase of the programme. but listening to borisjohnson, he made the point that when it came to the road map for england, he saw no reason why it shouldn't go ahead but there was a lot of caution in his comments. he said yes the vaccination programme so far had made a contribution to reducing people getting seriously ill and then dying with covid but of course it was locked down in his view,
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which had had a major role in suppressing the virus and now, at each stage of the road map, lifting restrictions, you get more infections and more people being seriously ill and caution was certainly needed and it could be that his words and his views are slightly affected by what we've heard from jim about what's going on in south london with the south african variant and the possibility that might become more of an issue. so where do we go with the vaccine programme here? as we've heard, it's 45 and older in england who can now go online and start booking. matt hancock the health secretary said thenit hancock the health secretary said then it would be 40 and over but wasn't totally clear about when that would begin, he said it was subject to supply and that remains a slight imponderable at the moment, how much supplies they're going through to this target of getting all adults offered a firstjob by the ofjuly. —— firstjab. hugh, thank you. people across england braved freezing temperatures last night to enjoy their first drink or meal
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out for months. in soho in london, the streets were packed, with roads closed to give more space for outdoor drinking and eating. it was also a busy day on the high street in many towns and cities — but businesses have warned they will continue to struggle while social distancing is needed. andy moore reports. in london �*s soho last night an atmosphere of relief and celebration. it atmosphere of relief and celebration.— atmosphere of relief and celebration. , ~ . celebration. it feels like we are out of prison. _ celebration. it feels like we are out of prison. i _ celebration. it feels like we are out of prison. i feel— celebration. it feels like we are out of prison. i feel good. - celebration. it feels like we are | out of prison. i feel good. been t in: to out of prison. i feel good. been trying to do the _ out of prison. i feel good. been trying to do the same _ out of prison. i feel good. been trying to do the same thing, - trying to do the same thing, working. _ trying to do the same thing, working, sleeping, - trying to do the same thing, working, sleeping, eating. i trying to do the same thing, . working, sleeping, eating. it’s trying to do the same thing, working, sleeping, eating. it's nice to be out. there _ working, sleeping, eating. it's nice to be out. there was _ working, sleeping, eating. it's nice to be out. there was a _ working, sleeping, eating. it's nice to be out. there was a police - to be out. there was a police presence but no reports of any major problems. and across england, that seemed to be the picture, people were out enjoying themselves, but on the whole, safely and responsibly. what a beautiful day!— the whole, safely and responsibly. what a beautiful day! some people labelled the _ what a beautiful day! some people labelled the day _ what a beautiful day! some people labelled the day the _ what a beautiful day! some people labelled the day the glorious - what a beautiful day! some people labelled the day the glorious 12th, | labelled the day the glorious 12th, in newcastle and elsewhere, some had taken the day off to soak up the atmosphere. taken the day off to soak up the atmosphere-_ taken the day off to soak up the atmoshere. ~ �* , ~ ., atmosphere. we've been in lockdown for so long- —
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atmosphere. we've been in lockdown for so long- we _ atmosphere. we've been in lockdown for so long. we couldn't _ atmosphere. we've been in lockdown for so long. we couldn't have - for so long. we couldn't have possibly gone back to work today. we needed the day off to go out and do what we wanted to do! for needed the day off to go out and do what we wanted to do!— what we wanted to do! for many, there was plenty _ what we wanted to do! for many, there was plenty of— what we wanted to do! for many, there was plenty of shopping - what we wanted to do! for many, there was plenty of shopping to l there was plenty of shopping to catch up on. it’s there was plenty of shopping to catch up om— there was plenty of shopping to catch up on. it's good to go back inside and _ catch up on. it's good to go back inside and shop _ catch up on. it's good to go back inside and shop instead - catch up on. it's good to go back inside and shop instead of- catch up on. it's good to go back inside and shop instead of doing | catch up on. it's good to go back i inside and shop instead of doing it online. it's nice to be around other people. to online. it's nice to be around other --eole. ., , ., , online. it's nice to be around other neale, ., , ., , ., people. to see humans. footfall fiuures people. to see humans. footfall figures show _ people. to see humans. footfall figures show the _ people. to see humans. footfall figures show the number - people. to see humans. footfall figures show the number of - people. to see humans. footfall- figures show the number of shoppers was way up, not surprisingly, on the same time last week and last year. but still down on the last comparable date in 2019. i but still down on the last comparable date in 2019. i think if we look at yesterday _ comparable date in 2019. i think if we look at yesterday it _ comparable date in 2019. i think if we look at yesterday it was - comparable date in 2019. i think if we look at yesterday it was a - we look at yesterday it was a buoyant day, good day for retail, much—needed, and hospitality as well but realistically these figures are quite low when we compare them not to last year but the year before. i think the change, the shift has happened online, it's part of the retail mix, and we have to accept that. that retail mix, and we have to accept that. �* , , ., ., that. at this restaurant in newcastle _ that. at this restaurant in newcastle staff _ that. at this restaurant in newcastle staff are - that. at this restaurant in newcastle staff are just l that. at this restaurant in | newcastle staff are just as that. at this restaurant in - newcastle staff are just as happy that. at this restaurant in _ newcastle staff are just as happy as customers to open up again. i newcastle staff are just as happy as customers to open up again.- customers to open up again. i have been in furloughed _ customers to open up again. i have been in furloughed two _ customers to open up again. i have been in furloughed two times. - customers to open up again. i have been in furloughed two times. so l customers to open up again. i have i been in furloughed two times. so for me, it's so excited to come back. to
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be honest, i don't know about the rest of the people, but for me, it's really important, mental health e. so, yes, fingers crossed, we don't close again!— so, yes, fingers crossed, we don't close again! gymnasiums and sport centres like — close again! gymnasiums and sport centres like this _ close again! gymnasiums and sport centres like this one _ close again! gymnasiums and sport centres like this one in _ close again! gymnasiums and sport centres like this one in st _ close again! gymnasiums and sport centres like this one in st austell. centres like this one in st austell in cornwall were allowed to open yesterday. in cornwall were allowed to open esterda . , ., , in cornwall were allowed to open esterda. , . , ., yesterday. usually i hate getting out of bed on — yesterday. usually i hate getting out of bed on a _ yesterday. usually i hate getting out of bed on a monday - yesterday. usually i hate getting out of bed on a monday morningj yesterday. usually i hate getting - out of bed on a monday morning but last night i was dancing around the house and my son but i was crazy. many of the country �*s pubs and restaurants are spilling out with permission onto the streets outside. all we need now is the weather to enjoy our new—found pavement culture! andy moore, bbc news. scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, has brought forward the easing of some covid restrictions — ten days earlier than expected. 0ur correspondent, lorna gordon, is in glasgow. lorna, tell us more. victoria, nicola sturgeon _ lorna, tell us more. victoria, nicola sturgeon said - lorna, tell us more. victoria, nicola sturgeon said the - lorna, tell us more. victoria, nicola sturgeon said the data lorna, tell us more. victoria, - nicola sturgeon said the data here is encouraging, we've gone from upwards of 2000 people testing positive for covid every single day
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backin positive for covid every single day back in early january to fewer than 300 positive cases every day now. she says it's at the lowest level since late september and significantly, there has been a 40% drop in positive cases in the last two weeks. so that means a big, significant change here in scotland is on the way. earlier than expected. and the state local restriction is being lifted from friday. meaning at that point, friends and families across scotland will be able to meet again outdoors. from friday, that it's friday this week, the 16th of april, we will all be able to travel anywhere within scotland for the purposes of outdoor socialising, recreation or informal exercise, and we are also able to relax the rules for meeting people outdoors, again from friday this week. at the moment, a maximum of four adults from two households are permitted to meet outdoors, from friday onwards that will change to six adults
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from up to six households. well the next key date to look for after friday is the 26th of april, that's two weeks monday, at that point tourist accommodation will be able to reopen, shops will be able to reopen fully as well pubs, restaurants and cafe s outdoor, a big reopening of the economy and of course cross—border travel between scotland and england and wales as well. international travel however is not yet on the cards. the first minister said that will be decided on a four nations basis as it remains a significant risk. she said delaying that now is the price we pay for greater normality at home. there's been political response, labour has welcomed the announcement, saying there are still significant concerns of regional variations in the vaccination programme, the conservatives welcoming the announcement but they said hospitality here in scotland is on its knees and every day that the
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doors stay closed, more jobs are lost. doors stay closed, more “obs are lost. ., ., ., ., ,, doors stay closed, more “obs are lost. ., ., ., ., around a million students in england are expected to find out today when they'll be allowed to resume in—person teaching. it's expected that they may have to wait another month until 17th may to return to campus accommodation and lessons. universities uk has written to the government asking for that date to be brought forward. 0ur education correspondent elaine dunkley reports. the impact of the pandemic on student life has been far—reaching. nearly a million students in england are waiting for guidance from the government on whether they can return to in—person lectures and accommodation. the road map out of lockdown has left some students feeling lost. we lockdown has left some students feeling lost-— lockdown has left some students feelin: lost. ., ., ., , , feeling lost. we are not overly sure what's going _ feeling lost. we are not overly sure what's going on. — feeling lost. we are not overly sure what's going on, it's _ feeling lost. we are not overly sure what's going on, it's about - what's going on, it's about settling, trying to adapt to that, the uncertainty of what is going to happen. that has made us feel a little bit on edge. i don't know. i
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wish we had some certainty, just something — wish we had some certainty, just something to know where we are going _ something to know where we are anoin. ,, , ., something to know where we are aoian. ,, , ., , going. students from practical courses including _ going. students from practical courses including science - going. students from practical courses including science and| courses including science and creative arts were allowed to return to campuses in march. throughout the pandemic, most doing courses such as medicine, dentistry and social work have been able to continue at university. but there is concern that many students have been left in limbo. . ., , ., that many students have been left in limbo. . .,, ., , limbo. the pandemic has had its areatest limbo. the pandemic has had its greatest effect _ limbo. the pandemic has had its greatest effect on _ limbo. the pandemic has had its greatest effect on mental - limbo. the pandemic has had its greatest effect on mental health limbo. the pandemic has had its i greatest effect on mental health in young people. and that population includes students and i genuinely believe it is in the very best interests of our students for them to be back on campus so that we can give them the support they need and they've also got their peer support and i can't stress how important that peer support is. this and i can't stress how important that peer support is.— and i can't stress how important that peer support is. this is what the government _ that peer support is. this is what the government is _ that peer support is. this is what the government is keen - that peer support is. this is what the government is keen to - that peer support is. this is what| the government is keen to avoid. that peer support is. this is what i the government is keen to avoid. a repeat of the spike in cases that followed the mass migration of students last september. universities are keen to reassure that they are covid safe. brute
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universities are keen to reassure that they are covid safe. we have our own testing _ that they are covid safe. we have our own testing centre, _ that they are covid safe. we have our own testing centre, where - that they are covid safe. we have our own testing centre, where it | our own testing centre, where it students get tested twice a week so we can be sure we are controlling any infection if it were to arise. we have social distancing in the lecture rooms and we have changed our ventilation arrangements in the lecture rooms so they are fully ventilated to the outside. in england, the government promised a review at easter but many students are still none the wiser about when they can't return to university life. elaine dunkley, bbc news. america's health authorities have recommended pausing the use of the johnson and johnson covid vaccine after six cases of severe blood clots in people who've had it. nearly seven million people in the united states have been given the vaccine. the uk has ordered 30 million doses, though it hasn't been approved by regulators yet. the time is 16 minutes past one. our top story this lunchtime. over 45s in england are being asked to book their first covid vaccination. but the prime minister has warned
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people there will be more infections as the economy reopens. and campsites in england see a rush of visitors as people take their first opportunity for a holiday in months. coming up on the bbc news channel, 2,000 fans for both tottenham and manchester city will be allowed to attend the league cup final at wembley as long as they adhere to strict coronavirus protocols and are not under 18. there's been a second night of unrest in minneapolis, where riot police confronted crowds of protesters angered by the shooting dead of a black man. police say one of their officers meant to use a taser on the suspect — but accidentally drew her gun instead. in the same city, the trial of a former police officer accused of murdering another black man, george floyd, continues. peter bowes reports. another tense night. unrest on the streets of minneapolis
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in response to the police killing of another black man. this was already a city on edge. the renewed anger and frustration follows the death of daunte wright, a 20—year—old motorist who was shot by a female officer after he was stopped for a minor offence. he'd attempted to escape and the police tried to arrest him on a previous warrant. this bodycam footage shows what the police chief said was a fatal mistake. taser, taser, taser! it is my belief that the officer had the intention to deploy their taser, but instead shot mr wright with a single bullet. the swift release of the bodycam video appears to have been an attempt by the police to show transparency in the face of immediate criticism. presidentjoe biden said he had watched what he called the graphic footage, and he was waiting for an investigation to determine whether the shooting was an accident. in the meantime, he said
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people should stay calm. there is absolutely no justification — none — for looting, no justification for violence. peaceful protest, understandable, and the fact is that, you know, we do know that the anger, pain and trauma that exists in the black community in that environment is real, it is serious and it is consequential. but it will notjustify violence and/or looting. the minneapolis trial of derek chauvin, the former police officer accused of murdering george floyd, is moving into its final stages. the latest witness, mr floyd's brother, told the jury about his family. that's my mother. she is no longer with us right now. that's my oldest brother, george. i miss both of them. i was married, may 24th i got married.
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and my brother was killed may 25th, and my mom died on may 30th. it is like a bittersweet month, because i was supposed to be happy when that month comes. over the next few days, derek chauvin's lawyers will present the jury with their case. as the trial winds up, extra security — members of the national guard — are being drafted in around the courthouse and across the city as emotions run high. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles. the prime minister has insisted the review he's ordered into the collapsed finance firm that david cameron lobbied for, greensill capital, will be given free reign. but labour says the scope of the investigation is inadequate. it wants a full parliamentary inquiry into what it calls the "rampant cronyism" in government. helen catt reports. how did former prime minister david
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cameron used his contacts in westminster, and did his employer, lex greensill, benefit from his efforts? the government is holding a review of schemes company was involved in, headed by a former lawyer. i involved in, headed by a former la er. ., ~' involved in, headed by a former la er. ., ~ ., , ., lawyer. i would like it to be done auickl lawyer. i would like it to be done quickly but _ lawyer. i would like it to be done quickly but with _ lawyer. i would like it to be done quickly but with the _ lawyer. i would like it to be done quickly but with the maximum i quickly but with the maximum possible access so we cannot understand exactly what has happened, and it will be presented, of course, to parliament in due course. ., ., , ., of course, to parliament in due course. ., ., ., ., course. there were already a lot of auestions course. there were already a lot of questions in _ course. there were already a lot of questions in parliament, _ course. there were already a lot of questions in parliament, for- course. there were already a lot of questions in parliament, for the i questions in parliament, for the health secretary he went for a drink with mr cameron and mr greensill. absolutely i attended a social meeting organised by the prime minister. — meeting organised by the prime minister, and given that the department of business came up, i reported _ department of business came up, i reported to — department of business came up, i reported to officials in the normal way _ reported to officials in the normal wa , ., reported to officials in the normal wa. , reported to officials in the normal way. labour accused the government of a pattern — way. labour accused the government of a pattern of— way. labour accused the government of a pattern of behaviour. _ way. labour accused the government of a pattern of behaviour. it - way. labour accused the government of a pattern of behaviour. it is - of a pattern of behaviour. it is cronyism. _ of a pattern of behaviour. it is cronyism, and _ of a pattern of behaviour. it is cronyism, and it _ of a pattern of behaviour. it is cronyism, and it stinks, - of a pattern of behaviour. it 3 cronyism, and it stinks, so if you think he has done nothing wrong and has nothing to hide, will he publish
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all the minutes, all the e—mails, all the minutes, all the e—mails, all the minutes, all the e—mails, all the correspondence, all the directions he gave to civil servants and all his text messages with david cameron so we can see exactly what went on with the awarding of this contract? ,, , ., , , , contract? questions bourdy is the secretary too- _ contract? questions bourdy is the secretary too. last _ contract? questions bourdy is the secretary too. last year _ contract? questions bourdy is the secretary too. last year greensill| secretary too. last year greensill was chosen to give loans to other businesses as part of a government scheme to help businesses and become the mix. the british business bank, which won it, says he was not lobbied by mr cameron. i never received a _ lobbied by mr cameron. i never received a single _ lobbied by mr cameron. i never received a single focal- lobbied by mr cameron. i never. received a single focal whatsapp from mr cameron.— received a single focal whatsapp from mr cameron. lobbying is a usual art of from mr cameron. lobbying is a usual part of politics — from mr cameron. lobbying is a usual part of politics and _ from mr cameron. lobbying is a usual part of politics and mr— from mr cameron. lobbying is a usual part of politics and mr cameron - from mr cameron. lobbying is a usual part of politics and mr cameron said l part of politics and mr cameron said he did not break any rules, although he did not break any rules, although he says there are lessons to be learned. laboursays he says there are lessons to be learned. labour says the review is not enough and tomorrow it will for safe routes to try to get mps to run their own investigations —— and tomorrow it will force a vote. church leaders have written an open
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letter to politicians, calling for a unified response to the recent violence in northern ireland. the letter — addressed to stormont ministers, the british and irish governments, and the eu — says there needs to be a renewed commitment to peace and reconciliation. almost 90 police officers have been injured during the rioting in several towns and cities. trade between the uk and the eu partially recovered in february, after a steep drop following brexit. separate data also suggests the economy grew that month. let's speak to our correspondent, dharshini david. it recovered a little in terms of trade between the uk and eu? take turia, we trade between the uk and eu? take turia. we saw _ trade between the uk and eu? take turia, we saw the _ trade between the uk and eu? tag
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but by february in 46 —— there was a 46.6% rise in experts to the eu, which confirms what some companies had already said, they were staying away from the borders because they were concerned about disruption and delays in january and they were concerned about disruption and delays injanuary and they had shipped goods ahead of time to try to avoid that. they are trading once again and other firms are getting to grips with the new changes, but the level of exports is still below where it was for much of 2020. the pandemic is dampening demand among a lot of our competitors out there, but there is also the case that many exporters, particularly in areas like fresh food, are still struggling with the volume of new formalities they had to go through. they are urging help from the government, they say profits and jobs could suffer. and the economy grew
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slightly in february? yes, we know the drill, we have a lockdown and much of the activity in the economy is paused, so in february things were paused, up by 0.4% for output, but the better news is that economists are saying that as we reopen, now it's a chance for us to see the recovery take off, but how much buy depends on how much we spendin how much buy depends on how much we spend in the shops.— spend in the shops. consumers are the ke to spend in the shops. consumers are the key to this. _ spend in the shops. consumers are the key to this. thank— spend in the shops. consumers are the key to this. thank you, - the key to this. thank you, dharshini david. the world's richest people will have to radically change their lifestyles if climate change is to be tackled, according to new research. the cambridge sustainability commission said the wealthiest 5% were responsible for more than a third of the growth in emissions between 1990 and 2015. it says people will need to fly less, insulate their property and ditch polluting cars. here's roger harrabin. take off for the sunshine. pollution from flying is growing, but it is routine for many of us in rich nations.
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the more you fly, the more you pollute, so the commission says frequent flyers should pay more tax. the government says collecting flight data might breach privacy, but the reports's authors say the rich must change. that class of individuals, the 1% all the 5% you just referred to, that lead to the most carbon intensive lifestyles, whose behaviour needs to be targeted by a range of different policies and measures. what we're arguing is for a shrink and share reports, we need to shrink the carbon budget to bring it in line with paris targets which all governments have signed up to, but within that, share that responsibility fairly. the gulf in emissions between rich and poor is vast. the wealthy 1% of people in its twice as much climate heating gases as the poorest half of the world's population put together. this clearly must change, the report says. change is coming.
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take britain's offshore wind farms, they produce clean energy. technology will help cure the climate problem. government policy should not focus on penalising people and their political— on penalising people and their political lifestyles that should be encouraging people to take up clean technologies. we have a good array of clean _ technologies. we have a good array of clean technologies, from the electric— of clean technologies, from the electric car to the heat pump, we should _ electric car to the heat pump, we should be — electric car to the heat pump, we should be making those as attractive as possible. but technology hasn't stopped emissions rising. that is partly because people are driving ever bigger cars. there is much support for taxing or banning large suvs like these. the report says the rich must lead the way in cutting emissions. rich versus poor, it'll be a theme this year. president biden's convening a climate summit next week and the uk's hosting
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another in november. they won't be allowed to forget, it is mostly the wealthy who have overheated the planet. roger harrabin, bbc news, london. the loosening of restrictions in england has meant a rush to the pub and the great outdoors. campsites and holiday parks across the country have seen their first visitors of the year. danjohnson has been to meet them. it's been a busy start to this late season and in shropshire, people got the chance to spend their first night away as restrictions eased. they've been making the most of it. i've been really looking forward to it, i've been stuck in my house now for 12 months, working, it's been nice to get a nice break away. it was very warm in there but it was nice to wake up to a bit of frost this morning, it's a good excuse to jump in the hot tub later. so good to be away, especially after covid home—schooling and now we've got kayaking and paddle boarding. yes, it's going to be really good. are you looking forward to it? very excited. what's it been like stuck at home? very boring! not fun!
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some are ready to start the day in a really refreshing way! oh, my god! you're not regretting it, are you? no, not at all! but a wet suit would be nice! for the owners, it's been an unprecedented time. the toughest year. so they hope this is the start of a summer of recovery. i think the tourism industry, all industries have had a really tough time but obviously when your business is closed like it has been, or turnover is down 30 or 40%, we need to reopen and we're full this weekend. you know, we've got to make sure we don't break down, some of the hot tubs are late being delivered but it's great to see the people back. caravans have returned to the peak district but what was that they used to say in the scouts? be prepared. the toilet blocks are closed until the 17th of may due to government guidelines so i think from then, we will have a lot more bookings. but people are still happy to come,
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using their own facilities. from now. we've even got a tent arrived today for four nights! splashdown at southport pleasure land, after a year when rides were mostly off limits, restricting family fun and putting places like this under threat. it's nice to be open again, a lovely sunny day. we couldn't hope for more. it's really nice to be back in work, making all the kids and all the families happy. it doesn't matter what marketing we do or what offers we make, the sun is the best thing in the world for us. ain't that the truth? fingers crossed, it keeps shining and covid stays under control. danjohnson, bbc news, shropshire. no toilets, but at least the sun is shining. what will it be like for the rest of the week? here's ben rich. the days are not too bad for getting

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