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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 11, 2021 12:00am-12:31am BST

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this is bbc news: i'm geeta guru—murthy with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. prince charles pays tribute to his father the duke of edinburgh, as the details of the royalfuneral are announced. the prince of wales says he was a much loved figure who gave the most remarkable, devoted service to the queen, his country and the commonwealth. my my dear popeye was a very special person who i think above all else would've been amazed by the reaction. “ p°p�*up- amazed by the reaction. —— pop—up. and the touching things that have been said about him. during the day there were gun salutes across the country and around the world, to mark the duke's death. prince philip's funeral
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will be held at windsor castle on saturday — there'll be just 30 in the congregation — and a minute's silence across the uk. in other news... activists in myanmar say dozens of people died in a military crackdown at a protest in the city of bago. the irish prime minister warns that northern ireland must not go back to its sectarian past — after another night of violence. the duke of edinburgh is to be buried in windsor on saturday. he died on friday at the age of 99. because of coronavirus restrictions, his funeral will take place within the grounds of windsor castle, with no public processions — but it will be televised. the palace has said
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prince harry will attend but his wife meghan, who is pregnant, has been advised by her doctors not to travel. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. at midday in the capital cities of the four nations of the united kingdom, 41 gun salutes sounded in tribute to the duke. fire! fire. and for a man who served in the royal navy in the second world war and later, guns were fired in tribute aboard several warships. and in gibraltar, home to the royal navy's gibraltar squadron. at windsor castle, the earl of wessex arrived with his wife to join the queen in the family's mourning, as officials put the finishing touches to the plans
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for the duke's funeral. it will take place at three o'clock next saturday afternoon at st george's chapel inside windsor castle. no part of the funeral will be accessible to the public. the duke's coffin will be borne in a ceremonial procession from the castle�*s state apartments to the chapel. the coffin will be borne on a land rover which the duke helped to design. members of the royal family will walk behind the coffin. there will be a national one—minute silence when the coffin reaches the chapel at three o'clock. inside the chapel, the congregation will be limited to 30. the prime minister will not be attending, to free his place for the family. members of the public are being discouraged from going to windsor. the best place to watch it will be on television, said a palace spokesman. from his highgrove home, the prince of wales has paid this tribute to his father. as you can imagine, myfamily and i miss my father enormously. he was a much loved
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and appreciated figure, and apart from anything else, i can imagine, we're so deeply touched by the number of people here and elsewhere around the commonwealth, who also share our loss and our sorrow. my dear papa was a very special person, who i think above all else would have been amazed by the reaction and the touching things that have been said about him. and from that point of view, we are, my family, deeply grateful for all that. it will sustain us in this particular loss and at this particularly sad time. other family tributes to the duke were paid in a special bbc programme. his appreciation of how he could help the queen always seemed to be present in terms
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of supporting her, because she was very young when she became queen and they needed to be a double act for a lot of that time, in order to allow her to take on that role. my father was always - a great source of support and encouragement... and guidance, - all the way through. never trying to curtail any. of the activities or anything that we wanted to try and do, but always encourage that. i and always rememberl and thank him for that. i think i will best remember him as always being there, and a person you could bounce off ideas, but if you were having problems, you could always go to him, and know that he would listen, and try to help. back in windsor, after their meeting with the queen,
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the earl and countess of wessex departed from the castle. how was the queen? she'd been amazing, the countess said. nicholas witchell, bbc news. despite the authorties urging people to stay away from royal residences because of coronavirus restrictions, a steady stream of well wishers has been turning up at both buckingham palace and windsor castle throughout saturday. our royal correspondent, daniela relph, is at windsorfor us. in this royal town, a military tribute to start the day. a salute, and a silence. through windsor there was a steady stream of people from early this morning, curious locals and those making a longer trip. some paying their respects with their own flourish.
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but the advice from the royal family and the police has been consistent, stay away and avoid large gatherings. it's the same message for the duke's funeral next weekend. for many, though, there was a need to be here in person. it such an important moment. we cannot not show the respect and support for our queen with physical acts because in the digital age sometimes, you know, leaving a digital footprint, sometimes i don't think it's enough. people are behaving very well. it's very nice. they're maintaining distance and everything. i did think twice before coming and i know the suggestion - is to just observe on telly but i thought i'd try- and since now it's quiet, i thought i'd come in, i lay my flowers and leave. people have been extremely sensible. i mean, there aren't mobs around. people are respecting the day and respecting the covid and the situation we're in.
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windsor is a town used to turning out for events of national significance. most are celebratory, like the queen's 90th birthday with her husband by her side. they are very much part of the rhythm of life here. to be asked to stay away is so different from what normally happens. but that is the request for next saturday. there will be a heavy police presence and people will be told not to gather, and instead stay home, to remember the duke in what buckingham palace has described as his remarkable life. daniela relph, bbc news, windsor. monarchs, heads of state and prime ministers across the world have sent heartfelt tributes. joe biden described the duke as a "heck of a guy". the president of china also sent his condolences to queen elizabeth. the australian prime minister said the duke's life had been one of service, loyalty and honour. shaimaa khalil
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reports from sydney. fire! gunshot. honouring a life of duty and service. a sign of respect for a man who, for decades, has had a long and enduring relationship with this country. the prime minister paid tribute to the duke of edinburgh, whose presence, he said, was a reminder of the stability needed in a world that can often be uncertain. memories of him will, of course, tell stories of his candour and a unique and forceful and authentic personality. but above all, he was a man who was steadfast, who could be relied upon, always standing by his queen. prince philip's military services first brought him here in 1940. but it was in 1954 that he arrived alongside the newly crowned queen elizabeth on an historic visit —
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the first by a reigning monarch to australia. newsreel voiceover: troops and representatives of many i australasian lands... the duke visited more than 20 times and has fostered a close connection with the country and its people. at times, taking a moment to enjoy the famed aussie lifestyle. throughout the decades, prince philip was patron to nearly 50 organisations here, but it's his character, his candour, his ability to be himself, that have endeared him to so many australians. more than 700,000 young australians have taken part in the duke of edinburgh's award scheme. sarah started when she was 16. i don't think i would have been able to actually participate in community events or participate in physical activity and learn these new skills that i got to learn without the award kind of pushing me to do that. the duke was also a well known figure in new zealand.
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he appreciated a traditional welcome, but his focus was always on supporting young people. for over 50 years, the duke of edinburgh awards have connected him to thousands of new zealand's young people. and, of course, perhaps most importantly, he has served in support of her majesty the queen for many, many years — in her service to new zealand, the commonwealth, and indeed the world. in australia, the duke of edinburgh has always been warmly welcomed, and he'll be fondly remembered by the politicians and the public alike. shaimaa khalil, bbc news, sydney. a little later in the programme we'll have more on the death of prince philip. other news now. activists in myanmar say soliders have killed more than 80 people in the central city of bago. the mass killing occured during
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violent clashes on friday. despite the bloodshed — thousands of people returned to streets across the country on saturday — to protest the military rulers and the ongoing atrocities. phil robertson — from human rights watch — gave us this update. there was an ongoing resistance by a lot of people. they have built barricades and parts of the town, and the military surrounded those barricades and the protesters, starting at 5am, and attacked them with machine guns, rocket propelled grenades and other heavy artillery. it was basically a massacre that took place over a couple of hours, but you know, many, many people were killed. i mean, the numbers are still a bit in flux. it may well be more than 50 people were killed. we're hoping, obviously, that there will be more pressure at the un security council. we want to see a resolution to having a global arms embargo that would be imposed by un security council resolution.
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that is really, i think, the key thing that needs to happen now. the special envoy�*s here now in thailand, she is in quarantine for about a week, but then she will be basically talking to the thais and others in the region about the situation. there is supposed to be a meeting, a special meeting on myanmar on the 20th of april where there will be a discussion amongst the front—line states about what could possibly be done, but the problem is that it is hopelessly split, just like the un security council is hopelessly split. there doesn't seem to be a clear way forward that everyone can get around. the irish prime minister, meehal martin, has warned that northern ireland must not be allowed to "spiral back" into "sectarian murders and political discord". the taoiseach�*s remarks, made on the 23rd anniversary of the good friday agreement, came after a 12th night of unrest in parts of belfast. 1a police officers were injured. from belfast, charlotte gallagher reports. police come underfire
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from missiles in a loyalist area of north belfast as a flag flies at half—mast for prince philip nearby. 0nly hours earlier, people here had been urged to stay—at—home out of respect for the queen. in a nearby nationalist neighbourhood, there are similar scenes as well with officers being pelted with rocks, bottles and petrol bombs. in the loyalist tiger's bay area, stolen car that had been set on fire is pushed towards the police lines. the violence wasn't as intense and frenzied as on wednesday and thursday, when a bus was set on fire and water cannon deployed for the first time here in six years. there is concern that the ages of some of those involved in the writing on friday night, three 14—year—old ——in the rioting on friday night, three 14—year—old
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boys were arrested. there's anger too as adults who have been filmed encouraging them. others have been trying to defuse the situation, though. youth workers have been on the streets encouraging people to go home. it's the 23rd anniversary of the good friday agreement, which helped bring about an end to the troubles — a 30 year period of violence sectarian conflict, which cost the lives of more than 3,500 people. the agreement paved the way for a welcome, if imperfect, peace. people living here don't want to return to the past. charlotte gallagher, bbc news, belfast. thousands of people have been moved from the eastern caribbean island of st vincent after a volcano sent the prime minister, ralph gonsalves, said evacuees had been temporarily housed on cruise ships and on safer parts of the island — and there had been no casualties so far. india has reported a record number of daily coronavirus infections —
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more than 116,000. nearly 800 people are reported to have died in the latest 2a hour period — the highest number in more than five months. the severity of the second wave is being blamed on a reluctance to wear masks, and on over—crowding. the and on over—crowding. worst hit state is now imposing the worst hit state is now imposing weekend lockdowns until the end of the month. the headlines on bbc news... the duke of edinburgh will be buried next saturday at windsor castle in a ceremonial royal funeral. the prince of wales, has said the royal family has been deeply touched by the tributes paid to the duke. i particularly wanted to say... 65 years ago, his royal highness prince philip established the duke of edinburgh's award in the uk. since then, it has been delivered in more than 130 countries and territories — to help millions of young people build skills, confidence and resilience. earlier i spoke tojohn may — the secretary general of the duke of edinburgh's international award foundation and niji mutaka — a young woman who achieved her gold award in kenya.
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she explains how the award changed the direction of her life for the better. it comes in three parts, you have your goals commute feel better, the smallest goal, you have bronze, silver gold from the highest is gold commit takes quite some time, but i think how this award, once you start, you can stop, once you start, you can stop, once you start training commute can't stop, and you have some new skills in you that you can use even later. i remember on campus, i was very young, i was really shy, but once i started and was given a leadership position, i was able to lead my team to actually complete our award through 18 months and we were able to use our skills much later. i'm not the young girl that i was then, i carry all those skills now. let me just bring — all those skills now. let me just bring you _ all those skills now. let me just bring you into - all those skills now. let me just bring you into this - all those skills now. let me just bring you into this you | just bring you into this you must have met the duke many
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times, what are your thoughts today? i times, what are your thoughts toda ? , , �* , ., today? i guess it's a mixture of sadness — today? i guess it's a mixture of sadness and _ today? i guess it's a mixture of sadness and also - today? i guess it's a mixture | of sadness and also immense gratitude to an extraordinary man— gratitude to an extraordinary man who _ gratitude to an extraordinary man who had the vision, as you say, _ man who had the vision, as you say, 65— man who had the vision, as you say, 65 years ago, to create an educational framework, say, 65 years ago, to create an educationalframework, none formal— educationalframework, none formal educational learning as we know— formal educational learning as we know it today, that means that _ we know it today, that means that young people can properly be prepared for life. did that young people can properly be prepared for life.— be prepared for life. did you ask him what _ be prepared for life. did you ask him what sparked - be prepared for life. did you ask him what sparked the i ask him what sparked the original idea? because i think i started just for boys than, and it expended to girls by about 18 months. we and it expended to girls by about 18 months.— and it expended to girls by about 18 months. we did talk about 18 months. we did talk about its beginnings - about 18 months. we did talk about its beginnings and - about 18 months. we did talk about its beginnings and i - about 18 months. we did talk i about its beginnings and i have to say— about its beginnings and i have to say it — about its beginnings and i have to say it involves young women very. _ to say it involves young women very. very _ to say it involves young women very, very quickly. the duke was — very, very quickly. the duke was really— very, very quickly. the duke was really delighted to hear that— was really delighted to hear that as _ was really delighted to hear that as well.— was really delighted to hear that as well. ., ., ., ~ ., that as well. you have worked a lot in education _ that as well. you have worked a lot in education and _ that as well. you have worked a lot in education and health. - lot in education and health. you thank you would've done what you have done without the
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spur of this award. no. honestly speaking, once you get into the word, one of the things that it lets you become it doesn't change you at all. they let you use your personality. they let you be yourself and they let you use yourself and they let you use your god—given talents to actually be creative and see what you could do with your talents to impact your community. i rememberwhen talents to impact your community. i remember when i started i was very much into giving back to the community. i would gather metis mentors to go feed children. my group members would go and teach on community health, teach and empower other women to come and join us. so i don't think i would've done. it gave me a lot of leadership skills, a lot of communication skills, how to deal with people. even what i am doing now with my life, which is continuing with the programme, community service. we are still using the skills that we learned during our award programme to actually continue with what i'm doing
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now. ~ . , ~' continue with what i'm doing now. ., , ~ ., now. what did the duke of edinburgh _ now. what did the duke of edinburgh say _ now. what did the duke of edinburgh say to _ now. what did the duke of edinburgh say to you - now. what did the duke of edinburgh say to you in . now. what did the duke of. edinburgh say to you in terms of his ongoing involvement? what was he most proud of what this whole programme that is huge. it's global, it's involved so many people. i think he was very surprised that— think he was very surprised that it _ think he was very surprised that it grew in the way that it did~ — that it grew in the way that it did~ it — that it grew in the way that it did. it was originally an idea for the — did. it was originally an idea for the united kingdom and it has grown to involve more than 130 countries around the world. more _ 130 countries around the world. more than— 130 countries around the world. more than a million young beanie _ more than a million young people at anyone time are their award. — people at anyone time are their award, which i think is a wonderful legacy. the duke described the award as a do—it—yourself growing up kit. ithink— do—it—yourself growing up kit. i think that's a brilliant description because what it does — description because what it does is _ description because what it does is it takes all the experiences that i think a young _ experiences that i think a young person should have outside _ young person should have outside the classroom, packages them _ outside the classroom, packages them together in a way that is fun as —
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them together in a way that is fun as well as interesting and challenging. and then itjust lets young people, as you just heard, — lets young people, as you just heard, set their own targets. did you — heard, set their own targets. did you ever find out exactly what spurred this particular package of ideas. a lot of it has been talked about in the last 2a hours about the duke school and this award encapsulating some of those values that he apparently held very dear. values that he apparently held very dear-— very dear. yes, there are certain — very dear. yes, there are certain elements - very dear. yes, there are certain elements of - very dear. yes, there are certain elements of fact. | very dear. yes, there are i certain elements of fact. his experience where undoubtedly life forming for him. i am certairr— life forming for him. i am certain that it had influence on him _ certain that it had influence on him and he was involved with setting _ on him and he was involved with setting up— on him and he was involved with setting up the award, along with— setting up the award, along withjohn hunt. i'm certain that— withjohn hunt. i'm certain that that _ withjohn hunt. i'm certain that that influence had a strong _ that that influence had a strong effect on the duke's ideas — strong effect on the duke's ideas with the award. but ultimately, what he wanted, i think. — ultimately, what he wanted, i think, was to give young people
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the power— think, was to give young people the power to reach their aspirations and to set their targets— aspirations and to set their targets and to aim high and to become — targets and to aim high and to become the people that they want — become the people that they want to— become the people that they want to be. that is still happening 65 years on. thousands of people have their own personal memories, having met him at official engagements over the years. on his 50th birthday in 1971 the queen and prince philip visited the shipyard at barrow—in—furness in cumbria, where they met twin sisters who remember the encounter to this day. they shared their recollections with our north of england correspondent, judith moritz. newsreel: today at barrow, the first of a new class i of british warship takes to the water. the launch of hms sheffield in 1971 was a momentous day, a real royal occasion. and for two people in particular, it was very special. newsreel: twin sisters, sheila and ann present l the traditional bouquet to the queen. the sisters represent the twin industries of
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shipbuilding and engineering. 50 years on, sheila and ann remember meeting the queen and especially the duke of edinburgh. it was an honour to represent the town. yeah. and it's not everyday you get to meet the queen and the prince in one day, is it? it was also the 50th birthday of the duke, so the whole atmosphere was absolutely amazing. and you remember him putting you at ease? as he came towards us, i you could almost see him smiling, he was dying to ask us questions. i i think he wasjust so in awe that there was two girls that were so similar, that he thought he would have a little joke. he just said to us, - you are so alike, you really must get up to some kind of fun with your boyfriends _ and doing swapping? we just laughed it off and i said, "no we don't, really." of course, the photograph that got caught was this business where he is doing this... which is, do you know, "do you swap boyfriends?" but that was it. with a twinkle in his eye? oh, yes. yeah, a little bit of fun, i you know what he was like. what's this one?
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happy birthday. from the gorgeous girls. the twins were surprised to find themselves in next day's papers. sheila has kept all the mementos. which one of you is which? ithink... you're not sure?! no, i'm not, just a minute. we were in every daily paper, and i do remember one- of the managers from vickers at the time said, crikey, i you wouldn't think that they'd launched a ship yesterday. i less about the ship, more about you? more about the twins| and his birthday, yes. memories of the day have sadly outlasted hms sheffield, which was sunk during the falklands conflict. as for the twins, they'll never forget the duke and the fun few moments they shared. he was a very handsome man, wasn't he? oh, yes. he was dashing, wasn't he? especially when he had his uniform. who doesn't like a man in a uniform?
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judith moritz reporting there. minella times, ridden by racheal blackmore, has won the grand national here in england. it's the first time a female jockey has ever ridden the winner in what is one of the most famous horse races in the world. and as you'd expect, the 31—year—old jockey from ireland was slightly taken aback by her win. it's hard to even comprehend it right now, to be honest, it hasn't even sunk in. you know, the aintree grand national is the first race as a kid that would've caught my imagination or sparked my interest. to finish with your head in front is just beyond belief, to be honest. a reminder of our top story.... prince charles, says the british royal family has been deeply touched by the number of people who've shared their sorrow about the death of his father, the duke of edinburgh. the duke's funeral will take place on saturday at st george's chapel, windsor — with a ceremony scaled back because of coronavirus restrictions.
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there is much more of course on the duke of edinburgh and all of those who share their memories with him on the bbc website. thank you very much for watching. website. thank you very much forwatching. bye—bye. hello there. the first half of the weekend has been cold. the second half of the weekend starts with frost. and sunday promises to be another chilly day for the time of year — there'll be some sunshine and wintry showers around, as well. now this was the picture on saturday at buxton in derbyshire. i know it's high up, but we had a covering of snow for a while. towards more southeastern parts of england, it was cloudy skies with some rain and drizzle — that damper weather has been moving away, it's been on that weather system there that's heading into continental europe, so the cloud is breaking towards the southeast. we've got high pressure to the west of the uk, a northerly breeze bringing in the cold. so we start sunday with a widespread frost, it'll be a colder start for the southeast of england and east anglia as the cloud breaks, lowest temperatures
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likely to be in northern scotland at minus seven celsius. and there could be some icy patches around too. still a few showers first thing, although many places will be starting dry and sunny, cloud will tend to increase, we will see a few more showers make out in the morning, and they'll turn more widespread in the afternoon — some of them heavy with hail, sleet and snow mixed in there, as well. it'll be another cold day, temperatures typically 6—8 celsius, maybe a touch colder than that across northern scotland, a touch milder than that across southern parts of england. but the damp weather coming into northern ireland by the evening on that weather front there, that'll slide its way down into wales, the southern half of the uk. but a frosty star on monday for many, particularly cold for northern england and scotland where we have the clearer skies. for the most part, monday here should be dry and sunny, just a few showers near some eastern coasts. should brighten up through the day in northern ireland, but stays quite cloudy through wales, the midlands towards southern england, some patchy rain — and early in the morning,
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it could be a touch wintry in the midlands as we engage some of that colder airfirst thing. temperatures will be a notch up on monday, but still cold for the time of year, around 8—10 celsius. now looking further ahead, we've got high pressure turning to dominate the weather through the week ahead, and that means the winds will be light, there'll be some morning mist and fog patches. you'd expect it to be dry underneath an area of high pressure — may not completely be the story, though. there's a risk of a few showers around, especially during the first half of the week. many places will be dry with sunshine, a little less cold by day and night.
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this is bbc news.
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the headlines... military gun salutes have honoured the duke of edinburgh, who died on friday. buckingham palace announced he'll be laid to rest next saturday in windsor castle. prince charles paid tribute to his father saying he gave the most remarkable, devoted service to the queen, his country and the commonwealth. flags have been flying at half—mast as commonwealth and world leaders continue to send condolences to the royalfamily, including the president of china and the pope. the irish prime minister has warned that northern ireland will not be allowed to spiral down into sectarian murders and political discord. his remarks came after further unrest in parts of belfast. there's the headlines.

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