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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  April 12, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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a big step back to normality in many parts of the uk, with the easing of some key restrictions. cheers, chaps. cheers! in england, pubs have welcomed back customers for outdoor service. some opened on the stroke of midnight. there've been long queues outside many nonessential shops that have finally reopened their doors. while those desperate for a hair cut can get one at last. among them — our correspondent. how much of a mess have i made? just a tad — just a tad, dan, yeah! is it recoverable? restrictions are being eased as well in wales, where nonessential shops and beauty salons can all re—open. we'll have the latest on an important day on the route out of lockdown. also this lunchtime: the government's expected to order an investigation into david cameron's
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controversial lobbying for the finance company greensill. the flag flies at half mast over parliament as mps and peers return to pay tribute to the duke of edinburgh. and we talk to the woman who made history — the first female winner of the grand national. i think it will take some time to sink in, but i got a better night's sleep last night! and coming up on the bbc news channel, tottenham say they will conduct a review after another of their players, son heung—min, suffers racist abuse online. good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. it's a big step back to normality
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for much of the uk today, with the high street reopening in england and wales and some restrictions also relaxed in scotland and northern ireland. so, from today, nonessential shops are open again in england, along with pubs and restaurants, which can now serve customers outside. hairdressers, gyms, and swimming pools are also back in business. in wales, shops and some high—street services are open, and the ban on travelling to and from england has ended. northern ireland's "stay at home" order is lifted, replaced by guidance to "stay local". in scotland, pupils in six council areas have returned to school full—time. well, as many restrictions are eased, the prime minister is warning people to behave responsibly. nina warhurst has our first report. finally, it is time. for the high
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street today, it really is a new dawn. . �* , , ., , dawn. excited, i didn't sleep last niaht, m dawn. excited, i didn't sleep last night. my son — dawn. excited, i didn't sleep last night, my son said, _ dawn. excited, i didn't sleep last night, my son said, you - dawn. excited, i didn't sleep last night, my son said, you i - dawn. excited, i didn't sleep last night, my son said, you ijust - night, my son said, you ijust thought it was a radio interview, but i can't wait to get back in here, we have maintained contact with our customers. it is a small city with the heart of a lion, i can't wait, i am beyond excitement, i probably won't sleep for the next two weeks. imilli i probably won't sleep for the next two week-— i probably won't sleep for the next twoweeks.~ .,., ,, two weeks. will your customers be able to get — two weeks. will your customers be able to get a _ two weeks. will your customers be able to get a word _ two weeks. will your customers be able to get a word in _ two weeks. will your customers be able to get a word in edgeways? i l able to get a word in edgeways? i doubt it, but they know that! and i doubt it, but they know that! and now is the perfect time to bag a bargain. show us what you got, then! just a pair of trousers. fire bargain. show us what you got, then! just a pair of trousers.— just a pair of trousers. are you worried about _ just a pair of trousers. are you worried about safety _ just a pair of trousers. are you worried about safety out - just a pair of trousers. are you worried about safety out and l just a pair of trousers. are you - worried about safety out and about today? worried about safety out and about toda ? ~ ., worried about safety out and about toda ? ~ . ., , , today? well, i have had my first 'ab, i today? well, i have had my first jab. i have _ today? well, i have had my first jab. i have got _ today? well, i have had my first jab, i have got the _ today? well, i have had my first jab, i have got the mask - today? well, i have had my first jab, i have got the mask for - today? well, i have had my first. jab, i have got the mask for when today? well, i have had my first i jab, i have got the mask for when i go in places, we try to keep away from people. go in places, we try to keep away from maple-— from people. from today, all nonessential _ from people. from today, all nonessential retailers - from people. from today, all nonessential retailers can - from people. from today, all-
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nonessential retailers can reopen in england and wales. in scotland, shoppers will have to wait until later this month, and in northern ireland it is click and collect only with some outdoor retailers opening back up. the good news for businesses is that more than half of consumers do feel safe to return. if you are heading out shopping today, you are heading out shopping today, you can expect things to look pretty different. debenhams is one of so many household names closing down for good. in all, it is estimated up to 180,000 jobs were lost in retail 2020. but where some doors have closed over lockdown, others have opened. matthew did specialise in bespoke partyware. now he has added her teas and tracksuits to match our new working from home taste. i think it has been so — new working from home taste. i think it has been so positive _ new working from home taste. i think it has been so positive to _ new working from home taste. i think it has been so positive to have - new working from home taste. i think it has been so positive to have that i it has been so positive to have that time for once in my whole career to actually go back and explore something that i haven't really had time to do, streetwear, where i
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originally started from, so to go back to designing out of my bedroom, it is lovely to have the time to develop it. 50 it is lovely to have the time to develop it— it is lovely to have the time to develo it. , ., . ., ., ., develop it. so you have learnt a lot but ou develop it. so you have learnt a lot but you don't _ develop it. so you have learnt a lot but you don't want _ develop it. so you have learnt a lot but you don't want another - develop it. so you have learnt a lot i but you don't want another lockdown. i don't want another lockdown, i missed the so much, being here is like a second home, being bounced back it is perfect.— back it is perfect. today has felt like a long _ back it is perfect. today has felt like a long time _ back it is perfect. today has felt like a long time coming - back it is perfect. today has felt like a long time coming for- back it is perfect. today has felt i like a long time coming for millions of businesses, but after the first burst of spending, the reality of recouping the losses of a pandemic and working out how to survive. nina warhurst, bbc news, chester. our business correspondent ben thompson is in cheltenham. yeah, ben, good afternoon to you. it has been a very difficult year for all sorts of businesses this last year, but here in cheltenham they are really celebrating the reopening of retail, the high street are pretty busy, a fun fair atmosphere as many businesses celebrate getting
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customers back through the doors and cash in their tails. in fact, figures published just this morning giving us a first snapshot of how many people are back on high streets, suggesting the number of people out shopping is up by more than 230%just this people out shopping is up by more than 230% just this morning alone. we should say that is coming from a relatively low base, but it is also worth remembering too that while high street may be busy, many retailers have not survived this pandemic, many high—profile casualties of the crisis, and many businesses now looking at what they do next to keep the tills ringing. diane is from the economic recovery task force here in cheltenham. look, todayis task force here in cheltenham. look, today is a really important day, getting customers back through the doors of shops. bier? getting customers back through the doors of shone— getting customers back through the doors of shops. very much a defining moment, doors of shops. very much a defining moment. not — doors of shops. very much a defining moment, notjust _ doors of shops. very much a defining moment, not just for _ doors of shops. very much a defining moment, notjust for the _ doors of shops. very much a defining moment, not just for the shops - doors of shops. very much a defining moment, not just for the shops but l moment, notjust for the shops but cheltenham and the communities, desperate for some socially distanced interaction, i do believe. a lot of work has gone into getting
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shops safe and getting people back, but we know customer habits have changed, we bought a lot more in lockdown online, so how do you make sure people keep coming back? retail most certainly — sure people keep coming back? retail most certainly isn't _ sure people keep coming back? retail most certainly isn't dead, _ sure people keep coming back? yum. i most certainly isn't dead, the pandemic provoked an evolution to enable us to evolve even faster. we have seen some great businesses, small ones in the main, pivot and change and become a hybrid of their digital and physical space, which is very encouraging, to say about working alongside each other. by, lot working alongside each other. a lot of work to do, really _ working alongside each other. a lot of work to do, really good to talk to, thanks very much. here in cheltenham, the busyness suggests people are willing to get out with pent—up demand, a lot of money, cinemas, bars, restaurants and shopping, many retailers say the queues outside the doors are very welcome. ben, thank you very much indeed, ben thompson. hairdressers in england have reopened with huge pentup demand,
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and regular customers can finally get a haircut after months without one. some salons are already booked out for weeks to come. throughout the lockdown, our reporter danjohnson has been trying to cut his own hair. this morning, he rushed to a hairdresser for a more professional touch. i'd had a little go at trying to keep the sides neat myself with the clippers, which i think ijust about got away with. but tom's certainly got some work to do to try to rescue that this morning. and it's a busy morning, tom, you've got lots of people wanting to see you, right? yeah, yeah, i got a fully booked day after this, after sorting out, correcting your home job haircut. yeah, we'll probably be doing a lot of cuts like this where we'll be correcting it and also taking quite a lot of hair off, i imagine, throughout the day. and how much of a mess have i made? just a tad — just a tad, dan! is it recoverable? it is, yeah. i feel like we've done a good job already, so. is it actually harder if people have been cutting their own hair? d'you know what, i quite like the challenge, you know. it gives it a bit
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more of a fun aspect. yeah. you've got thousands of people who have booked appointments, right, you're even opening a new salon to try to meet demand? we are opening one in greenwich, the first day today, we've got like 6000 people on the waiting list, so yeah, should be busy. is it nice for you to get your hands back amongst the hair? it's really nice, yeah, it's only taken me your haircut, dan, to make me feel normal again. ifeel guilty for taking up the space. but hopefully, it's usefuljust to show that the covid secure measures are in place, you've got to wear the visor and the mask, right, as i have? yes. does that make things awkward? you know what, we've done this before after the first lockdown, we did this, it was a bit of a shock, but we did it all through the summer, worked really well, didn't get any outbreaks in the salons. it feels quite normal now. yeah _ it can be a little bit tricky. we've already snipped one mask this morning, haven't we?
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it does illustrate the practical problem of trimming around the ears but you're coping very well and i'm gratefulfor the chance. i certainly needed it and i'm pleased to have the opportunity. hopefully the results are smart and not the kind of mess that i had left it in. danjohnson dan johnson getting his danjohnson getting his hair cut there. with snow falling in many areas of the country, it may be a little chilly in the pub gardens that are now open again for outside hospitality in england. 0nly around 40% of licensed premises actually have the outdoor space to serve customers. my colleague martine croxall is having a lunchtime drink in leicester. martine. its only orange juice, though, martine. its only orangejuice, though, ben, that's all i'm having! we are at the craddock arms in knighton in leicester, one of those pubs that has a beautiful outdoor space, there is a one—way system that runs through some nobody bumped into each other, all the essential information that you need there, hand sanitiser,
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the qr code and a place to put your name and address so you can be tracked if there is a spike in infections. this is the socially distanced garden that the craddock arms was lucky enough to have, and they are going to be very busy today, asjohnny wainwright, the landlord, will tell us. i can take this off now i am in situ. how popular has it been? this off now i am in situ. how --oular has it been? ., ., popular has it been? phenomenal, the -hone popular has it been? phenomenal, the hone has popular has it been? phenomenal, the phone has been _ popular has it been? phenomenal, the phone has been going _ popular has it been? phenomenal, the phone has been going every _ popular has it been? phenomenal, the phone has been going every two - popular has it been? phenomenal, the phone has been going every two or- phone has been going every two or three seconds, we are fully booked within an hour and a half, two hours, which is tremendous. what within an hour and a half, two hours, which is tremendous. what are ou able to hours, which is tremendous. what are you able to offer _ hours, which is tremendous. what are you able to offer people? _ hours, which is tremendous. what are you able to offer people? obviously, i you able to offer people? obviously, it is only outside, _ you able to offer people? obviously, it is only outside, we _ you able to offer people? obviously, it is only outside, we have _ you able to offer people? obviously, it is only outside, we have got - you able to offer people? obviously, it is only outside, we have got the i it is only outside, we have got the full selection of drinks, and we have got a garden menu going as well, which is slightly limited from a normal restaurant menu. it well, which is slightly limited from a normal restaurant menu.- a normal restaurant menu. it has been a really _ a normal restaurant menu. it has been a really hard _ a normal restaurant menu. it has been a really hard year _ a normal restaurant menu. it has been a really hard year for - a normal restaurant menu. it has| been a really hard year for people in leicester, what have they been saying to you about their appetite for getting out to socialise? i think people are really pleased, it is great seeing everybody back
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today, it is fabulous. they have all got nice big smiles on theirfaces, and it is great for the staff as well. ., . , and it is great for the staff as well. ., .,, ,. and it is great for the staff as well. ., ,, ,, well. how has your business coped? you have needed _ well. how has your business coped? you have needed to _ well. how has your business coped? you have needed to rely _ well. how has your business coped? you have needed to rely on - well. how has your business coped? you have needed to rely on some i you have needed to rely on some government help? we you have needed to rely on some government help?— you have needed to rely on some government help? we have, we have. to be honest. — government help? we have, we have. to be honest, the _ government help? we have, we have. to be honest, the furlough _ government help? we have, we have. to be honest, the furlough has - government help? we have, we have. to be honest, the furlough has been l to be honest, the furlough has been fantastic for us, we have managed to retain most of our staff, which is excellent, and we are looking forward to having everybody back. it must be wonderful for you to see the play is thriving again. thank you very much, i hope it is a successful day. 0ver100 very much, i hope it is a successful day. over 100 people very much, i hope it is a successful day. 0ver100 people have booked and already to come to the craddock arms today, they are open until about 11 o'clock tonight, so a good day to be here in the sunshine. enjoy the orangejuice, here in the sunshine. enjoy the orange juice, martine! the reopening of gyms and outdoor pools in england will come as a relief to many. among those finally reopening their doors today, the birmingham university gym, wherejoe wilson has been speaking
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to a young man with cerebral palsy for whom exercise is a necessity. monday morning in birmingham, jeremy sharp is finally back where he belongs — a gym session after the pool. he exercised for 30 years week in, week out — until lockdown. jeremy has cerebral palsy. he need fitness for crucial mobility — to keep the life he wants to live. the activities many people turned to during lockdown simply weren't possible forjeremy — he needs to be here. it is absolutely brilliant. i actually got quite emotional about it first thing this morning, which i didn't expect to do. moving my muscles at the moment is like trying to move a brick wall. so without having crucial facilities like the swimming pool and the gym, it can make things really, really difficult. the charity that campaigns
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for sporting inclusion worries about new psychological barriers after lockdown. over two thirds of disabled people are fearful of returning to places like gyms, and therefore i think it's beholden on all of us to think about how we make a particular effort to facilitate that. swimming is crucial to sporting participation for all ages and all abilities. reopening day in north london — lost time to make up. ayo akinwolere is a tv presenter who set world records for deepwater swimming. he's a passionate advocate. look, i want to see britain swimming, i'm not even going to lie about that! it's something that's key for me. everyone from every different background, different colour, different genders, i want to see us all in the pool. let's face it, we are an island, and if we are an island and we're surrounded by water, we need to be swimming, that's all i'm going to say!
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well, reopening is happening in england at present, and nothing's quite back to old normal yet. individual gym sessions with covid precautions, like social distancing and cleaning, are allowed. but group exercise classes are not yet permitted. the studio is still empty. every step requires caution and thought. today we filmed at birmingham university's overflow gym. jeremy sharp knows he'll be welcomed throughout the facilities here, and when a gym is essential, reopening means everything. joe wilson, bbc news, in birmingham. people in wales can now travel to and from england, and nonessential shops, along with some high—street services such as beauticians, can reopen. here's tomos morgan. as foreign holidays are up in the air, staycation is are in the spotlight and here, yurts are almost fully booked until the end of the year. they could have opened two weeks ago when self—contained
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accommodation was allowed to reopen for holiday—makers from wales. brute for holiday-makers from wales. we usuall for holiday— makers from wales. - usually work at about 80% of our guests, they come from england, the remaining coming from wales. a view foreign guests come over. llp remaining coming from wales. a view foreign guests come over.— foreign guests come over. up and down hiuh foreign guests come over. up and down high streets _ foreign guests come over. up and down high streets across - foreign guests come over. up and down high streets across wales, i down high streets across wales, there is a sigh of relief from both shop owners and shoppers as all nonessential businesses can begin trading again. close contact beauty can also reopen, almost a month after hairdressers took their first snip of 2021. students of all ages can fully return to the classroom from today, after a gradual welcoming back before the easter break. as many businesses reopen today, others will be looking over england with envious eyes as they remain closed. and in places like tintin on the border with england, that sense of frustration is heightened, just a stone �*s throw over the river wye is
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gloucestershire for outdoor hospitality and gymnasiums have reopened but here in wales, they have to wait a few more weeks yet. it's extremely frustrating, friends that i know of that have pubs have been absolutely just that i know of that have pubs have been absolutelyjust bombarded with bookings. peoplejust been absolutelyjust bombarded with bookings. people just wanting to get a beerfrom bookings. people just wanting to get a beer from the tap. bookings. people just wanting to get a beerfrom the tap. i am angry about it, its art businesses that are suffering, but our hands are completely tied. in are suffering, but our hands are completely tied.— are suffering, but our hands are completely tied. in the next rush government _ completely tied. in the next rush government review _ completely tied. in the next rush government review on _ completely tied. in the next rush government review on the - completely tied. in the next rush government review on the 23rd i completely tied. in the next rush j government review on the 23rd of april the 1st minister is due to set out the next phase of easing across wales which will include setting a date for indoor hospitality. today is but another example of how unlocking is moving at different paces across the uk nations. tomos morgan, bbc news. northern ireland's stay at home order has been lifted more than three months after it was imposed. car washes are allowed to reopen, and nonessential shops can resume click—and—collect. ten people from two households can also meet in private gardens, but people have been told to stay local and continue to work from home where they can.
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in scotland, some primary and secondary pupils have returned to full—time lessons in school. pupils will no longer have to follow strict physical distancing rules but will still need to wear face coverings. the majority of scotland's pupils are due to return to school on the 19th of april. downing street is expected to announce an investigation into david cameron's efforts to lobby on behalf of the failed finance company greensill. the former tory prime minister has been criticised for contacting the chancellor by text and meeting the health secretary for a private drink but insists he did not break government rules. jonathan blake reports. he was prime ministerfor six he was prime minister for six years but it's david cameron �*s actions after leaving office that are under scrutiny now. in particular, his
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work for this man, lex greensill, who'd been an unpaid adviser to david cameron �*s government. now working for his company greensill capital, mr cameron has approached ministers on its behalf. those efforts are now expected to be the subject of an independent investigation launched by the government. investigation launched by the government-— investigation launched by the covernment. , . , ., ., government. public office should not become the — government. public office should not become the platform _ government. public office should not become the platform for— government. public office should not become the platform for private - become the platform for private gain. and i don't really think the former ministers and prime ministers should be engaged in lobbying for particular commercial companies when they are lobbying their successors who they know very well and could have privileged access to them. it’s have privileged access to them. it's siml have privileged access to them. it's simply not fair. last week the chancellor rishi sunak published text messages he sent in reply to david cameron after the former prime minister messaged him about access to government backed emergency loans. it also urged to health secretary matt hancock met mr cameron and lex greensill for a private drinker to discuss a new payment system for the nhs. in a
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statement last night, david cameron said there are important lessons to be learned. as a former prime minister i accept that communications with government need to be done through only the most formal of channels so there can be no room for misinterpretation. lobbying as it's called, talking to those in power to try and influence what they do is nothing new around here, it's part of how westminster works. labourand here, it's part of how westminster works. labour and conservative governments have run into trouble in the past over improper access to ministers. but now, once again, the questions of not only what the rules allow but what is appropriate, are up allow but what is appropriate, are up for debate. the allow but what is appropriate, are no for debate-— allow but what is appropriate, are up for debate. the fact is lobbying as art up for debate. the fact is lobbying as part and _ up for debate. the fact is lobbying as part and parcel _ up for debate. the fact is lobbying as part and parcel of _ up for debate. the fact is lobbying as part and parcel of any - up for debate. the fact is lobbying l as part and parcel of any democratic system, constituents, businesses, everybody is lobbying the government for things they want are things they think the government should be but the question is when there are conflicts of interest, how do officials and ministers and government respond and there isn't nearly enough conversation about this, it's got much too casual. labour say serious questions remain,
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and they want david cameron to answerfor his actions and they want david cameron to answer for his actions in parliament. jonathan blake, abc news. the time is 20 minutes past one. our top story this lunchtime: it's a big step back to normality for much of the uk today, with the high street reopening in england and wales, and some restrictions eased in scotland and northern ireland. and — the duke of edinburgh remembered — we speak to tracey edwards — the round the world sailor — about the prince's legacy coming up on the bbc news channel, hideki matsuyama hopes his masters win at augusta will open the floodgates forjapanese golfers after becoming the first major champion from his country in the men's game. parliament is being reconvened early so mps and peers can pay tribute to the duke of edinburgh. condolences have also been offered in holyrood, at stormont and in the senedd. it's been reported that prince harry has arrived in the uk, prior to the funeral
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of his grandfather on saturday. 0ur royal correspondent, daniela relph, is at windsor castle. yes, over the course of this week we will begin to get more details about the funeral service. and of course exactly who will be attending here in st george's chapel on saturday afternoon. we know one of those will be prince harry, the duke of sussex and as you say it is widely reported now that he is back in the uk, and isolating ahead of the funeral of his grandfather on saturday afternoon. there have been a number of sightings of him at heathrow yesterday after flying in from los angeles. and there will obviously be a lot of interest in the return of harry because of that strained relationship in particular with his brother william over the past year. but today is also a day for political tributes and they will be led by the prime minister boris johnson in the house of commons this afternoon. the commons being brought
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back a day early in order to have this afternoon and evening for mps to pay their own personal tributes to pay their own personal tributes to the duke of edinburgh. then they have already begun in the scottish parliament, led by nicola sturgeon who said it was right to honour an extraordinary life and we've been hearing from a number of msps with their own anecdotes and personal stories of meeting the duke of edinburgh. stories of meeting the duke of edinburgh-— prince philip first met the queen — who was then princess elizabeth — at the britannia royal naval college in dartmouth. the duke's years in the navy were immensely important to him and throughout his life he maintained close links with the force. john maguire is at the college in dartmouth and has been speaking to the head of the navy about what prince philip meant to it. five minutes to the colours, sir. this is how the day starts at the britannia royal naval college in dartmouth. but at this morning's colours ceremony the ensign was lowered to half mast. the college is observing a week of mourning in memory of the duke of edinburgh.
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he trained here as a young cadet, served with the navy in the second world war and maintained links to the military throughout his life. to lead is to serve and that is service to the nation, its service to your country, its service to those above you, but it's especially to serve those below you. and to do that you have to have integrity, you have to have enthusiasm, you have to have professional skills, curiosity, but you have to have empathy and wit, and i think he had masses of that. he arrived here in may 1939, destined for a career in the royal navy. but thanks to what may have been a chance meeting, his destiny was to become the royal consort. he looked after the two princesses whilst their parents were doing their official duties and also, avoiding an outbreak of mumps in the college. and so, we know that they played
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with the train set, the captain's children when they were in the house and famously now, played croquet on the lawn out here in front of the captain's house which clearly gave them an opportunity to get to know each other a little better. the passing decades have seen trees grow and some of the landscaping change but it is still possible to find the locations where princess elizabeth and prince philip's meeting was captured for posterity. well, this is the spot from where that photo was taken, looking down into the captain's garden here at dartmouth, seeing princess elizabeth as she was then, and prince philip playing croquet. we don't know of course what was said, what was thought, what was imagined back then, nor could they have imagined that they would be together for a marriage lasting 73 years. the captain here remembers his passing out parade and the guest of honour, prince philip. as he walked down the ranks, speaking to each of us, he made us feel really at ease. asked us some really probing
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questions about our journey ahead in our careers. but under that question, was of course, he'd been there, he'd done it. the current crop of cadets will graduate on thursday, a more sombre parade than usual, as the royal navy's newest officers prepare to follow in the bootsteps of their distinguished predecessor and to honour his passing. john maguire, bbc news, dartmouth. tracy edwards skippered the first all—female crew in the whitbread round the world yacht race, becoming the first woman to receive the yachtsman of the year trophy and was awarded an mbe. she met the duke of edinburgh several times. shejoins me now. really lovely to have you with this, he was really passionate, wasn't he, about sailing? passionate, wasn't he, about sailin: ? ., , passionate, wasn't he, about sailin: ? .,, ~ ., sailing? he was. although i never sailed with _ sailing? he was. although i never sailed with him, _ sailing? he was. although i never sailed with him, many _ sailing? he was. although i never sailed with him, many of- sailing? he was. although i never sailed with him, many of my - sailing? he was. although i never. sailed with him, many of my friends did and he was hugely respected, as a skipper, crew, yachtsmen, notjust respected by his crew, but by the
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people he competed against, you know. he was true sportsman and a real gentle man of our sport. $5 i real gentle man of our sport. as i mentioned. _ real gentle man of our sport. as i mentioned, you _ real gentle man of our sport. as i mentioned, you met— real gentle man of our sport. as i mentioned, you met him, what was he like? i mentioned, you met him, what was he like? ., , mentioned, you met him, what was he like? ., ., , ., , like? i was actually quite nervous about meeting — like? i was actually quite nervous about meeting him. _ like? i was actually quite nervous about meeting him. meeting - like? i was actually quite nervous about meeting him. meeting a i like? i was actually quite nervous i about meeting him. meeting a fellow sailor. i'd already met all of the senior royals on more than one occasion, he was the last that i met and of course, i needn't have been worried. he had this extraordinary ability to put you at ease. and it was at an exhibition, actually, of explorers and adventurers and there was a picture of him and her majesty the queen, on the yacht, outside cows on the isle of wight and i said i saw the picture of you on the yacht and i soon as i said there were yacht, he was off, telling some quite irreverent and funny stories which had me in stitches. and i think one of the most appealing things about speaking to him was that he would love it his own jokes! you know. he was an extraordinary
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man in so many ways and i think his passion on the water for sailing extended to men and women, he was very inclusive, so ahead of his time. and that passion as well for the duke of edinburgh award, getting young people out on the water, on mountains, inwards, you know, learning, experiencing, achieving, he had this incredible passion. so lovely to talk to you, thank you for your time. tracey edwards. and there will be a special edition of politics live on the tributes to the duke of edinburgh in the house of commons — that's on bbc two from 2pm today. the irish jockey rachael blackmore made history on saturday by becoming the first woman to win the grand national. her victory follows success at the cheltenham festival last month, and many now regard her as the best national hunt jockey in british and irish racing. 0ur correspondent, laura scott, spoke to herfrom ireland, where she is in quarantine.
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rachael blackmore is still five lengths — rachael blackmore is still five lengths clear. it�*s rachael blackmore is still five lengths clear.— rachael blackmore is still five lengths clear. it's been two days since a historic— lengths clear. it's been two days since a historic victory _ lengths clear. it's been two days since a historic victory in - lengths clear. it's been two days since a historic victory in the i since a historic victory in the grand national but rachael blackmore still cannot believe it happened, despite re—watching the replays. celebrations are on hold, though that hasn't stopped some stars getting in touch. it that hasn't stopped some stars getting in touch.— that hasn't stopped some stars getting in touch. it will take some time to properly _ getting in touch. it will take some time to properly sink— getting in touch. it will take some time to properly sink in _ getting in touch. it will take some time to properly sink in but - getting in touch. it will take some | time to properly sink in but there's been a lot of messages stop you know, it's been unbelievable. people i haven't spoken to for years, from school. people like ringo starr, tweeting about it, it's, it goes from one end of the spectrum to the other. �* . . ~ ., .,, a" from one end of the spectrum to the other. �* ., «g , other. blackmore has quickly become the new face — other. blackmore has quickly become the new face of _ other. blackmore has quickly become the new face of racing, _ other. blackmore has quickly become the new face of racing, leading - the new face of racing, leading jockey at the cheltenham festival last month before winning the world �*s most famous race, not so long ago there were people who didn't think women should ride on the grand national, let alone win it. is there a sense of satisfaction that you kind of defied the doubters, that it
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was possible for a woman to win the race? , ., ., ~ ., ._ ., race? there is no taking away from the fact, you _ race? there is no taking away from the fact, you know, _ race? there is no taking away from the fact, you know, those - race? there is no taking away from the fact, you know, those times i race? there is no taking away from i the fact, you know, those times when that long ago but you know, for me, personally, it's never been an experience i have had in racing in recent times and i think that something racing should be very proud of. something racing should be very roud of. , , something racing should be very roudof. , , i, proud of. even the best 'ockeys lose much more — proud of. even the best 'ockeys lose much more often i proud of. even the best 'ockeys lose much more often than i proud of. even the best jockeys lose much more often than they - proud of. even the best jockeys lose much more often than they win, i proud of. even the best jockeys lose much more often than they win, the j much more often than they win, the feeling she got crossing the grand national finishing feeling she got crossing the grand nationalfinishing post feeling she got crossing the grand national finishing post on minella times made all the sacrifices falls and disappointment worthwhile. after this remarkable season, it is your next ambition the gold cup or becoming championjockey? flit next ambition the gold cup or becoming champion jockey? becoming champion 'ockey? of course, i would love to — becoming champion 'ockey? of course, i would love to win i becoming champion jockey? of course, i would love to win the _ becoming champion jockey? of course, i would love to win the gold _ becoming champion jockey? of course, i would love to win the gold cup, i i i would love to win the gold cup, i would love to do all of those things. but i never did set myself massive targets. and yes, i'm not going to start now. i think you just take every day as it comes. she mi . ht take every day as it comes. she might shy _ take every day as it comes. she might shy away _ take every day as it comes. she might shy away from making gold on the track, but one thing she wants is for the female jockey tank to be consigned to history. her breakthrough achievements should help that. laura scott, bbc news. time for a look at
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the weather. here is matt

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