Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 11, 2021 1:00am-1:31am BST

1:00 am
this is bbc news. i'm lewis vaughan—jones. our top stories: yet more tributes to prince philip, including from his eldest son prince charles, as details of the royal funeral are announced. the south pacific religious sect who revered prince philip is a god. —— as. activists in myanmar say dozens of people died in a military crackdown at a protest in the city of bago. and an erupting volcano forces thousands from their homes on the caribbean island of st vincent. hello, and welcome to bbc news.
1:01 am
the duke of edinburgh is to be buried in next saturday. he died on friday at the age of 99. because of coronavirus restrictions, his funeral will take place within the grounds of windsor castle, with no public processions — but it will be televised. the palace has said prince harry will attend but his wife meghan, who is pregnant, has been advised by her doctors not to travel. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. at midday in the capital cities of the four nations of the united kingdom, 41 gun salutes sounded in tribute to the duke. fire! fire. and for a man who served in the royal navy
1:02 am
in the second world war and later, guns were fired in tribute aboard several warships. and in gibraltar, home to the royal navy's gibraltar squadron. at windsor castle, the earl of wessex arrived with his wife tojoin the queen in the family's mourning, as officials put the finishing touches to the plans for the duke's funeral. it will take place at three o'clock next saturday afternoon at st george's chapel inside windsor castle. no part of the funeral will be accessible to the public. the duke's coffin will be borne in a ceremonial procession from the castle�*s state apartments to the chapel. the coffin will be borne on a land rover which the duke helped to design. members of the royal family will walk behind the coffin. there will be a national one—minute silence when the coffin reaches the chapel at three o'clock. inside the chapel, the congregation will be limited to 30. the prime minister will not
1:03 am
be attending, to free his place for the family. members of the public are being discouraged from going to windsor. the best place to watch it will be on television, said a palace spokesman. from his highgrove home, the prince of wales has paid this tribute to his father. as you can imagine, myfamily and i miss my father enormously. he was a much loved and appreciated figure, and apart from anything else, i can imagine, we're so deeply touched by the number of people here and elsewhere around the commonwealth, who also share our loss and our sorrow. my dear papa was a very special person, who i think above all else would have been amazed by the reaction and the touching things that have been said about him. and from that point of view, we are, my family, deeply grateful for all that.
1:04 am
it will sustain us in this particular loss and at this particularly sad time. other family tributes to the duke were paid in a special bbc programme. his appreciation of how he could help the queen always seemed to be present in terms of supporting her, because she was very young when she became queen and they needed to be a double act for a lot of that time, in order to allow her to take on that role. my father was always a great source of support and encouragement... and guidance, all the way through. never trying to curtail any of the activities or anything that we wanted to try and do, but always encourage that. and always remember and thank him for that. i think i will best remember him l as always being there, - and a person you could bounce
1:05 am
off ideas, _ but if you were having problems, you could always go to him, and know- that he would listen, and try to help. - back in windsor, after their meeting with the queen, the earl and countess of wessex departed from the castle. how was the queen? she'd been amazing, the countess said. nicholas witchell, bbc news. despite people being urged to stay away from royal residences because of coronavirus restrictions, a steady stream of well—wishers turned up at both buckingham palace and windsor castle throughout the day. our royal correspondent, daniela relph, has been at windsorfor us. in this royal town, a military tribute to start the day. a salute, and a silence. through windsor there was a steady stream of people
1:06 am
from early this morning, curious locals and those making a longer trip. some paying their respects with their own flourish. but the advice from the royal family and the police has been consistent, stay away and avoid large gatherings. it's the same message for the duke's funeral next weekend. for many, though, there was a need to be here in person. it such an important moment. we cannot not show the respect and support for our queen with physical acts because in the digital age sometimes, you know, leaving a digital footprint, sometimes i don't think it's enough. people are behaving very well. it's very nice. they're maintaining distance and everything. i did think twice before coming
1:07 am
and i know the suggestion - is to just observe - on telly but i thought i'd try and since now it's quiet, i thought i'd come in, - lay my flowers and leave. people have been extremely sensible. i mean, there aren't mobs around. people are respecting the day and respecting the covid and the situation we're in. windsor is a town used to turning out for events of national significance. most are celebratory, like the queen's 90th birthday with her husband by her side. they are very much part of the rhythm of life here. to be asked to stay away is so different from what normally happens. but that is the request for next saturday. there will be a heavy police presence and people will be told not to gather, and instead stay home, to remember the duke in what buckingham palace has described as his remarkable life. daniela relph,
1:08 am
bbc news, windsor. let's get some of the day's other news. the former president of brazil, dilma rousseff, says the incumbent, jair bolsonaro, has left brazil adrift on an ocean of hunger and disease through his response to the coronavirus pandemic. rousseff, like her predecessor lula da silva, also accused bolsonaro of genocide for failing to slow the number of deaths. india is in the grip of an overwhelming second wave of coronavirus. the country recorded more than 145,000 new cases on saturday and the highest number of daily deaths in five months. the wealthy maharashtra state has started a weekend lockdown after a rapid surge in the local area. activists in myanmar say soliders have killed more than 80 people in the central city of bago. the mass killing occured during violent clashes on friday. despite the bloodshed, thousands of people returned to streets across the country on saturday to protest the military rulers and the ongoing atrocities.
1:09 am
phil robertson, from the advocacy group human rights watch, spoke to us earlier. there was an ongoing resistance by a lot of people. they had built barricades in parts of the town. and the military surrounded those barricades and the protesters, starting at 5am, and attacked them with machine guns, rocket—propelled grenades and other heavy artillery. it was basically a massacre that took place over a couple of hours. but, you know, many, many people were killed. the numbers are still a bit in flux, but it may well be more than 50 people were killed. we are hoping, obviously, there will be more pressure from the un security council. we want to see a resolution, to have a global arms embargo that would be imposed by the un security council resolution.
1:10 am
that is, really, i think the key thing that needs to happen now. the special envoy is here now in thailand. she's in quarantine for a week. but then she will be talking to the thais and others in the region about the situation. there is supposed to be an asean meeting, a special meeting on myanmar on april 20th where there will be a discussion among the front—line states about what can possibly be done. but the problem is that asean is hopelessly split. just like the un security council's hopelessly split. there doesn't seem to be a clear way forward that everyone can get around. thousands of people have been evacuated from the eastern caribbean island of st vincent after a volcano on friday sent a cloud of ash and smoke high into the air. the prime minister said evacuees had been temporarily housed on cruise ships and on safer parts of the island.
1:11 am
0ur central america correspondent will grant reports. it is an awe—inspiring, frightening sight, captured by the islanders vincent as they the islanders vincent as they the affected areas. huge, thick plumes of smoke and dust % shooting several kilometres into air, as the volcano unleashed its incredible explosive power. it was bright. but then the light began to deteriorate. it wasn't at a slow pace, it was rapidly deteriorating. it was just darkness. and... and then what happened, you began to feel something hitting your skin. ash. and as the ash blocked out of
1:12 am
the sky, these were the scenes as daytime on the island turned dark as night in moments. these eruptions are rare. just a handful into hundred years. the last was some a0 years ago, with no casualties, and the government on st vincent are trying hard to avoid loss of life this time too. i trying hard to avoid loss of life this time too.- life this time too. i hereby order as — life this time too. i hereby order as follows. - life this time too. i hereby order as follows. one, - life this time too. i hereby order as follows. one, the evacuation of all premises in the areas designated as the red zone on the north—east and the north—west of st vincent. and the evacuation of the area itself. ., ., ., ., itself. to aid the evacuation order, itself. to aid the evacuation order. a _ itself. to aid the evacuation order, a vessel _ itself. to aid the evacuation order, a vessel was - itself. to aid the evacuation order, a vessel was sent - itself. to aid the evacuation order, a vessel was sent to | itself. to aid the evacuation i order, a vessel was sent to the leeward side of the east caribbean island. a number of large commercial cruise lines which operate in the caribbean have also pitched in, and some residents found themselves aboard ships if they didn't have safe haven with family elsewhere.
1:13 am
have safe haven with family elsewhere-— have safe haven with family elsewhere. this is not a drill! disaster preparedness - elsewhere. this is not a drill! disaster preparedness in - elsewhere. this is not a drill! disaster preparedness in the | disaster preparedness in the caribbean is generally well co—ordinated, however, a volcanic eruption of this magnitude is a challenge of a different order, especially amid a pandemic. the threat of what could happen if the evacuation doesn't go smoothly is ever present. when the volcano erupted at the turn of the temporary century, 1600 people are believed to have died. —— 20th century. though many on st vincent hopes they would never live through such an eruption committee hope is now that they can ride it out safely. will grant, bbc news. the duke of edinburgh will be buried next saturday at windsor castle in a ceremonial royal funeral. the prince of wales has said the royal family has been deeply touched by the tributes paid to the duke. the greek prime minister kyriakos mitsotakis has ordered a speedy investigation into the killing of a veteran crime journalist in athens. yorgos karavaz was shot at least six times outside his
1:14 am
home in athens. courtney bembridge reports. the wife of yorgos karavaz sits on the sidewalk where her husband was shot multiple times with a silenced weapon by two men on a paired. senior police have described the killing is a professional hit.— professional hit. we turned around to _ professional hit. we turned around to see _ professional hit. we turned around to see what - professional hit. we turned around to see what was - around to see what was happening, the shots could still be heard, and then i saw a man in khaki standing above him, firing repeatedly. his colleagues _ him, firing repeatedly. his colleagues broke the news during a daily bulletin. it’s during a daily bulletin. it's our own. _ during a daily bulletin. it's our own, yorgos _ during a daily bulletin. it�*s our own, yorgos karavaz, who our own, yorgos karavaz, who our audiences see every day, who all these years has worked
1:15 am
in many difficult subjects, that together we have covered our crime reporting. it's very difficult to even believe that something like this has really happened. it's a piece of news that has really shocked us. yorgos karavaz specialised in crime reporting and work for several greek newspapers and broadcast media during his 32 year career. the news website he founded published attributed to him which said some chose to shut him up, to make him stop writing his texts with bullets. ursula von de lyon described it as a heinous, cowardly act. the speaker of the european parliament tweeted investigations... and europe's human rights commissioner tweeted. .. human rights commissioner tweeted... the head of the journalists union said whoever thinks that... greek authorities say the murder investigation is being
1:16 am
expedited. can you's president said the duke of being a towering symbol of family values, and the princess elizabeth when her father king george vi died and she ascended to the throne. 0ur africa correspondent sent this report from there. the royal visitors stepped off into the hot sunshine of nairobi. in 1952, a young princess elizabeth and her husband the duke of edinburgh were at the start of each tour, standing in for herfather, king george vi, who was too ill to travel. the couple took in the sights, but little did they know that destiny was waiting in the wings. destiny was waiting in the win . s. �* destiny was waiting in the wins. �* ., ., wings. after now after their arrival came _ wings. after now after their arrival came the _ wings. after now after their arrival came the first... -
1:17 am
wings. after now after their| arrival came the first... she was a young _ arrival came the first... she was a young beautiful- arrival came the first... she was a young beautiful lady, and her husband, he was a big man. it was here as the treetops lodge that everything changed for the couple. during an overnight stay, the princess became the monarch, after her father died a. following their stay here at treetops, the queen and the duke were catapulted into 70 years of service, not only to the united kingdom, but the commonwealth as well. and this was the start of years of friendship and partnership that the prince had with this continent. as the queen's consort, the prince accompanied her on numerous tours in africa. the first years of her reign saw a rise in independence struggles, and the british empire retreated.
1:18 am
prince philip often represented her at ceremonies to hand over power, like this one in nairobi. today, on the world's youngest continent, the prince has left another legacy. 0ver a00,000 people in africa are currently taking part of the duke of edinburgh international award, transforming their lives. . . award, transforming their lives. ., . ., ., , lives. the fact that he was able to come _ lives. the fact that he was able to come up _ lives. the fact that he was able to come up to - lives. the fact that he was able to come up to a - lives. the fact that he was - able to come up to a programme that changed his life, because even hundreds of years to come, i can tell you, this programme will still be in existence. 3c} will still be in existence. 30 ears will still be in existence. 30 years after _ will still be in existence. 30 years after that fateful visit, the royal couple return to treetops, having experienced so much, but perhaps this place represented the moment that defined both their lives.
1:19 am
staying with the world reaction of the death of the duke of edinburgh. thousands of people have been mourning his death around the world, and the people of vanuatu island in the south pacific ocean are among the most remote of them. this is the prince philip movement, a religious sect in vanuatu, who revere prince philip asa god. they say he is the most important person ever to have recognised their existence, and spent decades rehearsing dances for his visits to the island. kirk huffman is a research associate for the australian museum at sydney university, and expert on the prince philip movemennt group thank you very much for coming on the programme. mr; thank you very much for coming on the programme. my pleasure. could ou on the programme. my pleasure. could you start _ on the programme. my pleasure. could you start by _ on the programme. my pleasure. could you start by telling - on the programme. my pleasure. could you start by telling us - could you start by telling us how people there will be reacting to this sad news? the prince philip _ reacting to this sad news? tue: prince philip movement reacting to this sad news? tte: prince philip movement peoples are restricted to people in the interior of the south—western
1:20 am
part of the island in southern vanuatu, where there are several hundred followers of the movement, and they were having meetings, ithink the movement, and they were having meetings, i think it was yesterday, with their chiefs to decide how they will commemorate the funerary rituals for prince philip, and i think those rituals will possibly be taking place tomorrow, their time, possibly be taking place tomorrow, theirtime, i imagine there will be a number of ritual dances, possibly a procession with objects that they have because prince philip, since the late 1970s, has actually been writing to them, they have letters from him, they have photographs of him, they have photographs of him which they have, some of them are a little cyclone damage because they have been at least two major cycling through that area of the island since the late 1970s.—
1:21 am
since the late 1970s. kirk, could you _ since the late 1970s. kirk, could you tell— since the late 1970s. kirk, could you tell us - since the late 1970s. kirk, could you tell us how - since the late 1970s. kirk, could you tell us how this| could you tell us how this started? it is part of a century old prophecy where these people, in this one particular area, they have been looking for a spiritual version of one of their mountain gods or spirits, who went overseas, and it wasn't, he was supposed to come back and it wasn't until the 1970s that their interest focused on the possibility that prince philip might be the recycled version of that spirit. the interesting thing that british people might find out about this movement is that the movement is not concentrated on prince philip as a representative of the british royalfamily, because british royal family, because in british royalfamily, because in their belief system, his original spirit or him himself is actually from their island. and so, he happens at the
1:22 am
moment to have been living in england for a while, so to speak. that's the twist in the tail they are! t speak. that's the twist in the tail they are!— tail they are! i see, that is a twist, and — tail they are! i see, that is a twist, and where _ tail they are! i see, that is a twist, and where does - tail they are! i see, that is a twist, and where does that l twist, and where does that leave for example, prince charles? is there a likely relationship there now? tum relationship there now? two members — relationship there now? two members of _ relationship there now? two members of the _ relationship there now? “turrr members of the movement actually met prince charles, two or three years ago when he visited the capital of vanuatu briefly, on an official visit to the pacific, and they haven't decided how the movement will actually react, and that is another thing, it is up to them to decide whether they will focus on prince charles, but i think it will continue as the prince philip movement, and with great respect to prince charles, but i don't think it will become
1:23 am
the prince charles movement, so to speak, it will continue under the heading of the prince philip movement, because the good thing about vanuatu is you don't really die, you just get recycled, and you reappear in a different form and maybe a different form and maybe a different skin colour or whatever,. different skin colour or whatever, ._ different skin colour or whatever,. , ., ., whatever,. just on that, could ou rive whatever,. just on that, could you give us — whatever,. just on that, could you give us a _ whatever,. just on that, could you give us a flavour- whatever,. just on that, could you give us a flavour what - whatever,. just on that, could you give us a flavour what life | you give us a flavour what life is like for people that? it is very good! _ is like for people that? it is very good! it's _ is like for people that? it is very good! it's better- is like for people that? tit 3 very good! it's better than europe or the uk or australia. quality of life is very they are on their own land, none of them are in doubt, they make on their own food, they are lifestyles, very traditional, it's a self—sustaining society, it's a self—sustaining society, it's a self—sustaining society, it's a sustainable if they were suddenly forced into development, it wouldn't necessarily be beneficial to them. they are traditional
1:24 am
people, theirfocus is on them. they are traditional people, their focus is on the traditional life, and the prince philip thing is only one aspect of their traditional life, not their major focus, because they have over spirits and stuff that they deal with, but they are one of the many traditional societies in the world and basically the modern world does not know much about them. �* , . , world does not know much about them. �* , ., , ., world does not know much about them. �* , .,, ., _, them. are they able to continue livin: in them. are they able to continue living in the _ them. are they able to continue living in the way _ them. are they able to continue living in the way they _ them. are they able to continue living in the way they choose . living in the way they choose to or is that way of life under threat? ~ , ., , , ., threat? well if people try to keep pushing _ threat? well if people try to keep pushing developmentl threat? well if people try to - keep pushing development onto these places, these lifestyles are under threat, and it's a real shame, a real pity because the thing is, those are the kinds of societies that the modern world can actually learn from to be more sustainable, there shouldn't be sort of change, we should be all out
1:25 am
there sending people there to learn how to live in a sustainable fashion and take advice from them. they are teachers, the real survivors, they have been for hundreds of years. they have been for hundreds of ears. �* , they have been for hundreds of ears. , years. it's absolutely fascinating _ years. it's absolutely fascinating to - years. it's absolutely fascinating to listen | years. it's absolutely l fascinating to listen to years. it's absolutely - fascinating to listen to you, thank you very much for coming on and landing us your expertise.— on and landing us your expertise. rachael blackmore, a 31—year—old jockey created history on saturday when she became the first female to ride the winner in the grand national. last month she became the first female to end the cheltenham festival as the events leading rider so her triumph on board minella times capped a memorable few weeks for the irish rider. it's hard to even comprehend it right now, it hasn't even sunk in, the grand national is the first race as a kid that would have caught my imagination or sparked my interest, and to
1:26 am
finish with your head in front is beyond belief, to be honest. congratulations to her. you can reach me on twitter — i'm @ lvaughanjones hello there. the first half of the weekend has been cold. the second half of the weekend starts with frost. and sunday promises to be another chilly day for the time of year — there'll be some sunshine and wintry showers around, as well. now this was the picture on saturday at buxton in derbyshire. i know it's high up, but we had a covering of snow for a while. towards more southeastern parts of england, it was cloudy skies with some rain and drizzle — that damper weather has been moving away, it's been on that weather system there that's heading into continental europe, so the cloud is breaking towards the southeast. we've got high pressure to the west of the uk, a northerly breeze bringing in the cold. so we start sunday with a widespread frost, it'll be a colder start
1:27 am
for the southeast of england and east anglia as the cloud breaks, lowest temperatures likely to be in northern scotland at minus seven celsius. and there could be some icy patches around too. still a few showers first thing, although many places will be starting dry and sunny, cloud will tend to increase, we will see a few more showers make out in the morning, and they'll turn more widespread in the afternoon — some of them heavy with hail, sleet and snow mixed in there, as well. it'll be another cold day, temperatures typically 6—8 celsius, maybe a touch colder than that across northern scotland, a touch milder than that across southern parts of england. but the damp weather coming into northern ireland by the evening on that weather front there, that'll slide its way down into wales, the southern half of the uk. but a frosty start on monday for many, particularly cold for northern england and scotland where we have the clearer skies. for the most part, monday here should be dry and sunny, just a few showers near some eastern coasts. should brighten up through the day in northern ireland, but stays quite cloudy through wales, the midlands towards southern england, some patchy rain — and early in the morning, it could be a touch wintry in the midlands as we engage some of that colder airfirst thing. temperatures will be
1:28 am
a notch up on monday, but still cold for the time of year, around 8—10 celsius. now looking further ahead, we've got high pressure turning to dominate the weather through the week ahead, and that means the winds will be light, there'll be some morning mist and fog patches. you'd expect it to be dry underneath an area of high pressure — may not completely be the story, though. there's a risk of a few showers around, especially during the first half of the week. many places will be dry with sunshine, a little less cold by day and night.
1:29 am
1:30 am
this is bbc news, the headlines: military gun salutes have honoured the duke of edinburgh, who died on friday. buckingham palace announced he will be laid to rest next saturday on the grounds of windsor castle. because of coronavirus restrictions, his funeral will take place with no public risk —— processions. prince harry will attend. since charles gave tribute to his father, saying he gave the most remarkable, devoted service to his queen, his country and the commonwealth. plugs have been flying at half mast is commonwealth and world leaders continue to send condolences to the royal family, including the president of china and the pope. —— flags. activists in myanmar say soldiers have killed more than 80 people in what human rights observers have called a massacre. it happened in the central city of bago. now, let's hear more
1:31 am
from prince charles, who has paid tribute to his father, the duke of edinburgh.

20 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on