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tv   BBC World News  BBC News  April 12, 2021 5:00am-5:31am BST

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this is bbc news. i'm sally bundock. the prime minister will lead tributes to prince philip in the commons as parliament's recalled a day earlier after the easter break. a major easing of england's lockdown: pubs, gyms, hairdressers and shops can all open for the first time this year. eerie scenes on st vincent as volcanic ash blankets the caribbean island with warnings of more eruptions to come. it shines a light on the ignored in america but nomadland is not overlooked at the bafta awards, the big winner at britain's top film awards.
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the prime minister boris johnson will lead tributes later to prince philip, as parliament is recalled a day earlier than planned after the easter break. well—wishes continue to pour in from around the world, with all of the duke of edinburgh's children speaking about their father over the weekend. with more, here's our royal correspondent daniela relph. it will be a week of reflection here in windsor as the town prepares for the duke of edinburgh's funeral. over the weekend, his children attended church in windsor great park and spoke personally of the grief and loss. it’s and spoke personally of the grief and loss.— and spoke personally of the grief and loss. it's very, very sad but i _ grief and loss. it's very, very sad but i have _ grief and loss. it's very, very sad but i have to _ grief and loss. it's very, very sad but i have to say - grief and loss. it's very, very sad but i have to say that. grief and loss. it's very, very | sad but i have to say that the extraordinary tributes and the memories that everyone has had and been willing to share has been so fantastic and it just
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goes to show he might�*ve been our father, goes to show he might�*ve been ourfather, grandfather, father but he meant so much so many other people. it but he meant so much so many other maple-— but he meant so much so many other people-— other people. it -- it is lovely _ other people. it -- it is lovely for _ other people. it -- it is lovely for so _ other people. it -- it is lovely for so many - other people. it -- it is| lovely for so many other other people. it -- it is - lovely for so many other people to learn — lovely for so many other people to learn what he did because i think— to learn what he did because i think quite a lot of things that— that have come out will have surprised some people. the countess — surprised some people. the countess also _ surprised some people. iie: countess also spoke surprised some people. i“ie: countess also spoke to surprised some people. i“i2 countess also spoke to a surprised some people. ii2 countess also spoke to a state renew the duke. she told them her death —— his death had been very peaceful and said it was as if someone had taken him by the hand and off he went. princess and paid her own tribute, releasing this photo of her and herfather at tribute, releasing this photo of her and her father at the london olympics in 2012. of his death, she said: the family focus is now on protecting and supporting the queen as she mourns. her son
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prince andrew said after 73 years of marriage, she felt there was now a huge void in her life. daniela relph, bbc news, windsor. let's get some of the day's other news. germany has drafted legislation that would shift the power to impose covid—19 restrictions to the federal government from regional leaders to combat a surge in infections. another 13,000 infections were confirmed on sunday, ringing the total number past 3 million since the pandemic began. it could be implemented as soon as friday of this week. elections in peru have been dominated by the pandemic. none of the 16 candidates will win on first round votes, so the two leading candidates will now face a run—off when results are announced. voting is mandatory in the country and it's expected that as many as 15% of the electorate failed to fill in their voting slips in protest at the government's handling of the pandemic. the former prime minister david cameron says he has
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"important lessons" to learn over his lobbying work on behalf of a financial firm. it follows weeks of criticism that he contacted ministers about greensill capital. he insists he did not break any rules, but accepts he should have gone through "only the most formal of channels". england takes its next step in easing lockdown restrictions today. all non—essential shops, gyms, and close—contact services like hairdressers can reopen. pubs and restaurants can also welcome customers back, but only in outdoor settings. rules have also been relaxed in other parts of the uk, as aruna iyengar reports. opening its doors at midnight, regulars at this huddersfield pub have been waiting for this moment for months.- pub have been waiting for this - moment for months.- what moment for months. cheers! what used to be — moment for months. cheers! what used to be taken _ moment for months. cheers! what used to be taken for— moment for months. cheers! what used to be taken for granted - moment for months. cheers! what used to be taken for granted is - used to be taken for granted is now a luxury to be savoured. drinking could only take place
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outdoors, so was the chilly weather a put off? it outdoors, so was the chilly weather a put off?- weather a put off? it was snowing _ weather a put off? it was snowing earlier - weather a put off? it was snowing earlier but - weather a put off? it was snowing earlier but i - weather a put off? it was snowing earlier but i wasj weather a put off? it was - snowing earlier but i was still going to come out.— going to come out. after 14 months of _ going to come out. after 14 months of not _ going to come out. after 14 months of not going - going to come out. after 14 - months of not going anywhere, except— months of not going anywhere, except for inaudible, it is a great — except for inaudible, it is a great plus. except for inaudible, it is a great plus-— except for inaudible, it is a treat lus. ~ ., ~ ., great plus. we did not know if an one great plus. we did not know if anyone was — great plus. we did not know if anyone was going _ great plus. we did not know if anyone was going to - great plus. we did not know if anyone was going to come, i great plus. we did not know if anyone was going to come, it| great plus. we did not know if i anyone was going to come, it is in huddersfield, _ anyone was going to come, it is in huddersfield, it _ anyone was going to come, it is in huddersfield, it is _ in huddersfield, it is midnight, _ in huddersfield, it is midnight, it- in huddersfield, it is midnight, it is- in huddersfield, it is . midnight, it is freezing in huddersfield, it is - midnight, it is freezing cold and — midnight, it is freezing cold and look. _ midnight, it is freezing cold and look, everyone - midnight, it is freezing cold i and look, everyone has come. every— and look, everyone has come. every single _ and look, everyone has come. every single table _ and look, everyone has come. . every single table has someone. thousands of businesses are reopening over the next phase of covid—19 restrictions easing. in england shops can open, pubs can serve customers outdoors, hairdressers, salons and gyms and outdoor attractions like zoos and theme parks cannot be visited. in wealth, non—essential shop can reopen today but it will be a few more weeks until pubs can do the same. travel restrictions across the border have been eased and most children are back in school. and in scotland, most children will return to school unless they are shielding. some are still closed for easter holidays. in northern ireland
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all children are back in school. the stay at home as it is being relaxed and up to ten people from two households can meet in a private garden. in a statement, prime minister boris johnson struck a cautious tone. he said: but there is no stopping the enthusiasm of pub landlords as they prepare to pull points. this pub in bexleyheath applied for a temporary license to open at midnight. i for a temporary license to open at midnight-— for a temporary license to open at midnight. i think we've come throu~h at midnight. i think we've come through the _ at midnight. i think we've come through the woods _ at midnight. i think we've come through the woods so _ at midnight. i think we've come through the woods so i'm - at midnight. i think we've comel through the woods so i'm hoping that this is sort of a rebirth almost and that we are open now for the foreseeable. the almost and that we are open now for the foreseeable.— for the foreseeable. the next bi date for the foreseeable. the next big date for— for the foreseeable. the next big date for hospitality - for the foreseeable. the next big date for hospitality will i big date for hospitality will be may 17, when hopefully customers will be able to enjoy a meal and a drink indoors. aruna iyengar, bbc news. later in the business coverage i will be speaking to the british retail consortium to get a sense from them how
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prepare the high street is for today and the weeks ahead. local officials have sacked one of the policemen being sued by a black us army lieutenant after two officers pointed their guns and pepper—sprayed him during a traffic stop. lieutenant caron nazario alleges violations to his constitutional rights, including assault, illegal search and detention. in a statement, the town of windsor in virginia says it dismissed officerjoe gutierrez after an internal investigation. the bbc�*s tim allman reports. yells: get out of the car, now! yells: open the door, get out of the car! i guns drawn and tensions high, two police officers approach a parked car at a petrol station in the us state of virginia. you received an order! obey it! they flagged the vehicle down, they say, for failing to display license plates. this deemed a high—risk stop. get out of the car! get out, now! in the driver's seat, wearing his uniform, is army second lieutenant
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caron nazario. now! what's going on? get out of the car, now! officers joe gutierrez and daniel crocker repeatedly called for him to get out of the vehicle. lieutenant nazario repeatedly asks why he's been stopped... i didn't do anything. back up. ..then one of the officers starts using pepper spray. hold on. the soldier, who is black and latino, said he was frightened to unbuckle his seatbelt, feeling in a confrontation with police he had to keep both hands on display. take your seatbelt off and get out of the car! eventually, he got out of his car, was forced to the ground, and handcuffed. put your hands behind your back. repeats: put your hands behind your back. i in the end, he would be released without charge, but lieutenant nazario is no longer happy to let things lie. if we hold enough of these officers accountable for these actions, eventually, we won't have another incident like this. and i think that's what one
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of client's major aims are with this litigation — to try and stop this kind of behaviour. open the door! get out of the car! a sentiment perhaps shared by the town of windsor. in a statement, local officials announced thatjoe gutierrez had been sacked and other officers will now get additional training. they added they were saddened that an incident like this had cast their community in a negative light. tim allman, bbc news. tropical cyclone seroja has ripped across a 1,000 kilometre stretch of western australia, leaving a trail of damage and almost wiping out one holiday town. courtney bembridge has the story. this is the moment the storm made landfall in western australia's mid west region. it brought heavy rain and wind gusts of up to 170 kilometres an hour, winds so strong they ripped the roofs of houses,
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right down power lines and left a path of the brief. some residents said they had to hide in cupboards after their walls were blown in. thousands of homes are still without power. and this is what the town of kalbarri looks like today. just extraordinary. i kalbarri looks like today. just extraordinary. 7096 i kalbarri looks like today. just extraordinary. 7096 of i kalbarri looks like today. just extraordinary. 7096 of the i kalbarri looks like today. just i extraordinary. 7096 of the town has been damaged. it i extraordinary. 7096 of the town has been damaged. it is i extraordinary. 7096 of the town has been damaged. it is rare . has been damaged. it is rare for tropical cyclones to hit as far south in western australia and the houses here are not made to withstand cyclonic conditions. emergency services say they have been inundated with calls for help that there are no reported deaths or injuries. the storm was downgraded as it started to move inland.— downgraded as it started to move inland. , �*, move inland. the people's roofs u . move inland. the people's roofs u- and move inland. the people's roofs up and down — move inland. the people's roofs up and down the i move inland. the people's roofs up and down the street... it i move inland. the people's roofs up and down the street... it is l up and down the street... it is the same _ up and down the street... it is the same with i up and down the street... it is the same with a i up and down the street... it is the same with a system i up and down the street... it is the same with a system that wreaked havoc in east timor and indonesia last week, killing more than 200 people and causing severe flooding and landslides. courtney bembridge, bbc news.
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stay with us on bbc news. still to come: he hideki matsuyama claims a 1—shot victory at augusta to claim the first couple to be the first japanese man to claim a top golf title. pol pot, one of the century's greatest mass murderers, has reported to have died of natural causes. he and the khmer rouge movement he led were responsible for the deaths of an estimated 1.7 million cambodians. there have been violent protests in indonesia, where playboy has gone on sale for the first time. traditionalist muslim leaders have expressed disgust. the magazine's offices have been attacked and its editorial staff have gone into hiding. it was clear that paula's only contest was with the clock. and as for her sporting legacy, paula radcliffe's competitors will be chasing her new world best time for years to come.
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shouting. quite quietly but quicker and quicker, she seemed tojust slide away under the surface and disappear. this is bbc news. the latest headlines: the british prime minister will lead tributes to prince philip in the commons as parliament's recalled a day earlier after the easter break. let's return to our top story, because the people of malta have been mourning the death of the duke of edinburgh. it was the duke's home for two years when he and his then princess wife were posted there as a young naval officer in 1949. it marked the start of a special bond with the country. 70 years on, prince philip remains deep in the affections of many maltese, as our europe correspondent nick beake has
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been discovering. young royals fell in love with the majesty of malta 70 years ago. and the feeling was mutual. today, this once british island is remembering the prince. british island is remembering the prince-— the prince. the father of a future monarch i the prince. the father of a future monarch sets i the prince. the father of a future monarch sets to i the prince. the father of a i future monarch sets to take over his new command. posted here in 1949, this was to be prince philip's last of military service. before his duty became service to his wife. ., ., ., home wife. together again... home for two years _ wife. together again... home for two years was i wife. together again... home for two years was the i wife. together again... home | for two years was the splendid villa guardamangia, some of the happiest moments of their lives, the queen later recalled. after 40 years of neglect, the maltese government has bought and is now restoring the property. a tribute to the british crown but also to the prince and his personality.
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multis are very warm people, they are not formal, they are very informal —— maltese. busily the monarchy has to be formal so sometimes when the duke would make lapses in his comments and perhaps go a bit too far and receive certain criticism, the maltese would like this because they would say even the duke is human. haste say even the duke is human. we have a photograph over here and you can — have a photograph over here and you can see the duke of edinburgh and you can see the queen, — edinburgh and you can see the queen, as _ edinburgh and you can see the queen, as princess elizabeth, my father— queen, as princess elizabeth, my father and mother are there ~~ _ my father and mother are there- - -— my father and mother are there... , , ., there... the newlyweds from britain were i there... the newlyweds from britain were embraced i there... the newlyweds from britain were embraced by i there... the newlyweds from j britain were embraced by the maltese mobility, including nicholas�*s father, baron, his job and title amused the duke of nbra. he job and title amused the duke of nbra. ,, job and title amused the duke ofnbra. _ of nbra. he said by the way, what do you _ of nbra. he said by the way, what do you actually i of nbra. he said by the way, what do you actually do i of nbra. he said by the way, what do you actually do when j what do you actually do when you're not being a baron? and i said what did you say? and he said what did you say? and he said well, i don't know what to say, perhaps a little bit like what do you do when you are not being a jerk. the what do you do when you are not being a jerk-— being a 'erk. the guests of honour being a jerk. the guests of honour the i being a jerk. the guests of honour the princess i being a jerk. the guests of honour the princess and i being a jerk. the guests of. honour the princess and the duke — honour the princess and the duke. .,
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honour the princess and the duke. . ,., ., ., honour the princess and the duke. . ., ., ., duke. the dazzling ballroom of 19505 duke. the dazzling ballroom of 1950s multiple i duke. the dazzling ballroom of 1950s multiple a i duke. the dazzling ballroom of 1950s multiple a world i duke. the dazzling ballroom of 1950s multiple a world away i 1950s multiple a world away from ostia postwar britain. this was a couple get to bear the full weight and responsibilities of the ground. it wasn't just on responsibilities of the ground. it wasn'tjust on the dance floor of this grand hotel that prince philip made his mark. he took centre stage when the country gained independence from the uk in 1964 and his regular visits over the decades, both with and without the queen, secured his place in modern maltese history. in the queen, secured his place in modern maltese history.- modern maltese history. in the distance they i modern maltese history. in the distance they can i modern maltese history. in the distance they can see i modern maltese history. in the distance they can see hms i distance they can see hms chequers... distance they can see hms chequers- - -_ chequers... this was his last trip, six years ago. i chequers... this was his last trip, six years ago. an i chequers... this was his last trip, six years ago. an island off fond memories, outbidding a friend a finalfarewell. nick beake, bbc news. the emergency services in the caribbean island of st vincent have described the country as looking like a battle zone after the continuing explosions from la soufriere volcano. streets, houses, forests and fields were covered in white ash, and seismologists warn that further eruptions are probable over the next couple of days. will grant reports.
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darkness has descended over st vincent since la soufriere erupted — darkness and ash. the initial eruption threw a huge plume of smoke and dust kilometres into the air, which obscured the sun. the volcano's activity later knocked out the power to much of the island. a blanket of white—grey volcanic ash now coats everything in sight — homes, buildings, cars and roads. the dust cloud even reached the neighbouring island of barbados, and visibility in some places is extremely limited. st vincent has closed its airspace and travel across the wider caribbean has been affected with many thousands left stranded. i came over here for my mother's funeral. last minute, ourflights were cancelled. we've tried to get through to the embassy, we've had no luck in getting through.
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we've had our pre—travel covid tests. we've been told to travel again, we have to have a new covid test within the 72 hours before we travel to the uk. where we can get these done in this current time, i genuinely don't know. we just don't have a clue. following the first initial explosion, there has been a series of smaller eruptions over the past 48 hours. the question being posed to scientists is how long could this go on for? it's very difficult to say. the eruption in 1979 lasted a few months and the eruption in 1902 lasted ten months, although not continuously, so i expect we'll see quiet periods and then periods where there's perhaps explosions occurring again, which are going to produce more ash which will spread across the island. although la soufriere is the most active volcano in the eastern caribbean, it has only erupted five times over the past 300 years.
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islanders know they are living through a moment of history but the only aim of residents and authorities alike is to come through it with no loss of life. will grant, bbc news. now it's time for the latest sport from the bbc sports centre. hello there, i'm gavin ramjaun — and this is the latest from the bbc sports centre. hideki matsuyama has become the first japanese winner of the major — after a tense final round at augusta in the masters on sunday. the 29—year—old held his nerve, to finish with a 73, 10 under for the tournament. there were some wobbles — five bogey�*s, including on the 18th, saw his overnight lead cut. he finished one shot ahead of american will zalatoris. a momentous day for matsuyama though, claiming this year's coveted green jacket. inter milan are 11 points clear at the top of italy's serie a after a 1—0 win over cagliari. a late goal from former manchester united full—back matteo darmian made it 11 wins in a row. inter need just 16 points from their last eight games
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to win theirfirst league title since 2010. manchester united have cut manchester city's lead at the top of the english premier league to 11 points, after a convincing win over tottenham. edinson cavani inspired united's stunning second half performance. son heung min had given the hosts the lead, but it was a somewhat ill tempered match. after the 3—1victory, the united manager, claiming the forward conned the referee for his part in a disallowed first half goalfor united. i always use the analogy that if that was my son and he gets that from one of his mates and he stays down and he needs ten other mates to help him up three minutes after, he is not going to get food for a few days because that is embarrassing. son is very lucky that his father— son is very lucky that his father is— son is very lucky that his father is a better person than 0le~ — father is a better person than 0le~ i— father is a better person than 0le~ i am _ father is a better person than ole. i am very, very disappointed because like we
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say in — disappointed because like we say in portugal, bread is bread and cheese is cheese stop i told — and cheese is cheese stop i told already ole what i thought about _ told already ole what i thought about his comments, and i have to tell_ about his comments, and i have to tell you — about his comments, and i have to tell you that i'm very, very disappointed that in five, six, seven— disappointed that in five, six, seven questions, you ignore the dimension — seven questions, you ignore the dimension of that comment. south africa host pakistan injohannesburg on monday, in the second twenty20 of their four—match series. pakistan won the first game with a ball to spare, after an unbeaten 74 from wicketkeeper mohammad rizwan. the hosts are weakened with a number of their key players either injured or involved in the indian premier league. and you can get all the latest sports news at our website — that's bbc.com/sport. but from me, gavin ramjaun, and the rest of the sport team, we'll see you next time. thanks to gavin and the team. sonya clark is an artist who uses textiles, human hair, and other unlikely objects to explore race, racism and american history. her work points out the politicization of black hair and calls attention to the roots of racial injustice. her first major career survey,
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"tatter, bristle, and mend," is on display at the national museum of women in the arts in washington dc which has been extended throuthune 27. i work with hair because i think that is is one of the ways we can conjure our ancestors. it is the fibre that we grow but in it is also our dna of that is to say it is a repository of all those who have come before us, so all your great, great grandfathers and grandmothers and everybody beyond is in a strand of hair. unravelling is a piece that i first started in 2015 which was 150th anniversary of the end of the civil war. and the first time i performed the piece was in a gallery in new york. i invited people tojoin me,
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shoulder to shoulder, to just with our hands unravel this contentious assemble. the confederate battle flag. so it takes a fair amount of work to unravel it. and for some people thatis unravel it. and for some people that is incredibly frustrating. theyjust that is incredibly frustrating. they just wanted to that is incredibly frustrating. theyjust wanted to be over, they want to rip it down, shredded up. we all know class but we actually don't understand its structure and how difficult it is to undo it. and that is a little bit like white supremacy in this nation. like, it is all around us and yet the undoing of it is something that takes attention and time and diligence and i would also say solidarity. so of course my work is political but it is not only political. if someone only sees it as political then that flattens something about the work. my
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work also celebrates culture, it calls out injustice, celebrates humanity, it is personal, it is collect live. there are lots of things, hopefully, in the work. there is this great quote by paul robeson but the artist must make a choice whether to fight for freedom of slavery, make a choice whether to fight forfreedom of slavery, and make a choice whether to fight for freedom of slavery, and the point is that i have no choice. as a black woman in america, my life depends on this nation reckoning with its injustices. but more than that, it is not just personal. if the united states of america doesn't fulfil its promise of a multiracial democracy, it will undo itself. the film nomadland was the big winner at the bafta awards, which were held without an audience due
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to covid restrictions. that meant the winners accepted the awards via zoom, well the winners that decided to turn up, as our entertainment correspondent colin paterson explains. ina yearwhen in a year when one had to go home, the best film at the baftas was one all about isolation. baftas was one all about isolation-— baftas was one all about i isolation._ everyone isolation. nomadland. everyone which is not _ isolation. nomadland. everyone which is not out i isolation. nomadland. everyone which is not out until— isolation. nomadland. everyone which is not out until the i isolation. nomadland. everyone which is not out until the end i which is not out until the end of the month is about a woman who has lost everything and travels the united states on her own in a van. it one of four afters, her own in a van. it one of fourafters, infinite her own in a van. it one of four afters, infinite —— including frances mcdormand best actress. i including frances mcdormand best actress.— including frances mcdormand best actress._ but | best actress. i like work. but sadl , best actress. i like work. but sadly. in _ best actress. i like work. but sadly. in a — best actress. i like work. but sadly, in a year— best actress. i like work. but sadly, in a year that i best actress. i like work. but sadly, in a year that you i sadly, in a year that you didn't even have to turn up to turn up, she still managed not to turn up. we turn up, she still managed not to turn urn-— to turn up. we have 'ust received i to turn up. we have 'ust received this i to turn up. we havejust received this message i to turn up. we have just| received this message by to turn up. we have just i received this message by a carrier pigeon from francis who is somewhere in the wilds of north america.— is somewhere in the wilds of north america. and neither did the winner— north america. and neither did the winner of i north america. and neither did the winner of best i north america. and neither did the winner of best actor. i north america. and neither did the winner of best actor. sir i the winner of best actor. sir anthony _ the winner of best actor. ’i “' anthony hospital ——
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the winner of best actor. 5 “' anthony hospital —— hopkins for the father. at the age of 83, sir anthony hopkins is now the oldest best actor whenever. ihe oldest best actor whenever. he did not come into —— arrive via zoom. she is —— he is on holiday in wales. i zoom. she is -- he is on holiday in wales.- zoom. she is -- he is on holiday in wales. i am covered in pete, holiday in wales. i am covered in pete. you — holiday in wales. i am covered in pete, you can i holiday in wales. i am covered in pete, you can see i holiday in wales. i am covered in pete, you can see my i holiday in wales. i am covered | in pete, you can see my hands. i thought somebody were watching a football match. irlext watching a football match. next u - , the watching a football match. next up. the oscars _ watching a football match. next up, the oscars and i watching a football match. next up, the oscars and nomadland is now the clear favourite. but a word of warning, the last six films who have one at the baftas have failed to repeat at the oscars. i wonder if ransom met francis mcdonald will bother to show up. i will be talking to the british retail consortium about shops reopening. with lockdown
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restrictions being eased in england. to what extent is the high street ready and how is it coping? that and a moment. hello there. generally speaking, it looks like monday should be a drier day, and temperatures may be a little higher than they were over the weekend. it certainly was a cold weekend, and we had widespread wintry showers developing, even had some snow here for a while in greater london. a lot of those wintry showers are fading away, but we still have cold air across the uk. high pressure towards the south—west — and running around the top of it, this weak weather front has been bringing some damp weather into northern ireland, that's pushing into parts of wales and southern england. there could briefly be a little bit of sleet and snow as we run into the colder air. and we start monday with a widespread frost, perhaps some icy patches. lowest temperatures in scotland and northern england, where we have the clearer skies. maybe still some damp weather, a bit of rain or wintering us across parts of wales will soon move into southern england. that doesn't last long, cloud breaks, sunshine comes through, we're left
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with the odd shower. most of the showers will filter into western parts of northern ireland, much of scotland, northern, eastern england, and the midlands having a dry day, much better day than it was on sunday with some sunshine — and as a result, temperatures will be a couple degrees higher, as well. still cold and those temperatures will fall away quickly into the evening with those clearer skies, most places ending the day fine and dry. high pressure is building in across the uk for tuesday. you think of high pressure, you think dry weather — and for most places, it will be, but not quite everywhere. starts cold and there'll be a frost around. the sunshine coming through, some cloud developing especially in the west, maybe bringing a few showers into northern ireland, south—western parts of scotland, wales, and western areas of england. the distribution of showers does keep changing a bit, but it does look drier towards eastern areas, and more parts of the country will see temperatures in double figures. now we still have high pressure in charge as we move into wednesday.
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things look a little different — yes, it'll start cold, there may well be a frost around, as well, and after a sunny start, cloud will tend to build up. but this time, it'll probably spread out a bit more, there won't be the depth of cloud, so we're unlikely to see many, if any showers around, and those temperatures in western areas could hit 13—14 celsius. it's fairly quiet weather over the weekend, there won't be much rain around, many places will be dry. but it'll still be cold — not quite as cold as it was over the weekend, mind you, but there's still a risk of frost overnight. goodbye.
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this is bbc news with the latest business headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. open for business: from today, thousands of shops across england reopen after being closed since december. the british retail consortium tells us how the high street is coping. chinese regulators hit alibaba with a record fine, accusing the world's largest online retailer of abusing its strong position. leading tech bosses put their chips on the table as they meet with the biden administration to tackle a global semiconductor shortage.

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