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tv   BBC News Special  BBC News  April 10, 2021 4:00am-6:01am BST

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for sure next week temperatures wherever you are going to be edging upwards. this is chester, for example. more of the southerly flow. temperatures back towards the mid—teens and that means later in the week after to start the week. this is bbc news. tributes are being paid from around the world to the duke of edinburgh, who's died at the age of 99. prince philip was the longest—serving royal consort in british history, a role that he'd made very much his own. there was no precedent. if i asked someone what you expect me to do, they all looked blank. they had no idea, nobody had much idea. a statement by buckingham palace spoke of the queen's deep sorrow at the loss of her beloved husband. flags are lowered to half mast in several countries as world leaders past and present pay their respects. here in the uk, floral tributes are laid at the gates of buckingham palace and windsor castle by well—wishers of all ages.
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welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. tributes have been paid to to the duke of edinburgh, who's died at the age of 99. prince philip was the longest serving royal consort in british histor, a constant support to queen elizabeth during more than 70 years of marriage. his death was announced in a brief statement from buckingham palace. prince philip was known for his strong views, but also his unswerving sense of duty,
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playing a prominent role in public life here in the united kingdom and across the commonwealth. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell looks back at a remarkable life. his was the support that mattered most. across more than 70 years of marriage and more than 65 years of elizabeth's reign, it was philip to whom she could always turn. he hadn't always found the role of consort easy, and sometimes, ill—judged comments got him into trouble. but it was a partnership which weathered the storms and coped with constant scrutiny to demonstrate a deep mutual understanding and love. philip was born in corfu in 1921. he was part of european royalty, descended from queen victoria. his family was banished from greece, his parents separated. at school in northern scotland, the young philip learnt
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to be self—reliant. his majesty walking down the ranks of the cadets... as the second world war loomed, he was an 18—year—old naval cadet, and at dartmouth college in the summer of 1939, he met the then 13—year—old princess elizabeth. he is said to have made a deep impression on her. philip served with distinction in the navy during the war. when the fighting ended, he started to discreetly escort elizabeth to family gatherings. he changed his name to philip mountbatten and became a british citizen. within buckingham palace, many courtiers were wary of him, but elizabeth was in love, and in the summer of 1947, the palace announced their engagement. it is with the greatest| pleasure that the king and queen announce - the betrothal of their dearly beloved daughter the princess elizabeth and lieutenant - philip mountbatten. they were married in westminster abbey on the 20th of november, 19117. after all the traumas
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of the second world war, a moment for celebration. again and again, the people called for elizabeth and philip! again and again, they joyfully responded. in 1952, the couple set off on a visit to the commonwealth. the king, george vi, waved them off from the airport. nobody realised he was in the final stages of lung cancer. a few days later, at a hunting lodge in kenya, philip broke the news to his wife that her father had died and that she was now queen. as george vi returns - to his sorrowing capital... they returned to london to lead the nation's morning. it was a challenging moment for philip. his wife was now fully occupied with her role as moderate, with her role as monarch, but there was no clearly defined role for him. there were long lunches with male friends and glamorous companions. in 1956, after philip had been absent forfour months aboard the royal yacht,
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there were rumours of a rift in the marriage, rumours which were flatly rejected by the palace. it it the 18th we are due back now? by the 1960s, philip had created the template for his role as consort. he focused on issues which interested him. he was an early champion of the need to conserve nature, and he created the scheme which is named after him, the duke of edinburgh award, encouraging young people to realise their potential. give young people a chance to discover their own abilities for themselves as an introduction to the responsibilities and interests of the grown—up world, and incidentally, to make new friends and have a great deal of fun and satisfaction in the process. no decade was more difficult for the royal family than the 1990s. the death of diana, princess of wales, was both a family tragedy and a moment of tension for the monarchy. it was the queen to whom the country looked for public comfort. it was philip to whom the queen
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turned for private support. and still, prince william with his head hung, walking next to his grandfather... it had been philip who had encouraged william and harry to walk behind their mother's coffin, and it had been philip who had taken the lead in trying to understand the domestic problems of his children. it revealed a sensitivity rarely seen in public. he remained physically active at an age when most people would have relished retirement. in many years, right up to his mid—90s, he carried out more engagements than younger members of the family. 0ften alone, but most frequently with his wife, he was the figure a few paces behind the queen, always looking out for her, and occasionally doing his own bit of crowd control. he was often forthright in his comments, and occasionally his blunt remarks and attempts at humour backfired. but he remained his own man. he once summed up his style in characteristic fashion.
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i have just done what i think is my best. i can't suddenly change my whole way of doing things, i can't change my interests, or the way in which i react to things. it's part of... it's somebody�*s style, it's too bad. throughout the monarchy�*s many ups and downs of recent times, philip, duke of edinburgh, was the occasionally restless but constant presence at the queen's side. their marriage and his support was crucial to the success of her reign. in a speech to celebrate their golden wedding anniversary, the queen spoke of the debt that she and the country owed him. he is someone who doesn't take easily to compliments, and he has quite simply been my strength and stay all these years. and i, and his whole family, and this and many other countries, owe him a debt greater than he would ever claim or we shall ever know.
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0ur correspondent paul hawkins is outside buckingham palace. paul, it is the middle of the night, orvery paul, it is the middle of the night, or very early morning, whichever way you look at it, but obviously, buckingham palace has been the centre of floral tributes, palace has been the centre of floraltributes, people palace has been the centre of floral tributes, people coming to visit throughout the day on friday, and no doubt it will continue through saturday too? yes, absolutely. people are expected to gather here to pay their respects to remember the duke of edinburgh on saturday, despite the advice from the government and the royal family that people shouldn't attend places such as buckingham palace and windsor castle because of the covid restrictions in place. instead, they should donate to the prince's charities. nevertheless, there are still
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some floral tributes here at the gates of buckingham palace. the royal parks have cleared away some of those flowers, but some of them remain, some balloons remain, and in fact, in the past hour, we have actually spoken to... as you can imagine, there is not many people here at aam, but we have spoken to one man who brought about £100 worth of alcohol to lay at the gates of buckingham palace, which we believe is still there, draped in the union flag. but speaking of the flag, the unionjack flying at half mast above buckingham palace and indeed, above all uk government buildings until eight o'clock on the day after the funeral, the date of which has yet to be announced by the palace. more details yet to come. all we do know is that the funeral for prince philip will be held at saint george's chapel, which is inside windsor castle, in the west of london, where the prince passed away
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peacefully, and where the queen still resides. and it was interesting how the announcement was made, wasn't it, paul, in terms of, you have obviously got the traditional announcement on those gates behind you, but also the more modern announcements on twitter? , , twitter? yes, first came the tweet and — twitter? yes, first came the tweet and then _ twitter? yes, first came the tweet and then came - twitter? yes, first came the tweet and then came the . tweet and then came the traditional note on the gates. and in keeping with prince philip's embrace of new technology, i guess, philip's embrace of new technology, iguess, he philip's embrace of new technology, i guess, he would have approved that it should have approved that it should have been that way. he was an innovator in the 1950s and 19605. innovator in the 1950s and 1960s. he modernised the running of the royal household. here at buckingham palace, he had an intercom fitted so that instead of note being passed between staff to the queen, they could just buzz down when they could just buzz down when they wanted to contact her. he was one of the first people to have computers inside his offices, and a little known fact, he also used to cook breakfast inside some of his room is using an electric
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frying pan. so definitely an innovator, and embrace of new technology. and paul, you touched on that earlier, what more details or we have about the funeral arrangements? 0bviously, for viewers around the world, it is important to underline that we are still living under covid restrictions, pretty strict once, in the uk, and that is going to have an impact on the kind of funeral that will happen?— kind of funeral that will hahen? , happen? absolutely. there will be no state _ happen? absolutely. there will be no state funeral, _ happen? absolutely. there will be no state funeral, mostly - be no state funeral, mostly because of the covid restrictions, which limit funerals in the uk at the moment to no more than 30 people, but that said, that is how prince philip is reported to have wanted his funeral, a small affair. he wasn't a fan of pomp and ceremonial. he wanted it to be small and intimate, so there can't be more than 30 people, so that is pretty much in keeping with prince philip's restrictions. all we know at the moment is that it will be in st george's chapel in windsor castle, and more details will be released
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by the palace probably, i would have thought, on twitter. qm. have thought, on twitter. 0k, paul hawkins _ have thought, on twitter. 0k, paul hawkins outside buckingham palace, thank you very much. prince philip pledged at his marriage in 19117 to give lifelong support to his wife, and after she ascended the throne in 1952, he was a permanent presence at queen elizabeth's side. his sense of duty and service have been mentioned who offered his condolences, and said that the duke's legacy would live on through all the charitable endeavours he shaped. 0ur diplomatic correspondent, james landale reports on reaction around the world to the duke's death. first to greet his royal- highness was the governor... for more than 70 years, the duke of edinburgh crisscrossed the world. sometimes at the queen's side, sometimes on his own, leaving an international legacy that was reflected in the global tributes paid today. breaking news from the uk. the royal family has issued a statement...
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across the world, his death made the headlines. from a white house that the duke knew so well, the current incumbent sent his condolences. prince philip, he was a heck of a guy. his lifetime of service to the united kingdom and the whole commonwealth... he will be missed, particularly in the united kingdom. 99 years old and never slowed down at all, which i admire the devil out of. and it was to the commonwealth the duke travelled so often, renewing friendships with countries with historic ties to britain, including those like canada, which still held the queen as head of state. prince philip was a man of service, motivated by a sense of duty to others. i know that through the duke of edinburgh's award, he helped empower millions of young people. at times, the duke represented
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the queen overseas, as countries marked their move from empire to independence and then commonwealth. you should have seen his royal highness at the last commonwealth heads of government meeting. it was extraordinary. he was the heart and the soul, and i think he will be greatly missed. he brought spice and excitement wherever he went, and i don't think we'll see the like of him again. the duke had a global perspective. all the places and the people that you've seen, they all belong to this one family of nations of ours. presenting television programmes about his travels, but also representing britain at memorials for a world war in which he played an active part. chancellor merkel said his friendship with germany would not be forgotten. president macron of france said he lived an exemplary life, defined by bravery and duty.
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greek—born, of danish blood, the duke was an elder statesman of european royalty. the spanish king, here on the left with his wife, sent a telegram to the queen. 0ne place, of course, where the duke may be especially missed is the island of tanna in the south—west pacific, where he was worshipped by some as a god. prince philip will be remembered as one of the first people in the public eye to champion the cause of conservation, a cause taken up enthusiastically by his grandchildren william and harry. for nearly 20 years, he was president of the world wildlife fund, now the worldwide fund for nature, and after stepping down he remained an active campaigner, as our science and environment editor, david shukman, reports. nature was one of prince philip's great loves, and the need to conserve it became a lifelong passion.
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he fought not just for endangered species but for the whole of the natural world. we depend on being part of the web of life. we depend on every other living thing on this planetjust as much as they depend on us. from his earliest official visits around the globe, this one to antarctica, wildlife was always a theme. he used his position to inspire younger generations. in this lecture for 2,000 children, many of the pictures were his. i don't think i'll tell you which are mine, but if you see a very bad one, you will know! an emerging theme was our responsibility. we as humans have got this power of life and death. not just life and death, but extinction and survival of other species of life. we ought
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to exercise it with some sort of moral sense. why make something extinct if we don't have to? he contributed to a series of dramatically titled books about threats to nature and he took advantage of his access to governments the world over. he helped to set up the worldwide fund for nature and led it for years. on a visit to the pandas in china, he highlighted the need to save them and their habitats. and he went live on television with david attenborough to make that point. the panda range has been squeezed between mountains on one side and human encroachment on the other. his important conservation has been huge. you can go anywhere in the world and he will know where he had to make the connection, where to put the pressure
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and what you have to do. he is very practical. but he did not always help himself. in the 60s, hejoined a tiger hunt and once shot a tiger in india. this image was to remain controversial. it was later said that tigers were not considered endangered back then. but prince philip did have his own distinct views. he supported fox hunting and the shooting of game birds, which set him at odds with many environmentalists. there is an advantage in people wanting to shoot, because if you have a game species, you want it to survive because you want to have some more next year. it is exactly like a farmer, you want to crop it, you don't want to exterminate it. so this was a man of his own brand of environmental concern and he did not like being labelled. would you describe yourself as a green? no. why not? well, because i think there's a difference between being concerned for the conservation of nature and being a bunny hugger.
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when i was president of the wwf, i got more letters about people... the way animals were treated in zoos than about any concern for the survival of a species. people can't get the idea of a species surviving. as far back as 1970, with a young prince charles by his side, he was typically forthright about the need to be realistic in the fight for nature. even naturalists drive cars occasionally, and having accepted that, we must go a step further and recognise the compromises that have to be reached. this agreement is inevitable, but to the groups must go on meeting, because we have simply got to hammer out answers to problems which are going to affect all life on these islands
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for generations to come. in many ways, prince philip was ahead of his time, using his fame as a royal to raise awareness of conservation, an early environmentalist who did not want to be called that. a unique campaignerfor a cause that is evermore relevant. over the years prince philip sat for many offical portraits, and here two artists share their experiences of painting the duke in that intimate setting. i have very fond memories of my sittings with him. he is a fascinating person to talk to. and the sittings would fly past. it really sort of took me by surprise what a genuine interest he took in art. not just talking about pictures, but looking and routing through my paintbox, actually asking me about oil colour and wanting to learn a little more about a
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painting technique. from day one, he was asking me questions about what i was doing and why. for more than anyone who wasjust doing and why. for more than anyone who was just idly curious. and so after a while, i said, well, curious. and so after a while, isaid, well, you curious. and so after a while, i said, well, you seem to know a lot about it. have you done any painting yourself? he said, i'm glad you asked! i have taken it up again recently. next time, i will bring in some of my own work. your heart always slightly sinks in that situation. they were in the style of maybe early 20th—century modernist european painters. there was definitely the influence, i would say, of matisse and those sorts of people. they were really pretty good. as a good. s a young good. as a young man, engaged to the young princess elizabeth, he would stay at windsor castle and he said that lights out when the family had retired for
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the night, he would find a torch and go creeping around the state rooms just to look at the state rooms just to look at the pictures. what made the time with him so interesting was that i felt that he was sharing, notjust time, but actually an intimate passion, his enthusiasms, and there was an openness in the man that probably took me by surprise. prince philip's life in art. as a former naval officer, the duke of edinburgh was a frequent visitor to the british territory of gibraltar, which borders spain. he took the royal yacht britannia there in 1957 and flew in to the airport as a pilot in 1996. the chief minister of gibraltar fabian picardo told us this was a moment of mourning across the british family of nations and prince philip was very much loved there.
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i remember all the times i had the privilege of speaking to him. he was always full of support for the gibraltarians, full of the recounting of memories of his time in gibraltar, wishing as well, and it always sticks in my mind that he would always ask me how the convent was. the convinces the convent was. the convinces the residents of the governor of gibraltar where the duke of edinburgh would have stayed on each of his occasions in gibraltar, some of them quite extended. he spent ten days here at one stage. he opened a legislative council back in 1950, so a very strong relationship with gibraltar and the people of gibraltar have always wanted ensure we remember with fondness. politicians, international leaders and friends have been paying tribute to the duke of edinburgh, the longest serving royal consort in british history, who has died two months short of his 100th birthday. the duke had spent three weeks in hospital last month.
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the us president, joe biden, commended prince philip's lifelong dedication to the queen. he paid tribute to him, as did leaders across the world, royalties, prime minister, presidents. the armed forces will lead a second day of tributes to prince philip, with gun salutes taking place at lunchtime across the uk, in gibraltar and from warships at sea. saluting batteries will fire 41 rounds at one round every minute from midday. we'll close with some of the lasting words and images reminding everyone of the life and times of prince philip, duke of edinburgh.
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a colder weekend to come. high pressure just a colder weekend to come. high pressurejust nosing on here, but that airflow nosing in, a chilly one, a scattering of wintry showers, but on saturday, an area of low pressure and weather fronts just pressing on towards the south—east of england. so a cold rain for some here. it may just try to turn a bit sleety to higher ground before moving away on saturday night. that area of cloud, though, across east anglia and south—east england on saturday, producing some outbreaks of rain, where as elsewhere, some sunshine, the odd shower popping up, wintry nature, rain, sleet, hail, some snow to higher ground, more particularly in
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scotland. much of the uk, a cold day with single figure temperatures. as the system pulls away on saturday night, clear skies forjust pulls away on saturday night, clear skies for just about everyone, meaning a widespread frost into sunday morning. high pressure still around, if flow from the north or north—east on sunday, so there will be sunny spells, if you showers popping up, the main theme on sunday is that it continues to be cold out there, with widespread single figure temperatures. if you catch a shower, a wintry mix possible of rain, sleet, hail, perhaps no to higher ground. clouding up in scotland later in the day, and this front sees northern ireland and scotland with some cloud and patchy rain on sunday night, stopping the temperatures going down too far, whereas under the high pressure in clear skies, for much of england and wales, a cold, frosty night going into monday morning. 0n a cold, frosty night going into monday morning. on monday, northern england, northern ireland and scotland with a lion's share of the showers here, the chance of some
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occasional rain, where the rest of england and wales closer to high pressure will see some dry, occasionally sunny weather, and temperatures back into double figures. into tuesday, a north— south split. in the south, you are closer to high pressure, so you are more likely to be settled. in scotland and northern ireland, closer to low pressure, so the chance of more cloud and outbreaks of rain, especially in north—west scotland. sunny spells in northern england, but especially across the rest of the country and wales, temperatures up to 13—14 in cardiff and london. high pressure still close to the south and south—east of the uk on wednesday, low pressure close to northern ireland. the chance of some rain, whereas the rest of the uk will be mainly dry, patchy cloud building after a sunny start and further sunny spells, and again, more widely those temperatures into double figures. as we look to see how things are for the second half of the week, it looks as though
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high pressure will know is a way, low pressure begins to head our way from the south—west, so maybe after a low pressure thursday, the chance of things again on friday into saturday, this time coming up for the south. first half of the weekend may be dry, later turning more unsettled, and an increasing chance of some rain. 0ne and an increasing chance of some rain. one thing is for sure. next week, wherever you were will edge upwards. this is chester, for example. the northerly winds will be gone. more of a southerly flow. temperatures towards the mid—teens, meaning after a chilly start the week, they will be closer to the seasonal average once again. back to your weather —— that is your weather for the weekend. this is bbc news. tributes are being paid from around the world to the duke of edinburgh who's died at the age of 99.
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prince philip was the longest—serving royal consort in british history — a role that he'd made very much his own. there was no precedent. if i asked someone, "what you expect me to do?" they have no idea. nobody had much idea. a statement by buckingham palace spoke of the queen's deep sorrow at the loss of her beloved husband. flags are lowered to half mast in several countries as world leaders past and present pay their respects. here in the uk — floral tributes are laid at the gates of buckingham palace and windsor castle by well—wishers of all ages. and we reflect on his legacy — including the duke of edinburgh's award — which has enriched the lives of millions of young people.
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hello and welcome. flags on all government buildings across the united kingdom, are being flown at half—mast, to mark the duke's death. politicians will deliver their own tributes when parliament is recalled at westminster on monday. here's our royal correspondent daniela relph on reaction to the news of the duke's death. the union flag at half mast. above the palace where he had spent so much of his working life. and placed on the gates, the official announcement of the duke of edinburgh's death. it is to her majesty and her family that our nation's thoughts must turn today, because they have lostjust a much loved and wholly respected public figure but a devoted husband and a proud and loving father, grandfather and, in recent years, great grandfather.
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his presence and significance in british national life recognised in the tributes. the uk has lost an extremely public servant in prince philip. he dedicated his life to our country and, above all, i think he will be remembered for his support and devotion to the queen. all of our thoughts are with the queen, the royal family and the british public, as they come together to mourn this huge loss. memories of an extraordinary man, a note amongst the flowers left at windsor, where he died. the remembrance has gone way beyond this royal town. on behalf of the welsh government and people in all parts of wales, i offer our deepest condolences to her majesty the queen, her majesty's children and theirfamilies, on this sad occasion. it is with deep sadness that i have learnt of the death of his royal highness the duke of edinburgh.
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it is a sadness that i know will be shared by countless others in northern ireland and across the world. when any family loses a loved one is difficult and while they may be public figures they are also family who are hurting, so i want to extend my condolences. at the queen's official residence in scotland, the formal announcement and personal memories. he had a close association, of course, with scotland. he went to school in scotland. i know that he enjoyed all of the time he spent at balmoral. he had a very long association as chancellor with the university of edinburgh. probably above all of that, the duke of edinburgh's award scheme transformed the lives and gave hope and inspiration to countless numbers of young people. it was back injuly that we last saw the duke of edinburgh on an official engagement in windsor, a rare public appearance and a reminder of his role in royal life. prince philip sums up a life lived well and ended well.
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and i would say, across the nation, we can look at this life, feel a deep sense of pride, a deep sense of admiration and gratitude. the royal family will grieve in private for now but tonight, on the duke and duchess of sussex's charity website, a message thanking the duke of edinburgh for his service, saying he will be greatly missed. he had remembered a memorable public figure for so many. i want to pay my respects to prince philip because he led the royal family and they feel very bad for them, for what happened. i suppose it was inevitable for a man who is 99 years of age that this would be the final outcome, but it's sad. it's been a sad day for the royal family and the country for the he served in the forces
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as well, which is good, but also the royal family. i will miss him. at york minster, the bells have been rung 99 times as a mark of respect for the duke's 99 years. as a tribute, they will be repeated across the uk, for a man who held a unique place in public life. a sense of some of the reaction across the uk. that was daniela ralph. you heard from the prime minister earlier. he gave that statement outside number 10 downing street the united kingdom and the commonwealth has gone through enormous change during the reign of queen elizabeth — and the duke of edinburgh has played a huge part in helping britain and her empire transition towards a new relationship with the countries in the commonwealth �*club'. in that time he travelled and developed connections with scores of countries, learning about their respective cultures. 0ur south asia correspondent rajini vaidyanathan has been taking a closer look at the duke of edinburgh's relationship with the subcontinent.
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prince philip's ties to south asia ran deep. as uncle was mountbatten, the last viceroy of india and the first governor general of an independent india. prince philip was also stationed when he served in the when he served in the royal navy and he was stationed in sri lanka during world war and he visited india with the queen. they came here 1961, and were guests of india on the annual republic day parade, and during that trip they also visited the taj mahal and played polo. prince philip did not just have those official connections. he also had strong personal connection here in india and was very close to the royal family injaipurand the story goes that every year on his birthday the royalfamily would send him a box of alfonso mangoes so much did he enjoy eating them. talking to other people
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here as well many the duke of edinburgh scheme had on their school years ago. it was a big thing here as well. and i was talking to one woman who remembers getting her award from prince philip himself he was visiting her school at the time, and she said it was one of the most memorable experiences in her educational life. india's prime minister issued a statement paying condolences and said his thoughts were with the british people and royal family. he said that prince philip had a distinguished career in the military and was at the forefront of many community service initiatives. pakistan's prime minister said that he sent his condolences and he said that prince philip and viewed a unique spirit of public service. last november the queen and the duke of edinburgh celebrated 73 years of marriage and here, in their own words, they reflect on that unique partnership.
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the fact of the matter is that a marriage involves two partners. there is lots to do, time seems to fly and it appears to us at least that we have been fairly busy over the last 50 years. and that time has of course flashed past. until that is you start looking back and try to recall what things were like 50 years ago and begin to realise how much has changed. in the autumn of 19117 we got married and everyone seemed to think that our wedding was a very happy
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occasion and brought a little colour back to life after the dreary war years. we certainly thought so. we were then fortunate to enjoy five happy years of fairly conventional married life and that include two years with the home of our own motor but i was in the navy. this period came to an abrupt end when the queen had a melancholy duty of succeeding her father after his premature death in 1952. she was 25 and i was 30 and with two small children and life as you can imagine changed dramatically in many ways. but it had much less effect on our married life than anticipated. and after an interval of ten hectic years we had two more children and were settled into a new way of life. and like all families who went to the full range of pleasures and tribulations of bringing up children. much can be done by an individual but i am sufficiently old—fashioned to believe that a great deal more
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can be achieved by partnership in marriage. 0r two of the knife there prince philip has had to listen to me speaking. frequently we have discussed my intended speech beforehand. and as you can imagine his views have been expressed in a forthright manner. the main lesson we have learned is that tolerance is the one central ingredient of any happy marriage. it may not be quite so important when things are going well but it is absolutely vital when things get difficult. and you can take it from me, the queen has the quality of tolerance in abundance. he is someone who does not take easily to compliments but he has quite simply been my strength and stay all these years. and i am his whole family and this and many other countries owe him a debt greater than he would ever claim we shall ever know.
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always forward thinking the duke of edinburgh was fascinated by science, technology and industry. naturally inquisitive and highly innovative, he pioneered many news ideas long before they became popular. it was the duke's mission to combine tradition with the promotion of a forward—looking monarchy, to communicate using the latest technology. he fully supported televising the queen's coronation in 1953. moving pictures from london that would be seen around the world. 16 years later in 1969, he invited the cameras deep into royal live to see the family from the inside.
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asked where was the king and they said oh, he is in the garden. and i went out and there was nothing to be seen except a lot of terribly rude words and language coming out of a rhododendron bush. quite rightly broke new ground by cameras as a presenter. at midnight tonight greatest concerted effort ever made to observe and record the detailed effects of our world will commence. a0 minutes to get around the world. well it is going to be a boost of a rush. it may leave you a little bit muddled. but i don't think it matters very much. it took to the media as a campaigner. we've got to make the best use of the skill and the brains of the people and we know well people in this country have got a remarkable talent for things that they learn how to do them and we ought to make the best use of that. one particular branch of science appealed to him. engineering held the key to just about everything. everything that was not invented by god was invented by an engineer.
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he promoted the production of clean, sustainable energy and was the senior fellow of the royal academy of engineering that he helped found in 1976. he launched the prince philip designers prize and was the head of thejudging panel for over 50 years, rewarding elegant scientific solutions. technology he admired the outside world he brought into the royal household here upgrading communications with an intercom system. i can't get there except if i fly, is that right? he was a pioneer when it came to transport and an early user of feel which was less damaging to the environment. so much of royal life is about pageantry, ceremony, tradition and the past. the duke of edinburgh always kept an eye on the future. such a pioneer.
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one of prince philip's greatest contributions to public life was the award scheme he established in 1956, the duke of edinburgh's award. at the time, the scheme was seen a radical and pioneering and encouraged young people to explore new challenges, take risks and show initiative. (chapter head has the duke of edinburgh's award, activities, expeditions and adventures. for millions of people, it has been part of growing up. it aims to give young people from all backgrounds a sense of achievement outside of the classroom, through field trips and volunteering. for these pupils at a secondary school in the heart of manchester, the experience has been life changing. when you go on duke of edinburgh, it is a whole different environment. it is green everywhere
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as far as you can see. even signing up for it was a bit out of my comfort zone because prior to it i was quite shy and reserved and didn't talk to many people in my year. i'd been working in a charity - shop for a year in my community and i think definitely it's. been a very interesting... you get to meet lots - of interesting people, you get to talk to lots of interesting people, to hear their story. | had fun and made so many friends without. .. don't know how i would have got through my high school years, honestly, it's been really, really good. it began in 1956 and grew out of the duke's own experiences of gordonstoun. the awards ethos was rooted in the philosophy of the school's headmaster, kurt hahn, who felt that education should be about more thanjust academic achievement. it is based on hahn's theory that you shouldn't be a specialist in any one thing. he felt that you shouldn't concentrate entirely on academic achievement. his his philosophy was if you can get young people to succeed in any area of activity, that mere sensation of success would spread over into a lot of others.
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when the scheme first started it was considered quite revolutionary but it also had its detractors. i think a lot of organisations thought it was going to be a rival to scouts, guides, outward bound trust, all sorts of people thought, "oh, dear, here comes another youth organisation to rival us." the cleverness was it was a programme which was complementary and not competitive so anyone could do it. the programme has moved with the times. it started as a boys only group and even when girls joined there was a gender divide. can you tell me how you will be able to get instructors and adjudicators to teach things like marriage and make—up and all the other new schemes you've mentioned in your pamphlet? make—up we've got no problem, marriage might be a bit more difficult! from helping at food banks to vaccination centres, during the pandemic, many young people have volunteered through the scheme.
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i think the duke of edinburgh is fantastic to gain especially independence. everyone can do it, everyone is helping the community, everyone is being active, everyone is learning a new skill, and i think the inclusion of the youth is fantastic. 0k, guys, ready to go? throughout the decades, the awards have been based on physical activity, skills, service and expedition. what you choose to do in each category is almost unlimited. then there are three levels — gold, silver and bronze. it was his energy that created the organisation, that enabled many young people to be able to access these development opportunities and he was an absolute stalwart champion for young people's opportunities and development, right the way through until he retired. while this is an incredibly sad moment to reflect on his passing, we are incredibly optimistic about the fact that we can build on his incredible legacy, and the award will still be going strong many, many years from now. water! its popularity and success has spread across the globe, with more than 140 countries taking part.
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the scheme that bears his name will perhaps be his greatest legacy. a testament to the ideas and outlook of the duke of edinburgh. the royal biographer and broadcaster, gyles brandreth, told us earlier how he thought prince philip would be remembered: today, it is the end of an era. the end of the extraordinary life of an extraordinary man. the principal role that he had was to support the queen and if we regard the resident queen's arena is a success and i think most people do, the joint author of that success has to be prince philip, duke of edinburgh. that fundamentally was what it was all about. he did a multiplicity of other things that served many generations. in the news broke this morning 16 happen to be
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doing charity work as part of trying to get his gold duke of edinburgh award so he has impacted the lives of millions people around the world. essentially today is a day of feeling such sadness and sympathy for the queen who met him when she was a little girl and fell in love with him as a teenager and has been married to him since 19117. since before most of us were born. he was there at her side. an absolute rock for the queen of course driven by duty, she is sustained by faith and it is her faith, sustained by faith and it is herfaith, i imagine, today, thatis herfaith, i imagine, today, that is the only consolation and also a sense of gratitude to have had this companion for so long and over the recent months with him. we keep hearing and quite rightly to quotations where she talks about him being her strength and another where she talks
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about him being her constant strength and guide. what i remember most telling scene them together is how he made her laugh. he was a very funny man. he was a good companion and it is easy to forget that nobody really treats the queen track quite normally. there is an invisible mode around the queen at all times. even her children when they meet at the beginning of the day had to babble curtsy. the only person in the world who could treat the queen as a woman, as a wife, was prince philip. and the only person in the world you could say to prince philip, do shut up, was the queen. and she did. and she did. plenty of global reaction as well — new zealand's prime minister, jacinda ardern, has announced that a memorial will be held following the prince's funeral. here she is reflecting on his strong connection he visited with her majesty the queen on ten occasions and then had additional solo visits. the first was in 1953 and the last was in 2002.
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yet a connection to a number of new zealand organisations both as patron and supporters, including the new zealand force. for over over 50 years the duke of edinburgh awards have connected him to thousands of new zealand young people and perhaps most importantly, he has served the support of her majesty the queen for many years in her service to new zealand, the commonwealth and indeed the world. with me is our reporter mark lobel with the latest reaction from papers around the world.— reaction from royalty around the world. european royalty. that is because he was european royalty himself and these two bits evoking memories of not just who he was but his huge character and personality and each one telling us something different and this one is interesting from the king of spain because he starts it by
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saying the pet name. we are sorry to have to mourn the passing of dear uncle philip. he is a relative both the queen and the duke of edinburgh. you can see the _ and the duke of edinburgh. you can see the warm _ and the duke of edinburgh. you can see the warm greeting between him and the queen and prince philip. it between him and the queen and prince philip.— prince philip. it was recent, and he said _ prince philip. it was recent, and he said in _ prince philip. it was recent, and he said in this - prince philip. it was recent, j and he said in this telegram that they will never forget the moment they all shared together in the uk state visit and he talks about his legacy and dedication to the crown eyes do the belgian, dutch and swedish royal family and heart—warming tributes. the swedish king touching on a shared passion he had with the duke of edinburgh for sailing in the uk. white met the leaders of both germany and france. and also on the front pages of papers there. if we look at the frankfurter
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allgemeine. you can see prince philip in a ceremonial uniform and you can see how he embodied and you can see how he embodied an era of british history and the french president is saying that the duke led an exemplary life and noted his bravery and commitment to youth services and the environment and if we do look at the front page of the frankfurter allgemeine you can see on the balcony there after the coronation injune after the coronation in june 1953 after the coronation injune 1953 the duke of edinburgh with the queen. angela merkel talking about his sense of duty. she says will remain un—forgotten. abs, duty. she says will remain un-forgotten._ un-forgotten. a lot of the pictures — un-forgotten. a lot of the pictures were _ un-forgotten. a lot of the pictures were seen - un-forgotten. a lot of the pictures were seen at - un-forgotten. a lot of the pictures were seen at the | un-forgotten. a lot of the - pictures were seen at the duke show him in his military garb there are many years of that in the — garb there are many years of that in the portrait _ garb there are many years of that in the portrait being - that in the portrait being painted online in an article thatis
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painted online in an article that is going viral from an americanjournalist as that is going viral from an american journalist as part of the white house press lobby and he does a story of a time in 1963 when kennedy had just been assassinated and prince philip overfor assassinated and prince philip over for the funeral and busting the residences in washingtonjohn f kennedy's white is looking forjohn junior and looks in the playroom and finds the duke of edinburgh playing on the floor with all the toys withjohn junior who was asking where is daddy and another image of him holding john daddy and another image of him holding jothr�*s hand during holding john jr's hand during the holding jothr�*s hand during the funeral services is so touching and amazing to see and also amazing was president 0bama's tribute to the duke of edinburgh. he voted with his wife michelle and they said he show the world what it meant to be a supportive husband a powerful woman. they knew them
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well over a period of eight years ending in 2016 when he was driving president 0bama around. they said as two americans are unaccustomed to palace and pompey did not know what to expect. we should not have worried. they immediately put us at ease with the grace and generosity, a ceremonial occasion into something far more natural, more comfortable.
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it is a cold weekend to come. for many area sunshine and how betterjust nosing on here. the flow of air around. the sunshine and a scattering of wintry showers but for saturday, an area of low pressure and some weather fronts just brushing in the south—east of england so a cold rain for some here. they may dry to turn a bit sleety for higher ground before clearing away on saturday night. an area of cloud around east anglia and south—east england on saturday producing some outbreaks of rain whereas elsewhere some sunshine. the old shower popping up, rain, sleet, hail, much of the uk as a cold day and single figure temperatures. as the system pulls away on saturday night clear sky is just bad for everyone and a widespread frost going into sunday morning. high pressure but still
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around that a flow of air from the north—east on sunday so there will be some sunny spells, a few showers popping up at the main theme on is that it continues to be cold out there with widespread single figure temperatures. a few catch a shower and wintry mix as possible in rain, sleet, hail, perhaps some snow to higher ground. plodding up a later in the day and had wakes of aim living in here. this one of rain is in northern ireland and scotland, patchy rain on sunday night and stopping the temperatures going down too far whereas underneath high skies for much of england and for wales it will be a cold frosty night going into monday morning. on monday, northern england, northern ireland and scotland with the lion's share of the showers here and the chance to sing some occasional rain whereas the west of england and wales close at high pressure and will see drag in occasionally sunny weather and temperatures back into double figures.
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going to choose a dozen north—south split. in scotland and northern ireland you are closer to low pressure so here is the chance certainly for more cloud and outbreaks of rain particularly in north—west scotland. sunny spells in northern england and particularly across the best of england and wales. temperatures up to 13 or 1a in cardiff and london. high pressure still close to the south east of the uk on wednesday. low pressure close to scotland and northern ireland so here more cloud. the chance of seeing some rain and the west of the uk will be moved. and again more widely those temperatures now into double figures. as we just look to see how things are for the second half of the week it looks as if high pressure when there's away.
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low pressure begins to header away from the south—west there may be after largely dry thursday and increasing chance things will turn more and settled again friday into saturday and this time actually coming up from the south. first half of the week here mainly dry then later in the week turning more with an increasing chance of seeing some rain. but the only thing for sure next week temperatures wherever you are going to be edging upwards. this is chester, for example. more of the southerly flow. temperatures back towards the mid—teens and that means later in the week after to start the week. this is bbc news.
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tributes are being paid from around the world following the death of the duke of edinburgh at the age of 99. as the world mourns, a series of gun salutes will be held in the uk and other countries to honour the duke. flags are lowered to half mast in respect as world leaders share their condolences. his presence and service a reassurance, a reminder of the stability we so often need in a world that can be so uncertain. prince philip was the longest—serving royal consort in british history — a role that he'd made very much his own. there was no precedent. if i asked someone what you expect me to do,
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they all looked blank. they had no idea, nobody had much idea. here in the uk, a statement by buckingham palace speaks of the queen's deep sorrow at the loss of her beloved husband. hello and welcome. today the formal events around the uk and the commonwealth that mark the death of prince philip begin. the queen's husband died on friday aged 99. in three hours from now, a 41—gun salute will take place in canberra in australia. at midday in each of the capitals of the four nations of the uk, a series of gun salutes will fire 41 rounds at one round every minute. another will happen an hour later in gibralter. with lockdown restrictions
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still in force, this will not take place in public, but will be broadcast around the world. prince philip was known for his strong views, and his great sense of duty. 0ur royal correspondent nicholas witchell looks back at a remarkable life. windsor castle, where the duke spent much of the past year in isolation with the queen, where he died yesterday morning, and where it's he died yesterday morning, and where its expected his funeral will take place in saint georges chapel in about a week from now. further details of the arrangements are expected to be given by buckingham palace later today. the duke of�*s death will be a grievous loss for the queen after their 73 years of marriage. last night on a bbc programme, their eldest children paid tribute to him. i eldest children paid tribute to him. ~' ., , , him. i think he would probably want to be _ him. i think he would probably want to be remembered - him. i think he would probably want to be remembered as - him. i think he would probably want to be remembered as an| want to be remembered as an individual in his own right,
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really. individual in his own right, reall . , individual in his own right, reall. ., ., ., really. his appreciation of how he could help _ really. his appreciation of how he could help the _ really. his appreciation of how he could help the queen - really. his appreciation of how. he could help the queen always seemed — he could help the queen always seemed to be present in terms of supporting her, because she was very— of supporting her, because she was very young when she became queen, _ was very young when she became queen, and they needed to be, i think. _ queen, and they needed to be, i think. a — queen, and they needed to be, i think, a double act for a lot of that— think, a double act for a lot of that time in order to allow her to— of that time in order to allow her to take on that role. it was her to take on that role. was in her to take on that role. it was in august 2017, on the forecourt of buckingham palace, that the duke carried out his final solo engagement, inspecting a parade by the royal marines. it was pouring with rain, yet the duke, who was then 96, was not to be deterred. duty came first that day, as it had for so many decades. so often alongside the queen, but also pursuing his own public programme, to which she wrote his own famously forthright style. but the public image of the duke, walking a few paces behind his wife, only tells part of the story. his greatest contribution was the unseen support he gave to the queen as
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she coped with the often solitary role of head of state. 0ccasionally, she alluded to it. he is my constant strength and guide, she said during the diamond jubilee. he was the one person she could always turn to. just before his 90th birthday, the duke had said in a bbc interview that he felt it was time to wind down. i reckon i've done — time to wind down. i reckon i've done my _ time to wind down. i reckon i've done my bit. _ time to wind down. i reckon i've done my bit. i- time to wind down. i reckon i've done my bit. i want - time to wind down. i reckon i've done my bit. i want to i i've done my bit. i want to enjoy myself for a bit now! with less responsibility, less frantic rushing about, less preparation, less... i'm trying to think of something to say. yet it wasn't until six years later and that parade in the pouring rain on the forecourt of buckingham palace that there was any real evidence that he was any real evidence that he was retiring. now, the queen must continue without him. the world will pay its tributes to
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a man of strong personality who made a significant contribution to the nation's life. and his family will mourn a much loved father, grandfather, great—grandfather and husband. 0ur correspondent paul hawkins is outside buckingham palace. paul, tell us more about what is being planned.— is being planned. yes, so, on saturday. _ is being planned. yes, so, on saturday, there _ is being planned. yes, so, on saturday, there will- is being planned. yes, so, on saturday, there will be - is being planned. yes, so, on saturday, there will be a - is being planned. yes, so, on saturday, there will be a 41 i saturday, there will be a 41 gun salute, one round fired every minute, so lasting around 40 minutes. first of all, in canberra, capital of australia, and then in the uk on saturday, the gun salute will start in the gun salute will start in the uk in the major cities of the uk in the major cities of the uk, so london, edinburgh, cardiff and belfast. that gun salute taking plays across the uk, and also won royal naval ships out at sea, including hms
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diamond and hms montrose, recognising the duke of edinburgh's incredible contribution to the royal navy, his distinguished naval career, when he served during world war ii, of course, and many people expected to gather again despite advice of the country because of covid restrictions at places like buckingham palace and windsor castle. find palace and windsor castle. and it has obviously _ palace and windsor castle. and it has obviously been a day when many have wanted to come to buckingham palace behind you, and of course, to windsor castle, to pay tribute, to lay floral tributes as well in memory of the duke? yes, they still have been _ memory of the duke? yes, they still have been coming - memory of the duke? yes, they still have been coming to - memory of the duke? yes, they still have been coming to lay - still have been coming to lay those floral tributes. throughout the night here, the royal park service has been taking some of them away and leaving some here, but people have come to pay tributes, leaving balloons and candles. 0ne chap had even left £100 worth of alcohol by the front gate, so people have been
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coming to remember the duke of edinburgh and exchange their memories. some people, of meeting him.— meeting him. and it is also interesting _ meeting him. and it is also interesting isn't _ meeting him. and it is also interesting isn't it, - meeting him. and it is also interesting isn't it, the - meeting him. and it is also interesting isn't it, the wayj interesting isn't it, the way interesting isn't it, the way in which the announcement was made, both in terms of the note put behind you and the gates of buckingham palace, but also how the announcement was made on twitter, which is very different to announcements in the past, obviously pre—twitter. the past, obviously pre-twitter.- the past, obviously re-twitter. , , pre-twitter. yes, exactly. you've got _ pre-twitter. yes, exactly. you've got the _ pre-twitter. yes, exactly. you've got the old - pre-twitter. yes, exactly. you've got the old way - pre-twitter. yes, exactly. you've got the old way of| you've got the old way of making these sorts of announcements, by pinning a note to the gates of buckingham palace, then you've got the newer, more modern way of announcing these sorts of things, the death of the duke of edinburgh, coming in social media via a tweet from the palace, which is a sign of the modern times, something prince philip himself would have approved of. he was a fan of innovation, modernising the royal household during the 19505 royal household during the 1950s and 60s, certainly at buckingham palace. he was one of the first people to have a
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computer in his room. he also fitted an intercom system so the staff could speak to the queen instead of passing notes around the house, and he was also a fan of cooking his breakfast in some of the rooms using an electric frying pan, so a moderniser, innovator, and someone who likes to shake things up and would have been fan of the way his death was announced, certainly, by social media. �* ., announced, certainly, by social media. ., , ., media. and of course, paul, if ou can media. and of course, paul, if you can remind _ media. and of course, paul, if you can remind viewers - media. and of course, paul, if| you can remind viewers around the world that we are in the uk under strict covid rules, that will have an impact, won't it, and how this will be marked publicly and privately?- publicly and privately? yes, for those — publicly and privately? yes, for those who _ publicly and privately? yes, for those who don't - publicly and privately? yes, for those who don't know, l publicly and privately? yes, i for those who don't know, the restrictions in the uk are that no more than 30 people can attend a funeral, so it will be attend a funeral, so it will be a small, intimate affair, which is apparently what the duke would have wished for anyway. he was not a fan of pomp or ceremony, so it will be a small service, which we know, according to the palace, will
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take place at saint georges chapel inside windsor castle, that we know no details have been announced yet. we are expecting more details of the funeral, such as the date, over the weekend, but it certainly won't be anything like the originalfuneral arrangements original funeral arrangements pre—pandemic, codenamed 0peration forth bridge, thousands of people expected to line the streets of windsor and also here in london with a naval procession and armed forces procession. none of that happening, a lot of it scaled back because of covid restrictions on the pandemic at the royalfamily, and also the governments, urging people to stay away from places like buckingham palace and windsor castle, but people still need to find somewhere to go, they are still coming here is still living tributes, they wouldn't be surprised to see more people here on saturday. 0k, paul, thank you very much. paul hawkins outside buckingham palace. as we've heard, people around the world have hailed
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prince philip's sense of public duty. the us president, joe biden, called him a selfless servant of the people of the uk and the commonwealth, commending his lifelong dedication to the queen. 0ur diplomatic correspondent james landale reports now on the continuing tributes from across the globe. first to greet his royal- highness was the governor... for more than 70 years, the duke of edinburgh crisscrossed the world. sometimes at the queen's side, sometimes on his own, leaving an international legacy that was reflected in the global tributes paid today. breaking news from the uk. the royal family has issued a statement... across the world, his death made the headlines. from a white house the duke knew so well, the current incumbent sent his condolences. prince philip, he was a heck of a guy. his lifetime of service to the united kingdom and the whole commonwealth... he will be missed, particularly in the united kingdom. 99 years old and never slowed
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down at all, which i admire the devil out of. and it was to the commonwealth the duke travelled so often, renewing friendships with countries with historic ties to britain, including those like canada, which still held the queen as head of state. prince philip was a man of service, motivated by a sense of duty to others. i know that through the duke of edinburgh's award, he helped empower millions of young people. at times, the duke represented the queen overseas, as countries marked their move from empire to independence and then commonwealth. you should have seen his royal highness at the last commonwealth heads of government meeting. it was extraordinary. he was the heart and the soul, and i think he will be greatly missed. he brought spice and excitement wherever he went,
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and i don't think we'll see the like of him again. the duke had a global perspective. all the places and the people that you've seen, they all belong to this one family of nations of ours. presenting television programmes about his travels... but also representing britain at memorials for a world war in which he played an active part. chancellor merkel said his friendship with germany would not be forgotten. president macron of france said he lived an exemplary life, defined by bravery and duty. greek—born, of danish blood, the duke was an elder statesman of european royalty. the spanish king, here on the left with his wife, sent a telegram to the queen. 0ne place, of course, where the duke may be especially missed, is the island of tanna in the south—west pacific, where he was worshipped by some asa god.
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commonwealth leaders have continued to share messages of condolence. as many australians woke to the news of the duke's death on saturday morning, the prime minister, scott morrison, echoed the global tributes. this is what he had to say. the duke of�*s life was one of duty and of service. of loyalty and of honour. memories of him will of course tell stories of his candour, and a unique and forceful and authentic personality. but above all, he was a man who was stabbed fast. who could be relied upon, always standing by his queen. there are many towering figures in the world has there would have lost unknown. —— is steadfast. but few have been
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with us in our lifetimes. a long time. his presence and service our reassurance, a reminder of the stability we so often need in a world that can be so uncertain. the canadian prime minister, justin trudeau described the duke as a "man of great purpose and conviction" and a little earlier the canadian royal watcher and author, patricia treble, reflected on the duke's special relationship with her country. he was here at least once a yearfor he was here at least once a year for a he was here at least once a yearfor a long time, and one of his last visits was 2013, and he was doing what he always did. he would come in to visit his regiments, the charities and organisations that he supported here. and it was here in toronto, to present colours to one of his regiments, the royal canadian regiment, and he
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had been their commander—in—chief for 60 years at that point, so he new generations of officers and men. everyone knew at that point, though, it was one of the last visits, and it turned out it was the last visit. there must have been about 5000-6000 there must have been about 5000—6000 people that gathered, and it was one of those events that was rarely publicised here, but people knew it was the end of an era. and it was really his relationship with the military which is being remembered here. the canadian armed forces started their tweet and just said, with love from canada, when they offered their condolences to the queen and the royal family. prince philip will be remembered as one of the first people in the public eye to champion the cause of global conservation — a cause taken up enthusiastically by his grandchildren, william and harry. for nearly 20 years he was president of the world wildlife fund — now the worldwide fund for nature — and after stepping down he remained an active campaigner, as our science and environment editor, david shukman, reports.
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nature was one of prince philip's great loves, and the need to conserve it became a lifelong passion. he fought not just for endangered species but for the whole of the natural world. we depend on being part of the web of life. we depend on every other living thing on this planetjust as much as they depend on us. from his earliest official visits around the globe, this one to antarctica, wildlife was always a theme. he used his position to inspire younger generations. in this lecture for 2,000 children, many of the pictures were his. i don't think i'll tell you which are mine, but if you see a very bad one, you will know! an emerging theme was our responsibility. we as humans have got this power of life and death. if we've got this power of life and death, notjust life and death but extinction and survival of other species of life, then we ought to exercise it with some sort
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of moral sense. why make something extinct if we don't have to? he contributed to a series of dramatically titled books about threats to nature and he took advantage of his access to governments the world over. he helped to set up the worldwide fund for nature and led it for years. on a visit to the pandas in china, he highlighted the need to save them and their habitats. and he went live on television with david attenborough to make that point. the panda range has been squeezed between mountains on one side and human encroachment on the other. his important conservation has been huge. you can go anywhere in the world and he will know where he had to make the connection, where to put the pressure and what you have to do. he is very practical.
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but he did not always help himself. in the 60s, hejoined tiger hunts and once shot a tiger in india. this image was to remain controversial. it was later said that tigers were not considered endangered back then. but prince philip did have his own distinct views. he supported fox hunting and the shooting of game birds, which set him at odds with many environmentalists. there is an advantage in people wanting to shoot, because if you have a game species, you want it to survive because you want to have some more next year. it is exactly like a farmer, you want to crop it, you don't want to exterminate it. so this was a man with his own brand of environmental concern and he did not like being labelled. would you describe yourself as a green? no. why not? well, because i think there's a difference
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between being concerned for the conservation of nature and being a bunny hugger. when i was president of the wwf, i got more letters about people... the way animals were treated in zoos than about any concern for the survival of a species. people can't get their heads round the idea of a species surviving. as far back as 1970, with a young prince charles by his side, he was typically forthright about the need to be realistic in the fight for nature. even naturalists drive cars occasionally, and having accepted that, we must go a step further and recognise the compromises that have to be reached. disagreement is inevitable, but the groups must go on meeting, because we have simply got to hammer out answers to problems which are going to affect all life on these islands
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for generations to come. in many ways, prince philip was ahead of his time, using his fame as a royal to raise awareness of conservation, an early environmentalist who did not want to be called that. a unique campaignerfor a cause that is ever more relevant. the duke of edinburgh's sporting activities provided him with a welcome opportunity to get away from formal royal duties. for him, sport became an outlet for his restless energy, and he proved himself to be a keen and talented competitor. andy swiss reports. prince philip always enjoyed sport, and he often excelled at it. at school, he learnt to love sailing, and as a wedding present, he and the queen were given a dragon class yacht, blue bottle. his main sailing companion was a socialite, uffa fox, who became a lifelong friend. the two acquired something of a playboy image, but it did not detract from their sailing prowess.
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uffa fox once said of his sailing mate, i have never known anyone to take a boat across the tide as skilfully as he does. prince philip would take part in the royal regatta at cowes for the next 50 years. people in our modern kind of technological era, it really doesn't matter to them whether it rains or it blows or it's wet or it's cold, you just get indoors. the thing about going to sea is, you are suddenly exposed to an element which you can't really control. you are subject to it, and i think that's quite good for the soul, frankly. and now, a change of bowling from the pavilion end. as an enthusiastic cricketer, he also drew praise from high places. that one moved across to leg. he has a perfect action for l a right hand off spin bowler. laughter prince philip would often play so others could benefit.
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he was a firm believer in recreation for all, and raised huge amounts of money over the years for the playing fields association. but it was on the polo field that the duke was to grab most of the limelight, becoming one of the top four players in britain in the 1960s, even though he had started relatively late in the sport. he also made it more popular. the duke's presence on the field put polo into the gossip columns. he attracted spectators to come and watch. and they were really coming to watch him. not the polo, but of course, they then, or some of them, got interested in polo, and made a habit of watching it. he had to stop playing polo when he was 50 because of arthritis in his hands, but he noticed another equestrian sport, far more popular in countries like germany and hungary, which he threw himself into. go on!
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carriage driving became his new passion. he was even responsible for drawing up the rules, and worked tirelessly to raise the profile of the sport, as well as competing in the british team. great britain was represented by george bowman... his fellow team—mate george bowman was one of the more unlikely friendships the prince made during his sporting life. i was a scrap merchant. and of course, he was a prince, and at times, people made a lot about this, but he never treated me any different. he always looked at me like a fellow, and that was one of the things i admired about him. despite some hair raising spills along the way, such as here, when his carriage hit a concrete block, the duke carried on driving well into old age.
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in greek, the name philip means "lover of horses", and the way he handled his animals was a measure of both the man and his sportsmanship. the ministry of defence has said that gun salutes will take place across the uk to mark the death. members of the public across the uk have been paying their respects. we'll close now with some of the lasting words and images of the life and times of prince philip, duke of edinburgh.
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a colder weekend to come. for many areas, there will be some sunshine. high pressure just nosing on here, but that airflow nosing in, a chilly one, a scattering of wintry showers, but on saturday, an area of low pressure and weather fronts just pressing on towards the south—east of england. so a cold rain for some here. it mayjust try to turn a bit sleety to higher ground before moving away on saturday night. that area of cloud, though, across east anglia and south—east england on saturday, producing some outbreaks of rain, where as elsewhere, some sunshine, the odd shower popping up, wintry nature, rain, sleet, hail, some snow to higher ground, more particularly in scotland. much of the uk, a cold day with single figure temperatures. as the system pulls away
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on saturday night, clear skies forjust about everyone, meaning a widespread frost into sunday morning. high pressure still around, and a flow from the north or north—east on sunday, so there will be sunny spells, a few showers popping up, the main theme on sunday is that it continues to be cold out there, with widespread single figure temperatures. if you catch a shower, a wintry mix possible of rain, sleet, hail, perhaps snow to higher ground. clouding up in scotland later in the day, and this front sees northern ireland and scotland with some cloud and patchy rain on sunday night, stopping the temperatures going down too far, whereas under the high pressure and clear skies for much of england and wales, a cold, frosty night going into monday morning. on monday, northern england, northern ireland and scotland with the lion's share of the showers here, the chance of some occasional rain, where the rest of england and wales closer to high
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pressure will see some dry, occasionally sunny weather, and temperatures back into double figures. into tuesday, a north—south split. in the south, you are closer to high pressure, so you are more likely to be settled. in scotland and northern ireland, closer to low pressure, so the chance of more cloud and outbreaks of rain, especially in north—west scotland. sunny spells in northern england, but especially across the rest of the country and wales, temperatures up to 13—14 in cardiff and london. high pressure still close to the south and south—east of the uk on wednesday, low pressure close to northern ireland. the chance of some rain, whereas the rest of the uk will be mainly dry, patchy cloud building after a sunny start and further sunny spells, and again, more widely those temperatures into double figures. as we look to see how things are for the second half of the week, it looks as though high pressure will know
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high pressure will nose away, low pressure begins to head our way from the south—west, so maybe after a low pressure thursday, from the south—west, so maybe after a largely dry thursday, the chance of things again on friday into saturday, this time coming up for the south. first half of the weekend may be dry, later turning more unsettled, and an increasing chance of some rain. one thing is for sure. next week, wherever you were will edge upwards. this is chester, for example. the northerly winds will be gone. more of a southerly flow. temperatures towards the mid—teens, meaning after a chilly start the week, they will be closer to the seasonal average once again. that is your weather for the week ahead. this is bbc news. tributes are being paid from around the world following the death
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of the duke of edinburgh at the age of 99. as the world mourns — a series of gun salutes will be held in the uk and other countries to honour the duke. flags are lowered to half mast in respect — as world leaders share their condolences. his presence and service our reassurance, a reminder of the stability we so often need to know where that can be so uncertain. prince philip was the longest—serving royal consort in british history — a role that he'd made very much his own. there was no precedent. if i asked someone, "what you expect me to do?" they have no idea. nobody had much idea. here in the uk — a statement by buckingham palace speaks of the queen's deep sorrow at the loss of her beloved husband.
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hello and welcome . flags on all government buildings across the united kingdom , are being flown at half—mast , to mark the duke's death. politicians will deliver their own tributes when parliament is recalled at westminster on monday. here's our royal correspondent daniela relph. the union flag at half mast. above the palace where he had spent so much of his working life. and placed on the gates, the official announcement of the duke of edinburgh's death. it is to her majesty and her family that our nation's thoughts must turn today, because they have lostjust a much loved and wholly respected public figure but a devoted husband and a proud and loving father, grandfather and, in recent years, great grandfather.
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his presence and significance in british national life recognised in the tributes. the uk has lost an extremely public servant in prince philip. he dedicated his life to our country and, above all, i think he will be remembered for his support and devotion to the queen. all of our thoughts are with the queen, the royal family and the british public, as they come together to mourn this huge loss. memories of an extraordinary man, a note amongst the flowers left at windsor, where he died. the remembrance has gone way beyond this royal town. on behalf of the welsh government and people in all parts of wales, i offer our deepest condolences to her majesty the queen, her majesty's children and theirfamilies, on this sad occasion. it is with deep sadness that i have learnt of the death of his royal highness the duke of edinburgh. it is a sadness that i know will be shared by countless to her majesty the queen, her majesty's children and theirfamilies, on this sad occasion. it is with deep sadness that i have learnt of the death
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of his royal highness the duke of edinburgh. it is a sadness that i know will be shared by countless others in northern ireland and across the world. when any family loses a loved one is difficult and while they may be public figures they are also family who are hurting, so i want to extend my condolences. at the queen's official residence in scotland, the formal announcement and personal memories. he went to school in scotland. i know that he enjoyed all of the time he spent at balmoral. he had a very long association as chancellor with the university of edinburgh. probably above all of that, the duke of edinburgh's award scheme transformed the lives and gave hope and inspiration to countless numbers of young people. it was back injuly
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that we last saw the duke of edinburgh on an official engagement in windsor, a rare public appearance and a reminder of his role in royal life. prince philip sums up a life lived well and ended well. and i would say, across the nation, we can look at this life, feel a deep sense of pride, a deep sense of admiration and gratitude. the royal family will grieve in private for now but tonight, on the duke and duchess of sussex's charity website, a message thanking the duke of edinburgh for his service, saying he will be greatly missed. he had remembered a memorable public figure for so many. i want to pay my respects to prince philip because he led the royal family and they feel very bad for them, for what happened. i suppose it was inevitable for a man who is 99 years of age that this would be the final outcome, but it's sad.
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it's been a sad day for the royal family and the country for the he served in the forces as well, which is good, but also the royal family. i will miss him. at york minster, the bells have been rung 99 times as a mark of respect for the duke's 99 years. as a tribute, they will be repeated across the uk, for a man who held a unique place in public life. a sense of some of the reaction across the uk. in public when appearing with the queen, the duke of edinburgh was careful to take second place to her majesty, but as our royal correspondent sarah campbell reports, behind closed doors, it was the duke who took the lead — influencing family decisions — and driving many reforms. # god save the queen #. a great roar from the crowd outside buckingham palace.
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while the queen took centre stage in public life when it came to family matters it was prince philip who was in charge. when elizabeth came to the throne philip had to leave the navy. it was unusual in the 1950s and 60s for the man of the household to give up his career to support his wife and children, but he had little choice but to fit his life around her unique position and, as their home movies show, he did so with gusto. first hand accounts i have been told by people who were there at the time are of prince philip notjust bathing the children, playing with the children, reading to the children, he was a hands—on dad. his was an unusual childhood, split up from his parents and his four sisters, one of whom was tragically killed. tv: the pleasures of family l life are enjoyed by the baby's mother and father less frequently than by ordinary families. royal duties involved frequent foreign travel, but, as philip's family grew, he was determined to do things differently.
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i always aim to be home during the holidays so i can see the children. we try and keep the children out of the public eye largely so that they can grow up as normally as possible. in 1969, philip allowed the tv cameras in for a behind—the—scenes documentary. this was the royal family as never seen before or since, reportedly on the instruction of the queen. decisions such as schooling were his. gordonstoun, the scottish boarding school had suited philip as a youngster and so that is where he chose to send his sons. while in later life prince charles praised the school's ethos, his years there far from home were difficult. prince charles has his memories and when it comes to prince phillip his motives in what he was doing as a father was to try to toughen up his son, to correct what he perceived as weaknesses, i suppose ultimately to perhaps recreate the self—reliant, self—confident boy that
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philip was turned into by the gordonstoun system. father and son did come to share common ground, however. the duke passed on his love of painting and a passion for the environment and conservation. his relationship with his other children was more straightforward. the bond with princess anne was clear, alike in many ways, she was outspoken and she knew how to deal with her father's similarly frank manner. he shared a naval background with prince andrew, both having served in fields of conflict. and he may have been disappointed when prince edward chose to leave the royal marines, but over the years their relationship grew ever closer. it was to his youngest son that philip entrusted
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perhaps his greatest legacy, the duke of edinburgh's award. what is it like working with your father? he doesn't, don't worry. it's very easy. he does his own thing. tv: and now the veil- is thrown back and we can see the princess of wales. there were difficult years when the marriages of three of his four children failed, the most public the split of charles and diana. what emerged much later, to the surprise of some, was the extent to which he tried to help. during the break—up he had written to his daughter—in—law and the tone of his letters and her replies revealed a softer, compassionate side to the duke, rarely seen in public. dearest pa, she wrote in 1992, that she was pleased to receive his letter and particularly so to read that he was desperately anxious to help. he replied if invited he would always do his utmost to help but was ready to concede that he had no talents as a marriage counsellor. there was no doubt on her part
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that gruff and stern though philip could often be, that his motives were of the best and she appreciated that. cheering. into his 90s public engagements became fewer, but family events, like princess charlotte's christening, remained a priority. in 2018, despite a recent hip replacement, he walked unaided into the chapel for his grandson harry's wedding. two years later, isolating at windsor, he was there for his granddaughter beatrice. tv: a heady programme of official engagements | prevents the princess and the duke from seeing their son as often as they wish. it is only on occasions like this that they can enjoy the happiness of parenthood. it was a long life where duty and family responsibility often came into conflict. the pandemic, as has been
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the case for so many families, deprived his loved ones of direct contact with him in his final months. his diminishing influence as the family patriarch coincided with a time of great public and private upset for the family. perhaps the duke's steady influence and forthright manner were missed. his children, grandchildren and great—grandchildren will be united in mourning his loss. with me is our reporter mark lobel with the latest reaction from papers around the world.
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his straightforward nature and a sense of duty will remain and forgotten. his married to german printers and he had a brother—in—law who was an active nazi and he fought in the second world war. i don't think any of his sisters were invited to his wedding at the time. also, a glowing tribute from france. if we look at the front page. you can see the pins in his ceremonial uniform there. they say that he embodied an area of british history and a fantastic tribute from the french president saying that he led an exemplary life noting his bravery and commitment to youth and the environment. they love to make uniform, didn't they? a lot of voters on front pages showing him in his full military uniform, perhaps reflecting the huge respect globally for the service to the crown. a huge amount about duty particularly to the commonwealth. as one of
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the key things to be remembered. 2.4 billion people and particularly in this day we've had tributes from canada and all around but there is a slightly different portrait doing the rounds online which has been told by the white house press lobbyjournalist 1963 and the weekend of his funeral the queen cannot travel because she was pregnant so prince philip went and john f kennedy's wife jacqueline was looking for their three—year—old son so she opened the door and on the floor playing with him and all the toys was prince philip after he had heard john the toys was prince philip after he had heard jothunior asking where is daddy, and another touching image circulating where you seejohn junior watching part of the funeral possession and holding his mothers hand but also that of prince philip. and the queen of prince philip. and the queen of and prince philip popular in
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america as well. and that is coming up to the tributes being paid. jo biden covering every part of his life and talking about the fact that the duke of edinburgh took part in world war ii and championed environmental causes and inspired young people and looked after his family, the commonwealth and the uk. president 0bama who knew them well, right up until been driven by the 94—year—old in 2016 around the royal grounds met them in 2009, we were very nervous vote this tribute. as two americans and a come back unaccustomed to palaces we do not know what to expect. the queen and prince philip immediately put as it is with the grace and generosity turning a ceremonial occasion into something more natural and comfortable. a final quote they said the duke of edinburgh show the world what it meant to be a supportive husband to a powerful woman. thank you for giving us an overview of what
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the global papers and global royalty of said about the duke. the word new prince philip to be a man of strong views that many people may not have known about his thirst for knowledge. he was fascinated by science, technology and industry. naturally inquisitive and highly innovative he pioneered many ideas long before they became popular. it was the duke's mission to combine tradition with the promotion of a forward—looking monarchy, to communicate using the latest technology. he fully supported televising the queen's coronation in 1953. moving pictures from london that would be seen around the world. 16 years later in 1969, he invited the cameras deep into royal live to see the family from the inside. when i used to come to royal lodge i
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asked where was the king and they said oh, he is in the garden. and i went out and there was nothing to be seen except a lot of terribly rude words and language coming out of a rhododendron bush. quite rightly broke new ground by cameras as a presenter. at midnight tonight greatest concerted effort ever made to observe and record the detailed effects of our world will commence. 40 minutes to get around the world. well it is going to be a boost of a rush. it may leave you a little bit muddled. but i don't think it matters very much. it took to the media as a campaigner. we've got to make the best use of the skill and the brains of the people and we know well people in this country have got a remarkable talent for things that they learn how to do them and we ought to make the best use of that. one particular branch of science appealed to him. engineering held the key to just about everything. everything that was not invented by god was invented by
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an engineer. he promoted the production of clean, sustainable energy and was the senior fellow of the royal academy of engineering that he helped found in 1976. he launched the prince philip designers prize and was the head of thejudging panel for over 50 years, rewarding elegant scientific solutions. technology he admired the outside world he brought into the royal household here upgrading communications with an intercom system. i can't get there except if i fly, is that right? he was a pioneer when it came to transport and an early user of feel which was less damaging to the environment. so much of royal life is about pageantry, ceremony, tradition and the past. the duke of edinburgh always kept an eye on the future.
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last november the queen and the duke of edinburgh celebrated 73 years of marriage and here, in their own words, they reflect on that unique partnership. the fact of the matter is that a marriage involves two partners. when there is lots to do, time seems to fly and it appears to us at least, that we have been fairly busy over the last 50 years. and that time has, of course, flashed past. until, that is, you start looking back and try to recall what things were like 50 years ago, and begin to realise how much has changed. in the autumn of 1947, we got married and everyone seemed to think that our wedding was a very happy occasion, and brought a little
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colour back to life after the dreary war years. we certainly thought so. we were then fortunate to enjoy five happy years of fairly conventional married life, and that included two years with a home of our own in malta when i was in the navy. this period came to an abrupt end when the queen had a melancholy duty of succeeding her father after his premature death in 1952. she was 25 and i was 30 and with two small children, and life as you can imagine, changed dramatically in many ways. but it had much less effect on our married life than i anticipated. and after an interval of ten hectic years we had two more children and were settled into a new way of life. and like all families who went
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to the full range of pleasures and tribulations of bringing up children. much can be done by an individual but i am sufficiently old—fashioned to believe that a great deal more can be achieved by partnership in marriage. all too often i fear prince philip has had to listen to me speaking. frequently we have discussed my intended speech beforehand. and as you can imagine his views have been expressed in a forthright manner. the main lesson we have learned is that tolerance is the one central ingredient of any happy marriage. it may not be quite so important when things are going well, but it is absolutely vital when things get difficult. and you can take it from me, the queen has the quality of tolerance in abundance. he is someone who does not take easily to compliments but he has quite
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simply been my strength and stay all these years. and i am his whole family and this and many other countries owe him a debt greater than he would ever claim we shall ever know. as a young man prince philip enjoyed sailing and went on to join dartmouth college in 1939 as a naval cadet. it was the start of a much loved and illustrious career in the royal navy. philip first saw action with hms valiant in the mediterranean. within two or three days ofjoining there was
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a great bombardment in north africa. and it was quite impressive. 15 inch guns going off which i had heard before and i suddenly realise life is for real. march 1941. hms valiant of the south—west coast of greece. aha, valiant of the south-west coast of greece-— of greece. a few guns replied but the enemy's _ of greece. a few guns replied but the enemy's fate - of greece. a few guns replied but the enemy's fate was - but the enemy's fate was sealed. prince philip made this entry in his log. my sealed. prince philip made this entry in his log.— entry in his log. my orders were that _ entry in his log. my orders were that if _ entry in his log. my orders were that if any _ entry in his log. my orders were that if any ship - were that if any ship eliminated a target i was to switch on and eliminate it for the rest of the fleet. they said, well illuminate. and by good chance i found a cruiser with that everyone started shooting. his actions in the battle earned him a mention in
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dispatches. in the last year of the war he was a new destroyer in the pacific fleet. the summer of 1945 heading for japan. summer of 1945 heading for ja an. �* summer of 1945 heading for jaan. �* japan. being in tokyo bay with the surrender _ japan. being in tokyo bay with the surrender ceremony - japan. being in tokyo bay with j the surrender ceremony taking place in about a ship which was 200 yards away and you could see what was on with a pair of binoculars, well, it was a great relief i mean, suddenly feeling that life is different. five years after the end of the second world war he was back in the mediterranean in command of his first ship. the prince and his first ship. the prince and his young wife princess elizabeth, the motor years were two of the happiest of their lives, cut short by news of king george's failing health. his career in the royal navy was over. from now on he was the new queens consort but he
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would always look back on his time at sea is a deeply significant period of his life. i am particularly proud to do this because, like all of us who served in the navy during the war i lost many friends and shipmates who are commemorated here. a look back at the life of the duke of edinburgh. flags will be flying at half mast across all official buildings in the united kingdom. parliament will reconvene on monday for mps to make their own tributes when parliament comes back together in westminster. they are also hearing that consulates to mark the death of the duke are due to take place later across the uk and in gibraltar and from warships at sea, saluting batteries will fire 45 answer
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one round every minute from 12 o'clock british summertime in cities including london, edinburgh, cardiff and belfast. you are watching bbc news. goodbye. a colder weekend to come. this weekend is going to be cold with some sunshine around but there will be wintry showers, two and some rain, particularly across southern and south—east england. closer to this weather front. we have that feed of arctic northerly air running across the country and feed in in plenty of showers to northern parts of scotland and northern ireland to start saturday morning. there will be further accumulations of snow over the high ground. further south are cold frosty start, bright with sunshine but showers were developed anywhere and they
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will contain hail, sleet and snow. across the south—east corner it will stay dry with outbreaks of rain. and it is going to be a cold day weather you are. temperatures of 4—9 . well below par for the time of year. two saturday night it stays cold. wintry nature. and we will see the rain and cloud easing away from the south—east but still hang back of cloud and elsewhere another cold night with a widespread frost and some ice to watch out for. by and some ice to watch out for. by sunday we lose those weather fronts and we're all anyone of northerly winds and again, it is going to be one of those days. sunshine and wintry showers. a brighter day for the south—east corner of the country and believes that weather front and then after a cold and start it is going to be sunshine and wintry showers with accumulations of snow over the hills. a very cold day to come wherever you are. highs a 5-9 c. that come wherever you are. highs a 5—9 c. that is the weekend's weather and as we head into the
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new week high pressure tries to build into southern areas and we have these weather fronts across western areas which will introduce more cloud at times. the current thinking for monday is that northern ireland, wales, the midlands and the south—west could see the rain and wind winds over the high ground whereas further north it could be drier with some sunshine. temperatures creeping up sunshine. temperatures creeping up across the south. ten or 11 degrees. another cold one to come elsewhere. as we move to the new working week we can see we have cut off that air from the north and temperatures will slowly finally be recovering closer to normal.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and rachel burden. 0ur headlines today: gun salutes will take place across the uk to mark the death of the duke of edinburgh at the age of 99. details about the duke's funeral are due to be released later, as the royal family mourns the loss of a beloved husband and father. if you are having problems, you could always go to him and know that he would listen. and try to help. i think he probably would want to be remembered as, um... as an
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individual_ remembered as, um... as an individual in _ remembered as, um... as an individual in his own right, really. the man, and his legacy.

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