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tv   BBC News Special  BBC News  April 10, 2021 10:00am-2:01pm BST

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hello and welcome to viewers in the uk and around the world to this special bbc news coverage from windsor castle following the death of the duke of edinburgh at the age of 99. gun salutes will take place across the uk today to mark an extraordinary life of duty and service. prince philip was by the queen's side for more than 70 years — the royal family mourns the loss of a beloved husband and father. if you were having problems, you could always go to him and know that he would listen and try to help. i think he'd probably want to be remembered as... ..as an individual in his own right really.
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details about the duke's funeral are due to be released later, as tributes are paid here in windsor, across the country and around the world. flags are flying across the uk at half mast, including here at buckingham palace where a small number of people have begun to gather and lay flowers to pay tribute to prince philip. we'll be reflecting on the duke's far—reaching legacy and hearing from those whose lives he touched. hello, welcome to this
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bbc news special. iamjane i amjane hill at i am jane hill at windsor castle. the armed forces will lead a second day of tributes to the duke of edinburgh, who died yesterday aged 99, with gun salutes across the uk, in gibraltar and from warships at sea. details of his funeral are also expected to be announced later. prince philip was the longest serving royal consort in british history — and was a constant support to the queen during more than 70 years of marriage. today we will be looking back on his life with some of those who knew the duke well, the people whose lives were touched by his charitable endeavours and public duties, and we'll discuss how his legacy will live on. first, though, our royal correspondent nicholas witchell has this report.
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the duke's death will be a grievous loss for the queen after their 73 years of marriage. last night on a bbc programme, their eldest children paid tribute to him. i think he'd probably want to be remembered as... ..as an individual in his own right, really. his appreciation of how he could help the queen always seemed to be present in terms of supporting her, because she was very young when she became queen and it needed to be, i think, a double act for a lot of that time in order to allow her to take on that role. it was in august 2017 on the forecourt of buckingham palace that the duke carried out his final solo engagement, inspecting a parade by the royal marines. it was pouring with rain, yet the duke, who was then 96, was not to be deterred.
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duty came first that day, as it had for so many decades, so often alongside the queen, but also pursuing his own public programme to which he brought his own famously forthright style. but the public image of the duke walking a few paces behind his wife only tells part of the story. his greatest contribution was the unseen support he gave to the queen as she coped with the often solitary role of head of state. 0ccasionally she alluded to it. he is my constant strength and guide, she said during the diamond jubilee. he was the one person she could always turn to. just before his 90th birthday, the duke had said in a bbc interview that he felt it was time to wind down. i reckon i've done my bit. i want to enjoy myself for a bit now. with less responsibility, less frantic rushing about, less preparation, less trying to think
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of something to say. yet it wasn't until six years later and that parade in the pouring rain on the forecourt of buckingham palace that there was any real evidence that he was retiring. now, the queen must continue without him. the world will pay its tributes to a man of strong personality who made a significant contribution to the nation's life, and his family will mourn a much loved father, grandfather, great—grandfather and husband. nicholas witchell, bbc news. with me here at windsor is our royal correspondent sarah campbell. of course, the public have been asked not to congregate, not to bring flowers for obvious reasons, but there are scores of people at windsor castle this morning and people have been leaving flowers and you have been looking at some of the
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messages? that you have been looking at some of the messaues? . , , ., , . messages? that is right, people have said to me they _ messages? that is right, people have said to me they felt _ messages? that is right, people have said to me they felt that _ messages? that is right, people have said to me they felt that they - messages? that is right, people have said to me they felt that they had - said to me they felt that they had to. the message has gone out from the royal family to. the message has gone out from the royalfamily and to. the message has gone out from the royal family and the government, asking people because of the pandemic to not do anything that would require crowds together and they are asking for donations rather than flowers. but i think there is a strong feeling. perhaps in windsor as well, because people feel the queen and prince philip were local residents, so there is a personal collection. they would have seen them out and about, seeing them out in windsor great park over the years, so it is understandable they feel they would want to lay flowers. there was a big pile of flowers outside the at the gate at the end of the long walk. they were cleared up of the long walk. they were cleared up last night and taken inside the grounds of windsor castle and laid out in the messages were laid out so members of the royal family could see the messages that have been left. i popped up again early this morning and there are more flowers building up there. some of the
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messages, one that struck me said, extraordinary man, extraordinary life, national hero, nothing more needs to be sad. i should say, we are talking about the fact that covid restrictions, people are being asked not to go to other royal residences, but there is an online book of condolence that is on the royal website and that is where people are being asked to leave messages, messages of support for the queen, of course. messages of thanks, a lot of messages i have seen is thank you for 70 years of public service. there are ways to market without physically having to go to a building. market without physically having to go to a building-— go to a building. there are many wa s for go to a building. there are many ways for members _ go to a building. there are many ways for members of— go to a building. there are many ways for members of the - go to a building. there are many ways for members of the publicl go to a building. there are many i ways for members of the public to remember him and later on today we will have the more formal side of that, we will have a lengthy gun salute? fix. that, we will have a lengthy gun salute? �* , ., salute? a lengthy gun salute. that is due to happen — salute? a lengthy gun salute. that is due to happen at _ salute? a lengthy gun salute. that is due to happen at midday - salute? a lengthy gun salute. that is due to happen at midday today. | salute? a lengthy gun salute. that. is due to happen at midday today. it
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is due to happen at midday today. it is a death gun salute, 41 rounds, so one every minute for a0 minutes. they will be fired from cities across the uk, gibraltar and from warships out in the sea. this is, gun salutes are typical, traditional at royal events. i think particularly for prince philip it is particularly for prince philip it is particularly poignant because he does have a strong connection to the armed forces and they will want to market on a personal level. whenever he saw him at any engagement and he was interacting with members of the armed forces, you could see the mutual respect, because of his history fighting in the second world war. there was a lovely moment here a couple of hours ago when the household cavalry members where exercising the horses. they came round the corner and they lined up and they stopped, gave a salute and observed a two—minute silence and then they carried on. today will be an important day for the armed forces because they will want to show how much he meant to them. find
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show how much he meant to them. and we think later today, we may hear a few more details about the funeral, which of course, again will be so different. ~ ., ., different. where we not in a pandemic? _ different. where we not in a pandemic? it _ different. where we not in a pandemic? it is _ different. where we not in a pandemic? it is wet - different. where we not in a pandemic? it is wet saying, | different. where we not in a - pandemic? it is wet saying, there are hundreds of families over the year who have been affected by the pandemic and have had to change plans and not remember their loved ones in the way they would have liked to in any other year. that is the case with prince philip's funeral. such an important figure, they will have been plans laid out for years as to how it would have been properly celebrated and those will have to be curtailed because of the covid restrictions. there are limits to the amount of people that can be in the chapel, but the main concern is not having any sort of funeral procession or an event which might gather crowds together. because people, whether you tell them to or not, they will want to come and show respect, so that is what is to be avoided. it is up to
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the queen to approve those final plans and that is what she has been looking through over the last few hours and we are expecting this afternoon to have the exact details over what we can expect over the coming days. for over what we can expect over the coming days-_ over what we can expect over the cominu da s. ., ., ., ~ i. , coming days. for now, thank you very much, are coming days. for now, thank you very much. are royal— coming days. for now, thank you very much, are royal corresspondent, - much, are royal corresspondent, sarah campbell. let's speak to sangita myska at buckingham palace. what is happening there at the palace? what is happening there at the alace? �* w ., what is happening there at the alace? �* . ., , palace? buckingham palace is the centre of public— palace? buckingham palace is the centre of public life _ palace? buckingham palace is the centre of public life in _ palace? buckingham palace is the centre of public life in the - palace? buckingham palace is the centre of public life in the uk. - palace? buckingham palace is the centre of public life in the uk. it l centre of public life in the uk. it is a place of celebration and a place of commemoration. when the news broke yesterday we saw a steady stream of people coming through to the front of the gates. you can see them over my shoulder, laying flowers. the police are very quick to move them on. the reason is, the palace and the government are well aware we are still in a pandemic. the infection is endemic in and the palace is mindful of that and asking
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the public perhaps not to come here in person, but she was a charity and make a donation in the name of prince philip. the flowers that were left here last night have now been cleared away and taken inside the palace gates. but what did happen this morning is that some of the tributes, the personal, handwritten notes that have been tied to the gate have remained up until late last night. they have captured the sentiment and the mood of the people arriving here. it is one of paying respect to prince philip's sense of duty, to his family and also to the country. one said, to our unsung hero, prince philip. 65 years of service, 73 years of marriage to our beloved queen. thank you and rest in peace. another one that was touching left in a bowl of flowers was a nod towards his service as a naval officer serving in world war ii. fair winds officer serving in world war ii. fairwinds and officer serving in world war ii. fair winds and following the seas.
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in other words, a message from one sailor to another, good luck on your next journey. sailor to another, good luck on your nextjourney. it is interesting, as i have looked at the palace today, i have been concentrating on the balcony. how many times have we seen prince philip next to her majesty the queen, always by her side and always there in the important moments in this country's history and most recently, i was here with you for the uk and world coverage of the 2012 olympic games when the royal family the 2012 olympic games when the royalfamily came out, the 2012 olympic games when the royal family came out, very much a centrepiece of our existence and culture. i think as the next couple of days worked their way through, i think more and more, the queen will come to the forefront of our minds as we remember that she has lost, not only her consort but her husband of 73 years.
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not only her consort but her husband of 73 years-— of 73 years. thank you from buckingham _ of 73 years. thank you from buckingham palace. - of 73 years. thank you from buckingham palace. let's . of 73 years. thank you from l buckingham palace. let's talk of 73 years. thank you from - buckingham palace. let's talk a bit about the commonwealth and talk to someone who met prince philip. the queen is the patron of the royal commonwealth society, which is a network of individuals and organisations committed to improving the lives and prospects of commonwealth citizens across the world. with me is dr linda yoo, chair of the royal commonwealth society. thanks for being here on bbc news. you met prince philip at one of his last public engagements, i believe? yes, this was in 2016, the year before he stood down. i had just joined the royal commonwealth society and i was very fortunate that he was at a couple of our events as well as the commonwealth service at westminster abbey which celebrates commonwealth day across the commonwealth every march. i met prince philip at buckingham palace, this is late 2016 to celebrate an
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environmental project. something close to his heart and the queen's as well. it is the queen's commonwealth canopy, which is the first environmental project the queen has put her name to to protect forests around the commonwealth. my impression, someone who has been engaged in this issue since the 19605 when he was president of the uk branch of the wwf, struck me that with so many people around, he was so engaged in asking specific, personal questions about how the project was coming, how it was working at the charity. he did this, notjust working at the charity. he did this, not just with working at the charity. he did this, notjust with me but everyone else that came along, which really stayed with me. 50 that came along, which really stayed with me. ., ., , with me. so engaged and interested elect remember, _ with me. so engaged and interested elect remember, this _ with me. so engaged and interested elect remember, this was _ with me. so engaged and interested elect remember, this was a - with me. so engaged and interested elect remember, this was a man - with me. so engaged and interested | elect remember, this was a man into his 905 and working in that way? absolutely, his energy was completely inspiring, actually! find completely inspiring, actually! and i am so interested in what you were
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able to pick up of his personality? i appreciate it was a formal event and you are both in a formal capacity, but we have had so much in the last 2a hours about his humour. some people might call it something different but that slightly sparky side to his personality. although it was a formal event, i am interested whether you are able to see a chink of that? i definitely saw a twinkle in his eye. the other event where this really came through was actually at the guildhall. 2000 people, from the charity sector, the high commissioners, who are the ambassadors from commonwealth countries, sojust imagine, the most packed room, as he and the queen were making their way to the platform, he was speaking with me, speaking with people all around me, and you really got the sense of a sense of humour as well as, tell me about what is happening in your nation in the commonwealth.
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remember, 5a countries, and a network of 2.a billion people, which is what makes the commonwealth unique, the people to people connection, and he embodied that because he was able to speak to people at so many different levels with that personal touch, which is quite hard to do, i think, when you are speaking to so many people who have such different backgrounds than you. have such different backgrounds than ou. �* , ., have such different backgrounds than ou. �* y ., . have such different backgrounds than ou. �* , ., . , have such different backgrounds than ou. �* ., , ., ., you. and you have been doing it for decades as — you. and you have been doing it for decades as well. _ you. and you have been doing it for decades as well. i'm _ you. and you have been doing it for decades as well. i'm interested - you. and you have been doing it for| decades as well. i'm interested that you touched on the environmental issues. someone far younger than me said to me in the last 2a hours that they only feel that they've learnt since prince philip has died just how passionate he was about environmental issues, conservation, animal preservation, from a very long time ago, long before we started talking about this in common parlance, and they said, i didn't realise he was in some ways ahead of the game on that. if realise he was in some ways ahead of the game on that.— the game on that. if we think back to the wwf, — the game on that. if we think back to the wwf, he — the game on that. if we think back to the wwf, he was _ the game on that. if we think back
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to the wwf, he was the _ the game on that. if we think back to the wwf, he was the first - the game on that. if we think back to the wwf, he was the first uk | to the wwf, he was the first uk president in the early 19605, and then remained involved for several decades after that as the international president and then honorary president. we can think back on decades of involvement. the other area in which he was ahead of his time was that he incorporated that into a couple of big commonwealth projects that he was involved with, one of them the commonwealth conference to bring leaders to together. he takes them on a tour. the next one is in canada in 2023. they can see environmental projects and learn about leadership. by projects and learn about leadership. by building that network, i think he has done something we now see is important to preserve the environment in other issues, to get out into the grass roots and do something about it, and he has done that through the duke of edinburgh awards, which focuses on the outdoors, his continued involvement
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in about 800 charities that he is involved with, and a lot so large number combine environment and community. i almost feel that we all listened more in the 605 and 705 we will see that to make this change to protect our environment we have to bring all the communities together to do that, and he was doing that since the 19605. to do that, and he was doing that since the 1960s.— since the 1960s. yes, and a brief finalthought _ since the 1960s. yes, and a brief final thought about _ since the 1960s. yes, and a brief final thought about the _ since the 1960s. yes, and a brief- final thought about the commonwealth broadly, because he had the queen, we know the queen has always taken her role as head of the commonwealth incredibly seriously, and again that takes us to them as a partnership because that was something they were both passionate about.— both passionate about. absolutely. the last overseas _ both passionate about. absolutely. the last overseas as _ both passionate about. absolutely. the last overseas as it _ both passionate about. absolutely. the last overseas as it was - both passionate about. absolutely. the last overseas as it was to - the last overseas as it was to malta, a commonwealth country, where she opened the commonwealth heads of government meeting, and in that speech she paid tribute to prince philip. she said i am indebted to him in ways most of us probably wouldn't see. he has accompanied her
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on every single overseas visit. she said, we all owe him a debt of gratitude for the work he has done in the communities of the commonwealth, and anotherfactoid, commonwealth, and another factoid, he commonwealth, and anotherfactoid, he has not only accompanied the queen on all her overseas visits, they have been to every commonwealth country except for two — cameroon and rwanda. they value this unique part of the commonwealth which is the people to people connection which is just as the people to people connection which isjust as important the people to people connection which is just as important as government to government, and that is where he, as the duke of edinburgh, constant companion of the queen, and what she called in that speech her constancy, really made an impact on the commonwealth. 50 impact on the commonwealth. so interesting to hear your reflections. thank you very much indeed for being with us on bbc news. the most senior officer in the royal navy has also paid tribute to prince philip. the duke of edinburgh was himself a veteran, having been one of the youngest first lieutenants in the royal navy.
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first sea lord and chief of the naval staff admiral tony radakin says the duke will be �*deeply missed'. his generous spirit, his delight in all aspects of the naval service, and his deep understanding of our values, standards and ethos made him such a close friend to the service for over eight decades. and he will really be deeply missed by all of us. gun salutes will take place across the uk, in gibraltar and from warships at sea to mark the duke of edinburgh's death at the age of 99. saluting batteries will fire a1 rounds, at one round every minute from midday in the uk, at locations including the tower of london.
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there will be salutes in edinburgh and portsmouth. joining me now to talk about the significance and history of the gun salute is leiutenant colonal erica bridge, who serves with the royal artillery, and is chief of staff at the general staff centre at sandhurst, where she joins me from now. thank you for your time. tell us in layman's terms, if possible, explain a gun salute, the significance and what it means in terms of marking the passing of the duke of edinburgh. the passing of the duke of edinburgh-— the passing of the duke of edinburgh. the passing of the duke of edinburuh. ., g. edinburgh. good morning, jane. the nun edinburgh. good morning, jane. the gun salutes — edinburgh. good morning, jane. the gun salutes will— edinburgh. good morning, jane. the gun salutes will be _ edinburgh. good morning, jane. the gun salutes will be fired _ edinburgh. good morning, jane. the gun salutes will be fired as - edinburgh. good morning, jane. the gun salutes will be fired as you - edinburgh. good morning, jane. the gun salutes will be fired as you say l gun salutes will be fired as you say across the country and from all four nations, and as you mentioned, from gibraltar as well. there are a number of saluting bases across the country, so cardiff, edinburgh castle, and belfast will have salutes fired by 105 and 10a regiment royal artillery. two salutes in london. the horse
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artillery will fire for the first time from woolwich. normally they would fire from hyde park as a royal park, but obviously with covid and trying to keep the public safe as well, they will be firing from just outside their base. the honourable artillery company will be firing from the tower of london as well. and there are two naval stations, devonport and portsmouth, who will be firing salutes. a number of ships at sea, including hms diamond and hms montrose. really good for both the royal navy and the army to be able to pay their tribute and respect to the duke of edinburgh through the format of a royal salute. this is known as a death gun salute, which as you mention, a a1 gun salute. a royal salute which incorporates the 21 rounds of a royal salute, and then 20 rounds which are fired because they are from those designated saluting stations. it will take a0 minutes in
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total between the first round being fired and the a1st round at those — second intervals. the saluting bases will have between three and six guns, depending on where they are located. there are six guns which date back to the first world war firing at woolwich. find date back to the first world war firing at woolwich.— date back to the first world war firing at woolwich. and in terms of our firing at woolwich. and in terms of your personal _ firing at woolwich. and in terms of your personal reflections _ firing at woolwich. and in terms of your personal reflections as - firing at woolwich. and in terms of your personal reflections as a - your personal reflections as a member of the armed forces, of course, people are interested to know your feelings today. losing the queen's consort, a man whose life was steeped in the armed forces and two had an extremely impressive career in the royal navy himself as well. �* , , ., career in the royal navy himself as well. �* , , . ~' career in the royal navy himself as well. �* , ., ~ ., career in the royal navy himself as well. �* , , ., ~ ., ., well. absolutely, and i think all of the military _ well. absolutely, and i think all of the military will— well. absolutely, and i think all of the military will feel _ well. absolutely, and i think all of the military will feel great - well. absolutely, and i think all of| the military will feel great sadness at his passing. 0ur the military will feel great sadness at his passing. our ability to demonstrate our respect by firing these salutes will very much be felt by those soldiers and sailors taking
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part today. this will mean a huge amount to them, and in a short space of time, they will have done an enormous amount of work to prepare for today, enormous amount of work to prepare fortoday, in enormous amount of work to prepare for today, in spite of such short notice, but many of these batteries will be firing salutes throughout the year anyway, and so their drills and skills will be absolutely on the mark. as i say, they will have been a lot of preparation in the last few hours to get ammunition to the right places, for the guns to be prepared, and certainly for the king's troupe under the command of major vicky flood, they will have been a lot of activity in the last few hours, getting horses ready and getting their harness absolutely impeccable as well. ., ., ., .., as well. lieutenant colonel erica brid . e, as well. lieutenant colonel erica bridge. thank— as well. lieutenant colonel erica bridge, thank you _ as well. lieutenant colonel erica bridge, thank you for _ as well. lieutenant colonel erica bridge, thank you for your - as well. lieutenant colonel erica bridge, thank you for your time | bridge, thank you for your time today. and the household cavalry has marked prince philip's death with a salute. mounted soldiers rode through the streets of windsor before saluting in front of the castle and riding off. in australia, there has been
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a military tribute to the duke. a series of gun salutes fired a1 rounds outside parliament house. the flag over the sydney harbour bridge has been lowered at half—mast. so too has the one over parliament house in the capital. the prime minister scott morrison said memories of prince philip will be of his candour and of a unique, forceful and authentic personality. prince philip often allowed television crews access to the inner workings of royal life, to show the public another side of his family. joining me now is one of those documentary makers, robert hardman, who toured windsor castle with prince philip for a tv bbc one series, "the queen's castle". he is also the daily mail's royal commentator, and a royal biographer.
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hello and welcome. good morning. your thoughts here today. ifind myself thinking so much about the fact that the queen, who has led such a life of service, wakes up this morning a widow, and it's something that so many families have been forced to confront, particularly over the last year, and i am just interested first of all in your perspective on that, on a human level, as someone who has lost her strength, herstay level, as someone who has lost her strength, her stay and a husband of very many decades. i strength, her stay and a husband of very many decades.— very many decades. i think that's absolutely _ very many decades. i think that's absolutely right. _ very many decades. i think that's absolutely right. first _ very many decades. i think that's absolutely right. first and - absolutely right. first and foremost, our thoughts are with the queen. theirs has been the longest royal marriage in history. i mean, we are living through the reign of one of the greats, the longest lived monarchs that we've ever had. as she herself has said, in so much of
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everything she has achieved, she has done it thanks to having him there as well. he was the longest serving consort in history. i was lucky enough as a royal correspondent to go all over the world and watch some of these historic state visits. this is the most widely travelled monarch in history, the first monarch to go to places like russia and china, behind the old iron curtain, all over the world. and wherever she went, he went. 0ften, over the world. and wherever she went, he went. often, the duke would go when the queen couldn't go. when she was a young mother, she couldn't 90, she was a young mother, she couldn't go, for example, to sail round the world to open the 1956 olympics in melbourne, so she sent the duke. he was the only member of the royal family to visit the pitcairn islands. he has been to antarctica.
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he has always been to represent the queen. rule number one and a duty number one, support the queen, he always said to the staff. his role was primarily in support of her. she wakes up today and she is missing this titanic figure who has just been part of her life and the monarchy�*s life in the life of the nation and the commonwealth. it is really nice, actually, today and yesterday, to see the level of international tributes coming forth. genuine tributes from people who have all over the world been touched by the umpteenth thing that the duke was responsible for. so many charities, the armed forces, his legacy is colossal. i charities, the armed forces, his legacy is colossal.— charities, the armed forces, his
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legacy is colossal. i do want to ask ou of legacy is colossal. i do want to ask you of course _ legacy is colossal. i do want to ask you of course about _ legacy is colossal. i do want to ask you of course about your— legacy is colossal. i do want to ask you of course about your personal| you of course about your personal reflections as someone who spent time with him. it is so striking to hear people remembering his humour, people reflecting on the fact that perhaps that cheekiness, the humour didn't necessarily always come across in real life, or it came across in real life, or it came across in real life, or it came across in ways that we know and get portrayed as gaffes, but i'm interested in how you found him, in essence, working alongside him. you certainly had — essence, working alongside him. gm. certainly had to have done your homework. he did not suffer fools gladly. i did find myself asking what you would call a dam full question. and with good reason. people talk about... fundamentally, he was a kind man. you would walk into a room, go into a situation that was a stiff situation, and he wanted to break the ice, to make
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people relax a little, and he did that with humour. as he himself once said, if you time to time, that happened, but most of the time, whenever you saw him in a room, it might have been some big royal reception, in one corner you would hear gales of laughter. i would go, the duke is over there, laughter. i would go, the duke is overthere, because laughter. i would go, the duke is over there, because that was his way. i spent some time with him in the castle behind you, and after the fire of 1992, it was good duke who led the restoration. it was a very difficult period for the monarchy, and this wonderful 1000 year old castle, to see it go up in flames was a tragedy, but he took the situation by the scruff of the neck, led the restoration committee and he put it back together. if you go round a lot of parts of the castle,
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it is in better condition now than then. he has been the longest serving range of the great park in its 1000 year history. all over windsor, there are signs of the things he's done, whether it is the restoration of the deer herd or the famous long walk stop tucked away in the estate where you won't see it is actually a vineyard which was a thing where a few years ago he worked out that the soil might be good for producing grapes, and lo and behold, windsor castle sparkling wine is now so good that the queen has been serving it at state banquets to world leaders. i think it is on the global stage, those organisations, the duke of edinburgh award schemes, the world wildlife fund, pioneering organisations that made the way for
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so many environmental groups to follow, though sort of things. that is a legacy we will be talking about for many, many years to come. i is a legacy we will be talking about for many, many years to come. i had no idea that — for many, many years to come. i had no idea that the _ for many, many years to come. i had no idea that the wine _ for many, many years to come. i had no idea that the wine was _ for many, many years to come. i had no idea that the wine was produced here and i suspect a lot of people watching will not know that either. that is extraordinary. we live in a world where if you do anything and are committed to anything, you are expected to shout about it, tell the world on social media to get recognition for it. right at the beginning of your answer that reflected on the causes he was passionate about. i am struck by the number of people even today who have said, i didn't realise he was so interested in the environment from such an early age, or i didn't realise he was so interested in engineering. would your assessment be, he didn't shout about those sort of passions and commitments? you have ut of passions and commitments? you have put your _ of passions and commitments? gm. have put your finger on it. that was
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have put yourfinger on it. that was his style. he was so influential in so many ways, but always wanted to, as it were, redirect the spotlight away from himself. anyone who tried to suggest things like a commemorative stamp for your birthday, sir. he would say, don't be so ridiculous. he didn't like a fuss, that was always his way. he was very good at bringing people together, this convening power and getting other people to think it was their idea. so often he organised an extraordinary summit in the 805 where he got all the major faiths extraordinary summit in the 805 where he got all the majorfaiths in the world to gather and get them to all agree to sign up to various environmental policies. it was a major achievement at the time, he even got the pope on board, and not many people can do that. that was his way, he would never take the credit. there is nothing in windsor
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castle to save that it was the duke of edinburgh who led the restoration. there is a beautiful stained glass window, designed it himself. talented artist. the only way you know he has painted any pictures hanging in the royal palaces, that down in the bottom corner there is a very small e. but he has left a colossal mark and it is nice to see the whole world is waking up to that. find is nice to see the whole world is waking up to that.— is nice to see the whole world is waking up to that. and the impact in the weeks and _ waking up to that. and the impact in the weeks and months _ waking up to that. and the impact in the weeks and months to _ waking up to that. and the impact in the weeks and months to come - waking up to that. and the impact in the weeks and months to come on i waking up to that. and the impact in i the weeks and months to come on the royalfamily as a the weeks and months to come on the royal family as a whole, these are curious times in a pandemic but difficult times there have been in recent months for the royal family and before i let you go, i am
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interested in your thoughts on that? yes, he has been there, very much in private, the head of the family. clearly the queen is the head of everything. but she was always very keen that within the family that the duke was the head of the family and he was this authoritative figure. someone to whom all members of the family could turn. he was seen as a traditionalist and the disciplinarian, but he married into this institution, he knows what it is like to come up against some of the traditionalists of the establishment, because he did himself in the early days. he was always there for the younger members of the family. he was very good at sorting out, like all families, they would have their difficulties. i am quite sure that everyone will be
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rallying round the queen right now and making sure that as we go forward that everything can be... to provide solace for her. he leaves this legacy, but i think all members of the family will be very keen to honour his memory properly and appropriately and i think we will see a great show of royal unity in the weeks and months ahead. robert, thank ou the weeks and months ahead. robert, thank you very — the weeks and months ahead. robert, thank you very much _ the weeks and months ahead. robert, thank you very much for _ the weeks and months ahead. robert, thank you very much for your - the weeks and months ahead. robert, thank you very much for your time, . thank you very much for your time, royal biographer and documentary maker, robert hardmanjoining me. as i was talking to robert, gave me a chance to look around and there is a steady stream of people arriving at windsor castle. a lot of people holding bouquets of flowers. certainly many scores of people arriving in a steady stream arriving
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to pay their respects in windsor. leaders from around the world, both past and present, have been paying heartfelt tributes to the duke of edinburgh, praising his life of duty and devotion to the queen. those offering their condolences included the king and queen of spain, and american presidentjoe biden, who said that the duke's legacy will live on �*through all the charitable endeavours he shaped'. the bbc�*s james reynolds reports. right from the start of the queen's reign, prince philip was two steps behind and sometimes even out of shot. the model clearly worked. the royal couple went on to repeat it in more than 250 foreign trips. there were frequent visits to canada where the queen remains head of state. prince philip was a man of service, motivated by a sense of duty to others. i know, through the duke of edinburgh's award, he helped empower millions of young people from all backgrounds, including here in canada,
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to realise their greatest potential. the duke was remembered in australia, a country he visited more than 20 times. above all, he was a man who was steadfast. who could be relied upon. always standing by his queen. the duke met a number of american presidents. in 2016, at the age of 9a, he insisted on driving the 0bamas from the helipad to windsor castle, making a small piece of history as the oldest ever presidential chauffeur. he was a heck of a guy. his lifetime of service to the united kingdom and the whole commonwealth was visible to everybody for a long, long time. i think he is going to be missed particularly in the united kingdom. 99 years old, he never slowed down at all, which i admire the devil out of.
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prince philip, here with king felipe of spain, was related to many of the royal families of europe. his was a death in the family. "dear aunt lilibet", wrote spain's king and queen, "we are deeply saddened to hear about the passing away of dear uncle philip." this is how the news broke in south africa. the continent is home to commonwealth and former commonwealth states. my heart is saddened by the death of the prince, but, you know, the old man has lived, but he's a great loss. we just wish the family our condolences, you know, that they may be comforted. it is sad, yes, because we've lost a life, but then looking at the age he was, i guess it's a celebratory thing. we need to celebrate the prince's life.
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no need for crying. president mnangagwa of zimbabwe wrote... but it's the islanders of tanna in the south—west pacific who may feel the deepest loss of all. some worship prince philip as the reincarnation of an ancient warrior. james reynolds, bbc news. at windsor castle this morning we have been talking about so many members of the public arriving to pay their respects. a member of our team just saw the earl of wessex,
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the duke of edinburgh's youngest child, of course, arriving at windsor castle. we will continue to talk about the many tributes that are being paid. new zealand's prime minister, jacinda ardern, has announced that a memorial will be held following the prince's funeral. here she is reflecting on the duke's strong connection to new zealand. he visited with her majesty the queen on ten occasions, and then had additional solo visits. the first was in 1953 on the last was in 2002. they have a connection to a number of new zealand organisations, both as patrons and supporters, including, for instance, the new zealand defence force. for over 50 years, the duke of edinburgh awards have connected him to thousands of new zealand young people. and of course, perhaps most importantly, he has served in support of her majesty the queen for many, many years in her service to new zealand, the commonwealth
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and indeed the world. jacinda dern speaking in new zealand. gun salutes will take place across the uk, in gibraltar and from warships at sea to mark the death of the duke of edinburgh at the age of 99. saluting batteries will fire a1 rounds at one round every minute from midday at locations including the tower of london. the salute at woolwich barracks will feature first world war field guns that were fired at prince philip's wedding to the queen in 19a7. we can get more on this from our defence correspondent jonathan beale. jonathan, explain the role, the significance of a a1 gun salute? usually a 21 gun salute would be an honour for usually a 21 gun salute would be an honourfor a head of state usually a 21 gun salute would be an honour for a head of state visiting the united kingdom. but on special
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occasions they do fire a a1 gun salute. and part of this is the arcane laws that if you are firing from a royal fortress like the tower of london, you are allowed to fire a a1 gun salute and on special occasions like the death of winston churchill, the death of queen victoria, for example, they have fired a1 gun salute, for royal births, too. at midday, first of all the king's troops who are confined to barracks in woolwich, who would be in hyde park doing their salute, from the parade ground will do their a1 gun salute using those world war i guns that have been used, as you say, first of all for the royal wedding when prince philip married the queen, but also in her coronation, too. then we will also
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see that same event happening in all corners of the globe. but the tower of london, but in all corners of the uk, edinburgh, cardiff and belfast. given his connections to the royal navy, there will be a gun salute at the naval base in portsmouth, devonport and also gibraltar. also, two ships at sea, hms diamond, off the south coast left portsmouth yesterday will do that salute at sea. also in the gulf at the moment, hms montrose will fire their ceremonial guns in honour of the duke and to remember his life. jonathan beale, thank you.
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let's talk again to dr linda yoo, chair of the royal commonwealth society. the importance of the commonwealth and the extent to which we know the queen and the duke of edinburgh take that commitment very very seriously. they absolutely do. if you look at the number of countries the duke of edinburgh has accompanied the queen too, we are talking hundreds. he has taken solo visits, of course. the fact he has been to every commonwealth country, except for two — cameroon and rwanda — signifies the importance of the place and making that connection. the duke of edinburgh accompanied the queen to herfinal edinburgh accompanied the queen to her final official overseas visit, which was to malta, to open the commonwealth heads of government meeting, and that's not the only one they have been to. they have been to they have been to. they have been to the commonwealth games as it has been held around the commonwealth. in 2011, they were in perth in
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australia to celebrate the commonwealth. i think this really suggests that the commonwealth, in terms of the importance it has played in the charitable work of the duke, just cannot be overstated. about a third of his charities are related to the commonwealth. and a number of his key legacies, like the duke of edinburgh awards, millions of young people have been inspired to volunteer, work in the community, and that award has been granted in a1 commonwealth countries. in fact, one of my staff at the royal commonwealth society won a duke of edinburgh award and two years later when she finished university decided to come and work for us at the royal commonwealth society. she said it changed the way she thought about how she would pursue her work. she said, i get an award from the duke of edinburgh and i decide i am going to work in charities and be committed to the commonwealth, and here i am organising events at saint
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james's palace. i think that gives a sense of the impact he has had on young lives, and i think that will be one of the most powerful things that we will remember about the duke of edinburgh among many. filth. that we will remember about the duke of edinburgh among many.— of edinburgh among many. oh, yes, and his scheme, _ of edinburgh among many. oh, yes, and his scheme, we _ of edinburgh among many. oh, yes, and his scheme, we will— of edinburgh among many. oh, yes, and his scheme, we will talk- of edinburgh among many. oh, yes, and his scheme, we will talk about | and his scheme, we will talk about that more in the afternoon. that is profound, because that has reached such a large number of people, and thatis such a large number of people, and that is absolutely as he wanted it. another huge initiative she does —— you did was the emerging leaders dialogue. every six years, it was founded in 1956 in oxford, he brought together not just founded in 1956 in oxford, he brought together notjust government leaders but industry leaders, young leaders, people who are community leaders. he brought these disparate people together, about 200 or 300 of them and essentially sat them down in a residential programme, and it is based in different commonwealth
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countries and they go around the communities and they learn about the values that i think bind us together. that is one of the unique things about the commonwealth, the person—to—person connection, but it is also bound by values of equality, of protecting the environment, the shared values, and this is what he was trying to foster. at the end of that programme, which has been going on since the 19505, the leaders put together a plan for how they are going to make an impact on the world and in their community, so stepping outside of theirjobs as business leaders or government leaders, and that has been taken over by princess and, the princess royal, who is the president of it, and that will be another massive legacy, the holistic view to leadership which we all talk about a lot, but again, he was very much ahead of his time.— about a lot, but again, he was very much ahead of his time. that's very interesting- — much ahead of his time. that's very interesting. interesting _ much ahead of his time. that's very interesting. interesting to - much ahead of his time. that's very interesting. interesting to hear- interesting. interesting to hear your reflections. thank you very
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much indeed. among his many interests, prince philip had a passion for engineering. sirjim mcdonald, president of the royal academy of engineering, met him many times, and hejoins me now. do tell us about some of those experiences and how you remember him. ., ~ experiences and how you remember him. . ,, ., ., ., him. thank you, jane, and good morning- _ him. thank you, jane, and good morning- no — him. thank you, jane, and good morning. no organisation - him. thank you, jane, and good morning. no organisation could| him. thank you, jane, and good - morning. no organisation could ever have a patron who was so enthusiastic in such a wonderful supporterfrom engineering. the supporter from engineering. the entire supporterfrom engineering. the entire fellowship, made up of 1600 of the world's best engineers, are deeply saddened. through the course of yesterday, many of our fellows were giving us photographs and anecdotes of the wonderful time they spent with prince philip at the academies base in london. we named
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it prince philip house in honour of the duke. thejoy they it prince philip house in honour of the duke. the joy they felt in his association and leadership was terrific. an earlier speaker spoke about the duke's convening authority. we should remember that in 1965 the duke was president of the council of engineering institutions, and it was his vision to establish engineering at the heart of society which really led to the creation of the royal academy of engineering, so he laid out his own vision and brought together 130 of the country's best engineers at the time including sir frank whittle, the pioneer ofjet engines. barnes wallis, the inventor of the bouncing bomb. to really establish engineering at the heart of what we do. the intention was to ensure that engineering drove policy, the economy and industry. he made a contribution to well—being. he was always wonderful with people, and that has been a clear message that
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has come through time and again. i remember only a few years ago, with her majesty the queen and the duke of edinburgh visiting glasgow, they came to the university of strathclyde to open the technology and innovation centre. we took them on tours. prince philip went to the quantum technology labs. there were people lined up to tell him about quantum theory, and they demonstrated some great experiments. this was about the interaction between atoms and light, and the prince started to ask questions about laser technology, which drew our academics up short. this was a very informed visitor. they also put together a 3d model using ping—pong balls in different colours. you let them speak for a few minutes and then very seriously leaned forward and said, could you techno back to the beginning now please and tell me
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how these ping—pong balls are anything to do with quantum technology? that left the academics somewhat flummoxed, i have to say, and as he left them behind, he smiled wryly and said, i will be back later for the answer, and then spent a great five or ten minutes with our phd students. later in the visit, we were talking about space communications, and a technique that accesses parts of the radio spectrum that are underutilised and particularly useful to access rural communities. we set up a link with kenya, and we hadn't told him where the broadcast was coming from, but we are unable to broadcast and within seconds he recognised the profile of the land, and he said, this is a tree tops, isn't it? we were delighted he had recognised it. he spent some time responding to very probing questions about the future of communications systems, and this was clearly something that
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went all the way back to his time as a naval officer and his interest in engineering, but once we finished, rather than move onto the next exhibit, he wanted to stay and speak to our technicians and that is exactly what he did. very people oriented, no fuss, but a deep interest in engineering and technology. a sad loss now on our hands with our senior fellow, but we will push forward with his legacy, attracting people into engineering and putting it at the heart of the uk economy. i and putting it at the heart of the uk economy-— uk economy. i love your story, because that — uk economy. i love your story, because that combines - uk economy. i love your story, because that combines the - uk economy. i love your story, i because that combines the sense uk economy. i love your story, - because that combines the sense of humour, which people have been reflecting on in the last few hours, but also a great passion. briefly, were you able to get a sense of where that passion had originated? was it essentially from his time in the navy, was it something he was genuinely interested in and thought would help young people and would create jobs as well?—
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create jobs as well? indeed. undoubtedly, _ create jobs as well? indeed. undoubtedly, his _ create jobs as well? indeed. undoubtedly, his time - create jobs as well? indeed. undoubtedly, his time in - create jobs as well? indeed. | undoubtedly, his time in the create jobs as well? indeed. - undoubtedly, his time in the navy and his expertise as a pilot brought his own interest into engineering, science and technology. a passion for allowing young people to be excited about engineering and technology was driving all of this. i had the privilege of seeing him particularly with young people, asking genuinely about their interests, encouraging them to challenge themselves, that was an inspiration not only for the young people but for those of a more mature nature like myself that saw him inspire others and he will continue to do that, i have no doubt, and the academy will take that forward with pride as we put engineering front and centre. sir jim mcdonald, thank you for your reflections and thank you for joining us from ayrshire. the president of the royal academy of engineering. speaking to us from
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ayrshire in scotland. the duke of edinburgh had an obvious but also personal and close association with scotland, dating back to his schooldays in the 19305. he and the queen have enjoyed holidays with family at balmoral every autumn for many decades. as glen campbell reports. at holyrood palace, the lion rampant has raw —— is lowered. the city that shares its name with the duke of edinburgh takes in the news posted on the palace gates that his royal highness has died two months short of his 100th birthday. i do highness has died two months short of his 100th birthday.— of his 100th birthday. i do feel incredibly sad. _ of his 100th birthday. i do feel incredibly sad. it _ of his 100th birthday. i do feel incredibly sad. it will - of his 100th birthday. i do feel incredibly sad. it will be - of his 100th birthday. i do feel incredibly sad. it will be a - of his 100th birthday. i do feell incredibly sad. it will be a great loss and he was a real character. he has been there for many years at the queen's— has been there for many years at the queen's side the entire time, so it's a _ queen's side the entire time, so it's a huge — queen's side the entire time, so it's a huge loss to the country, especially— it's a huge loss to the country, especially with his long service. in especially with his long service. ballater on especially with his long service. in ballater on royal deeside, some remember a prince they met in person. remember a prince they met in erson. ~ ., ~' person. we were walking in the forest and _
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person. we were walking in the forest and this _ person. we were walking in the forest and this black _ person. we were walking in the forest and this black range - person. we were walking in the l forest and this black range rover came up and the duke got up and was fixing something at the side of the road. a, fixing something at the side of the road. �* . . .,. fixing something at the side of the road. �* . . . . . fixing something at the side of the road. ~ . . .. ., .., fixing something at the side of the road. ~ . . .. ., .. ., road. a character that we can all identify with- — road. a character that we can all identify with. it's _ road. a character that we can all identify with. it's sad, _ road. a character that we can all identify with. it's sad, and - road. a character that we can all identify with. it's sad, and i - road. a character that we can all identify with. it's sad, and i feel| identify with. it's sad, and i feel so sorry for— identify with. it's sad, and i feel so sorry for the _ identify with. it's sad, and i feel so sorry for the dear _ identify with. it's sad, and i feel so sorry for the dear queen. - identify with. it's sad, and i feel l so sorry for the dear queen. from his school— so sorry for the dear queen. from his school days _ so sorry for the dear queen. from his school days to _ so sorry for the dear queen. from his school days to big _ so sorry for the dear queen. from his school days to big national - his school days to big national moments like the opening of the scottish parliament, the duke of edinburgh's association with scotland was lifelong. the royal couple were a regular attendees of the highland games when they spent the highland games when they spent the summer at bell merrill. i think prince philip loved aberdeenshire because of the peace and quiet and indeed the outdoors. a man who was an accomplished sportsman, he loved attending the ballater games, i think he loved the competitive nature of highland games. in glasgow, more memories and reflections. absolutely gutted. i honestly thought he was going to get to the hundred. i think a lot of people actually wished he was going to get to that hundred. i'm gutted for the queen.
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| i did the duke of edinburgh award| scheme and that is something very positive he's give to the community. and from inverness... you kinda felt it was coming, but it's still a bit of a shock at the same time when you heard about it. yeah, it wasjust like a shame he didn't make it to a hundred, he was so close to his 100th and he was like a pillar of the royal family and quite an icon. more tributes will be paid at holyrood on monday when parliament is recalled to remember a remarkable prince. glenn campbell, edinburgh. it was at tree tops lodge in kenya where life changed for the duke of edinburgh. it was there that he had to tell his wife that king george had died. and that she was queen more from our africa correspondent.
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this is from tree tops lodge, whether royal couple stayed many years ago. the whether royal couple stayed many ears a . o. . whether royal couple stayed many earsato. , .,, years ago. the royal visitors ste - ed years ago. the royal visitors stepped off _ years ago. the royal visitors stepped off into _ years ago. the royal visitors stepped off into the - years ago. the royal visitors stepped off into the hot - years ago. the royal visitors - stepped off into the hot sunshine of nairobi. . , ., ., nairobi. prince philip often told the story of— nairobi. prince philip often told the story of how _ nairobi. prince philip often told the story of how his _ nairobi. prince philip often told the story of how his wife - nairobi. prince philip often told the story of how his wife came | nairobi. prince philip often told - the story of how his wife came here a princess, went up into the tree house, and when they came down the next day, she was a queen. at that moment, they didn't know that her father had passed away in the night. it wasn't until they got to a royal residence not too far away from here that he was tasked with the duty of having to tell her that her father had died and that she was now queen. this was a moment that transformed both their lives. also personally for prince philip. he was a navy
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officer with a promising career, but he had to give that up in order to support his wife. he took on many roles supporting the monarch and would step in when required. for example, in1963, would step in when required. for example, in 1963, when kenya gained independence, took part in the handover ceremony, standing in for his wife. 0ver handover ceremony, standing in for his wife. over the decades, he has travelled across this continent, particularly representing the commonwealth, which right now stands as a major legacy for prince philip queen elizabeth. we are here from windsor castle throughout the day of course on bbc news as members of the public continue to arrive. there is very
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much a steady stream, sizeable numbers of people arriving all the time, a lot of them holding flowers that they are directed to leave. the public are being asked not to gather in crowds because of the pandemic and to keep away, but of course, people want to be here to remember the duke of edinburgh. hello if you'rejust joining us in the uk and around the world — this is special bbc news coverage from windsor castle — following the death of the duke of edinburgh at the age of 99. gun salutes will take place across the uk today to mark an extraordinary life of duty and service. prince philip was by the queen's side for more than 70 years — the royal family mourns the loss of a beloved husband and father. if you were having problems, you could always go to him and know that he would listen and try to help. i think he'd probably
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want to be remembered as... ..as an individual in his own right really. details about the duke's funeral are due to be released later, as tributes are paid here in windsor, across the country and around the world. flags are flying at half—mast across the uk — including at buckingham palace, where small numbers of people have been gathering to pay their respects. the flags are flying at half mast across the naval base at portsmouth in preparation for the a1 gun salute which will take place at midday. we'll be reflecting on the duke's far—reaching legacy and hearing from those whose lives he touched.
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hello, welcome to this bbc news special. iamjane i amjane hill at i am jane hill at windsor castle where people are arriving all the time to pay their respects to the duke of edinburgh. the armed forces will lead a second day of tributes to the duke of edinburgh, who died yesterday aged 99, with gun salutes across the uk, in gibraltar and from warships at sea in about an hour's time. details of his funeral are also expected to be announced later. prince philip was the longest serving royal consort in british history and was a constant support to the queen during more than 70 years of marriage.
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today we will be looking back on his life with some of those who knew the duke well, the people whose lives were touched by his charitable endeavours and public duties. and we'll discuss how his legacy will live on. first, though, our royal correspondent nicholas witchell has this report. the duke's death will be a grievous loss for the queen after their 73 years of marriage. last night on a bbc programme, their eldest children paid tribute to him. i think he'd probably want to be remembered as... ..as an individual in his own right, really. his appreciation of how he could help the queen always seemed to be present in terms of supporting her, because she was very young when she became queen and it needed to be, i think, a double act for a lot of that time in order to allow her to take on that role. it was in august 2017
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on the forecourt of buckingham palace that the duke carried out his final solo engagement, inspecting a parade by the royal marines. it was pouring with rain, yet the duke, who was then 96, was not to be deterred. duty came first that day, as it had for so many decades, so often alongside the queen, but also pursuing his own public programme to which he brought his own famously forthright style. but the public image of the duke walking a few paces behind his wife only tells part of the story. his greatest contribution was the unseen support he gave to the queen as she coped with the often solitary role of head of state. 0ccasionally she alluded to it. he is my constant strength and guide, she said during the diamond jubilee. he was the one person she could always turn to. just before his 90th birthday,
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the duke had said in a bbc interview that he felt it was time to wind down. i reckon i've done my bit. i want to enjoy myself for a bit now. with less responsibility, less frantic rushing about, less preparation, less trying to think of something to say. yet it wasn't until six years later and that parade in the pouring rain on the forecourt of buckingham palace that there was any real evidence that he was retiring. now, the queen must continue without him. the world will pay its tributes to a man of strong personality who made a significant contribution to the nation's life, and his family will mourn a much loved father, grandfather, great—grandfather and husband. nicholas witchell, bbc news. with me here at windsor is our
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royal correspondent sarah campbell. sarah, in the last hour we have seen one member of the royalfamily arrive? one member of the royal family arrive? , . ., arrive? yes, prince edward, the queen and _ arrive? yes, prince edward, the queen and prince _ arrive? yes, prince edward, the queen and prince philip's - arrive? yes, prince edward, the l queen and prince philip's younger son drove past here and through those gates. surely that will be some comfort to the queen today as she reflects on the loss of the man who was the most important person in her life. we knew that prince charles travelled here from highgrove yesterday to add his comforts, add his words to her. it is worth reflecting it will be reflected in households across the uk that whilst we have been talking about the fact that the queen has spent a lot of time with the duke because they have been isolating, shielding at windsor castle, actually for the children and the widerfamily for whom we actually for the children and the wider family for whom we know the duke was such an important father figure. we talk about the queen taking on the public role in public,
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but privately, he was very much the head of the household and they have been deprived of direct contact with him over the last year because of the pandemic and prince charles fight before christmas. he said even though we have talked about social media and the zoom calls, it is not the same as being able to give somebody a hug. i am sure they will be sadness amongst the wider family that their connection with him has been much less than it otherwise would have been over the last year. prince edward, in the documentary that was shown last night, there was some nice tributes from the children to their father and is worth reflecting what he said. he said it was always a challenging role, but he did it with the most extraordinary flair, never try to overshadow the queen and he has always been there as the rock in the queen's life and within the family. so some reflection of how important prince philip was to the family. yes, and such a difficult year for
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families up and down the country. in one sense, the royalfamily families up and down the country. in one sense, the royal family wasn't immune to that, the queen and prince philip had their own small lockdown with just a very small number of staff with them for much of the last year, really? staff with them for much of the last year. really?— year, really? yes, it was referred to as hms _ year, really? yes, it was referred to as hms bubble. _ year, really? yes, it was referred to as hms bubble. before - year, really? yes, it was referred to as hms bubble. before that i year, really? yes, it was referred i to as hms bubble. before that time, the duke of edinburgh retired in august 2017 but he spent much of his time on the sandringham estate in a cottage there. the queen carried on her role as the monarch and was having to spend more time in windsor in london, carrying out her official duties. the pandemic brought them together, brought them to windsor castle and they probably spent more time than they otherwise would have them because there weren't any royal engagements for the queen to go to. but for the widerfamily, engagements for the queen to go to. but for the wider family, that is something many families across the country will be able to empathise with, they have separated, isolated. going forward, the funeral, we are
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expecting to have some details released this afternoon. of course, a royalfuneral would released this afternoon. of course, a royal funeral would have released this afternoon. of course, a royalfuneral would have been planned years and years in advance, but who could have planned for a pandemic? that means changes will have to be made to those plans because there is a clear feeling we cannot have funeral processions, anything that will bring lots of people out onto the streets. that will be avoided. also physically, the numbers of people who will be allowed to attend his funeral. it would have been hundreds of people, now that will be about 30 people, so how will that be organised? the queen has to approve those plans and as soon as she has, they will be made public. mil as soon as she has, they will be made public-— made public. all right, sarah campbell. — made public. all right, sarah campbell, thank _ made public. all right, sarah campbell, thank you - made public. all right, sarah campbell, thank you very - made public. all right, sarah - campbell, thank you very much. the household cavalry has marked his death with a salute and they rode through the streets of wendy before saluting in front of the castle here. let's find out what is
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happening in other parts of the country. let's speak to sangita myska at buckingham palace. what has been happening where you are over the course of the morning? of course, buckingham palace, so of course, buckingham palace, so much the centrepiece of public life in the uk, a place of both celebration and today, commemoration. much as it was yesterday, there has been a steady stream of people coming through past the palace gates, leaving flowers and just stopping to remember, reflect and pay their respects to prince philip and keep in their thoughts, her majesty the queen. almost everyone i speak to talks about his sense of duty, his sense of purpose and how he served the country. notjust as a naval officer during world war ii, but as the queen's consort. two of those i spoke to, jackie and her daughter grace, overcome with emotion as they laid theirflowers. this is grace, overcome with emotion as they laid their flowers. this is what they had to say. he
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laid their flowers. this is what they had to say.— laid their flowers. this is what they had to say. he means a lot to us. the they had to say. he means a lot to us- the majority — they had to say. he means a lot to us. the majority of— they had to say. he means a lot to us. the majority of the _ they had to say. he means a lot to us. the majority of the british - us. the majority of the british public— us. the majority of the british public really support them and they appreciate, especially in this time of covid _ appreciate, especially in this time of covid they have been a strength and constant in their lives. this of covid they have been a strength and constant in their lives.- and constant in their lives. this is grace your— and constant in their lives. this is grace your daughter? _ and constant in their lives. this is grace your daughter? this - and constant in their lives. this is grace your daughter? this is - and constant in their lives. this is l grace your daughter? this is grace, es. you grace your daughter? this is grace, yes- you have _ grace your daughter? this is grace, yes. you have brought _ grace your daughter? this is grace, yes. you have brought some - grace your daughter? this is grace, i yes. you have brought some flowers, what have you _ yes. you have brought some flowers, what have you brought? _ yes. you have brought some flowers, what have you brought? she - yes. you have brought some flowers, what have you brought? she wanted | yes. you have brought some flowers, i what have you brought? she wanted to brint the what have you brought? she wanted to bring the flowers _ what have you brought? she wanted to bring the flowers for _ what have you brought? she wanted to bring the flowers for prince _ what have you brought? she wanted to bring the flowers for prince philip. - bring the flowers for prince philip. she sees— bring the flowers for prince philip. she sees him on the telly and we live just — she sees him on the telly and we live just around the corner, so she has grown — live just around the corner, so she has grown up here. it has been a part of— has grown up here. it has been a part of her— has grown up here. it has been a part of her life, too. no has grown up here. it has been a part of her life, too.— part of her life, too. no doubt. such a special— part of her life, too. no doubt. such a special man. _ part of her life, too. no doubt. such a special man. over - part of her life, too. no doubt. such a special man. over the i part of her life, too. no doubt. - such a special man. over the years has been _ such a special man. over the years has been there, he has never wavered _ has been there, he has never wavered. we just appreciate him so much _ wavered. we 'ust appreciate him so much. ~ ., , , wavered. we 'ust appreciate him so much. ~ . , , , much. what is interesting is the number of _ much. what is interesting is the number of people _ much. what is interesting is the number of people bringing - much. what is interesting is the| number of people bringing really young children. when i speak to the parents, they say that we just hope
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the kids will remember a bit of us coming here and paying our respects. there is so much love and affection for the queen and they want their children to remember what an important part top prince philip played in her life. i was looking back at buckingham palace this morning, just looking at the balcony behind me. isn't that so much the scene we have seen at every important occasion in this country, prince philip standing right next to the queen, always there by her side, surrounded often by his family. the flag, the union flag at half mast today over buckingham palace in tribute to prince philip. as the day moves on, the palace and the government stressing we are still in the middle of a pandemic and asking people to respect the social distancing rules. many people have lost their lives, the palace are
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more aware about the many and are urging people to make a donation their favourite charity in the name of prince philip, rather than come here. if you do find yourself coming here, you will be moved on quickly. you may be allowed to lay your flowers and then you will be expected to exit. more from us as the day goes on. jane, back to you. thank you. just in the last few moments of statement has come through from the vatican on behalf of pope francis, expressing his regret at the death of the duke of edinburgh. let me read a little bit of that statement. we are saddened to hear of the death of prince philip. his holiness, pope francis, offers heartfelt condolences to her majesty and two members of the royal family. recalling prince philip's devotion to his marriage and family, his distinguished record of public service and his commitment to education and the advancement of
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future generations, his holiness commends him to the merciful love of christ our redeemer. that is part of the statement just released christ our redeemer. that is part of the statementjust released by the vatican. we are reflecting on the many tributes being paid across the country and across the commonwealth and the world. we're also talking about the a1 gun salute will happen at midday british time. 0ur reporterjohn maguire, is in portsmouth — where one of the gun salutes will be taking place. yes, portsmouth naval base, the largest of the royal navy's bases in the uk. as i am talking to, i can see two of the new aircraft carriers with their flags flying at half mast. the queen elizabeth and the prince of wales named after the duke of�*s wife and his son, respectively.
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the guns that will take part in the a1 gun salute of those there. three will fire shells and the other one is a reserve. they will fire around on each minute. so starting at midday, it will obviously take a1 minutes. there are going to be similar tributes to the national capitals across the uk and also on board ship and at various military basesin board ship and at various military bases in the uk also gibraltar, as one example. the a1 gun salute sits right at the top of the ceremonial tributes in extremely rare honour. it is being done today, not only in recognition of the duke and embed —— duke of edinburgh long decades of service, but also his military career. he was a naval officer in the second world war and was mentioned in dispatches for a cpap that place off the coast of greece in action against the italian navy.
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a lot of people have been talking in the last 2a hours or so about the fact his naval career was cut short once his wife acceded to the throne. would he have reached right to the top and become perhaps first selo, the overall commander of the british royal navy? that is a point of conjecture, but it was a service he very much enjoyed being part of when he was a young officer, one of the youngest first lieutenants on board ship during the war. and spent an extremely busy time. he has maintained contact with the royal navy, as with all of the other armed services, but in particular the royal navy and the royal marines during recent years. his last public appearance was with the royal marines. the crew will be performing their seller —— there are ceremonial
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duties. up until yesterday, their seller —— there are ceremonial duties. up untilyesterday, he their seller —— there are ceremonial duties. up until yesterday, he was very much one of their brothers, one of their comrades in arms or stop your always enjoyed meeting service men and women. there was a great story yesterday where he flew in to see royal marines in no way do warfare training covered in snow, obviously. he was scheduled to sit down and have a formal lunch with the commanding officer but instead decided to sit down with the lads with their mess tins, sit down with them and use the vip time talking to them and use the vip time talking to the royal marines. it gives you i think a measure of the man that he always enjoyed doing perhaps the unpredictable but certainly getting a good idea of how everything worked from the nuts and bolts of something like an aircraft carrier, a jet or helicopter, just trying to find out about the boots and the food that the other non—commissioned men and women would have been experiencing
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in their service. as i say, portsmouth naval base very much preparing for what i think will be a very auspicious and special occasion. very auspicious and special occasion-— very auspicious and special occasion. ., , ., occasion. john, many thanks. of course, occasion. john, many thanks. of course. we _ occasion. john, many thanks. of course, we will _ occasion. john, many thanks. of course, we will have _ occasion. john, many thanks. of course, we will have full- occasion. john, many thanks. of. course, we will have full coverage of the a1 gun salute, as you would expect. and katy austin is also here in another part of windsor castle where flowers have been laid. you have moved to another part of the town. lots of people arriving, bringing flowers, and many of the flowers that have already been left have been moved to where you are. explain what is happening there in another part of windsor.— another part of windsor. that's ri . ht. we another part of windsor. that's right- we are — another part of windsor. that's right. we are at _ another part of windsor. that's right. we are at the _ another part of windsor. that's right. we are at the top - another part of windsor. that's right. we are at the top of- another part of windsor. that's right. we are at the top of the | another part of windsor. that's - right. we are at the top of the long walk in windsor great park. the park itself here is very busy with people out walking with their families, with their dogs orjust out for exercise. behind me, you can probably see, there are flowers which have been left outside the
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gates. the advice to the public is, of course, not to travel, not to turn up to bring flowers and lead tributes, but still some people as they go about their walks this morning have been standing for a moment of reflection, leaving some flowers. a lot of the people we have seen coming here have been families, and some of the messages are very obviously from children. one message has been written talking about how the child who wrote it looks forward to learning about prince philip at school, one would presume. a steady stream of people coming past year. it is not too busy, of course. everyone is very keen to avoid crowds, as we are still under covid restrictions and social distancing is being encouraged. yes, we think the flowers that were laid yesterday have been removed. fresh ones have been put there this morning. the plastic wrapping is being taken off, so a lovely display by me, everything from simple daffodils to
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something a little more elaborate. we know that the queen is in residence here at windsor as well as she mourns the passing of her husband of more than 70 years. really, quite a lot of people here in windsor today. the crowds very much building in the last hour or so. quite quiet much earlier this morning when we first arrived, but now there are scores of people arriving here at windsor castle. political parties across the uk have suspended their campaigning for elections on 6th may following the death of the duke of edinburgh. mps will also return to parliament a day early on monday, following the easter recess. 0ur political correspondent
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helen catt is at downing street. helen, in addition to that, we expect we will hear a few more details a little later on today about funeral arrangements, which have some government involvement as well. we have some government involvement as well. ~ ., , . have some government involvement as well. . . , . ., have some government involvement as well. ~ . , . ., ., ., well. we are expecting to hear that, es, well. we are expecting to hear that, yes. although _ well. we are expecting to hear that, yes. although very _ well. we are expecting to hear that, yes, although very much _ well. we are expecting to hear that, yes, although very much when - well. we are expecting to hear that, yes, although very much when it - yes, although very much when it comes to things like funerals, these sorts of arrangements, it is very much the palace will take the lead. the government role is to be supportive, to take a step back publicly and facilitate what it is that the palace decides at the palace once. here in downing street this morning, it is very quiet. the flags, like on government buildings across the country, flying at half mast, as they are in whitehall and parliament. this is how it's going to stay politically for a few days yet. campaigning has been suspended in elections taking place on the 6th of may. the business of government will still go on but it will be done in a very different way, much more
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muted, so we won't get any big government announcements or see ministers going on visits, touring the tv studios as we usually would. the exception will be if there are any big public health announcements that need to be made because of the pandemic, but apart from that, we expect things to be very quiet from ministers and the government. ministers say they have already received thousands of messages of condolence from across the world for the duke of edinburgh, and on monday, mps will be coming back to parliament a day early to pay their own tributes. the prime minister will be those, starting at 2:30pm, circular stammer will respond, and individual mps will be able to pay their own tributes. it will last until 10pm. the duke of edinburgh didn't have a formal constitutional role, but i think mps will want to pay tribute to the role he played, that major role he did play in uk
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public life of a seven decades. helen, thank you very much, in downing street. let's take some time to reflect on the life and legacy of the duke of edinburgh. joining me now is the royal biographer and historian, robert lacey. very good of you to be with us here on bbc news. at the end of a year in which the whole nation has talked so much about loss and grief and death, families have been through such a difficult year and now the queen herself woke up this morning a widow. , ,, ., , ., herself woke up this morning a widow. , ,, ., , ., widow. yes. she has, of course, had the curious— widow. yes. she has, of course, had the curious blessing _ widow. yes. she has, of course, had the curious blessing because - widow. yes. she has, of course, had the curious blessing because of- the curious blessing because of covid for the last year of actually having the duke here in her bubble. rather unexpected because he had taken retirement to sandringham. 0ne taken retirement to sandringham. one of the happy results, therefore, was that he came to be with her. you know, we speculate about these
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things. there is so much that he gave to her life people are talking about it endlessly. i would pick up one thing, the sense of humour. i'm sure that's what, one of the things she will be missing terribly. all of us here, i think it's one of the reasons why people feel drawn to come here. we all knew his sometimes ghastly sense of humour the so—called garths. she was the principal recipient of that. the queen, for all her seriousness and duty, has an ability to put things humorous terms. when this castle burnt down, she was the person who came up with the phrase annus horriblis. the duke was very much her partner in doing that sort of thing.
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her partner in doing that sort of thin. ,, ., , thing. strength and stayed, we remember _ thing. strength and stayed, we remember so _ thing. strength and stayed, we remember so vividly. _ thing. strength and stayed, we remember so vividly. and - thing. strength and stayed, we i remember so vividly. and always thing. strength and stayed, we - remember so vividly. and always done with such subtlety. _ remember so vividly. and always done with such subtlety. he _ remember so vividly. and always done with such subtlety. he was _ remember so vividly. and always done with such subtlety. he was such - remember so vividly. and always done with such subtlety. he was such a - with such subtlety. he was such a man's man, someone with such determined opinions, but never did he upstage his wife. he was always notjust he upstage his wife. he was always not just literally one he upstage his wife. he was always notjust literally one step behind but never did he trespassed into her area. as i look at windsor, i think of how, after the death of diana, he identified the particular problems that william and harry would be having. and the way in which the boys were just down the road at eton school, and he was the one who suggested that the queen and he should invite them up to sunday lunch, so william and harry would come up for sunday lunch, not every week, because some weeks they would go with their father and so on, and prince philip suggested to the queen
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that this would be a good opportunity with william to stop preparing him for his future responsibilities. and perhaps they could talk about this sort of thing after lunch. my point here about philip is that, having said all this up, and had the lunch with william, at that point, when the time came for the serious talk about the future, prince philip would quietly leave the room and leave grandmother and grandson alone to create this special bond which of course we see today very much. prince william, you know, he is close to prince charles, obviously, because we look to the future of the monarchy. prince william very much takes his tone from his grandmother, but then also his grandfather, too. when you see prince william, i always think prince william, i always think prince philip is standing there. we fortet
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prince philip is standing there. we forget going back that many decades that that must have been very difficult thing for a man with a successful naval career at that time to have to do, to step back at a time when that really wasn't done. we are onlyjust getting there with egalitarianism between the genders as it is, and that many years ago, he knew what he was taking on, but nonetheless it was difficult for a man clearly with leadership qualities. man clearly with leadership tualities. , ., man clearly with leadership qualities-— man clearly with leadership tualities. , ., , qualities. yes, and with dignity. you are right. _ qualities. yes, and with dignity. you are right. he _ qualities. yes, and with dignity. you are right. he wasn't - qualities. yes, and with dignity. you are right. he wasn't quite l qualities. yes, and with dignity. i you are right. he wasn't quite the first househusband, but back in the 505, when thinking was so conventional by our standards, the way in which he was able to subordinates his bubbling ideas and personality and channel it all into support of his wife, because of course, she realised the difficulties, was looking forjobs
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she could give him. she gave him the job of looking after the coronation. he came up with the idea of televising the coronation, which the courtiers didn't want. and he pushed for it. , ., ., ., for it. they would have thought it was tuite for it. they would have thought it was quite radical, _ for it. they would have thought it was quite radical, i _ for it. they would have thought it was quite radical, i presume, - for it. they would have thought it was quite radical, i presume, for| was quite radical, i presume, for suggesting that. the was quite radical, i presume, for suggesting that-— was quite radical, i presume, for suggesting that. the courtiers were sus - icious suggesting that. the courtiers were suspicious of _ suggesting that. the courtiers were suspicious of him. _ suggesting that. the courtiers were suspicious of him. they _ suggesting that. the courtiers were suspicious of him. they don't - suggesting that. the courtiers were suspicious of him. they don't reallyj suspicious of him. they don't really like change. that's theirjob, really, to keep things solid and as they have been. so, this energetic young man comes in with all his ideas. he wasn't well received, and of course, he had this particular grievance at that time, cultivated by his uncle, lord mountbatten, that the family name should be changed. no more windsors, it is edinburgh or mountbatten now. he accepted that
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the government, backed by the queen mother, wouldn't accept that. a paradox, but here we are doing his duty and supporting his wife, but also contributing so much to everyone else's life. i also contributing so much to everyone else's life.- also contributing so much to everyone else's life. i know you will stay with _ everyone else's life. i know you will stay with us. _ everyone else's life. i know you will stay with us. we _ everyone else's life. i know you will stay with us. we will - everyone else's life. i know you will stay with us. we will talk i everyone else's life. i know you . will stay with us. we will talk more to robert, the author, historian and biographer, a little later here on bbc news. we have seen prince edward here at windsor castle. he arrived in a car at the castle within the last hour or so. driving through the gates just behind last hour or so. driving through the gatesjust behind me in the last hour or so. driving through the gates just behind me in the last hour. the duke of edinburgh had an obvious, personaland hour. the duke of edinburgh had an obvious, personal and close association with scotland.
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he and the queen have enjoyed holidays with family at balmoral every autumn for many decades. as glen campbell reports. at holyrood palace the lion rampant is lowered, as the city that has long shared its name with the duke of edinburgh takes in the news posted on the palace gates that his royal highness has died two months short of his 100th birthday. i do feel incredibly sad. i think it will be a great loss and he was a real character. the prince has been around for 99 years and has been at the queen's side the entire time. so it's a huge loss to the country, especially given his long service. in ballater on royal deeside, some remember a prince they met in person. we were walking in the forest and this black range rover came up and the duke got out and was fixing something at the side of the road... he was a very active gentleman for his age. ..he must have been 9a.
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he was a character we can all identify with. _ yeah, sad. and ifeel so sorry for the dear queen. from his school days to big national moments like the opening of the scottish parliament, the duke of edinburgh's association with scotland was lifelong. the royal couple were regular attenders of the highland games when they summered at balmoral. i think prince philip loved aberdeenshire because of the peace and quiet and indeed the outdoors. a man who was an accomplished sportsman, he loved attending the ballater games, i think he loved the competitive nature of highland games. in glasgow, more memories and reflections. absolutely gutted. i honestly thought he was going to get to the hundred. i think a lot of people actually wished he was going to get to that hundred. i'm gutted for the queen. | i did the duke of edinburgh award| scheme and that is something very positive he's give to the community.
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and from inverness... you kinda felt it was coming, but it's still a bit of a shock at the same time when you heard about it. yeah, it wasjust like a shame he didn't make it to a hundred, he was so close to his 100th and he was like a pillar of the royal family and quite an icon. more tributes will be paid at holyrood on monday when parliament is recalled to remember a remarkable prince. glenn campbell, edinburgh. let's go to edinburgh and join our correspondent. we are in the front of edinburgh castle and the gun salute for scotland will happen here at edinburgh castle at noon. some of
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them have come to enjoy the views and the sunshine and others are in edinburgh today possibly remembering the duke of edinburgh. people have been told not to gather, to stay at home and watch the gun salute at home. but there are a few people around here today. as we were seeing, the duke of edinburgh has touched many lives. notjust here in the city, but also across scotland in royal deeside particularly where the royal family used to go on so many of their holidays. but back in the 305 he went to school in gordonstoun wait up in murray and he seemed to enjoy his time at gordonstoun, making a bit of an impact there, particularly in sport. he was the captain of the hockey team, captain of the cricket team
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and he was also head boy. we have had a statement from gordonstoun and the principle there. she has said that gordonstoun community has joined together to convey their condolences. she said he was supportive of people is fulfilling, not only their academic potential, but also developing life skills. she also said we are immensely grateful for his support over the years and his presence and support in school life will be sorely missed. he kept in touch with gordonstoun over the years. he was there around five years. he was there around five years ago for their 80th anniversary and the principal was saying, instead of sitting with them to have his lunch, he wanted to mingle with the people. he wanted to find out who they were and what they were up to and talk to them about their education and aspirations. also in
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edinburgh, he was chancellor of the university for almost 60 years. we have had a statement from the university. they said they were proud he had served as chancellor from 1953, to 2010 and they mentioned his passionate belief in education which we keep hearing about, and in their words, education which we keep hearing about, and in theirwords, his innate inquisitiveness in scientific development. they said his tireless service was greatly appreciated by all. so this was definitely a man who touched the lives of many across scotland. ., , ., ,, who touched the lives of many across scotland. ., , ., ~ , ., scotland. from edinburgh, thank you ve much. joining me now is ian lloyd, the author of the duke: 100 chapters in the life of prince philip. thank you forjoining us. i know you
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have spoken to a large number of people in preparation for your book. tell us more about what you learnt, what people said to you? i tell us more about what you learnt, what people said to you?— tell us more about what you learnt, what people said to you? i think the thin that what people said to you? i think the thing that surprised _ what people said to you? i think the thing that surprised me _ what people said to you? i think the thing that surprised me doing - what people said to you? i think the thing that surprised me doing the i thing that surprised me doing the book was the sensitive side of prince philip, the side he quite often chose to hide. for instance, he had a love of poetry which one biographer mentioned to the queen mother. she said, i have never heard of it. princess margaret said, he must have heard of it. but he had over 200 poetry books in his library. and a thousand bucks of art and about 500 books on religion. he was a widely read man who chose to hide that side. it was a very soft side to him. he was a great letter
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writer. the late lady mountbatten told me that when her son was killed in the atrocity that killed earl mountbatten of burma, she wasn't able to go to the funeral because she was seriously injured. but prince philip wrote her a ten page letter with the details of the funeral and mother would want to know. that is very thoughtful and she found it a great help. there was a story about a yachtsman who he had met at cowes and the man was dying of cancer. he wrote a long letter again, to the man that he thought he should have. it was a side didn't like to show. i think he was that generation where you keep those things private. that generation where you keep those things private-— things private. that was interesting, _ things private. that was interesting, i— things private. that was interesting, i was - things private. that was interesting, i was aboutj things private. that was i interesting, i was about to things private. that was - interesting, i was about to ask things private. that was _ interesting, i was about to ask you why people felt that was the case? his upbringing, his schooling and i am interested in what people said to you about his very difficult early
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years? flit you about his very difficult early ears? . ., , ., ., you about his very difficult early ears? .., , ., ., , years? of course, he had a very problematic— years? of course, he had a very problematic childhood. - years? of course, he had a very problematic childhood. i - years? of course, he had a very problematic childhood. i think i years? of course, he had a veryl problematic childhood. i think he coped by bottling it up. i was told by one, in his childhood it was either sink or swim and he decided very much to swim. his mother was taken to a sanatorium, she had terrible mental issues. his sister is married within eight months of each other and his father went to monte carlo with a mistress. he was effectively an orphan, if you like, during his teenage years. one of them did say, he found in a way, the home he had always craved with the royal family. home he had always craved with the royalfamily. they home he had always craved with the royal family. they were the most secure of families in that the lifestyle of the queen leads is similar to the one queen victoria led with bow moral and windsor castle and so on. —— bow moral. they
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were very tight unit. prince philip the home and the security he probably craved. which i had never thought about, looking back. ithink the queen gave him security and the house of windsor, if you like. idit house of windsor, if you like. ian llo d, house of windsor, if you like. ian lloyd, thank you very much for joining us. senior church figures have been paying tribute to prince philip, with his own faith a central part of his life. we are going to talk more about that and how important the christian faith is to the queen and the duke of edinburgh and we will take some time to reflect on that in the next few minutes. but let's turn our attentions abroad. lots of responses and tributes being paid from overseas.
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in australia, there has been a military tribute to the duke. gunfire. a series of gun salutes fired a1 rounds outside parliament house. the flag over the sydney harbour bridge has been lowered at half—mast. so too has the one over parliament house in the capital. the prime minister scott morrison said memories of prince philip will be of his candour and of a unique, forceful and authentic personality. gun salutes will take place across the uk, in gibraltar and from warships at sea to mark the death of the duke of edinburgh at the age of 99. we can get more on this from our defence correspondent jonathan beale. the significance of the gun salutes, they are fired from ships at sea? yes, hms montrose in the gulf, and hms diamond just off the south coast
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left portsmouth with its flag lowered yesterday, will be taking part in this a1 gun salute. the focus will be probably at the barracks in woolwich where the king's trip, the royal horse artillery, who traditionally do this role for heads of states. a 21 gun salute is normal, but this is an important occasion for the nation and the commonwealth. it is a a1 gun salute, one round fired every minute. they will be using the same guns from the first world war that were used for the marriage, the wedding to the queen by the duke of edinburgh, but also at the coronation. and there is a significance. we will also see a gun salute from the tower of london, but also in cardiff, in edinburgh and in belfast. then, there is a focus, a
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particular naval focus, they will be fired in portsmouth and devonport. it is worth remembering the association that you can bed —— duke of edinburgh had the royal navy. he died the lord high admiral, a title bestowed on him by the queen. thahk bestowed on him by the queen. thank ou for bestowed on him by the queen. thank you for now. — bestowed on him by the queen. thank you for now, jonathan _ bestowed on him by the queen. thank you for now, jonathan beale. - bestowed on him by the queen. thank you for now, jonathan beale. as - you for now, jonathan beale. as people continue to arrive in windsor, hundreds of people are now here at the castle. joining me now is the royal editor at hello magazine, emily nash. emily, your thoughts. you won't be able to see what i can see around windsor, but a large amount of people bringing flowers. peoplejust wanting to be here, i suppose? your thoughts on what the nation feels today? i thoughts on what the nation feels toda ? ~ ., , ~' today? i think even though the duke was 99, today? i think even though the duke was 99. we — today? i think even though the duke
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was 99, we know— today? i think even though the duke was 99, we know he _ today? i think even though the duke was 99, we know he had _ today? i think even though the duke was 99, we know he had been - today? i think even though the duke was 99, we know he had been in - today? i think even though the duke was 99, we know he had been in illl was 99, we know he had been in ill health, people are still shocked at the announcement of its debt and have great sympathy for the queen and members of herfamily and want to do what they can. people are being mindful of social distancing regulations that they feel the need to go to royal residences and place flowers. the royalfamily to go to royal residences and place flowers. the royal family have asked people to make donations to charities associated with the duke in lieu of doing that. it demonstrates the sense of loss and emotion people are experiencing. yes, as so very many families have this year across the uk. it has been such a difficult and traumatic year for so many thousands of people. the royal family has gone through that as well. the queen and duke of edinburgh had to form their own covid bubble in windsor with quite a
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small number of staff. that is how they have had to live over the course of the last year? it speaks volumes that _ course of the last year? it speaks volumes that they _ course of the last year? it speaks volumes that they are _ course of the last year? it speaks volumes that they are doing - volumes that they are doing everything within the regulations, there is no attempt to request special treatment because they are the royal family. special treatment because they are the royalfamily. they are going through what so many, hundreds and thousands of people in the uk have experienced losing a loved one in this pandemic and the difficult circumstances surrounding the funeral arrangements. because so many have experienced that loss in the past year, it is something that is striking a chord with people, hence this outpouring of affection towards the queen. emily nash, for now, thank you very much. let's talk a little more about the importance of the christian faith to the royal family. senior church figures have been
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paying tribute to prince philip for his service as consort to a christian monarch, with his own faith a central part of his life. i'm joined now by a former chaplain to the queen, dr gavin ashenden, who is in normandy. thank you so much for your time. i believe you have also a personal connection through your father, i believe, serving alongside prince philip. believe, serving alongside prince phili. , , ., believe, serving alongside prince phili. , , . ., . philip. yes, my father and prince philip. yes, my father and prince philip were _ philip. yes, my father and prince philip were officers _ philip. yes, my father and prince philip were officers together - philip. yes, my father and prince philip were officers together on i philip. yes, my father and prince i philip were officers together on the same ship. in the north sea convoys stop. that same ship. in the north sea convoys that was an important time for them both. my dad remembered the collegiality of those years fondly. what were some of his remembrances? how did he remember him? so many
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people talk about what a high—flying career prince philip could have gone on to have, had that been something that was open to him. he on to have, had that been something that was open to him.— that was open to him. he was an immensely _ that was open to him. he was an immensely competent _ that was open to him. he was an immensely competent officer, i that was open to him. he was an i immensely competent officer, and those experiences in the north sea convoys were really quite terrifying. my father wrote about them in private memoirs, and i was astonished at what men, and my dad and prince philip were exactly the same age, and what they went through together was hard to imagine for those of us who... had thought that prince philip was an excellent officer, a very good friend, and a marvellous man, one he admired and liked very much. flit marvellous man, one he admired and liked very much-— liked very much. of course, you are former chaplain _ liked very much. of course, you are former chaplain to _ liked very much. of course, you are former chaplain to her— liked very much. of course, you are former chaplain to her majesty - liked very much. of course, you are former chaplain to her majesty the | former chaplain to her majesty the queen, and we know that her personal christian faith is of enormous importance to her. in your
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experience, was it equally important to the duke of edinburgh? yes. experience, was it equally important to the duke of edinburgh?— to the duke of edinburgh? yes, it was. to the duke of edinburgh? yes, it was- although — to the duke of edinburgh? yes, it was. although expressed - to the duke of edinburgh? yes, it was. although expressed more i was. although expressed more privately. as a lot of people have said, he is a lot —— he was a very private person in a lot of ways. his mother became a greek orthodox nun at the end of her life. she gave away her belongings, albeit quite an eccentric woman. she chain smoked and played canasta. she also harboured jewish refugees in her own flat during the war, risking her own liberty. she was an important influence. his wife has shown the greatest possible christian fortitude and example and really been the most wonderful ambassador for authentic christianity in a period of time when the church has begun to lose some of its influence
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and grip on the popular imagination due to a whole series of factors, but prince philip and the queen have been at the forefront of being part of the glue that has held together the really important values of christian civilisation which i think we are going to miss as they become increasingly eroded. fight! we are going to miss as they become increasingly eroded.— increasingly eroded. and the coming da s and increasingly eroded. and the coming days and weeks. _ increasingly eroded. and the coming days and weeks, the _ increasingly eroded. and the coming days and weeks, the most _ increasingly eroded. and the coming days and weeks, the most difficult i days and weeks, the most difficult that one can imagine for any individual who has lost a partner of so very many decades' standing, a desperately difficult time for the queen, and i can only assume, i am interested in your thoughts on whether her christian faith will help sustain her during an immensely sad time. , ., , ., help sustain her during an immensely sad time. , . , ., , ., sad time. christians are used to deaunt sad time. christians are used to dealing with _ sad time. christians are used to dealing with death. _ sad time. christians are used to dealing with death. after- sad time. christians are used to dealing with death. after all, i sad time. christians are used to l dealing with death. after all, our whole faith is based on the death and resurrection of christ, and for those who pray, there was a very real sense of the communion of
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saints. if you like, prince philip has moved from one way of being to another, and the queen will have been preparing, as a good christian does, for her own death. although death is painful and the loneliness that follows it is hard to bear for all of us, nonetheless, at the heart of the christian faith, there is this absolute certainty that we are going to meet again, because the real life we have been preparing for is about to start. i have no doubt that while the queen will be profoundly saddened at the loss of her lifelong companion, her sense of the reality of god and of heaven, the reality of god and of heaven, the reality of life after death, will be of an immense comfort and support to her, particularly at a time when it becomes personal, like this. , ., , time when it becomes personal, like this. , . , ., ., this. very many thanks for your reflections _ this. very many thanks for your reflections this _ this. very many thanks for your reflections this morning. - this. very many thanks for your reflections this morning. the i this. very many thanks for your - reflections this morning. the former chaplain to the queen. today is
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something that we would be talking perhaps a lot about in normal times. todayis perhaps a lot about in normal times. today is actually the grand national horse race. the queen, of course, hugely passionate about horses, as was the duke of edinburgh. let's go to aintree and speak to our sports correspondent, andy swiss, because thatis correspondent, andy swiss, because that is something that will be remembered there where you are today, something that is the royal family, the senior members of so very passionate about. that's right, it is a chance for racing to pay its respects here at aintree. prince philip was an honorary member of thejockey club, and before racing started yesterday, there was a two minute silence, and that they will happen today before racing gets under way at around about 1:30pm. racing gets under way at around about1:30pm. again, the course racing gets under way at around about 1:30pm. again, the course will fall silent. all the flags around the course are at half mast, and the jockeys are being invited to wear
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black arm bands. it is really a very subdued atmosphere to what we would normally expect at a grand national, not least of course because there are no spectators here today. for the first time, the grand national is taking place behind closed doors. across the sporting world, there will be tributes to prince philip here today. there will be a silence before all the premier league matches, also before football matches, also before football matches in scotland. here at aintree, as i say, the grand national very much the focus of the sporting world today, and racing will be very keen to pay its respects to prince philip before racing gets under way. andy, thank you very much for now. andy swiss at aintree on a very different grand national today. we will bring you continuing coverage from here at windsor, of course, but let's just remember now some of the last thing words and images of prince philip, the duke of
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edinburgh, as we edge up to the a1 gun salute that will be happening across the uk and from ships at sea as well. let's leave you with some of these images.
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hello and welcome to this special programme remembering the duke of edinburgh, whose death was announced by buckingham palace.
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in a few minutes' time, at midday uk time, a series of death gun salutes will be fired to mark his passing. across the uk, in gibralter, and on her majestys ships at sea, saluting batteries will be fired. we will be bringing you coverage of this full military tribute to prince philip. with me in the studio is our defence correspondentjonathan beale. talk us through what we can expect. at midday, we will see, right across the country, a salute, a death gun salute, as you say, a1 rounds will be fired, one round every minute. the focus will be probably at woolwich, where the royal horse artillery will be firing their guns. they date back to the first war, but they were used for both the royal
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wedding with the queen, and also at her coronation. usually, you would have a 21 gun salute for say a head of state coming, and you would see the royal horse artillery out in hyde park. 0bviously, the royal horse artillery out in hyde park. obviously, we are in different times because of the pandemic, so they will be doing it from their barracks in woolwich, in the parade square, and at the same time there will be a gun salute in edinburgh, cardiff, in belfast, and also, given his close association with the royal navy that goes back to when he was an 18—month—old, he was rescued by hms calypso when he left greece, right up until his death, he was still the lord high admiral of the royal navy, and honour bestowed by the queen, a title the queen had. as you say, there will be ships at sea, so we know hms montrose, which has been in the gulf, i think in the morning in port at the moment. hms diamond,
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which left portsmouth with the white ends in flag lowered, both of those ships will be firing, taking part in this royal salute. $5 ships will be firing, taking part in this royal salute.— this royal salute. as you are speaking. — this royal salute. as you are speaking, viewers _ this royal salute. as you are speaking, viewers can - this royal salute. as you are speaking, viewers can see i this royal salute. as you are - speaking, viewers can see pictures from the various venues you have mentioned, looking at the moment at woolwich barracks, which you said is sort of a focal point. in usual times, we would expect to see big crowds here, but people are being discouraged from going. thea;r crowds here, but people are being discouraged from going.— discouraged from going. they are beint discouraged from going. they are being asked _ discouraged from going. they are being asked to — discouraged from going. they are being asked to watch _ discouraged from going. they are being asked to watch from - discouraged from going. they are being asked to watch from home | discouraged from going. they are . being asked to watch from home and not to go and actually visit where these salutes are taking place. it is an extraordinary time, and it has had an effect on the plans for the funeral, clearly, which you know, you would have expected a very large military presence. there will still be a military presence, we understand, but clearly, it has had to be altered, the plans for the funeral. but i think this is the military making clear that they saw
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him as one of theirs. you know, this was a man who saw active service in the navy, in two notable incidents. first of all, in 19a1, in the battle of kate met up and off the coast of greece, where he used the searchlight on, hms valiant, and he lit up with the searchlight, an italian cruise of which they then opened fire on, and then, in 19a3, the invasion of crete, he was on hms wallace, and he and the commanding officer of the ship at the time, he was a lieutenant, the duke of edinburgh, had the presence of mind, because there were enemy bombers overhead and it was getting dark, and they made the decision to make a raft, and to tow the raft from behind the shift and to light up that raft to make sure the ship wasn't hit but this dummy raft was
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hit. , ., wasn't hit but this dummy raft was hit. , . , , . wasn't hit but this dummy raft was hit. . , , . ., hit. great presence of mind. incredible _ hit. great presence of mind. incredible presence - hit. great presence of mind. incredible presence of - hit. great presence of mind. | incredible presence of mind. hit. great presence of mind. - incredible presence of mind. those are two incidents that stand out, but also, he was escorting, i think again on hms wallace, convoys in the north sea that came under from german torpedo boats, which fired at them. so, he did, he is one of theirs. if you go into a royal navy ship today, in the ward room, you will obviously see a picture of the queen, but you will also often see a portrait of prince philip, too. as i said, he left this earth is somebody who was still having a royal navy title as the royal high admiral —— lord high admiral. his life was linked closely to the royal navy but also to the army, to the air force, too. ., , ., ., , also to the army, to the air force, too. .,, ., ., , ., too. he was one of theirs. for viewersjust — too. he was one of theirs. for viewersjust joining _ too. he was one of theirs. for viewersjust joining us, - too. he was one of theirs. for viewersjust joining us, you i too. he was one of theirs. forl viewersjust joining us, you are viewersjustjoining us, you are joining a special programme remembering the duke of edinburgh.
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0ur series of death —— a series of death gun salutes are about to be fired across the uk at various venues, also in gibraltar and on her majesty's ships at sea. we are looking at preparations for these salute is to stop. this, as you can see, is woolwich barracks in london. as jonathan was see, is woolwich barracks in london. asjonathan was explaining, the king's troop royal horse artillery — 71 horses there, 36 of them pulling six field guns. jonathan, worth saying again that those guns have a special significance, the ones in woolwich. , ., special significance, the ones in woolwich. , . ., woolwich. they date back from the first world war, _ woolwich. they date back from the first world war, and _ woolwich. they date back from the first world war, and they - woolwich. they date back from the first world war, and they are - woolwich. they date back from the first world war, and they are the i first world war, and they are the guns that you would normally see in hyde park when there is a visiting head of state, for example, fired a usually gay 21 gun salute, but this is a special occasion. they have fired a a1 gun salute for all births in the past. remember, it was a
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similar salute when queen victoria died, and when winston churchill died, and when winston churchill died as well. bell tolls gun fires
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number two. number two numbertwo gun, fire! gun fires
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number three, fire! number three, fire! gun fires studio: what we are watching is a coordinated series of gun salutes going on all across the united kingdom and abroad. i would like to bring injonathan beale, explained to the viewers what we are watching? we are seeing right across the country this a1 death gun salute, marking the death of the duke of edinburgh. it involves the royal navy, who are firing their guns in
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portsmouth dockyard, home of the royal navy and also in devonport. i think we saw pictures of them earlier wearing their white flashes, those are ceremonial guns they are firing. gun fires we are going to be seeing this once every minute?— we are going to be seeing this once every minute? once every minute, so one round fired _ every minute? once every minute, so one round fired every _ every minute? once every minute, so one round fired every minute - every minute? once every minute, so one round fired every minute for- every minute? once every minute, so one round fired every minute for 41 i one round fired every minute for a1 rounds. it is notjust here in the uk. there are events in edinburgh, in belfast, in cardiff, as i said portsmouth and devonport as well. but also in gibraltar. we have also seen a similar salute take place in canberra in australia and there will be run also in new zealand later on.
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number two. be run also in new zealand later on. number two-— fire! fire! gun fires i know we can only show one at a time, but they are all coordinated? yes, the ones firing at ships, will have to send the pictures back. hms diamond, we think is of the south coast at the moment and hms montrose, operating in the go. they will be firing a ceremonial gun. not just the royal navy, but the royal artillery taking part in this salute as well, as well as the king street royal horse artillery.
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gun fires 0ur correspondentjohn maguire is in portsmouth watching the gun salute. john, what is the atmosphere like? i think probably... we have a problem _ i think probably... we have a problem with _ i think probably... we have a problem with the _ i think probably... we have a problem with the line. -
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i think probably... we have a problem with the line. this i i think probably... we have a j problem with the line. this is i think probably... we have a - problem with the line. this is seen as you see it at windsor castle. gun fires listening in to that was our defence correspondentjonathan beale. this is a solemn and poignant moment but a personal one as well because the duke of edinburgh identified with the military and of course with the navy? with the military and of course with the na ? , , ,
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with the military and of course with thena ? , ,, the navy? yes, this is their way of honourin: the navy? yes, this is their way of honouring him. _ the navy? yes, this is their way of honouring him. i— the navy? yes, this is their way of honouring him. ithink— the navy? yes, this is their way of honouring him. i think there - the navy? yes, this is their way of honouring him. i think there will. the navy? yes, this is their way of| honouring him. i think there will be other opportunities to show that as we get near the funeral but this is the first chance they've had to show what he meant to them, what he meant to the armed forces. it wasn'tjust the navy, he was colonel in chief too many regiments in the army. i think the last act we saw him do last year was when he handed over colonel in chief of the rifles regiment to camilla. he was doing it right up until the end. he died with the title lord high admiral. this is how they show their respect. we have heard it all from the defence chiefs who have all come out and paid their respects. they have talked about his character, his leadership, his inspiration. notjust his service, but in the time when obviously he had left the navy and he had taken a
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more ceremonial duty. this tradition goes back, it goes back to the 1ath century. gun fires they think it goes back to the 1ath century? yes, they will remember more recent events with the death of queen victoria, the death of winston churchill, they fired a a1 gun salute like this. i'll sound that the duke would have heard from the same guns. i that the duke would have heard from the same guns-— the same guns. i would like to go back to john _ the same guns. i would like to go back to john maguire _ the same guns. i would like to go back to john maguire who - the same guns. i would like to go back to john maguire who is - the same guns. i would like to go back to john maguire who is at i the same guns. i would like to go | back to john maguire who is at the back tojohn maguire who is at the naval base in portsmouth. we are just seeing pictures now of the guns, what is the atmosphere like where you are?—
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guns, what is the atmosphere like where you are? yes, as i was saying earlier, where you are? yes, as i was saying earlier. solemn. _ where you are? yes, as i was saying earlier, solemn, but— where you are? yes, as i was saying earlier, solemn, but what _ where you are? yes, as i was saying earlier, solemn, but what we - where you are? yes, as i was saying earlier, solemn, but what we are i earlier, solemn, but what we are seeing _ earlier, solemn, but what we are seeing here, no doubt right across all of— seeing here, no doubt right across all of the — seeing here, no doubt right across all of the guns we are seeing, the ceremonial— all of the guns we are seeing, the ceremonial guns being fired is mililary— ceremonial guns being fired is military precision. here we are in portsmouth, a large naval base, the queen— portsmouth, a large naval base, the queen elizabeth class aircraft carriers— queen elizabeth class aircraft carriers behind me, the flags flying at half— carriers behind me, the flags flying at half mast and hms warrior has its red ensign _ at half mast and hms warrior has its red ensign flying at half mast. these — red ensign flying at half mast. these guns, asjonathan has been describing — these guns, asjonathan has been describing all ceremonial guns. they are used _ describing all ceremonial guns. they are used on— describing all ceremonial guns. they are used on all ships. the crew of six, are used on all ships. the crew of six. they— are used on all ships. the crew of six. they will— are used on all ships. the crew of six, they will fire two guns alternating on each minute, allowing time for— alternating on each minute, allowing time for the other one to be reloaded _ time for the other one to be reloaded and of course, to cool down to some _ reloaded and of course, to cool down to some extent. behind the gun
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firing _ to some extent. behind the gun firing party are three other members of the _ firing party are three other members of the royal navy. 0ne taking a tally, _ of the royal navy. 0ne taking a tally, one — of the royal navy. 0ne taking a tally, one with a stopwatch and another — tally, one with a stopwatch and another one in charge of the men and women _ another one in charge of the men and women who— another one in charge of the men and women who are firing the gun this morning — women who are firing the gun this morning. they are extremely loud, the ground — morning. they are extremely loud, the ground shakes when they fire and i can the ground shakes when they fire and i can see _ the ground shakes when they fire and i can see people in the watersjust off portsmouth, the gosport ferry going _ off portsmouth, the gosport ferry going backwards and forwards and hopefully they know what today is all about — hopefully they know what today is all about. of course, this tribute, this all about. of course, this tribute, this full— all about. of course, this tribute, this full military tribute, the ai lui'i this full military tribute, the ai gun salute as we have been hearing, extremely— gun salute as we have been hearing, extremely rare, isjust reserved for some _ extremely rare, isjust reserved for some of— extremely rare, isjust reserved for some of the — extremely rare, isjust reserved for some of the most important occasions in british— some of the most important occasions in british life. i think it's owners. _ in british life. i think it's owners, notjust prince philip's decades— owners, notjust prince philip's decades long royal service, public service _ decades long royal service, public service as — decades long royal service, public service as the consort by the side of and _ service as the consort by the side of and sometimes behind her majesty the queen, but also his military
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career— the queen, but also his military career which we have been hearing about— career which we have been hearing about over— career which we have been hearing about over the last 24 hours or so, that served — about over the last 24 hours or so, that served with the royal navy in the second world war up with some distinction, — the second world war up with some distinction, it was mentioned in dispatches for the battle of matter plan and _ dispatches for the battle of matter plan and always felt unable officer, first sea _ plan and always felt unable officer, first sea lord describe to me earlier— first sea lord describe to me earlier of— first sea lord describe to me earlier of how he was the epitome of a naval— earlier of how he was the epitome of a naval officer, straight back, no—nonsense approach. it endeared him, _ no—nonsense approach. it endeared him. not _ no—nonsense approach. it endeared him, not only to members of the royal— him, not only to members of the royal navy— him, not only to members of the royal navy and the royal marines, as he was _ royal navy and the royal marines, as he was captain general of the royal marines. _ he was captain general of the royal marines, but also many other men and women _ marines, but also many other men and women in _ marines, but also many other men and women in many areas of the armed forces _ women in many areas of the armed forces. whenever he visited, he was always _ forces. whenever he visited, he was always keen — forces. whenever he visited, he was always keen notjust to forces. whenever he visited, he was always keen not just to talk to the top brass, — always keen not just to talk to the top brass, as it were, but to find out exactly— top brass, as it were, but to find out exactly what was going on with the non—commissioned men and women as well_ the non—commissioned men and women
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as well to _ the non—commissioned men and women as well to discover what modern day military— as well to discover what modern day military life — as well to discover what modern day military life was like. we know and we have _ military life was like. we know and we have heard extensively how much he enjoyed _ we have heard extensively how much he enjoyed his time in the navy, full-time — he enjoyed his time in the navy, full—time in the military. and one can only— full—time in the military. and one can only wonder what heights he would _ can only wonder what heights he would have reached had he stayed within— would have reached had he stayed within the — would have reached had he stayed within the service. but this, very coordinated comic very specific honour— coordinated comic very specific honour that is being portrayed today seems _ honour that is being portrayed today seems very— honour that is being portrayed today seems very fitting to someone who dedicated _ seems very fitting to someone who dedicated so many years of his life to the _ dedicated so many years of his life to the armed forces. this dedicated so many years of his life to the armed forces.— dedicated so many years of his life to the armed forces. this was always ttoin to to the armed forces. this was always totin to be to the armed forces. this was always going to be a — to the armed forces. this was always going to be a solemn, _ to the armed forces. this was always going to be a solemn, ceremonial- going to be a solemn, ceremonial occasion, but i imagine it is more muted than it might have been because of the covid restrictions and the public being urged not to attend? i and the public being urged not to attend? ~ ., , and the public being urged not to attend? ~ . , ., , , attend? i think that is absolutely ritht. i attend? i think that is absolutely right- ithink— attend? i think that is absolutely right. | think it _ attend? i think that is absolutely right. i think it will— attend? i think that is absolutely right. i think it will be _ attend? i think that is absolutely right. i think it will be more i right. i think it will be more self—evident at other locations where — self—evident at other locations where the ai gun salute is being fired, _ where the ai gun salute is being fired, otherthan where the ai gun salute is being fired, other than where we are on the naval— fired, other than where we are on
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the naval base, because this is not an area _ the naval base, because this is not an area that— the naval base, because this is not an area that is open to the public, obviously. — an area that is open to the public, obviously, but whether or not they would _ obviously, but whether or not they would have — obviously, but whether or not they would have had arrangements for les. _ would have had arrangements for vips, current serving sailors, perhaps— vips, current serving sailors, perhaps veterans as well. i am sure there _ perhaps veterans as well. i am sure there would — perhaps veterans as well. i am sure there would have been different atmosphere today. but it is that muted, — atmosphere today. but it is that muted, as — atmosphere today. but it is that muted, as you say, other than guns are so— muted, as you say, other than guns are so loud — muted, as you say, other than guns are so loud it— muted, as you say, other than guns are so loud it doesn't seem muted at all, are so loud it doesn't seem muted at all. but _ are so loud it doesn't seem muted at all. but you _ are so loud it doesn't seem muted at all, but you can imagine crowds gathering — all, but you can imagine crowds gathering in certain locations if they— gathering in certain locations if they were allowed to do so, but not happening — they were allowed to do so, but not happening because of the pandemic restrictions today. a buckingham palace _ restrictions today. a buckingham palace and the royal family have been _ palace and the royal family have been at — palace and the royal family have been at pains to ask people to respect — been at pains to ask people to respect the pandemic restrictions. john maguire, our reporter in portsmouth, for the time being, thanks very much. i would like to bring in the royal biographer and historian robert lacey, who is in
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windsor. you are watching and listening to this tribute to the duke of edinburgh and it is worth reflecting, the importance of the military to the duke of edinburgh? yes, it was in the military context that the queen first met prince philip at dartmouth naval college. everybody here somehow is conscious of that link. there is a feeling here of people wanting to give support to the queen at this moment. we havejust had prince edward and his wife sophie have just driven past. they have obviously been to see their mother and it reminds us
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that prince edward is going to be the next duke of edinburgh. not immediately, but following the death of the queen, the title of edinburgh will be carried on by prince edward's will be carried on by prince edwards and we will have a duchess of edinburgh in sophie. they have been here clearly giving support to the queen and there is a feeling that that is what everybody here wants to do. and what is the scene around you, robert? the public seems a much more muted because of the covid restrictions. tats muted because of the covid restrictions.— muted because of the covid restrictions. a , restrictions. as you can see, there are members _ restrictions. as you can see, there are members of— restrictions. as you can see, there are members of the _ restrictions. as you can see, there are members of the public- restrictions. as you can see, there are members of the public all- are members of the public all around, but there is also awareness obviously of covid. people are distancing themselves quite a lot of people wearing mask, bringing
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children, flowers. a sense of not really so robot reverence and respect, but great quietness, as people are waiting. here, we are not really aware of these guns going off. we are not hearing them here physically, but people seem aware of the fact that this is a great military tribute to the duke, but there is a sort of personal feeling here most of all. in there is a sort of personal feeling here most of all.— here most of all. in terms of that tersonal here most of all. in terms of that personal link— here most of all. in terms of that personal link that _ here most of all. in terms of that personal link that prince - here most of all. in terms of that personal link that prince philip i here most of all. in terms of that i personal link that prince philip had to the navy and to the military, it has been said in the last few days, remarked upon quite extensively, that he could have achieved high office in the royal navy if princess elizabeth had been when she did. absolutely right. it is pure
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speculation, but he was already a high—flying naval officer. he was doing very well at dartmouth naval couege doing very well at dartmouth naval college when they first met. he served, as we've heard, at the battle of matapan. he is mentioned in dispatches, and of course, one of the happiest stages of the queen's life was when she was able, for a couple of years, to be an ordinary naval officer's wife in malta. coming right up to the present day, when there was a plan that didn't really come to anything for prince harry and meghan markle to live for a period in the commonwealth in canada. that was said to be inspired by the time the queen spent with prince philip in malta, when as a naval officer's wife, she could enjoy the pleasures of going to the shops and meeting with other service wives. and well, also i think what
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people are thinking about here in windsor, the curious blessing of covid, in that they brought the queen and prince philip together for the last months of their lives. the prince had been living for much of his retirement based in sandringham, but because of covid, he came to join the queen in her bubble here. as i say, that is what people around feeling. they are looking, taking photographs, somehow a feeling of both history and personal life moving on that is a very good way of summing it up. moving on that is a very good way of summing it up-_ summing it up. robert lacey, historian and _ summing it up. robert lacey, historian and royal— summing it up. robert lacey, i historian and royal biographer.
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number two numbertwo gun, fire! gun fires
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number one gun, fire! gun fires we are about halfway through the a1 gun salute to the duke of edinburgh, and i'll correspond it on the ground there in portsmouth, we were seeing portsmouth just a few moments ago, saying how very loud these salutes are. i want to bring in my colleague, jonathan beale, our defence corresponded, because it is a a1 shot salute — why a1? defence corresponded, because it is a 41 shot salute - why 41? a a1 shot salute - why al? normally, ou a a1 shot salute - why a1? normally, ou would a a1 shot salute - why a1? normally, you would see _ a a1 shot salute - why a1? normally, you would see the _ a a1 shot salute - why a1? normally, you would see the king's _ a a1 shot salute - why a1? normally, you would see the king's troop i a a1 shot salute - why a1? normally, | you would see the king's troop royal horse artillery coming riding on their horses, pulling the guns into
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hyde park and it would be a 21 gun salute. 0n special occasions, national occasions, they do fire a a1 gun salute. part of it is, you know, arcane procedures that go back to firing a1 gun salute in a walled fortress, for example, as you would describe the tower of london, or in a royal park, that you get that dispensation to do it, but i think clearly this is a most unusual event, and an important national event, and an important national event, and an important national event, and i think it tells you that, you know, the a1 gun salute is of significance. it is notjust a visiting head of state, but something much more important for the country. something much more important for the country-— the country. jonathan, thank you. let's the country. jonathan, thank you. let's listen _ the country. jonathan, thank you. let's listen into _ the country. jonathan, thank you. let's listen into a _ the country. jonathan, thank you. let's listen into a few _ the country. jonathan, thank you. let's listen into a few more. i
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fire! gun fires
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number three, fire! gun fires load! number three, fire! gun fires
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standby, number one gun. number one gun, fire! gun fires
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number two! numbertwo! fire! gun fires
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fire! gun fires number one!
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number two numbertwo gun! fire! gun fires
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number three! fire! gun fires number two! load! numbertwo gun! fire! gun fires number three!
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fire! gun fires
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number one gun, fire! gun fires
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load! gun fires
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number one... fire! gun fires 0ur defence correspondentjonathan 0ur defence correspondent jonathan beale is 0ur defence correspondentjonathan beale is here with me. idot our defence correspondent jonathan beale is here with me.— beale is here with me. not only is all four corners _ beale is here with me. not only is all four corners of _ beale is here with me. not only is all four corners of the _ beale is here with me. not only is all four corners of the uk - beale is here with me. not only is all four corners of the uk firing i all four corners of the uk firing simultaneously in honour of the duke of�*s life, normally it would be what we would have in london, the royal horse artillery doing that ceremonial role. in a number of locations they have batteries, so they are giving each gun time to
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reload and alternating between each gun, so it is military precision. number two, gun, so it is military precision. numbertwo, fire!
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number three... fire! gun fires numbertwo, load!
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standby number two gun. number two lui'i, standby number two gun. number two gun. fire! _ gun fires load. number three gun, load. numberthree gun, fire. gun fires numbertwo, load.
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numberone gun, fire! gun fires studio: jonathan, it is the scale of this tribute that makes it remarkable? tats this tribute that makes it remarkable?— this tribute that makes it remarkable? �* , ., , ., remarkable? as i said earlier, you would normally _ remarkable? as i said earlier, you would normally see _ remarkable? as i said earlier, you would normally see a _ remarkable? as i said earlier, you would normally see a gun - remarkable? as i said earlier, you would normally see a gun salute i remarkable? as i said earlier, you i would normally see a gun salute take place in hyde park on its own. but here you are seeing, notjust every corner of the uk taking part in this death gun salute, but you have got gibraltar, where it appears to be raining. they are taking part. as i said, there are warships at sea, hms diamond, hms montrose in the gulf, they are also taking part. this is no small feat of coordination. but i
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think it is the military right across the country paying their respects. fire! gun fires
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number one fire. gun fires studio: viewers are watching the land locations for the salute, but jonathan beale, it is also happening at sea? , ., jonathan beale, it is also happening atsea? , ., .,, ,, at sea? yes, two warships, hms diamond which _ at sea? yes, two warships, hms diamond which left _ at sea? yes, two warships, hms diamond which left fort - at sea? yes, two warships, hmsi diamond which left fort yesterday out on the south coast. also hms montrose which is important in a man taking part in this salute. the navy has a special place in the heart of the royalfamily, but you have got
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to remember, the duke of edinburgh passed the love of his navy down to his sons, both to the prince of wales and to prince andrew. number one gun, fire. gun fires numbertwo, load.
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number two. fire. gun fires numbers one and two, cartridge only. numbers one and two, cartridge only. number one, make safe. number one, cartridge only, unload.
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all guns exit. 0ne all guns exit. one and two. detachments rear. detachment, up. detachment, up. studio: that brings to an end the a1
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death gun salute for the duke of edinburgh. jonathan beale, our defence correspondent is with me in the studio. that is the fullest military tribute you could imagine? it is. as we said, a a1 gun salute is pretty rare, it is normally a 21 gun salute. and then to coordinate it across the uk in the major cities, but also in portsmouth, devonport it shows you how important the duke of edinburgh was to the military. what special place he holds in their hearts as well as when he was alive, what he held them in. this is the tribute, the start of the tribute they want to pay to the life, the extraordinary life of
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the life, the extraordinary life of the duke of edinburgh. he was somebody who served, saw combat and had a military connection up until the very end. he was rescued by a royal navy warship when he was just 18 months old from greece, hms calypso. but he was there during the second world war, he saw action, mentioned in dispatches and then was there at the very end when the japanese signed the surrender on a british warship. and he kept that association, notjust with the royal navy, but the army and the air force, holding honorary banks and regularly turning up. you could see he was a man who connected with the trips. even his his last appearance last year when he handed over the colonel in chief role of the rifles to camilla, he wanted to speak to the trips, he wanted to engage with them. they loved him. so
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the trips, he wanted to engage with them. they loved him.— the trips, he wanted to engage with them. they loved him. so this was a means of underarm _ them. they loved him. so this was a means of underarm one _ them. they loved him. so this was a means of underarm one of _ them. they loved him. so this was a means of underarm one of their- them. they loved him. so this was a means of underarm one of their own and we should also keep reminding viewers that this was an extraordinary display of coordination and synchronicity, because those guns were all being fired at the same time in all those locations? , ' , ~ locations? yes, different guns. we talked about _ locations? yes, different guns. we talked about in _ locations? yes, different guns. we talked about in woolwich _ locations? yes, different guns. we talked about in woolwich barracksl talked about in woolwich barracks and using the guns from the first world war. they were also using 105 millimetres light guns, in cardiff and edinburgh, belfast, tower of london and the royal navy using their ceremonial guns, too. both on their ceremonial guns, too. both on the dockside at portsmouth and devonport, but on those ships at sea. the royal navy is much smaller thanit sea. the royal navy is much smaller than it used to be when, you know, the duke of edinburgh was serving as a young officer. but the traditions remain the same. and also, the
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attachments are still as strong as ever. ~ ., �* ., attachments are still as strong as ever. . ., �* . , . , ever. we don't have those pictures ofthe ever. we don't have those pictures of the salute _ ever. we don't have those pictures of the salute at _ ever. we don't have those pictures of the salute at sea, _ ever. we don't have those pictures of the salute at sea, but _ ever. we don't have those pictures of the salute at sea, but hopefully| of the salute at sea, but hopefully they will come in at some stage, they will come in at some stage, they take a little longer to come in, of course. he can see the individual ceremonies coming to an end, this at edinburgh castle. jonathan, at an occasion like this, one would normally expect big crowds, but that cannot happen? there was a very clear message from the ministry of defence when they announced this will be taking place that the public should stay at home and watch it on television. take
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part in that way. it is frustrating, i suspect for many people that they cannot be there and see this. but we hope we have given them a sense of the occasion and being able to see this happening right across the united kingdom, notjust in one place, is pretty special. ii united kingdom, notjust in one place, is pretty special. if people hat ten to place, is pretty special. if people happen to be _ place, is pretty special. if people happen to be in _ place, is pretty special. if people happen to be in the _ place, is pretty special. if people happen to be in the vicinity, i place, is pretty special. if people happen to be in the vicinity, theyj happen to be in the vicinity, they may have heard the guns? i think the ma may have heard the guns? i think they may have — may have heard the guns? i think they may have felt _ may have heard the guns? i think they may have felt the _ may have heard the guns? i think| they may have felt the vibrations, too. as john they may have felt the vibrations, too. asjohn maguire was saying in portsmouth, he was feeling it. a sombre occasion, but those noises break through the silence. jonathan, thank you very much indeed. that was our defence correspondent, jonathan beale.
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while we are watching the end of the ceremony, millions of young people around the world have taken part in the duke of edinburgh award. prince philip launched the scheme in 1956, once describing it as a "do—it—yourself growing up kit". joining me now isjon watts, a chef in st albans. he was the first person to achieve bronze, silver and gold in the duke of edinburgh award while in prison. john, hello and welcome to bbc news and thank you forjoining us. tell us how important it was for you to participate in this scheme? it us how important it was for you to participate in this scheme?- participate in this scheme? it was incredibly important. _ participate in this scheme? it was incredibly important. at _ participate in this scheme? it was incredibly important. at 18 - participate in this scheme? it was incredibly important. at 18 years. incredibly important. at 18 years old, 12 years ago, i was a little boy in prison with no future. taking part in the duke of edinburgh is a ward gave me so many things, but amongst other things, it gave me a skill, i learned how to cook and i am sure. i would like to think i
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have a fairly successful career and i have a passion in life, passion about what i do. there is a fire that burns in my belly and i am able to lead a good life away from the life i was living and the life i could have been living, had it gone the other way. you could have been living, had it gone the other way-— could have been living, had it gone the other way. you speak with such sincerity and _ the other way. you speak with such sincerity and enthusiasm, - the other way. you speak with such sincerity and enthusiasm, was i the other way. you speak with such sincerity and enthusiasm, was this | sincerity and enthusiasm, was this something you volunteer to do or where you expected to do it? i volunteered to do it, but it was to get me out of myself. you are locked up get me out of myself. you are locked up for a long time. i registered to do it to do something different. i didn't think it would be something that will change my life. i didn't think that learning to cook would be something i would go on to do and become so passionate about. it was about doing something at the time and led on to be something quite amazing. and led on to be something quite amazint. ., .. and led on to be something quite amazint. ., , ., , amazing. you achieved bronze, silver and told amazing. you achieved bronze, silver and gold and — amazing. you achieved bronze, silver and gold and you _ amazing. you achieved bronze, silver and gold and you where _ amazing. you achieved bronze, silver and gold and you where i _ amazing. you achieved bronze, silver and gold and you where i will - amazing. you achieved bronze, silver and gold and you where i will dig i and gold and you where i will dig your gold award, i assume by the
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duke himself? tell us about that? i had the pleasure of being in the palace ten years ago this month. i met the duke when i was awarded my gold certificate. he asked me about my expedition and i told him we had been released on day release to go into the brecon beacons and he asked if we were attached by ball and chain. when you meet somebody like prince philip, can be overwhelming, so when he can break the ice with a fun comment like that, it eases you into it. it was an incredible experience. i was lucky enough to meet him three times.— experience. i was lucky enough to meet him three times. three times? what were the _ meet him three times. three times? what were the other _ meet him three times. three times? what were the other occasions? i meet him three times. three times? what were the other occasions? a i what were the other occasions? duke of edinburgh award charity event. , two charity events. tats a event. , two charity events. as a personality. _ event. , two charity events. as a personality. you _ event. , two charity events. as a personality, you wear _ event. , two charity events. as a personality, you wear well i event. , two charity events. as a personality, you wear well up to
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that combative, sharp wit that he had? , , ~' , ., that combative, sharp wit that he had? , , ~' i., 4' ., had? yes, i 'ust think, you know, he is a had? yes, ijust think, you know, he is a historical— had? yes, ijust think, you know, he is a historical figure. _ had? yes, ijust think, you know, he is a historical figure. it _ had? yes, ijust think, you know, he is a historical figure. it was - is a historical figure. it was amazing to be able to experience meeting him and being a part of his legacy in what i do now as well. tbthd legacy in what i do now as well. and how is your — legacy in what i do now as well. and how is your life _ legacy in what i do now as well. and how is your life now? it _ legacy in what i do now as well. and how is your life now? it is _ legacy in what i do now as well. and how is your life now? it is fun, i- how is your life now? it is fun, i mean covid _ how is your life now? it is fun, i mean covid has _ how is your life now? it is fun, i mean covid has thrown - how is your life now? it is fun, i mean covid has thrown a - how is your life now? it is fun, i mean covid has thrown a lot i how is your life now? it is fun, i mean covid has thrown a lot of| mean covid has thrown a lot of challenges my way, but taking part in the duke of edinburgh awards has helped me to face these challenges head on. i know you will go through tough times and it builds character. i am coping very well, given the circumstances.— circumstances. that is what the award is all _ circumstances. that is what the award is all about, _ circumstances. that is what the award is all about, it _ circumstances. that is what the award is all about, it is - circumstances. that is what the award is all about, it is about i award is all about, it is about self—reliance, resilience and being active? flit self-reliance, resilience and being active? , i, active? of course, yes. it has given me so much —
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active? of course, yes. it has given me so much in _ active? of course, yes. it has given me so much in my _ active? of course, yes. it has given me so much in my life. _ active? of course, yes. it has given me so much in my life. i _ active? of course, yes. it has given me so much in my life. i owe i active? of course, yes. it has given| me so much in my life. i owe prince philip and the duke of edinburgh award a lot. philip and the duke of edinburgh award a lot-— award a lot. that is very good to hear a very _ award a lot. that is very good to hear a very good _ award a lot. that is very good to hear a very good to _ award a lot. that is very good to hear a very good to talk - award a lot. that is very good to hear a very good to talk to i award a lot. that is very good to hear a very good to talk to you. | hear a very good to talk to you. thank you so much. and now we have just received these pictures of part of the gun salute being fired to prince philip — this from onboard the hms diamond at sea. fire. 0ur reporterjohn maguire, is in portsmouth — where one of the gun salutes is taking place. john is taking place. maguire, all quiet there now but john maguire, all quiet there now but different when the gun salutes were taking place, you said it was extremely loud? it were taking place, you said it was extremely loud?— were taking place, you said it was extremely loud? it was, every time the tuns extremely loud? it was, every time the guns fired _ extremely loud? it was, every time the guns fired here. _ extremely loud? it was, every time the guns fired here. remember, i extremely loud? it was, every time i the guns fired here. remember, from those pictures you have just seen on
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board hms diamond, we were talking about smaller ceremonial guns, smaller than the ones being fired at edinburgh castle and the woolwich barracks. it still made very, very loud explosion, it shook the ground. we were standing around 30 metres away had to wear double levels of ear protection. the first time, the first round that was fired really made peoplejump first round that was fired really made people jump out of their skin. i think what struck me about the whole process, watching not only what was happening here, but the pictures from around the uk and from gibraltar as well, was the military precision but also the metronomic sense of around being fired, the guns being fired in that a1 gun salute every single minutes. almost like a slow tolling bell at a funeral and it really set the tone.
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no public gathered anywhere, although i saw some people gathering to a certain extent in the more public areas, but we are in a naval base, so restricted ministry of defence property. although there were ferries going across the water, the isle of wight ferry was going across at the gosport ferry heading across at the gosport ferry heading across to the other side of the water where the gunnery team are actually based. there were two people on each gun and also people standing behind them making sure the timing was absolutely precision perfect to the second, counting the rounds being fired and of course, commanding them and making sure nothing went on towards the guns. it is worth pointing out behind me, the new queen elizabeth class aircraft carriers that are based at portsmouth at the naval base, hms queen elizabeth is closest to us and then hms prince of wales you might be able to see in the distance. portsmouth is still very much the
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largest naval base in the uk, the home of the navy and somewhere prince philip would have been extremely familiar with. talking to serving and former naval officers and non—commissioned officers this morning, all very much in mind of saying they wanted to salute the duke of edinburgh for his ease of service. not only royal service but also his military service.— also his military service. john, thank you _ also his military service. john, thank you very _ also his military service. john, thank you very much. - also his military service. john, thank you very much. our- thank you very much. 0ur correspondent, john maguire. let's remember some of the lasting words and images of the life and times of prince philip, duke of edinburgh.
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we'll be back live at windsor castle with jane hill for continuing coverage after the death at the age of 99 of the duke of edinburgh. but first what does the weather have in store for us this weekend? here's louise lear hello. it was a bitterly cold start for many with temperatures down as low as minus seven degrees but the clear skies i love the sunshine to continue through the day and this afternoon we have seen some beautiful blue sky and sunshine. the cold arctic air continues to push its way across the country. this weather front is bringing a change
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of fortunes down to the south and east. here we see the cloud today. if we draw a line from the bristol channel over towards the wash, anywhere south and east of that, the cloud has been thick enough for some drizzle. forthe cloud has been thick enough for some drizzle. for the rest of the day their showers will drift into the south midlands, maybe across south wales and south—west england. the risk of a few isolated showers and with any elevation this afternoon, some of those showers could contain sleet and snow. it is a cold afternoon for many and temperatures struggling a9 degrees quite widely. 0vernight, the rain will drift south—west and fade away. clear skies that will allow those temperatures well below freezing, particularly in sheltered rural areas of scotland and it will be another bitterly cold start. high pressure building from the west, but more of a breeze coming in from the north sea will make it feel cooler and that could drive in wintry
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showers as we go through the day. sunday will be a relatively quiet day. sunny spells, a few isolated showers and as the temperature struggle, some of those showers of hail and sleet. temperatures down and where they should be, five, 10 degrees as a maximum. the high—pressure sinks south and west and that will allow the weather front to push on to northern ireland and wales. little bit further south than first anticipated. a better day on monday for scotland and eastern england. a good deal of sunshine. a clouding overfrom the england. a good deal of sunshine. a clouding over from the west into south—west england, wales and northern ireland seeing outbreaks of showery rain. the temperature subdued, seven, 10 degrees wide. from monday into tuesday and the rest of the week there are indications that something less cold starts to develop and we could see temperatures turning back to where they should be for this time of year and it stays relatively dry across the country.
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gun salutes have taken place to mark the death of the duke of edinburgh at the age of 99. gun fires they took place across the united kingdom to mark an extraordinary life of duty and service. prince philip was by the queen's side for more than 70 years — the royal family mourns the loss of a beloved husband and father. always go to him and know that he would listen and try to help. i think you would probably want to be remembered as... as an individual in
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his own _ remembered as... as an individual in his own right. — the earl and countess of wessex visited windsor castle this morning. details about the duke's funeral are due to be released later, as tributes are paid here in windsor, across the country and around the world. prince philip will be remembered as one of the first people in the public eye to champion the cause of conservation. and we'll be reflecting on his love of sport. good afternoon and welcome to the bbc�*s news at 0ne. gun salutes have taken place to mark the death of the duke of edinburgh across the uk, in gibraltar and from navy warships at sea.
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at midday, batteries fired a1 rounds, one every minute. prince philip — who died yesterday, aged 99 — served as a naval officer during the second world war and held the office of lord high admiral. later today details of the duke's funeral are expected to be announced. 0ur royal correspondent, nicholas witchell, reports. at midday, in the capital cities of the four nations of the united kingdom, a a1 gun salute was fired. gun fires fire! and for a man who served in the r0 al fire! and for a man who served in the royal navy — fire! and for a man who served in the royal navy in _ fire! and for a man who served in the royal navy in the _ fire! and for a man who served in the royal navy in the second i fire! and for a man who served in i the royal navy in the second world war and later, guns were fired in the royal naval base in portsmouth,
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and in gibraltar, home to the royal navy's gibraltar squadron. at windsor castle, prince edward arrived to join the queen in the family's morning, as officials put the finishing touches to the plans for the duke of�*s funeral. and from the perfamily in a bbc programme broadcast last night, personal tributes from three of the duke of�*s children. his tributes from three of the duke of's children. , , ., , children. his energy was astonishing. _ children. his energy was astonishing. in - children. his energy was i astonishing. in supporting and children. his energy was _ astonishing. in supporting and doing it for such a long time, and in some extraordinary way, being able to go on doing it for so long. his appreciation _ on doing it for so long. his appreciation of _ on doing it for so long. his appreciation of how he could help the queen always seemed to be present— the queen always seemed to be present in terms of supporting her, because _ present in terms of supporting her, because she was very young when she became _ because she was very young when she became queen, and it needed to be, i think. _ became queen, and it needed to be, i think. a _ became queen, and it needed to be, i think, a double act for a lot of
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that— think, a double act for a lot of that time _ think, a double act for a lot of that time in order to allow her to take _ that time in order to allow her to take on— that time in order to allow her to take on that role. my that time in order to allow her to take on that role.— take on that role. my father was alwa s, take on that role. my father was always. was _ take on that role. my father was always, was always _ take on that role. my father was always, was always a _ take on that role. my father was always, was always a great i take on that role. my father was i always, was always a great source of support _ always, was always a great source of support and — always, was always a great source of support and encouragement. - always, was always a great source of support and encouragement. it - always, was always a great source of. support and encouragement. it was... and guidance _ support and encouragement. it was... and guidance all— support and encouragement. it was... and guidance all the _ support and encouragement. it was... and guidance all the way— support and encouragement. it was... and guidance all the way through. i and guidance all the way through. and guidance all the way through. and never— and guidance all the way through. and never trying _ and guidance all the way through. and never trying to _ and guidance all the way through. and never trying to curtail - and guidance all the way through. and never trying to curtail any i and guidance all the way through. and never trying to curtail any of. and never trying to curtail any of the activities _ and never trying to curtail any of the activities or— and never trying to curtail any of the activities or anything - and never trying to curtail any of the activities or anything we i and never trying to curtail any of i the activities or anything we wanted to try— the activities or anything we wanted to try and _ the activities or anything we wanted to tryand do. — the activities or anything we wanted to tryand do. but— the activities or anything we wanted to try and do, but always _ the activities or anything we wanted to try and do, but always encourage that. _ to try and do, but always encourage that. and _ to try and do, but always encourage that. and i— to try and do, but always encourage that. and i will— to try and do, but always encourage that, and i will always _ to try and do, but always encourage that, and i will always remember. to try and do, but always encourage i that, and i will always remember him and thank— that, and i will always remember him and thank him — that, and i will always remember him and thank him for— that, and i will always remember him and thank him for that. _ that, and i will always remember him and thank him for that. you - that, and i will always remember him and thank him for that.— and thank him for that. you know, he didn't suffer — and thank him for that. you know, he didn't suffer fools _ and thank him for that. you know, he didn't suffer fools gladly. _ and thank him for that. you know, he didn't suffer fools gladly. so, - and thank him for that. you know, he didn't suffer fools gladly. so, you i didn't suffer fools gladly. so, you had to... if you said anything that was in any way ambiguous, he would say, well, make up your mind. so, perhaps it made one choose your words carefully, if you know what i mean. he was very good at, at showing you how to do things. and
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instruct you in various things. i think i will best remember him as always— think i will best remember him as always being there, and a person you could _ always being there, and a person you could bounce off ideas, but if you were _ could bounce off ideas, but if you were having problems, you could always— were having problems, you could always go— were having problems, you could always go to him and know that he would _ always go to him and know that he would listen and try to help. what he's done has _ would listen and try to help. what he's done has amounted - would listen and try to help. writ he's done has amounted to would listen and try to help. wuat he's done has amounted to an astonishing achievement, i think. the duke of's funeral is expected to take place at saint george's chapel inside windsor castle, the setting so often for royal weddings, but in a weak�*s time, it will be where the queen and the duke of's immediate family will say theirfinal family will say their final farewells. the ceremony will be family will say theirfinal farewells. the ceremony will be in strict compliance with covid restrictions. the earl and countess of wessex departed a short time ago after seeing the queen. she, the
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countess said, is being amazing. with me now is our royal correspondent, sarah campbell. what more might we expect over the course of the day chris might of course, it is nowjust over 2a hours since the announcement was made that the duke of edinburgh had passed away, here at windsor castle, and over the coming days, this is where the focus will continue to be. due to the pandemic, _ the focus will continue to be. due to the pandemic, people are the focus will continue to be. diwe to the pandemic, people are being asked not to gather at royal residences, but look around here. clearly, people are feeling compelled to come and share tributes, share messages. we have spoken to some of them to find out just why they wanted to come. ibsen; just why they wanted to come. very difficult to find — just why they wanted to come. very difficult to find men _ just why they wanted to come. very difficult to find men like him, who has been — difficult to find men like him, who has been very supportive to his wife all throughout his life, gave up his career— all throughout his life, gave up his career for— all throughout his life, gave up his career for her. he all throughout his life, gave up his career for her.— career for her. he was 'ust a great man, career for her. he was 'ust a great man. wasn-t * career for her. he was 'ust a great man, wasn't he? _ career for her. he was 'ust a great man, wasn't he? a _ career for her. he wasjust a great man, wasn't he? a great - career for her. he wasjust a great man, wasn't he? a great servantl career for her. he wasjust a great. man, wasn't he? a great servant to the country. _ man, wasn't he? a great servant to the country. we — man, wasn't he? a great servant to the country-— the country. we respect everything the country. we respect everything the duke of— the country. we respect everything the duke of edinburgh _ the country. we respect everything the duke of edinburgh has - the country. we respect everything the duke of edinburgh has done . the country. we respect everythingj the duke of edinburgh has done for the duke of edinburgh has done for the queen— the duke of edinburgh has done for the queen and for us as a country.
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and we _ the queen and for us as a country. and we just — the queen and for us as a country. and we just want to show our support to the _ and we just want to show our support to the royal— and we just want to show our support to the royal family, really. so, and we just want to show our support to the royalfamily, really.— to the royalfamily, really. so, the flowers left — to the royalfamily, really. so, the flowers left outside _ to the royalfamily, really. so, the flowers left outside cambridge - to the royalfamily, really. so, the| flowers left outside cambridge gate yesterday were all taken inside the grounds of windsor castle yesterday evening, and my understanding is that the same thing will happen this evening. there is an online book of condolence which is now live on the royal website, and the hope is that people, ratherthan royal website, and the hope is that people, rather than travelling and leaving messages physically, they will leave messages of support on that online website. we know that in the past year, covid has affected the past year, covid has affected the ability of all families to properly mourn their lost loved ones, and prince philip is going to be no exception. we are waiting to hear the details of his funeral, which are due to be approved by the queen and which we expect to be made public this afternoon. clearly, any thoughts of a large—scale funeral procession which crowds would want to be a part of simply won't happen due to the pandemic, and we expect further details this afternoon. sarah campbell, thank you very much for now.
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tributes to the duke of edinburgh have continued to flow in from around the world. as australians woke on saturday to the news of prince philip's death, the prime minister, scott morrison, said his life had been one of duty, service, loyalty and honour. our sydney correspondent, shaimaa khalil, sent this report. gun fires honouring a life of duty and service, a sign of respect for a man who, for decades has had a long and enduring relationship with this country. the prime minister paid tribute to the duke of edinburgh, whose presence, he said, was a reminder of the stability needed in a world that can often be uncertain. memories of him will, of course, tell stories of his candour, and a unique and forceful and authentic personality. but above all, he was a man who was steadfast, who could be relied upon. always standing by
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queen. . ,�* , relied upon. always standing by queen. . a , ., , queen. prince philip's military service first — queen. prince philip's military service first brought _ queen. prince philip's military service first brought him - queen. prince philip's military service first brought him here | queen. prince philip's military i service first brought him here in 1940, but it service first brought him here in 1940, but it was in 1954 that he arrived alongside the newly crowned queen elizabeth on an historic visit, the first by a reigning monarch to australia. the duke visited more than 20 times and has fostered a close connection with the country and its people. at times, taking a moment to enjoy the famed aussie lifestyle. throughout the decades, prince philip was patron to nearly 50 organisations here, but it is his character, his candour, his ability to be himself that have endeared him to so many australians. more than 700,000 young australians have taken part in the duke of edinburgh's award scheme. sarah
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started when she was 16. i edinburgh's award scheme. sarah started when she was 16.- started when she was 16. i don't think i would _ started when she was 16. i don't think i would have _ started when she was 16. i don't think i would have been - started when she was 16. i don't think i would have been able - started when she was 16. i don't think i would have been able to| think i would have been able to participate in community events or participate in community events or participate in community events or participate in physical activity and learn these new skills i've got to learn these new skills i've got to learn without the award kind of pushing me to do that. the learn without the award kind of pushing me to do that. the duke of edinbur: h pushing me to do that. the duke of edinburgh has _ pushing me to do that. the duke of edinburgh has always _ pushing me to do that. the duke of edinburgh has always been - pushing me to do that. the duke of edinburgh has always been warmly| edinburgh has always been warmly welcomed here, and he will be fondly remembered by the politicians and the public alike. we stay with reaction from around the world. it was at the treetops hotel in kenya that prince philip and princess elizabeth were when she became queen, on the night king george vi died. at treetops now is our africa correspondent, catherine byaru hanga. i'm speaking to you from kenya. this region is often described as the scotland of kenya. you can see, it is about to stop pouring down with
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rain, but it was here in 1952 that the then princess elizabeth and prince philip came to visit tree tops, which isjust on prince philip came to visit tree tops, which is just on the other side of this watering hole. it was here that she became queen. prince philip was actually the one who had to break the news to her that her beloved father, who had been ill for a long time, had actually died, and that she had now become the monarch. now, this was an event that transformed both their lives, including prince philip, because he now had to take on a role supporting his wife, and over the decades, we've seen him making a significant impact on the continent, and we had some of the leaders in this region speaking out after his death. the president of kenya described him as a symbol forfamily president of kenya described him as a symbol for family values and a global unifying force right now,
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today, there are thousands of young who have been impacted by the work that was done by the duke of edinburgh international award, and today there are around 400,000 young people carrying out various activities from entrepreneurship to community work, and one thing that was very important to him was giving people the skills they needed to be able to create jobs. this is a very important thing on the continent, because we have high youth unemployment rates, so a lot of people today are saying this is probably going to be one of the biggest impact he has had in this region, through the duke of edinburgh international award. many thanks, catherine, in kenya. prince philip will be remembered as one of the first people in the public eye to champion the cause of conservation. for nearly 20 years he was president of the world wildlife fund, now the worldwide fund for nature. and after stepping down he remained an active campaigner, as our science and environment editor, david shukman,
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reports. nature was one of prince philip's great loves and the need to conserve it became a lifelong passion. he fought not just for endangered species, but for the whole of the natural world. we depend on being part of the web of life. we depend on every other living thing on this planet, just as much as they depend on us. from his earliest official visits around the globe, this one to antarctica, wildlife was always a theme. he used his position to inspire younger generations. in this lecture for 2,000 children, many of the pictures were his. i don't think i'll tell you which are mine but, if you ever see a very bad one, you will know. an emerging theme was our responsibility. if we as humans have got this power of life and death, notjust life and death, but extinction and survival, of other species of life, then we ought to exercise it with...
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..with some sort of moral sense. why make something extinct if we don't have to? he authored or contributed to a series of dramatically titled books about threats to nature. and he took advantage of his access to governments the world over. he helped to set up the world wide fund for nature and he led it for years. on a visit to the pandas in china, he highlighted the need to save them and their habitats. and he went live on television with david attenborough to make that point. the panda range has been squeezed between mountains on one side and human encroachment on the other. his importance to conservation worldwide has been absolutely huge. you can go anywhere in the world, you know, and he will know where you have to make the connection, where you have to put the pressure, what you have to do.
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he's very practical in those terms. but he didn't always help himself. there was the tiger. in the '60s, he joined tiger hunts and he once shot a tiger in india. this image was to remain controversial. it was later said that tigers weren't considered endangered. but prince philip did have his own distinct views. he supported fox—hunting and the shooting of game birds, which set him at odds with many environmentalists. there is an advantage in people wanting to shoot, because... if you have a game species, you want it to survive because you want to have some more next year, exactly like a farmer. you want to crop it. you don't want to exterminate it. so this was a man with his own brand of environmental concern, and he did not like being labelled. would you describe yourself as a green? no. why not?
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well, because i think... there's a difference between being concerned for the conservation of nature and... ..being a bunny hugger! when i was president of the wwf, i got more letters about people, the way animals were treated in zoos than about any concern for the survival of a species. people can't get their heads around the idea of a species surviving. and as far back as 1970, with a young prince charles by his side, he was typically forthright about the need to be realistic in the fight for nature. after all, even naturalists drive cars occasionally. and having accepted that, we must go a step further and recognise that compromises have to be reached. disagreement is inevitable, but the groups must go on meeting because we have simply got to hammer out answers to problems which are going to affect all life in these islands
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for generations to come. in many ways, prince philip was ahead of his time, using his fame as a royal to raise awareness of conservation, an early environmentalist who did not want to be called that. a unique campaignerfor a cause that's ever more relevant. david shukman, bbc news. we will reflect further on the duke of edinburgh's life. let's take a look at some of today's other news. two men are appearing in court in belfast, charged with rioting, after a further night of violence in northern ireland. police were pelted with stones, bottles and petrol bombs in the capital. loyalist groups had urged their supporters to stay at home following the death of prince philip. a friend of david cameron has said the former prime minister now believes he should have put his request for funding for greensill capital in writing. mr cameron texted the chancellor, rishi sunak, last year in an attempt to help the now collapsed financial
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firm get access to coronavirus loans. his friend insisted no rules had been broken. brazil's president, jair bolsonaro, has accused a supreme courtjudge of "judicial activism", after he ordered an inquiry into the country's handling of the pandemic. mr bolsonaro's response to covid has been criticised as "shambolic", due to his opposition to lockdowns, mask wearing and vaccines. let's return to our coverage of the life of the duke of edinburgh. the duke of edinburgh's sporting activities provided him with a welcome opportunity to get away from formal royal duties. for him, sport became an outlet for his restless energy, and prince philip proved himself to be a keen and talented competitor in a number of different sports. 0ur correspondent natalie pirks looks back at the duke's sporting life.
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prince philip always enjoyed sport and he often excelled at it. applause. at school he learned to love sailing and as a wedding present, he and the queen were given a dragon class yacht. the thing about going to see, you are suddenly exposed to an element which you cannot really control, you are subject to it and i think that is good for the soul, frankly. find is good for the soul, frankly. and now a change _ is good for the soul, frankly. and now a change of _ is good for the soul, frankly. and now a change of bowling from the pavilion _ now a change of bowling from the pavilion end. fits now a change of bowling from the pavilion end.— pavilion end. as an enthusiastic cricketer. _ pavilion end. as an enthusiastic cricketer, he _ pavilion end. as an enthusiastic cricketer, he drew _ pavilion end. as an enthusiastic cricketer, he drew praise - pavilion end. as an enthusiastic cricketer, he drew praise from i pavilion end. as an enthusiastic . cricketer, he drew praise from high places. he cricketer, he drew praise from high laces. . , cricketer, he drew praise from high laces, , . cricketer, he drew praise from high laces. .,, , . ., cricketer, he drew praise from high laces. , . ., ., cricketer, he drew praise from high laces. . ., ., ., places. he has perfect action for a riaht hand places. he has perfect action for a right hand off _ places. he has perfect action for a right hand off spin _ places. he has perfect action for a right hand off spin bowler. - right hand off spin bowler. laughter— right hand off spin bowler. laughter~ _
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laughter. but what you might not know is just how the playing fields around us are a huge part of his legacy. while councils were busy selling them off, his tireless fundraising campaign led to thousands of uk site being saved. it led to thousands of uk site being saved. , ., , ., ., , saved. it is a true testament to his assion saved. it is a true testament to his passion and _ saved. it is a true testament to his passion and commitment - saved. it is a true testament to his passion and commitment to - saved. it is a true testament to his passion and commitment to sport| saved. it is a true testament to his i passion and commitment to sport and the opportunities he saw that sport could create for so many young people who didn't necessarily have access to green space. the people who didn't necessarily have access to green space.— access to green space. the duke shared the _ access to green space. the duke shared the queen's _ access to green space. the duke shared the queen's love - access to green space. the duke shared the queen's love of - access to green space. the duke. shared the queen's love of horses and became one of the top polar plays in britain in the mid—60s, cementing the sport as a firm favourite. arthritis ended his career at 50. g0 favourite. arthritis ended his career at 50.— favourite. arthritis ended his career at 50. go on, you stupid horse. career at 50. go on, you stupid horse- but _ career at 50. go on, you stupid horse. but carriage _ career at 50. go on, you stupid horse. but carriage driving - career at 50. go on, you stupid - horse. but carriage driving became his passion — horse. but carriage driving became his passion and _ horse. but carriage driving became his passion and he _ horse. but carriage driving became his passion and he was _ horse. but carriage driving became. his passion and he was instrumental in drawing up the rules. he raised its profile and competed for great britain. fellow team—mate, george
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bowman, remembered him fondly. i was a scrap merchant. _ bowman, remembered him fondly. i was a scrap merchant. of _ bowman, remembered him fondly. in—s a scrap merchant. of course, he was a scrap merchant. of course, he was a prince and there may be at times people made a lot about this. but he never treated me any different, he always looked at me like an equal. and that was one of the things i really admired about him. despite some hair raising _ really admired about him. despite some hair raising spills _ really admired about him. despite some hair raising spills along - really admired about him. despite some hair raising spills along the| some hair raising spills along the way, the duke carried on well into old age. his passion made to support a family affair. and that report from our sports correspondent, natalie pirks. hello from windsor and welcome to this continuing bbc if you arejoining us, we are continuing with the special coverage on bbc news here. gun salutes have
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been fired in gibraltar and from war warships at city paid tribute to the duke of edinburgh. details of his funeral are also expected to be announced today. prince philip was the longest—serving royal consort in british history — and was a constant support to the queen during more than 70 years of marriage. senior church figures have been paying tribute to prince philip for his service as consort to a christian monarch, with his own faith a central part of his life. earlier, i spoke to a former chaplain to the queen, dr gavin ashenden about this aspect of his life. he began by explaining his family's connection with the duke. my father and prince philip were both officers together on the same ship in the north sea convoys and so that was a fairly important time for obviously them both and my dad remembered the collegiality of those years very fondly and used to give me messages to send to prince philip when i was at the palace
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of windsor castle from time to time. or windsor castle from time to time. did he, what were some of his remembrances? how did he remember him because so many people talk about what a very high—flying career prince philip could have gone on to have had that been something that was open to him? yes, well he was an immensely competent officer. those experiences of the north sea convoys were really quite terrifying, my father wrote about them in private memoirs and i wasjust astonished at what men of... so my dad and prince philip where exactly the same age and what they went through together was really hard to imagine for those of us who haven't had to go through them. dad thought prince philip was just an excellent officer and a very good friend and a marvellous man. 0ne he admired and liked very much. and as we say, you were of course,
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you are a former chaplain to her majesty the queen and we know her personal christian faith is of enormous importance to her. in your experience, was it equally important to the duke of edinburgh? yes, it was. although expressed more privately, he was, as you've heard a lot of people say, a very private person in lots of ways. not many people know that the two most important women in his life were profoundly influenced by the christian faith. his mother became a greek orthodox nun at the end of her life, she gave away all her belongings. albeit quite an eccentric one, she chain smoked and played canasta. there weren't many nuns like her. but she also harboured jewish refugees in her own flat during the war, risking her own liberty. she was an enormously important influence. then his wife has showed the greatest possible christian
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fortitude and example and has really been the most wonderful ambassador for christianity, for authentic christianity. in the period of time when the church has begun to lose some of its influence and grip on the popular imagination due to a whole series of factors, but prince philip and the queen have been at the forefront of being part of the glue that held together the really important values of christian civilisation which i think we are going to miss as they become increasingly eroded. earlier this lunchtime, gun salutes were fired across the uk, in gibraltar, and from warships at sea to pay tribute to the duke of edinburgh.
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let's discuss the importance and the symbolism of a gun salute. joining me now is leiutenant colonel david luck, from the ceremonial events and commemorations team at the ministry of defence, to talk about the history and signifcance of the gun salute. why does it stand out as a mark of tribute? ,., ., ., ., ., tribute? good afternoon. essentially, _ tribute? good afternoon. essentially, a _ tribute? good afternoon. essentially, a gun - tribute? good afternoon. essentially, a gun salute| tribute? good afternoon. i essentially, a gun salute is tribute? good afternoon. - essentially, a gun salute is an honour. it is a salute, as it says. it is the way in which traditionally it has become the mark of respect from the armed forces on these tremendous important occasions. so it is therefore the best possible way that we know within the resources that we have to mark such occasions, and in this case, the sad
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passing away of his royal highness the duke of edinburgh. it is with mixed emotions, i think. the duke of edinburgh. it is with mixed emotions, ithink. no the duke of edinburgh. it is with mixed emotions, i think. no one would ever want to have to perform these duties but we know at some stage or another, we might have to do so. it is an honour and a privilege for all members of the armed forces, particularly my own regiment, the royal regiment of artillery, to perform these duties on occasions such as these. find artillery, to perform these duties on occasions such as these. and the duke, as on occasions such as these. and the duke. as we — on occasions such as these. and the duke, as we have _ on occasions such as these. and the duke, as we have reflected, - on occasions such as these. and the duke, as we have reflected, had - on occasions such as these. and the duke, as we have reflected, had a l duke, as we have reflected, had a very distinguished naval career in his younger days. that connection with the armed forces generally is there throughout his life, as it is for so many members of the royal family? for so many members of the royal famil ? , , ~ for so many members of the royal famil ? , , ,, .,, ., family? yes indeed. the duke was an enthusiastic — family? yes indeed. the duke was an enthusiastic and _ family? yes indeed. the duke was an enthusiastic and very _ family? yes indeed. the duke was an enthusiastic and very much _ family? yes indeed. the duke was an enthusiastic and very much engaged l enthusiastic and very much engaged supporter of the armed forces, of all branches of the armed forces and the fact that his own career within the fact that his own career within the royal navy, he still had a
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massive amount of interest in both the royal air force and the army and was kernel of many regiments and took a great interest, notjust in what was going on with each one of those, but in terms of what was going on with the people within those organisations. he was, as he would expect, he was very at ease when talking to soldiers, sailors and airmen. he had a tremendous knack of being able to bring out the best in them. find knack of being able to bring out the best in them-— best in them. and that is interesting _ best in them. and that is interesting because - best in them. and that is interesting because that l best in them. and that is l interesting because that is best in them. and that is i interesting because that is a reflection that so many people have made that i have spoken to today, no matter who he was talking to from whatever field of life, from whatever field of life, from whatever field of industry, whatever field of life, from whateverfield of industry, he whatever field of life, from whatever field of industry, he was engaged and always had lots to say to them, probably lots of opinions as well. but that is coming out time and again and you are saying that is absolutely true in your case? inert;
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absolutely true in your case? very much so. absolutely true in your case? very much so- i — absolutely true in your case? very much so. ithink— absolutely true in your case? very much so. i think a _ absolutely true in your case? very much so. i think a piece _ absolutely true in your case? very much so. i think a piece on - absolutely true in your case? , much so. i think a piece on your programme yesterday brought out that he had an extraordinary and curious intellect. there is no doubt about that because even if he hadn't been directly involved in what you are doing, he would always want to know what you were doing and what impact that had new and your fellow soldiers, sailors and airmen, how you worked as a team to effectively come together and achieve your aim. he was very, very well briefed, but was also very, very widely read. he knew so much about the armed forces and that came through very, very clearly in the support that he had for the armed forces. of course, it was his final parade when he relinquished the rank of captain general of the royal marines. i was talking to a friend he was on that parade and he said, it was very extraordinary when he talked to you
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about your experiences and what you had done, just how much interest he had done, just how much interest he had in what you had been up to and how much faith he had in you to do thejob you had. because he had been there himself and he had done so and been through the training. of course, he had been on operations. that was a very good feeling to have when you met him. he had been there, he had done it. absolutely. would he ever have said or reflected that he would have liked to stay longer with his naval career? we know the reasons for which it wasn't possible, but was that something he would never have commented on in a private conversation with someone? i very much doubt _ conversation with someone? i very much doubt it. _ conversation with someone? i very much doubt it, to _ conversation with someone? i very much doubt it, to be _ conversation with someone? i very much doubt it, to be perfectly - much doubt it, to be perfectly honest. as we have heard, his royal highness was a very private man, and i think those things would have affected him personally, from upper career perspective, would have been his own musings. there is no doubt about it that he absolutely love the
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armed forces. obviously a particular affection for his own royal navy, reflected absolutely appropriately by the fact that he was the lord high admiral. whatever he did, whether it was dark blue, light blue or brown, he was with us and he always showed that real deep care, i think, is not too strong a word about what the officers and soldiers in his regiment sending his ships, the ships and aircraft establishments had an interest in, what they were up to and how they were doing. what they were up to and how they were doing-— what they were up to and how they were doinu. , , ., . were doing. very interesting to hear our were doing. very interesting to hear your reflections. _ were doing. very interesting to hear your reflections. thank _ were doing. very interesting to hear your reflections. thank you - were doing. very interesting to hear your reflections. thank you very - your reflections. thank you very much, lieutenant colonel david luck from the ceremonial events team at the ministry of defence. we will talk more about the armed forces doubtless later on. we have also reflected a lot today about the commonwealth and just how important that rollers head of the commonwealth is to the queen and to the duke of edinburgh. i'm joined now by patricia scotland,
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commonwealth secretary general, to talk more about how the commonwealth has been reacting. iam assuming i am assuming that you have had many interactions with the duke of edinburgh, given your role. perhaps you can explain that and talk about what personal recollections you have today. di what personal recollections you have toda . , what personal recollections you have toda. , ,, ., today. of course, as you know, the commonwealth _ today. of course, as you know, the commonwealth is _ today. of course, as you know, the commonwealth is 54 _ today. of course, as you know, the commonwealth is 54 countries, - today. of course, as you know, the| commonwealth is 54 countries, 2.4 billion people, 60% of whom are under the age of 13, and his royal highness was absolutely dedicated to all of those 54 countries, and particularly to those 60% of the commonwealth under the age of 30. his devotion to her majesty was always clear, but also his devotion to the future and making sure that there was a good future for the young people, and you see that particularly poignantly in the dedicated work that he undertook in relation to those young people
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through the duke of edinburgh awards. if you remember, when this was created, it was extraordinarily new and avant—garde to have a member of the royalfamily new and avant—garde to have a member of the royal family invest so directly and so personally into the future of young people, many of whom were very disadvantaged, many of whom had never had an opportunity to have this sort of experience, and so i saw from first hand not only the interest that he took in those individuals, but also the joy that he took from their success, and i was the dominican representative on the x service men and women's league of the commonwealth which of course he had championed all the way through. and his eye for detail about the welfare issues was really
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inspiring. if hejoined a charity, he didn'tjustjoin it in name, he joined it with all that was within him, and i don't think his royal highness, the same as the queen, everforgot the service highness, the same as the queen, ever forgot the service of the commonwealth volunteers, because all of those who came to the aid of the united kingdom from the commonwealth did so as volunteers. none of them were conscripted. and i don't think that that relationship, that bond of comradeship, was ever broken. and he demonstrated the importance of the commonwealth coming together as a force for good in the world will stop and i think every time i saw him, i would stop and i think every time i saw him, iwould marvel at stop and i think every time i saw him, i would marvel at his sense of humour, his wit, and the fact that he quite often had this little mischievous glint in his eye, but he
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was utterly serious about what mattered in the world, utterly serious about making sure that everybody had a chance and everybody had an opportunity to develop their skills. and i think you saw that in the commonwealth studies conference, and you also saw that in the work he did for the and you also saw that in the work he did forthe edinburgh, and you also saw that in the work he did for the edinburgh, the duke of edinburgh awards, quite remarkable. that's so interesting that you reflect that. sorry to interrupt you. it is interesting that you say that, because you are by no means the first person i have spoken to today who has talked about that glint in the eye, but along with the seriousness, so it is striking that that keeps coming through time and again as a theme. i think i am right in saying he visited almost all the commonwealth countries. and that was the queen and the duke of edinburgh, took that very seriously. if you think about — took that very seriously. if you think about the _ took that very seriously. if you think about the love _ took that very seriously. if you
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think about the love that - took that very seriously. if you think about the love that they| think about the love that they showed to those countries — malta, a commonwealth country, was particularly special to them. but the prince's devotion to the environment took him far and wide. he was the one who went to the regions, the pacific, the small islands in the pacific. he has been beating the drum for, what, more than 60 years about climate change, and that climate crisis which we all appreciate today, his royal highness was talking about on the television as an innovator more than 50 years ago, and that legacy that he started on environment has been handed over to prince charles, who has so committed himself to that, but you have seen it in the next generation as well. so, this love of country, this love of the environment, this love of the commonwealth, and this love of the commonwealth, and this love of the commonwealth, and this love of equality, because the prince
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went to all our member states in africa, in asia, in the caribbean, in the pacific, and what people always remember is his care and attention to detail, his humanity, his support of everything the queen did. when the queen spoke about the commonwealth when she was 21, she said she was going to devote her life to the commonwealth, whether it was going to be long or short. and from the moment that his royal highnessjoined her as her spouse highness joined her as her spouse and highnessjoined her as her spouse and then her consort, he was right beside her, absolutely supporting her in her devotion to the commonwealth. and remember that that wasn't always the flavour of the month in terms of commonwealth, but it has always been the flavour of the day for her majesty the queen and for his royal highness, and i
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don't think there is one day when they didn't, when they forgot the interests of the 2.4 billion people interests of the 2.4 billion people in the commonwealth who have voluntarily come together in order to make this world a better place, and i think that's what we will remember of him in the commonwealth, that he was determined to make our commonwealth a better place for the common good, and that all of us would come together, giving our skills, ourtalents would come together, giving our skills, our talents and our ability freely, in a free association of member states, to commit ourselves to delivering the things that mattered. and the commonwealth was the one who came up with the commonwealth charter which preconfigured the sustainable development goals. we did it in 2013, the rest of the world did it in 2013, the rest of the world did it in 2015, 2013, the rest of the world did it in 2015, and it was the commonwealth who came up with the formula that actually ended up being adopted at
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the paris cop 21. if you look at his contribution over 70 years, he never gave up, and he was resilient and committed, and i can only imagine how devastated the whole of the royal family must be, because i think we are all devastated too. baroness scotland, many thanks for your thoughts. baroness scotland, many thanks for yourthoughts. patricia baroness scotland, many thanks for your thoughts. patricia scotland, secretary general of the commonwealth, of course. let's stay very much here at windsor castle with reflections, with people who knew the duke of edinburgh. with me here at windsor is dr david staples, who is the chief executive of the united grand lodge of england, the governing body of freemasonry in england and wales. thank you very much for having me. we are talking about freemasons, and a lot of people watching might not
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know that the duke of edinburgh had any connection. know that the duke of edinburgh had any connection-— any connection. certainly, as a ounuer any connection. certainly, as a younger man. _ any connection. certainly, as a younger man, he _ any connection. certainly, as a younger man, he had - any connection. certainly, as a younger man, he had an - any connection. certainly, as a - younger man, he had an enormous amount of fun with his freemasonry. he was brought into the navy lodge in he was brought into the navy lodge in 1952 he was brought into the navy lodge in 1952 by his father—in—law, king george vi, and of course it is a great thing about our organisation, we don't care if you are a king, a duke or the son of a forklift driver like me, you can come in, you have an enormous amount of fun, and it teaches you to be a better person. if we think about what he would have been doing within that lodge, he went through the same ceremonies i went through the same ceremonies i went through the same ceremonies i went through and that other freemasons the world over have gone through. the first one teaches you the importance of how to respect other people, how it is important to think on those who are less fortunate than yourselves and to bear them in mind. fortunate than yourselves and to bearthem in mind. when we fortunate than yourselves and to bear them in mind. when we think about the work you did for charity and the hundreds of organisations that he himself supported actively, i think there was a wonderful symmetry there. the secondary ceremony teaches you the importance of improving yourself through education, and you look at his duke
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of edinburgh awards and the tens of thousands of young people who have been buoyed up by that and have gained in self—confidence, who have grown into bigger, better people buy that. again, an enormous synergy between the values that were so clear to him and so important to us. is it something he came to because he actively sort that out? it is something he wanted to join? he actively sort that out? it is something he wanted tojoin? is it something he wanted tojoin? is it something that came from his time in the navy? where did that inclination to be part of that come from, do you think? i to be part of that come from, do you think? ., , ., ., think? i imagine his father-in-law ta ed think? i imagine his father-in-law tapped him _ think? i imagine his father-in-law tapped him on _ think? i imagine his father-in-law tapped him on the _ think? i imagine his father-in-law tapped him on the shoulder - think? i imagine his father-in-law tapped him on the shoulder and i think? i imagine his father-in-law. tapped him on the shoulder and said this is something you should be doing. it is a good thing to do. the final lesson you learn in freemasonry, which i think is very pertinent indeed, make the most of your one life. we have a wonderful phrase, live respected and i regret it, and anyone who knew him would realise he certainly managed that. —— and di
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are there stories of him from his time there? there are people reflecting on his great knowledge and his great interest in people when he met them, but also a sense of fun that perhaps didn't always get seen in general public. dare get seen in general public. are there stories _ get seen in general public. site there stories that touch get seen in general public. the there stories that touch on that? that's right. it is interesting to note that he went through his three degrees but never progressed further within our organisation. i think you saw it as a release when he was in the lodge room. he was with friends and could enjoy himself and relax. that is true of anybody, i think. thank you for being with us. doctor david staples, ceo of the united grand lodge of england. many thanks for your time this afternoon. prince philip on occasion allowed television crews access to the inner workings of royal life, to show the public another side of his family. and one of those documentary
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makers, robert hardman, toured windsor castle with prince philip for a tv bbc one series, "the queen's castle". he is also the daily mail's royal commentator, and a royal biographer. i spoke to him earlier, and he said that the queen is of course at the forefront of everyone's minds today. first and foremost our thoughts are with the queen. you know, there's has been the longest royal marriage in history. you know, we are living through the reign of one of the greats, the longest lived monarch that we've ever had. as herself has said and so much of everything she's achieved she has done thanks to having him there as well. he was the longest serving consort in history. you know, i was lucky enough as a royal correspondent to go all over the world and watch some of these historic state visit. this is the most widely travelled monarchy in history. the first monarch to go to places like russia, china and go behind the old iron curtain
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and all over the world. and wherever she went, he went. and often the duke would go when the queen couldn't go. when she was a young mother, she couldn't go, for example, when she had young children she couldn't sail round the world to open the 1956 olympics in melbourne, so she sent the duke. i mean, he is the only member of the royal family to visit the tiniest outcrop of the old british empire, pitcairn island. had one royal visit and that was the duke of edinburgh. you know, he's been to antarctica, all these places, but it's always been to represent the queen. and his whole life, whenever you talk to his staff they always said, rule number one, duty number one, support the queen. so whatever he was doing was a primary in support of her. as you say, she wakes up today she's missing this titanic figure who has been part of her life, the monarchy�*s life and the life of the nation and the commonwealth. i mean, it's really nice actually
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today and yesterday see the level of international tribute coming fourth, genuine tributes from people who have been touched by the umpteen things that the duke was responsible for. whether it's the environment or the duke of edinburgh's award scheme, so many commonwealth charities, the armed forces. yeah, his legacy is colossal. i do want to ask you of course about your personal reflections as someone who spent time with him, and it's so striking to hear people remembering his humour, people reflecting on the fact that perhaps that cheekiness, the humour didn't always come across in real life, or it came across in ways that we know and get portrayed as gaffes, but i'm interested in how you found him, in essence, working alongside him?
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you certainly had to have done your homework. here is someone to coin the phrase, did not suffer fools gladly. and, you know, i did find myself asking what you would call a damn fool question. but people talk about his briskness, but he was fundamentally a kind man. he would walk into a room, he would go into a situation at a royal engagement and he wanted to break the ice, make people relax a little and he did that with humour. and as he himself once said, if you try and break the ice, occasionally you go through it. and from time to time that happened, but most of the time he always... whenever you saw him in a room, you might be in some big royal
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reception and you would just hear gales of laughter and you'd think, ok, the duke of's over there. because that was his way and i was lucky enough to spend some time with him in the castle just behind you there, jane. after the fire of 1992, it was the duke that led the restoration. it was a very difficult period for the monarchy and this wonderful 1000—year—old castle, to see it go up in flames was a tragedy. but he took this issue by the scruff of the neck, he led the restoration committee and he put it back together. in fact, you can go around a lot of the parts of castle and it is in better condition than it was then. the estate around you, the great part, he's been the longest serving range of the great park in its thousand year history.
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all over windsor there are signs of what he's done whether it's the restoration of the deer herd. tucked away in the estate where you won't see it is actually a vineyard which was the duke of's idea. a few years ago he worked out the soil might be quite good for producing grapes. and lo and behold, windsor castle's sparkling wine is now so good that the queen has been serving it at state banquets to world leaders. i mean, the level and the degree and span of his input is extraordinary. but i think it's on the global stage and those organisations, the duke of edinburgh's award scheme, the world wildlife fund, pioneering organisations that paved the way for so many other environmental groups to follow. those sort of things, that is a legacy that we will be talking about for many, many years. the biographer and author speaking to mejust a couple of the biographer and author speaking to me just a couple of hours ago. the duke of edinburgh had a personal and association with scotland dating
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back to his school days at gordonstoun in the 1930s. he and the queen have enjoyed holidays for many decades as glenn campbell reports. at holyrood palace the lion rampant is lowered, as the city that has long shared its name with the duke of edinburgh takes in the news posted on the palace gates that his royal highness has died two months short of his 100th birthday. i do feel incredibly sad. i think it will be a great loss and he was a real character. the prince has been around for 99 years and has been at the queen's side the entire time. so it's a huge loss to the country, especially given his long service. in ballater on royal deeside, some remember a prince they met in person. we were walking in the forest and this black range rover came up and the duke got out and was fixing something at the side of the road...
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he was a very active gentleman for his age. ..he must have been 94. he was a character we can all identify with. _ yeah, sad. and ifeel so sorry for the dear queen. from his school days to big national moments like the opening of the scottish parliament, the duke of edinburgh's association with scotland was lifelong. the royal couple were regular attenders of the highland games when they summered at balmoral. i think prince philip loved aberdeenshire because of the peace and quiet and indeed the outdoors. a man who was an accomplished sportsman, he loved attending the ballater games, i think he loved the competitive nature of highland games. in glasgow, more memories and reflections. absolutely gutted. i honestly thought he was going to get to the hundred. i think a lot of people actually wished he was going to get to that hundred. i'm gutted for the queen. | i did the duke of edinburgh award| scheme and that is something very positive he's give to the community.
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and from inverness... you kinda felt it was coming, but it's still a bit of a shock at the same time when you heard about it. yeah, it wasjust like a shame he didn't make it to a hundred, he was so close to his 100th and he was like a pillar of the royal family and quite an icon. more tributes will be paid at holyrood on monday when parliament is recalled to remember a remarkable prince. glenn campbell, edinburgh. a busy time around the castle and people are bringing flowers. we know prince edward and his wife, sophie essex arrived earlier. sophie wessex
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spoke briefly to many people along the road. it was the royal couple, the road. it was the royal couple, the duke of's younger son and his wife. she said apparently to some of the onlookers that the queen is being amazing. prince edward, who came to visit the queen in the last hour or two. a two minute silence will be held at the grand national this afternoon. our sports correspondent andy swiss spoke to us before the horse race event got under way. it isa it is a chance for racing to pay its respects at aintree. prince philip was an honorary member of thejockey club. before racing started yesterday, there was a two—minute silence and the same will happen again today racing gets under way, roundabout 1.30. again, the course
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wilful silent. the flags around the course are at half mast and the jockeys are being invited to wear black arm bands. it is already a very subdued atmosphere to what we would normally expect at a grand national, not least of course because they are no spectators here. for the first time, the grand national is taking place behind closed doors. across the sporting world there will be tributes for prince philip, there will be silence before the premier league football matches and before football matches in scotland. but at aintree, as i say, the grand national is very much the focus of the sporting world and racing will be very keen to pay its respects to prince philip before racing gets under way. panda; respects to prince philip before racing gets under way. andy swiss at aintree for today's _ racing gets under way. andy swiss at aintree for today's grand _ racing gets under way. andy swiss at aintree for today's grand national. i last november the queen and the duke of edinburgh celebrated 73 years of marriage. and over the years, they have both reflected on their unique partnership, which was one of enduring devotion and support.
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the fact of the matter is that the marriage involves two partners. when there is lots to do, time seems to fly, and it appears to us at least that we've been fairly busy over the last 50 years. and the time has, of course, flashed past. until, that is, you start looking back and try to recall what things were like 50 years ago, and you begin to realise how much has changed. in the autumn of 1947, we got married. everyone seemed to think that our wedding was a very happy occasion and it brought a little colour back to life after the dreary war years. we certainly thought so. we were then fortunate to enjoy five happy years of fairly conventional married life, and that included two years
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with a home of our own in malta while i was in the navy. this period came to an abrupt end when the queen had the melancholy duty of succeeding her father after his premature death in 1952. she was 25 and i was 30, and we had two small children. life, as you can imagine, changed dramatically in many ways. but it had much less effect on our married life than i anticipated. then, after an interval of ten hectic years, we had two more children and were more or less settled into our new way of life. and like all families, we went through the full range of pleasures and tribulations of bringing up children. much can be done by an individual, but i am sufficiently old—fashioned to believe that a great deal more can be achieved by a partnership in marriage.
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too often, i fear prince philip has had to listen to me speaking. frequently, we have discussed my intended speech beforehand, and as you will imagine, his views have been expressed in a forthright manner. the main lesson that we've learnt is that tolerance is the one essential ingredient of any happy marriage. it may not be quite so important when things are going well, but it is absolutely vital when rings get difficult. when things get difficult. and you can take it from me that the queen has the quality of tolerance in abundance. he is someone who doesn't take easily to compliments, but he has quite simply been my strength and stay all these years, and i and his whole family, and this and many other countries, owe him a debt greater than he would ever claim or we shall ever know.
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we have seen the gun salute that took place in gibraltar and across the country and it marked the passing of the duke of edinburgh, who died yesterday at the age of 99. bell. gun fires. number one, fire. numberone, fire. gun fires. fire!
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gun fires. number one gun, fire. gun fires. fire! gun fires. the tower of london, the last of those sites across the country and from ships at sea and gibraltar, the 41 gun salute to mark the death of the duke of edinburgh. we will have continuing coverage from here at windsor castle throughout the day
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here on bbc news, of course. but for now, we say goodbye to viewers on bbc one. we will stay with reflections on the life of the duke on bbc news.
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good afternoon and welcome to this special bbc news coverage from windsor castle. gun salutes have taken place to mark the death of the duke of edinburgh at the age of 99. they took place across the united kingdom to mark an extraordinary life of duty and service. prince philip was by the queen's side for more than 70 years — the royal family mourns the loss of a beloved husband and father. if you were having problems, you could always go to him and know that he would listen and try to help. i think he would probably want to be remembered as an individual in his own right.

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