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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 10, 2021 11:00pm-11:31pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the prince of wales pays tribute to his father the duke of edinburgh, as the details of the royal funeral are revealed. prince charles says he was a much—loved figure who gave the most remarkable, devoted service to the queen, his country and the commonwealth. my dear papa was a very special person who above all else would have been amazed by the reaction and the touching things said about him. gunshots. during the day there were gun salutes across the country and around the world, to mark the duke's death prince philip's funeral will be held at windsor castle on saturday. there'll be just 30 in the congregation, and a minute's silence across the uk.
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in other news: activists in myanmar say dozens of people have been killed after the military brutally suppressed a protest in the city of bago. thousands flee an erupting volcano on the caribbean island of st vincent. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. the duke of edinburgh is to be buried in windsor on saturday. he died on friday at the age of 99. because of coronavirus restrictions, his funeral will take place within the grounds of windsor castle, with no public processions — but it will be televised. the palace has said prince harry will attend but his wife meghan, who is pregnant, has been advised by her doctors not to travel.
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our royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. at midday in the four nations of the united kingdom, iii—gun salutes sounded in tribute to the duke. fire. gunshots. one, fire. gunshots. and for a man who served in the royal navy in the second world war and later, guns were fired in tribute aboard several warships... fire. gunshots. ..and in gibraltar, home to the royal navy's gibraltar squadron. at windsor castle, the earl of wessex arrived with his wife to join the queen in the family's mourning, as officials put the finishing touches to the plans for the duke's funeral. it will take place at three o'clock next saturday afternoon at st george's chapel inside windsor castle.
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no part of the funeral will be accessible to the public. the duke's coffin will be borne in a ceremonial procession from the castle�*s state apartments to the chapel. the coffin will be borne on a land rover which the duke helped to design. members of the royal family will walk behind the coffin. there will be a national one—minute silence when the coffin reaches the chapel at three o'clock. inside the chapel, the congregation will be limited to 30. the prime minister won't be attending, to free his place for the family. members of the public are advised not to go to windsor. "the best place to watch it will be on television," said a palace spokesman. from his highgrove home, the prince of wales has paid this tribute to his father. as you can imagine, myfamily and i miss my father enormously. he was a much—loved and appreciated figure. and apart from anything else, i can imagine...
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and we're so deeply touched by the number of people here and elsewhere around the commonwealth who also share our loss and our sorrow. my dear papa was a very special person, who i think above all else would have been amazed by the reaction and the touching things that have been said about him. and from that point of view, we are, my family, deeply grateful for all that. it will sustain us in this particular loss and at this particularly sad time. other family tributes to the duke were paid in a special bbc programme. his appreciation of how he could help the queen always seemed to be present in terms of supporting her, because she was very young when she became queen and they needed to be a double act
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for a lot of that time, in order to allow her to take on that role. my father was always a great source of support and encouragement. - n was... — and guidance, all the way through. never trying to curtail any. of the activities or anything we wanted to try and do, l but always encourage that. and always rememberl and thank him for that. i think i will best remember him as always being there, and a person you could bounce off ideas. but if you are having problems, you could always go to him, and know that he would listen, and try to help. back in windsor, after their meeting with the queen, the earl and countess of wessex departed from the castle. how was the queen?
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she'd been amazing, the countess said. monarchs, heads of state and prime ministers across the world have sent heartfelt tributes. joe biden described the duke as a "heck of a guy". the president of china also sent his condolences to queen elizabeth. the australian prime minister said the duke's life had been one of service, loyalty and honour. shaimaa khalil reports from sydney. honouring a life of duty and service. a sign of respect for a man who, for decades, has had a long and enduring relationship with this country. the prime minister paid tribute to the duke of edinburgh, whose presence, he said, was a reminder of the stability needed in a world that can often be uncertain. memories of him will, of course, tell stories of his candour and a unique and forceful
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and authentic personality. but above all, he was a man who was steadfast, who could be relied upon, always standing by his queen. prince philip's military services first brought him here in 1940. but it was in 1954 that he arrived alongside the newly crowned queen elizabeth on an historic visit — the first by a reigning monarch to australia. newsreel voiceover: troops and representatives of many i australasian lands... the duke visited more than 20 times and has fostered a close connection with the country and its people. at times, taking a moment to enjoy the famed aussie lifestyle. throughout the decades, prince philip was patron to nearly 50 organisations here, but it's his character, his candour, his ability to be himself, that have endeared him to so many australians.
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more than 700,000 young australians have taken part in the duke of edinburgh's award scheme. sarah started when she was 16. i don't think i would have been able to actually participate in community events or participate in physical activity and learn these new skills that i got to learn without the award kind of pushing me to do that. the duke was also a well known figure in new zealand. he appreciated a traditional welcome, but his focus was always on supporting young people. for over 50 years, the duke of edinburgh awards have connected him to thousands of new zealand's young people. and, of course, perhaps most importantly, he has served in support of her majesty the queen for many, many years — in her service to new zealand, the commonwealth, and indeed the world. in australia, the duke of edinburgh
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has always been warmly welcomed, and he'll be fondly remembered by the politicians and the public alike. shaimaa khalil, bbc news, sydney. the duke of edinburgh's close association with the military will be on show at his ceremonial royal funeral next weekend. philip had a distinguished career in the royal navy — and while he gave up active service in 1951, he remained closely connected to it and other military elements throughout his public life. to talk more about his naval career here's captain peter hore, a naval historian and author. thank you forjoining us. what sort of career might he have had, had he not become consort to the queen? there is no doubt at all that had he stayed in the navy after 1951, he would have risen to the very top of the service. probably like his grandfather and uncle, undoubtedly
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he would have.— he would have. what are the aualities he would have. what are the qualities that _ he would have. what are the qualities that would - he would have. what are the qualities that would have - he would have. what are the i qualities that would have taken he would have. what are the - qualities that would have taken him there? he qualities that would have taken him there? . . ., , , ., there? he had a great sense of service. there? he had a great sense of service- he _ there? he had a great sense of service. he was _ there? he had a great sense of service. he was very _ there? he had a great sense of service. he was very bright. . there? he had a great sense ofj service. he was very bright. he displayed all the qualities you expect of a first—class officer. after a short time at dartmouth, he came top of his term. in war time he went to do ten's courses, there were five examinations and he gained four first class passes. he showed readiness and ability in everything he did. even when he went to serve, within a few months, he went from being a sublieutenant to being the first loo tenant of the ship, second in talent. == first loo tenant of the ship, second in talent. , ., in talent. -- first lieutenant. tell us about the _ in talent. -- first lieutenant. tell us about the gate _ in talent. -- first lieutenant. tell us about the gate that _ in talent. -- first lieutenant. tell us about the gate that became i us about the gate that became relevant to the queen and prince philip. relevant to the queen and prince phili -. , ., relevant to the queen and prince
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phili. , ., ., philip. yes, he went to dartmouth aued 17 philip. yes, he went to dartmouth aged 17 and _ philip. yes, he went to dartmouth aged 17 and a _ philip. yes, he went to dartmouth aged 17 and a half, _ philip. yes, he went to dartmouth aged 17 and a half, in _ philip. yes, he went to dartmouth aged 17 and a half, in 1939. - philip. yes, he went to dartmouth aged 17 and a half, in 1939. his. aged 17 and a half, in 1939. his uncle, dicky mountbatten was engineering events behind the scenes. but when the king was visiting the college before the war, they arranged that elizabeth should meet prince philip of greece, as he was then. what the stories don't really tell you, the queen mother was so affected by this meeting, she insisted on entering through the gate of the college. if you look at one of those classic pictures, on the right—hand side is the captains house, and then down the side is the garden, and the royal family after that one meeting always used to enter the grounds of the college through the wicket gate, and through up through the wicket gate, and through up to the house. this through the wicket gate, and through up to the house-— up to the house. this is how traditions — up to the house. this is how traditions are _ up to the house. this is how traditions are born, - up to the house. this is how traditions are born, so - up to the house. this is how. traditions are born, so simply. there is a funny story about pyjamas
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and a pilot? there is a funny story about py'amas and a ilot? , there is a funny story about py'amas and a pum— and a pilot? yes! petty officer dickie richardson, _ and a pilot? yes! petty officer dickie richardson, he - and a pilot? yes! petty officer dickie richardson, he was - and a pilot? yes! petty officer dickie richardson, he was a i and a pilot? yes! petty officer- dickie richardson, he was a pilot, he sat in the back of a dive bomber, and in sumatra, dickie richardson and in sumatra, dickie richardson and his pilot, gus halliday, were shot down into the java sea. the ship where prince philip was the first lieutenant arrived very promptly, 20 minutes after they crashed into the sea. fished them out of the water, and prince philip lent his clothes, including his silk pyjamas to dickie richardson, who dined out on that story for the rest of his life. he only died a couple of his life. he only died a couple of years ago. aha, of his life. he only died a couple of years age-— of his life. he only died a couple of years ago. a rather lovely story to have up — of years ago. a rather lovely story to have up your— of years ago. a rather lovely story to have up your sleeve. _ of years ago. a rather lovely story
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to have up your sleeve. captain, l to have up your sleeve. captain, thank you so much for talking to us. a little later in the programme, we'll have more on the death of prince philip. activists in myanmar say soliders have killed more than 80 people in the central city of bago. the mass killing occured during violent clashes on friday. despite the bloodshed, thousands of people returned to streets across the country on saturday to protest the military rulers and the ongoing atrocities. phil robertson, from human rights watch, gave this update. there was an ongoing resistance by a lot of people. they had built barricades in parts of the town. and the military surrounded those barricades and the protesters, starting at 5am, and attacked them with machine guns, rocket—propelled grenades and other heavy artillery. it was basically a massacre that took place over a couple of hours. but, you know, many, many people were killed. the numbers are still a bit in flux, but it may well be more than 50 people were killed. we are hoping, obviously, there will be more pressure from the un security council.
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we want to see a resolution, to have a global arms embargo that would be imposed by the un security council resolution. that is, really, i think the key thing that needs to happen now. the special envoy is here now in thailand. she's in quarantine for a week. but then she will be talking to the thais and others in the region about the situation. there is supposed to be an asean meeting, a special meeting on myanmar on april 20th where there will be a discussion among the front—line states about what can possibly be done. but the problem is that asean is hopelessly split. just like the un security council's hopelessly split. there doesn't seem to be a clear way forward that everyone can get around. the irish prime minister, micheal martin, has warned that northern ireland must not be allowed to "spiral back" into "sectarian murders and political discord". the taoiseach's remarks, made on the 23rd anniversary of the good friday agreement,
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came after a 12th night of unrest in parts of belfast. 1a police officers were injured. from belfast, charlotte gallagher reports. police come under fire from missiles in a loyalist area of north belfast, as a flag flies at half mast for prince philip nearby. 0nly hours earlier, people here had been urged to stay at home out of respect for the queen. in a nearby nationalist neighbourhood, there were similar scenes too, with offices being pelted with rocks, bottles and petrol bombs. in the loyalist tiger's bay area, a stolen car that had been set on fire is pushed towards the police lines. the violence wasn't as intense and frenzied as on wednesday and thursday, when a bus was set on fire and water cannon deployed for the first time here in six years. there is concern at the ages of some of those involved in the rioting. on friday night, three
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14—year—old boys were arrested. there is anger, too, at adults who have been filmed encouraging them. others have been trying to defuse the situation, though. youth workers have been on the streets encouraging people to go home. it's the 23rd anniversary of the good friday agreement, which helped bring about an end to the troubles — the 30—year period of violent sectarian conflict which cost the lives of more than 3,500 people. the agreement paved the way for a welcome, if imperfect, peace. people living here don't want to return to the past. a series of volcanic eruptions has blanketed the caribbean island of st vincent in ash and smoke, forcing thousands of people to evacuate their homes. the prime minister says water supplies have been cut in most of the island and its airspace closed. here's robertson henry, an eyewitness and journalist living on the island.
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it was bright. but then the light began to deteriorate. it wasn't at a slow pace, it was rapidly deteriorating. and... i know where the volcano's summit, the crater, is situated. i couldn't make it out. it was just darkness. and then what happened, you began to feel something hitting your skin. ash. people looked up and there is this huge plume of ash hanging in the sky. silent, deadly, dreadful, ominous. and within minutes, you could just feel a change
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in the mood in the town. the eruption actually galvanised them to near panic mode. any form of transport, they could have got, getting out. the headlines on bbc news. the duke of edinburgh will be buried next saturday at windsor castle in a ceremonial royal funeral. the prince of wales has said the royal family has been deeply touched by the tributes paid to the duke. as we mentioned earlier, tributes have been paid to the duke of edinburgh from across the world. kenya's president kenyatta said the duke had been a "towering symbol of family values". prince philip was visiting kenya with his wife when her father, king george vi, died and she ascended to the throne. 0ur africa correspondent,
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catherine byaru hanga, sent this report from there. newsreel announcer: the royal visitors stepped off into the - hot sunshine of nairobi. in 1952, a young princess elizabeth and her husband, the duke of edinburgh, were at the start of a tour standing in for herfather, king george vi, who was too ill to travel. the couple took in the sights, but little did they know that destiny was waiting in the wings. half an hour after their arrival came the first engagement. l nearly all the people they met here have passed away, but, in 2015, the bbc spoke to a man who spent time with them. translation: she was j a young, beautiful lady, and her husband, he was a big man. and it was here, at the treetops lodge, that everything changed for the couple. during an overnight stay, the princess became the monarch
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after herfather died. following their stay here at treetops, the queen and the duke were catapulted into 70 years of service, not only to the united kingdom, but the commonwealth as well, and this was the start of years of friendship and partnership that the prince had with this continent. as the queen's consort, the prince accompanied her on numerous tours in africa. the first years of her reign saw a rise in independence struggles, and the british empire retreated. prince philip often represented her at ceremonies to hand over power, like this one in nairobi. today, on the world's youngest continent, the prince has left another legacy. over 400,000 people in africa are currently taking part in the
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duke of edinburgh international award, transforming their lives. i think the fact that he was able to come up with a programme that changes life, because even hundreds of years to come, i can tell you that this programme will still be in existence. 30 years after that fateful visit, the royal couple returned to treetops. they had experienced so much, but perhaps this place represented the moment that defined both their lives. well, 65 years ago, his royal highness prince philip established the duke of edinburgh's award in the uk. since then, it has been delivered in more than 130 countries and territories, to help millions of young people build skills, confidence and resilience. let's talk to a emily maitland, a young teacher in toronto
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who achieved her gold duke of edinburgh award in 2015. tell us about some of the activities that you did to get these awards. the award is quite amazing. i got some crazy opportunities through the award. i started when i was 14, and i was able to not only explore canada, but explore myself. the award was the very first thing i did for myself. growing up, i took care of my nana, who was not well. the award was the first thing i was able to do for me, and only for me. to set goals about confidence and skills that i never had before. i was able to write a novel, which has never seen the light of day but it was a great feat for me but because it instilled a passion for writing.
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in 0ntario where it was —40 degrees, in 0ntario where it was —40 degrees, i learned that you are working super hard, you are still cold... i got to run a cross—country race, i did come dead last but i learned the value of working with and for a team. i learned that even if you are running and you feel you are ready to give up, don't, there will always be someone there to push you through. a girl actually gave up her spot in the race to help me up a hill that day. i was able to learn and find a love for service, to give back to different people in different ways, an environmental club and a women's shelter which is very near and dear to me. ma; shelter which is very near and dear to me. ~ , ., , , to me. my mother used it when she had me and — to me. my mother used it when she had me and my _ to me. my mother used it when she had me and my sister. _ to me. my mother used it when she had me and my sister. this - to me. my mother used it when she had me and my sister. this is - to me. my mother used it when she had me and my sister. this is very l had me and my sister. this is very profound for a young woman. what impact do you think it will continue to have on the rest of your life, and the career you have chosen? it
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has had a huge impact on me already. it has made me passionate. it has made me realise educationjust can't be in a classroom. it made me want to further my career as a teacher to instill this idea that teaching and learning, you need to feel, touch and do, to gain as many skills as possible, and i try to give that to my students every day. and i try to help back with the award by being an award leader and helping other people like myself gain the award as well. ~ ., ., ~ people like myself gain the award as well. ~ . . . ., , ., people like myself gain the award as well. ~ . ., . ., ., well. what advice would you give to somebody thinking _ well. what advice would you give to somebody thinking about _ well. what advice would you give to somebody thinking about doing - well. what advice would you give to i somebody thinking about doing these awards? they do require a lot of commitment, increasingly so as you move through from bronze to silver and gold. i move through from bronze to silver and old. ., ., and gold. iwould say, do it. it takes commitment _ and gold. iwould say, do it. it takes commitment and - and gold. i would say, do it. it - takes commitment and perseverance but don't be afraid to step out of your comfort zone. the people you meet will change you forever. to make you not only a better person for yourself but a better person for
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other people. you will never have an experience like the duke of ed, it is life changing. x�*t�*ou experience like the duke of ed, it is life changing.— experience like the duke of ed, it is life changing. you are quite the ambassador— is life changing. you are quite the ambassador for _ is life changing. you are quite the ambassador for the _ is life changing. you are quite the ambassador for the duke - is life changing. you are quite the ambassador for the duke of - ambassadorfor the duke of edinburgh award scheme, i don't think he could have put it better himself. thank you forjoining us. a round—up of other news now. saudi arabia has executed three soldiers for high treason, saying they'd targeted the kingdom's security and military interests "in co—operation with the enemy" — which was not named. they were executed close to the border with yemen, where saudi arabia is fighting iranian—backed houthi rebels. india is in the grip of an overwhelming second wave of coronavirus. the country recorded more than 145,000 new cases on saturday and the highest number of daily deaths in five months. the wealthy maharashtra state has started a weekend lockdown. after a rapid surge in the local area. the former president of brazil, dilma rousseff, has said the incumbent, jair bolsonaro, has left brazil adrift on an ocean of hunger and disease through his response
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to the coronavirus pandemic. ms rousseff, like her predecessor lula da silva, also accused mr bolsonaro of genocide for failing to slow the number of deaths. a reminder of our main news this hour. the duke of edinburgh's funeral will take place next saturday. 41—gun salutes have taken place across the uk and the world in honour of queen elizabeth's husband, who died on friday at the age of 99. buckingham palace has announced that the duke will be laid to rest at st george's chapel in windsor castle. the royal ceremonial funeral will be scaled back because of coronavirus restrictions. people have continued to lay flowers outside buckingham palace and windsor castle. prince charles, his eldest son, said the duke would have been amazed by the touching things that have been said about him, and that they would sustain the family at a time of loss. now it's time for a look at the weather with louise lear.
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good evening. it was a cold and frosty start for many this morning, but there was some lovely sunshine around early on. however, as the day progressed, we quite literally had four seasons in one day. a frosty start, some sunshine, then some showers. and the shower is turning increasingly wintry with some hail and snow mixed in there as well. this has been the story through the day today. the shower clouds developed as we went through the morning and then became quite widespread into the afternoon. the only exception is down to the south—east where we had some fairly dense cloud throughout the day, associated with this weather front. and it brought some light, showery rain as well. now, the front drifts away, and through the next night the showers will fade and the temperatures will fall away quite sharply. so we are likely to see another frost in many northern and eastern areas across the country. maybe that frost getting into the south—east with the lack of cloud. the cold arctic air once again returns across the country, and so temperatures look likely to struggle as we go through the day on sunday.
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there will be some sunshine around first thing, but it will be the early bird that catches the sunshine as the shower clouds develop through the afternoon and, once again, though showers could be wintry with some hail, some sleet and snow mixed in there as well. almost anywhere could catch a shower as they fly through, and those temperatures will struggle. 6—8 c, generally, but we mightjust scrape double figures somewhere along the south. as we move out of sunday into monday, we've got this area of high pressure building in from the south—west. but this weather front across the top of that high could bring some outbreaks of rain. it looks likely to be slipping its way into northern ireland, eventually into wales and south—west england. so a dry day looks likely on monday across scotland and much of eastern england. still a cool breeze coming down from the north sea. here, those temperatures a little disappointing. once again, highs of 7—10 celsius. as we move out of monday into tuesday, the high pressure is going to build and stay with us. now, the position of this high
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will be subject to question and there is still likely to be the risk of some showers from time to time. where the high is sitting depends on the type of weather you will get, but it does look likely that we will see something a little less cold — temperatures increasing as we go through the week. perhaps back to average for the time of year. take care.
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hello, this is bbc news. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow mornings papers in a moment. first, the headlines. prince charles pays tribute to his father saying his "dear papa" was "a very special person", and speaks of the family's sad loss. i and speaks of the family's sad loss. particularly wa father i particularly wanted to say that my father for i suppose the last 70
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years has given the most

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