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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 10, 2021 8:00pm-8:31pm BST

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this is bbc news, the headlines at 8: prince charles pays tribute to his father, saying his "dear papa" was "a very special person", and speaks of the family's sad loss. i particularly wanted to say that my father, i suppose the last 70 years, has given the most remarkable, devoted service to the queen, to my family, and to the country, and also to the whole of the commonwealth, and, as you can imagine, myfamily and i miss my father enormously. the duke's funeral is to take place next saturday, at st george's chapel in windsor. the congregation will be limited to 30, and the palace said
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prince harry will attend. the prime minister will not attend. earlier today, there were gun salutes across the country and around the world, to mark the duke's death. a minute's silence was held for the duke at aintree ahead of this afternoon's grand national. rachael blackmore gallops into sporting history by winning the grand national on minella times — the first female jockey to do so. good evening. buckingham palace has announced that the funeral of the duke
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of edinburgh will take place next saturday at 3pm, at st george's chapel in windsor. at the same time, a minute's silence will be held across the uk. the funeral will not be accessible to the public, with the congregation limited to 30, but it will be televised live. the prime minister has announced he will not go to the funeral to allow for the attendance of as many family members as possible during coronavirus restrictions. tributes have continue to pour in throughout the day, led by duke's eldest son, prince charles. this evening he gave a statement, from his home in highgrove in gloucestershire. our correspondentjon kay reports. at highgrove estate in gloucestershire, the place prince charles called his sanctuary, this is where he comes for courtesy and for peace. we know he travelled from here to windsor, to wear the queen is currently, just after his father had passed away. but he is backing out at home in highgrove. it was here that he chose to make this
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statement. and it is partly the statement. and it is partly the statement of the heir to the throne, making a formal expression of gratitude to people across the country and around the commonwealth. but as you will hear now, it's also a very personal statement as well, delivered from the heart, off—the—cuff, no notes, just one take to camera. it was a tribute to the man he described as his dear papa. i particularly wanted to say that my father, i suppose for the last 70 years, has given the most remarkable, devoted service to the queen, to my family and to the country. and also to the whole of the commonwealth. and as you can
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imagine, my family and i miss my father enormously. he was a much—loved and appreciated figure. apart from anything else, we are so deeply touched by the number of other people here and elsewhere around the world, in the commonwealth, who also i think share our loss and our sorrow. my dear papa was a very special person, who i think above all else would have been amazed by the reaction, the touching things that have been said about him. from that point of view, my family are deeply grateful for all that, it will sustain us in this particular loss and at this particularly sad time. thank you.
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prince charles, the prince of wales, a short time ago here at his home, highgrove in gloucestershire, paying tribute to his late father, prince philip. and also expressing gratitude to the people of the country and the commonwealth for the outpouring of emotion, the tributes that have been paid in the last 2a hours or so. much has been said over many years aboutjust how different these two men were, father and son, very different characters. we know that in the past there have been differences and sometimes some contradictions between them. and yet what strikes you when you are here is the similarities between them as well, the fact they shared so many interests and passions. this is where prince charles comes to enjoy farming and wildlife, conservation, even polo, which are used to play. all passions which prince philip also enjoyed. so you get a sense of
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that connectivity between the generations, just as we heard a son talking in a personal capacity about the loss of his father. and the overriding sense in that statement from the prince of wales of gratitude, to the public and also what he described as what his father would have thought about the way people were now paying tribute to him, and speaking so fondly. today, gun salutes took place to mark the duke's death across the whole of the uk, in gibraltar and from navy warships at sea. batteries fired 41 rounds, one every minute. prince philip — who died yesterday aged 99 — served as a naval officer during the second world war. 0ur royal correspondent, nicholas witchell reports. check the breach! at midday in the four nations of the united kingdom, 41 gun salutes sounded in tribute to the duke. fire! gunshots.
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0ne, fire! gunshots. and, for a man who served in the royal navy in the second world war and later, guns were fired in tribute aboard several warships... fire! gunshot. ..and in gibraltar, home to the royal navy's gibraltar squadron. at windsor castle, the earl of wessex arrived with his wife to join the queen in the family's mourning as officials put the finishing touches to the plans for the duke's funeral. it will take place at three o'clock next saturday afternoon at st george's chapel inside windsor castle. no part of the funeral will be accessible to the public. the duke's coffin will be borne in a ceremonial procession from the castle�*s state apartments to the chapel. the coffin will be borne on a land rover, which the duke helped to design. members of the royal family
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will walk behind the coffin. there will be a national one—minute silence when the coffin reaches the chapel at three o'clock. inside the chapel, the congregation will be limited to 30 in strict compliance with covid regulations. members of the public are being discouraged from going to windsor. "the best place to watch it all will be on television," said a palace spokesman. for the royalfamily, it is a period of mourning, and from the family, in a bbc programme broadcast last night, personal tributes have been paid by three of the duke's children. his energy was astonishing. in supporting my mama and doing it for such a long time. and, in some extraordinary way, being able to go on doing it for so long. his appreciation of how he could help the queen always seemed to be present
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in terms of supporting her, because she was very young when she became queen and they needed to be, i think, a double act for a lot of that time, in order to allow her to take on that role. my father was always a great source of support and encouragement. - you know, it was...and guidance, all the way through, _ and never trying to curtail any. of the activities or anything that we wanted to try and do, - but would always encourage that. and i'll always, always remember and thank him for that. _ well, you know, he didn't suffer fools gladly, and so you had to... so, if you said anything, you know, that was in any way ambiguous, he'd say, "well, make up your mind," you know? so, perhaps it made one choose your words carefully, if you know what i mean.
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he was very good at showing you how to do things. he could instruct you in various things. i think i will best remember him as always being there, and a person you could bounce off ideas. but if you were having problems, you could always go to him and know that he would listen and try to help. what he's done has amounted to an i astonishing achievement, i think. i in windsor, people are placing flowers, despite the request that this shouldn't be done. many want to show appreciation to the duke and solidarity with the family. he was the consort to the queen for so long. he faced so much criticism and he handled it spectacularly. for me, he was the image
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of the monarchy and that stability. i mean, when we came to this country we were quite young at that time, and it means a lot to us as well. grieving, especially, the queen, is partner, is companion. so, yeah, kind of representing the younger age. _ and respecting the country, really. after their meeting with the queen, the earl and countess of wessex departed from windsor castle. how was the queen? she'd been amazing, the countess said. with me now is arthur edwards, a royal photographer at the sun who has photographed seven royal weddings, fourfunerals, and eight royal births. that is quite a tv you have got there. how willing a photographic subject was the duke of edinburgh? very unwilling unfortunately. i
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remember when we went to the guinness factory in dublin when the queen made the historic visit to ireland. a beautiful pint of guinness for him, we were waiting for him to drink this beautiful drink, it would make a great picture, he looked at it and walked away. afterwards, i asked, why didn't you drink it? he didn't like guinness, and that is how he was, he would never do something just to make a picture, he would never help you in any way. he was just like that. if you spoke to him, he was very gruff when he spoke back to you. very seldom warm to the press. so how did you get around it? how did you manage to take those pictures when your subject was so elusive and uncooperative? weill. pictures when your subject was so elusive and uncooperative? well, you know, elusive and uncooperative? well, you know. most — elusive and uncooperative? well, you know. most of— elusive and uncooperative? well, you know, most of the _ elusive and uncooperative? well, you know, most of the stuff _ elusive and uncooperative? well, you know, most of the stuff i _ elusive and uncooperative? well, you know, most of the stuff i did - elusive and uncooperative? well, you know, most of the stuff i did was - know, most of the stuff i did was him was when he was with the queen. especially towards the later years, he did some engagement on his own. the queen was always smiling and lovely, and he would be there,
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photographed with the queen. and of course when he was with the queen, he was very, very helpful to her, he did everything to make it easy for her. and so it was ok. in the early 80s, her. and so it was ok. in the early 805, it her. and so it was ok. in the early 80s, it was very aggressive towards the newspapers. he used to get very angry with the press. he speaks french and german fluently, he used to admonish photographers in whichever language, he would tell them, get back to your horses. look, over the years, he became a lot more mellow. —— to your houses. the colonel in chief of the rifles, he handed it to camilla lastjuly. he was very accommodating. we expected him to be there for a minute, he was out there for 20 minutes talking to the soldiers, laughing and joking.
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he was really lovely. thejob i did with him just before he retired, he was laughing, roaring with laughter... all of the gaffes he made, it was to cheer people up. in australia in 2002, we had a press reception. he got the press together and he gave us a real lecture, saying, i did say the chinese students had those eyes, and i did say to the aboriginal australians, do you still chuck spears? but they were private conversations and you were private conversations and you were not supposed to hear them. he is right, but being journalists, those are the things you find out. unfortunately, he got a bad press over it. ~ . , ., unfortunately, he got a bad press over it. ~ . y., unfortunately, he got a bad press over it. ~ . i. ., over it. what were you looking for when ou over it. what were you looking for when you were — over it. what were you looking for when you were trying _ over it. what were you looking for
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when you were trying to _ over it. what were you looking for when you were trying to get - over it. what were you looking for when you were trying to get a - over it. what were you looking forl when you were trying to get a good picture of him?— picture of him? well, “ust, i mean, ou knew picture of him? well, “ust, i mean, you knew he h picture of him? well, “ust, i mean, you knew he was _ picture of him? well, just, i mean, you knew he was never _ picture of him? well, just, i mean, you knew he was never going - picture of him? well, just, i mean, you knew he was never going to . you knew he was never going to perform. he would never help you in any way. just smiling. but also, the way he reacted with the queen, i remember the last trip they did to australia, theirfinal remember the last trip they did to australia, their final trip. remember the last trip they did to australia, theirfinal trip. the last day, he was gathering flowers off the children because the queen couldn't get to see everybody. he was bringing them to the queen and i have a picture where they are looking at each other like they had just met each other and just fallen in love. it was a lovely picture and thatis in love. it was a lovely picture and that is what he was like. when they were in pakistan and he was coming from a carriage, and the step was very steep, he was helping her down. those are the pictures, you just had to be so patient, and you would get the pictures. i to be so patient, and you would get the pictures-— the pictures. i like the fact he didn't enjoy — the pictures. i like the fact he didn't enjoy it. _ the pictures. i like the fact he didn't enjoy it. thank - the pictures. i like the fact he didn't enjoy it. thank you, - the pictures. i like the fact he - didn't enjoy it. thank you, arthur, for sharing your stories. ah,
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for sharing your stories. pleasure. as we've been hearing, the prime minister borisjohnson will not attend next saturday's funeral of prince philip to make space for as many family members as possible under pandemic rules. let's speak to our political correspondent, chris mason. why has he chosen not to attend? effectively because of coronavirus restrictions, which has massively reduced the numbers that can attend the funeral. i am told that protocol dictates he was on the list of attendees, of a funeral of this significance. the prime minister would normally be there in conventional circumstances. but given the restriction of numbers, a statement from number ten said, as a result of the coronavirus regulations, only 30 people can attend the funeral and the prime minister wanted to act in accordance with the best interests of the royal household, to allow as many family household, to allow as many family household members to attend, he will
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not be attending. the opportunity cost of him being there is somebody else wouldn't be able to be there so he isn't going to be there. in the context of the really difficult decisions are so many families have had in the last 12 months with funerals and limited numbers able to attend, in that sense, it is in keeping with the difficult decisions of others, having been forced to take. to that extent, in the context of the pandemic, we shouldn't be surprised. irate of the pandemic, we shouldn't be surrised. ~ ., ., of the pandemic, we shouldn't be surrised. . ., ., , ,, ., surprised. we are told the duke of edinbur: h surprised. we are told the duke of edinburgh would _ surprised. we are told the duke of edinburgh would not _ surprised. we are told the duke of edinburgh would not have - surprised. we are told the duke of edinburgh would not have wantedl edinburgh would not have wanted fast, and they would have been hundreds attending in normal times. exactly, and the limit ofjust 30 family pretty much, albeit televised, other than that about as private an occasion as you would expect in this context. 0ne private an occasion as you would expect in this context. one other thing to mention this evening, the conservatives and labour and i suspect the other political parties will resume campaigning ahead of the elections next month on tuesday
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morning of next week, and then pause again next saturday for the day, for the funeral. again next saturday for the day, for the funeral-— the message from palace officials was pretty clear, please don't come and congregate here. but there has been a pretty steady stream of people with cards, flowers, with messages of respect and goodwill. an orderly queue was organised, people were encouraged to socially distance. after they had laid flowers and cards in front of the palace, they were then politely urged to move on and not linger. i did speak to some of those people who had come to find out why they did so. i who had come to find out why they did so. ., , , ., ,
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did so. i got the news... this means a lot for me- — did so. i got the news. .. this means a lot for me- it— did so. i got the news... this means a lot for me. it means _ did so. i got the news... this means a lot for me. it means a _ did so. i got the news... this means a lot for me. it means a generation, j a lot for me. it means a generation, it means _ a lot for me. it means a generation, it means history, it means a lot for me _ it means history, it means a lot for me |_ it means history, it means a lot for me. . ., it means history, it means a lot for me. . ,, ., me. i decided to come because i am from chile, — me. i decided to come because i am from chile, i — me. i decided to come because i am from chile, i have _ me. i decided to come because i am from chile, i have been _ me. i decided to come because i am from chile, i have been living - me. i decided to come because i am from chile, i have been living here l from chile, i have been living here for four— from chile, i have been living here for four months. _ from chile, i have been living here for four months. we _ from chile, i have been living here for four months. we are _ from chile, i have been living here for four months. we are really- from chile, i have been living here. for four months. we are really sorry for four months. we are really sorry for what _ for four months. we are really sorry for what happened. _ for four months. we are really sorry for what happened. the _ for four months. we are really sorry for what happened. the sad - for four months. we are really sorry for what happened. the sad news. i for four months. we are really sorry . for what happened. the sad news. for me, for what happened. the sad news. for me. something — for what happened. the sad news. for me, something really— for what happened. the sad news. for me, something really emotional. - for what happened. the sad news. for me, something really emotional. whyj me, something really emotional. why did ou me, something really emotional. why did you come — me, something really emotional. did you come today to lay flowers? to remember prince philip because he was the _ to remember prince philip because he was the queen'shusband, and he was very important to the country. he always _ very important to the country. he always supported her. i very important to the country. he always supported her.— very important to the country. he always supported her. i thought it was really important _ always supported her. i thought it was really important to come - always supported her. i thought it was really important to come and| always supported her. i thought it. was really important to come and lay flowers _ was really important to come and lay flowers because _ was really important to come and lay flowers because he _ was really important to come and lay flowers because he did _ was really important to come and lay flowers because he did so— was really important to come and lay flowers because he did so much- was really important to come and lay flowers because he did so much for. flowers because he did so much for the country — flowers because he did so much for the country. really— flowers because he did so much for the country. really admirable. - flowers because he did so much for the country. really admirable. to i the country. really admirable. to teach _ the country. really admirable. to teach the — the country. really admirable. to teach the kids _ the country. really admirable. to teach the kids as _ the country. really admirable. to teach the kids as well _ the country. really admirable. to teach the kids as well what - the country. really admirable. to teach the kids as well what we i the country. really admirable. to . teach the kids as well what we were coming _ teach the kids as well what we were coming to— teach the kids as well what we were coming to honour. _ teach the kids as well what we were coming to honour. fi— teach the kids as well what we were coming to honour.— coming to honour. a really interesting _ coming to honour. a really interesting spread - coming to honour. a really interesting spread of - coming to honour. a really| interesting spread of ages, coming to honour. a really - interesting spread of ages, some very old people and very young people as well. parents are really keen to stress to young people just what the duke did to help their
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cause. 0n what the duke did to help their cause. on many of the cards and messages, some quite moving tributes. may your soul rest in peace. thank you. never to be forgotten. and one read fair winds and following seas. that is often used by sailors to wish someone a safe journey. remarkable contributions to the royal navy reflected. let's take a look at some other news now. and first, a look at the latest government figures on covid. there were 2,589 new coronavirus infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period — on average 2,710 new cases were reported per day in the last week. across the uk, the latest figures show 2,862 people were in hospital with coronavirus. a0 deaths were reported in the latest 24—hour period — that's people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—i9 test. on average in the past week, 36 deaths were announced every day. the total number is now 127,080.
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as for vaccinations, 106,878 people have had theirfirst dose of a covid vaccine in the latest 24—hour period, bringing the total to 32,010,244, over 60% of the adult population. 6,991,310 people have had both doses of the vaccine. 1a police officers were injured after a further night of violence in northern ireland last night. stones, bottles and petrol bombs were thrown at police in belfast even after loyalist groups urged their supporters to stay at home following the death of prince philip. activists in myanmar say soldiers have killed more than 80 people in the central city of bago. the mass killing occured during violent clashes on friday. despite the bloodshed, thousands of people returned to streets across the country on saturday to protest
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the military rulers and the ongoing atrocities. india has reported a record number of daily coronavirus infections, more than 145,794 deaths, the largest daily tally in more than five months. the number is being blamed on a reluctance to wear masks, and on crowding. the situation has been worsened by a general shortage of vaccines, drugs and hospital beds. thousands of people have been evacuated from their homes on the caribbean island of st vincent after a volcano errupted yesterday, sending huge clouds of ash and smoke miles high into the air. the islands prime minister said that no—one had been hurt and evacuees were taken to cruise ships and safer parts of the island. the former big brother star nikki grahame has died at the age of 38. the tv personality had been receiving treatment for an eating disorder at a private clinic following a fundraising campaign organised by her friends and family.
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the former presenter of big brother, davina mccall tweeted: i am so desperately sad to hear about nikki graham. my thoughts are with her friends and family she really was the funniest, most bubbly, sweetest girl. the australian prime minister said he had served with loyalty and honour. honouring a life of duty and service. a sign of respect for a man who for decades has had a long and enduring relationship with his country. the prime minister paid tribute to the duke of edinburgh, who he said was a reminder of stability needed in a world that can
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be uncertain. memories of him will tell stories of his candour. in a unique and forceful and authentic personality. but above all he was a man who was instead fast. who could be relied upon. man who was instead fast. who could be relied upon-— be relied upon. always standing by his queen. prince _ be relied upon. always standing by his queen. prince philip _ be relied upon. always standing by his queen. prince philip came - be relied upon. always standing byj his queen. prince philip came here in 1940. his queen. prince philip came here in 1940- but _ his queen. prince philip came here in 1940. but it— his queen. prince philip came here in 1940. but it was _ his queen. prince philip came here in 1940. but it was a _ his queen. prince philip came here in 1940. but it was a 1954 - his queen. prince philip came here in 1940. but it was a 1954 he - in 1940. but it was a 1954 he arrived with queen elizabeth on a historic visit, the first by a reigning monarch to australia. the duke visited more than 20 times and has fostered a close connection with the country and its people. at times, taking a moment to enjoy the famed aussie lifestyle. throughout the decades, prince philip was patented in nearly 50 organisations
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here, but it is his character, his candour and his ability to be himself that have endeared him to so many australians. more than 700,000 young australians have taken part in the duke of edinburgh award scheme. sarah started when sue was 16. i don't think i would have participated in community events and learned without the award pushing me to do that. == learned without the award pushing me to do that. , ., , ' ~ to do that. -- when she was 16. the duke was also _ to do that. -- when she was 16. the duke was also well— to do that. -- when she was 16. the duke was also well known _ to do that. -- when she was 16. the duke was also well known in - to do that. -- when she was 16. the duke was also well known in new i duke was also well known in new zealand. he appreciated a traditional welcome. but his focus was always on supporting young people. for was always on supporting young eo le, ., ., was always on supporting young --eole. ., ., :: was always on supporting young --eole. ., ., 11, ., , was always on supporting young ..eole, ., ., ii , ., , , ~' people. for over 50 years, the duke of edinburgh — people. for over 50 years, the duke of edinburgh awards _ people. for over 50 years, the duke of edinburgh awards have _ people. for over 50 years, the duke j of edinburgh awards have connected him to thousands of new zealand young people. and of course perhaps most importantly he has served in support of her majesty the queen for
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many years, the commonwealth and the world. in many years, the commonwealth and the world. �* , ., ., many years, the commonwealth and the world. ~ , . ., , ~ many years, the commonwealth and the world. ~ , . ., , ,, ., world. in australia, the duke of edinburgh _ world. in australia, the duke of edinburgh has _ world. in australia, the duke of edinburgh has been _ world. in australia, the duke of edinburgh has been fondly - world. in australia, the duke of - edinburgh has been fondly remembered and he will be remembered by politicians and the public alike. returning to the death of nikki grahame, our media correspondent joins us. the people who weren't aware of her, tell us about nikki. looking back, iam aware of her, tell us about nikki. looking back, i am amazed it was 15 years ago that she entered the big brother house. so many people over the years have been in that house. 0nly the years have been in that house. only a few make a real impact, and nikki grahame was one of those, she was funny, engaging, over—the—top, temper tantrums. was funny, engaging, over—the—top, tempertantrums. she was funny, engaging, over—the—top,
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temper tantrums. she had absolutely no filter. if it popped into her head,it no filter. if it popped into her head, it came straight out. the public had a very, very strong reaction over the years that she created, because she became part of the big brother world. she was in and out of the house a couple of times over the years. every emotion dialled up to 11. which was also perhaps a bit of a clue that she had her troubles as well. she was very open about them. she wrote about it. from the age of eight, she talked about the fact she had struggled with anorexia. she said she had spent more time in treatment than in the school for large parts of her adolescence. a lot of ups and downs. it was only a few weeks ago that her friends started a go fund me page saying she was struggling more than ever. lockdown had affected her very
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badly, her mother said. they were very worried for her, and this afternoon we heard the very sad news. ., ~ , ., now it's time for a look at the weather. showers turning wintry. some hail, some sleet and snow across the country. many of the showers will tend to fade away through this evening. a little weak weather front across the south that has brought stubborn clouds. that will allow the skies to clear once again. the temperatures fall away and a colder night to follow across east anglia and the south—east. a touch of frost is likely. it doesn't mean we start tomorrow relatively quiet, a good deal of sunshine coming through with high pressure from the west. just like today, it won't be long before
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the shower clouds develop. temperatures likely to struggle with the air coming down from the arctic. showers could continue with some hail, sleet and snow as well. temperatures a maximum of 5—10 degrees. hello this is bbc news. the headlines: prince charles pays tribute to his father saying his "dear papa" was "a very special person", and speaks of the family's sad loss. i particularly wanted to say my father, i suppose over the last 70 years, has given the most remarkable devoted service to the queen, to my family, and to the country, and also to the whole of the commonwealth. and as you can imagine, my family
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and! and as you can imagine, my family and i miss my father enormously. the duke's funeral is to take place next saturday, at st george's chapel in windsor. the congregation will be limited to 30, and the palace said prince harry will attend. the prime minister will not attend. earlier today, there were gun salutes across the country and around the world, to mark the duke's death. a minute's silence was held for the duke at aintree — ahead of this afternoon's grand national. rachael blackmore gallops into sporting history by winning the grand national on minella times — the first female jockey to do so. now on bbc news, a special edition of dateline with shaun ley.

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