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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 9, 2021 10:00am-12:01pm BST

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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. the uk government announces its plans to reopen international travel in england — if you want to go on holiday you will have to pay for a coronavirus test. airlines argue the cost is too high, and the transport secretary agrees. i think overall, the pricing should be lower and the reason i say that specifically is i'm looking at what's happening in other countries and i do notice there is a very big variation so we are committing as a government to work to drive those costs down. have you booked a holiday abroad this summer? are you willing to pay hundreds of pounds more for a covid test or will you have a staycation in the uk instead? you can get in touch with me on this on twitter, i'm @annita—mcveigh and use the hashtag bbc your questions.
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we would love to read out some of your comments. police use water cannon on protesters after coming under attack from petrol bombs and fireworks during another night of violence in belfast. president biden announces plans to tackle gun violence — which he says has reached devastating proportions in the united states. a medical expert in the trial of the former police officer derek chauvin says george floyd died from a lack of oxygen, due to the way he was restrained. and from today, everyone in england will be able to access two free rapid coronavirus tests a week, which provide results in around 30 minutes.
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hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. plans to reopen international travel for holidaymakers from england have been unveiled with a requirement to pay for coronavirus tests. the uk government has stopped short of saying if foreign trips can resume next month, but has outlined a so—called traffic light system, which will be used to categorise countries based on risk. for places on the green list, travellers will be asked to take a test before they return to england, and pay for a costly pcr test, typically £120, two days after arriving home. if you're coming to england from countries on the amber list you will also be asked to self—isolate for ten days, and pay for a pcr test on days two and eight. and passengers from red list destinations will be required to pay for ten days in a quarantine hotel. the plans have been met with widespread frustration by the travel industry. caroline davies has this report.
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we may be dreaming of sunshine and summer getaways, but would you pay around an extra £100 per person when coming back from your trip overseas? the boss of easyjet isn't impressed at this part of the government's plan to reintroduce international travel in england. i think it's a blow to all travellers who were wishing to go and see friends and families and go on a holiday this summer, and i think particularly the concern why there are now two test systems in what they call the green category. today's report says that passengers coming from the lowest risk green rated countries will still need to take one of the more expensive pcr tests when they arrive back in england, and pay for it themselves, currently around £100 each. instead, the industry wants to use the quicker and cheaper lateral flow tests. the government says pcr testing will allow them to monitor positive cases and check for variants of concern.
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the report also says that if travel does go ahead, countries which will be on the green list will be announced in early may. there will be a watchlist for countries at risk of being changed to amber, and there will be new consumer rights for ticket refunds. the industry is already gearing up for international travel on the 17th of may. whether that will happen won't be confirmed either way until early next month. the flight simulators here are in use 2a hours a day, with pilots yearning to get back to the skies. for pilots, we as a group are tremendously looking forward to getting back in the air again. pilots don't want to be on the ground any more than aircraft want to be on the ground, and for us, we are really trying to respond to any pent—up demand so that we are fully ready to go when the government gives the green light on certain routes in the future. this announcement is not the grand reopening the industry was looking for, but after months of travel restrictions, the easing looks likely to take time. caroline davies, bbc news.
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earlier, i spoke to our business presenter ben thompson who told us a bit more about the government's latest announcement there is a lot of frustration in the travel industry this morning that this does not reopen travel in any sort of meaningful fashion or way they would want because they say the cost of those pcr tests is still too prohibitive, they say it will mean only the wealthiest can afford to travel this summer. because if you take a family of four trying to head off to somewhere even if it's on the green list this summer, it could cost them up to £600 before they've even paid for their flights or hotels so they say is simply not good enough. they question why if you had a negative lateral flow test you had a negative lateral flow test you then need to take another one, they say only if you have a positive lateral flow test should you need to take a confirmation test, pcr test, when you get back so lots of queries and questions. we also don't know
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yet which countries will be on which list, the government says that will come in due course. speaking to us this morning the transport secretary grant shapps says he now wants to work with industry to try to bring down the costs of those pcr tests which we know cost up to £150. he says they should be more affordable to allow more of us to be able to afford them to then go on holiday and this is what he told us. i don't know what — and this is what he told us. i don't know what the _ and this is what he told us. i don't know what the scientifically - and this is what he told us. i don't know what the scientifically valid i know what the scientifically valid coasters — know what the scientifically valid coasters but it does seem to me that those _ coasters but it does seem to me that those higher ends should be driven down _ those higher ends should be driven down by— those higher ends should be driven down by their being perhaps more competition in the marketplace and thars— competition in the marketplace and that's what we will work on. i can't -ive that's what we will work on. i can't give you _ that's what we will work on. i can't give you the — that's what we will work on. i can't give you the exact figure but i know i think_ give you the exact figure but i know i think the _ give you the exact figure but i know i think the tests are coming out too expensive, — i think the tests are coming out too expensive, we are trying to drive back— expensive, we are trying to drive back down — expensive, we are trying to drive back down and i hope people understand that in this pandemic, we do have _ understand that in this pandemic, we do have to _ understand that in this pandemic, we do have to take every single possible _ do have to take every single possible precaution, though, we will keep the _ possible precaution, though, we will keep the requirement that are in place _ keep the requirement that are in place for— keep the requirement that are in place for the green, amber and red categories — place for the green, amber and red categories under constant review. as the situation changes.—
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the situation changes. there's been a small but — the situation changes. there's been a small but significant _ the situation changes. there's been a small but significant change - the situation changes. there's been a small but significant change in - a small but significant change in the advice coming from grant shapps, hasn't there?— hasn't there? yes. up until now he's been on record _ hasn't there? yes. up until now he's been on record as _ hasn't there? yes. up until now he's been on record as saying _ hasn't there? yes. up until now he's been on record as saying now - hasn't there? yes. up until now he's been on record as saying now is - hasn't there? yes. up until now he's been on record as saying now is not| been on record as saying now is not the time to book a foreign holiday. he's been discouraging people from actively making plans for the summer. this morning, a change in tone from the government, he said now into a three weeks might be the time to start thinking about booking once again. that again welcomed by the travel industry because as we know, that's been all but shut down for more than a year now, many people struggling to get away in any meaningfulfashion. he's been saying maybe now is the time to start booking despite those concerns about the cost of this is what he told us earlier. lip the cost of this is what he told us earlier. , ., �* , earlier. up until now, i've been sa in: earlier. up until now, i've been saying to _ earlier. up until now, i've been saying to peeple _ earlier. up until now, i've been saying to people don't - earlier. up until now, i've been saying to people don't book - earlier. up until now, i've been saying to people don't book a l saying to people don't book a holiday. — saying to people don't book a holiday, it's illegal to go away, it is still— holiday, it's illegal to go away, it is still of— holiday, it's illegal to go away, it is still of course, you can't travel untit— is still of course, you can't travel until the — is still of course, you can't travel until the 17th of may at the earliest _ until the 17th of may at the earliest but this is probably the first time — earliest but this is probably the first time i can say i'm not advising _ first time i can say i'm not advising people not to book to go away— advising people not to book to go away this—
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advising people not to book to go away this summer. instead, i'm saying _ away this summer. instead, i'm saying to — away this summer. instead, i'm saying to people in two or three weeks _ saying to people in two or three weeks you — saying to people in two or three weeks you will have the green list of countries, amber and weeks you will have the green list of countries, amberand red, so people — of countries, amberand red, so people will— of countries, amberand red, so people will be able to take their own decisions on this.— people will be able to take their own decisions on this. grant shapps the transport _ own decisions on this. grant shapps the transport secretary _ own decisions on this. grant shapps the transport secretary welcome i own decisions on this. grant shapps i the transport secretary welcome news for the travel industry, despite their concerns about the cost of the pcr tests. the government says it will review the situation over the coming months and we should get some indication of which countries will be on which list and then we can start making some more plans a little later. it's also worth bearing in mind they've launched what they are calling a green watchlist and that will be designed to avoid a repeat of some of the scenes we saw last year where countries moved between the green and amber list and that led to a rush of people trying to get back to the uk before the deadline. lots of people stuck in italy or france or spain, trying to get back to the uk before they were forced to quarantine. the government says the watchlist will give you advance noticed of fair is borderline and for it might be risky and that is
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one of the moves they want to put in place. they say this is a gradual reopening of the travel log, lots of work to do, some reassurance for the travel industry but not the whole cell opening up they wanted. i should also point out the supplies just to england, we are expecting news on the plans for wales, scotland and northern ireland in due course. ., ., , scotland and northern ireland in due course. . ., course. that was our correspondent ben course. that was our correspondent lten thomson _ course. that was our correspondent ben thomson at _ course. that was our correspondent ben thomson at gatwick_ course. that was our correspondent ben thomson at gatwick airport - course. that was our correspondent| ben thomson at gatwick airport and let me read out some of the comments had been sending about the idea of having to pay for a test and this traffic light system. graham says just watched your piece with the boss of london heathrow, it's all well and good him wanting lateral flow tests to open industry but they have high rates of false negatives are more importantly are unable to detect any new variant which might lead us to disaster. it has to be pcr all the way. this is from rosy. we have rebooked our honeymoon from
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last year to go to dubrovnik in july, after so many disappointments, i would pay for a test to allow us to go. and keith says it blows my mind anyone would want to travel abroad at the moment let alone pay hundreds for a test with the variance of the virus had a broad fight with the government risk bringing them to the uk? staycation is the way to go. and coral says mandatory pcr tests for fully vaccinated people returning from green countries is overkill, just do a cheap lateral flow test and a positive, back it up with a pcr. really interesting thoughts from you. do keep them coming in. you can do that on twitter. use the hashtag bbc your questions. we will certainly try to read out some more of those. the welsh government is speeding up the easing of its covid restrictions — as infection levels continue to drop. gyms will be allowed
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to reopen and people from two households can bubble up to meet indoors from 3rd may — instead of 10th may. the dates for reopening the hospitality industry have not changed. there's been another night of rioting in northern ireland, with petrol bombs, fireworks and stones thrown at the police in belfast. 0fficers used water cannon for the first time in six years in an attempt to restore order, as james reynolds reports. in belfast, the night was lit up. this latest unrest came on the nationalist side, not far from the wall separating the city's two communities. the police responded with water cannon, the first time they have done so in six years. the first minister says these scenes have taken northern ireland backwards. last night's clashes weren't on the same scale as wednesday, where rioters on the loyalist side hijacked and firebombed a bus.
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jeering. some of those gathered were in their early teens, far too young to remember the era of troubles that the 1998 good friday agreement pledged to end for good. history has shown very, very clearly in relation to northern ireland, one side acting on its own, whether it's within northern ireland or between the two governments or whatever, doesn't succeed. it only ever succeeds to bring peace and stability when both sides are working together. that's going to require joint action by government, it is going to require the assembly and the executive working really with a single voice. we join the british, the irish, the northern irish leaders in their calls for calm. we remain, as you heard us say before, steadfast supporters and prosperous northern ireland, in which all communities have a voice and all communities enjoy the gains of a hard—won peace.
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this is something that the president has spoken to quite passionately in the past. the past itself is what overshadows this unrest. northern ireland's fractures now reach its younger generation. james reynolds, bbc news. i've been getting the latest from our correspondent in belfast, chris page. there's a sense, certainly you get from the police, from people living in the areas which have been particularly affected by the street violence, that they fear things could get worse before they get better, to be frank. most of the rioting that's happened in northern ireland over the last week or so has occurred in loyalist areas. now, the police have spoken over the last number of months, really, about unease in those communities, about the brexit arrangements for northern ireland, people see the new trading arrangements, under which goods coming here from the rest of the uk need to be inspected,
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as creating a new economic border between northern ireland and the rest of the uk and diminishing the sense of britishness that is very, very important to loyalists. but there are other factors at play as well, the police have for the last couple of years, really, been cracking down on loyalist paramilitaries and the criminal element within those organisations, the organised crime networks, drugs trafficking, prostitution, for example. so they had thought that there could be some kind of violent backlash to some degree at some stage, connected to that. and then, last week, renewed controversy over a funeral, the funeral of the former leading ira man bobby storey, who died last summer. about 2000 lined the streets of west belfast for his funeral, including senior sinn fein politicians. prosecutors decided last week they weren't going to take any action on the basis of alleged breaches of coronavirus restrictions. so, as somebody put it to me yesterday, amongst loyalists, well,
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it's felt that there's kind of a melting pot of grievances going on there but what is worrying people more now, i think, is that for the last two nights of trouble in belfast, we've seen rioting — both in nationalist areas, the springfield road area, and in a loyalist area, the shankill road area. chris, of course, the vast majority of people who are involved in this violence are children and young people, who weren't even born when the good friday agreement was signed. they have grown up, until recent days, in a very peaceful, a largely peaceful northern ireland, so who's pulling the strings behind this because, undoubtedly, some people are? yes, it's notable, certainly that the rioting has happened in areas, relatively small areas, it has to be said, where paramilitary groups do have a particularly strong presence, so the police have said they are looking into how deeply paramilitaries have been involved
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in orchestrating the violence but, certainly, in the places where the rioting has happened, it's very unlikely that street violence would take place, without at least the tacit support of paramilitary groups. whenever you looked last night at the young people rioting in the springfield road area, it was very noticeable many of them seemed to me to be no older than their early teens and many people are making the point that it's unlikely perhaps that people of that age would be familiar with the intricacies of brexit or the intricacies of prosecutions in relation to the bobby storey funeral. so, perhaps, it's a phrase that is often spoken of here in northern ireland, whenever street violence breaks out, it is recreational rioting, pure anti—social behaviour, rather than politically motivated but, nonetheless, there are political issues at play here that's contributing to that sense of instability in some communities.
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inafew in a few minutes, i'll be speaking to two young people in northern ireland for their thoughts on what they have been witnessing and seeing, notjust on the streets of northern ireland, but in belfast, over the last few nights. the headlines on bbc news... the uk government announces its plans to reopen international travel in england — if you want to go on holiday you will have to pay for a coronavirus test. airlines argue the cost is too high. police use water cannon on protesters after coming under attack from petrol bombs and fireworks during another night of violence in belfast. president biden announces plans to tackle gun violence — which he says has reached devastating proportions in the united states. and that is our next story. staying with gun violence in the the us. us president biden has described gun violence as an epidemic — and an international embarrassment. on thursday, he put forward a series of measures
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to try to tackle the problem — via executive order, meaning he doesn't need approvalfrom congress. the president said there was widespread public support for stricter rules— despite the efforts of the gun lobby. every day in this country, 316 people are shot, every single day. 106 of them die. every day. 0ur flag was still flying at half staff for the victims of the horrific murder of eight, primarily asian american people in georgia. when ten more lives were taken in a mass murder in colorado. you probably didn't hear but between those two incidents, less than one week apart, there were more than 850 additional shootings. 850. that took the lives of more than 250 people. and left 500, 500 injured. this is an epidemic, for god's sake. and it has to stop.
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within hours of president biden's announcement on proposed gun controls, a man was killed in another mass shooting. lebo diseko has more. this is in texas today. there's been a mass shooting there — one person died, four people have been injured. yesterday, in south carolina, there were five people who were killed, including the shooter himself. he shot himself there. and, obviously, in the past few weeks, we've had really quite shocking mass shootings, both in georgia and also in colorado. when you look at these statistics, the number of mass shootings here in the united states, it's estimated that there is about one a day, on average. it's also estimated that there have been around 11,000 gun deaths this year alone. let's return to the violence we've been seeing in northern ireland over the last few days. as we've been hearing,
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it's prompted many conversations about what has driven so many young people to take to the streets — many of whom were not even born when the good friday agreement was signed in 1998. so what has been the experience of growing up in the wake of the troubles — and how do young people on both sides feel about the future? with me is 16—year—old elliejo taylor from londonderry — she's from a nationalist background and also i'm joined by 21—year—old matthew bell — he grew up in a unionist background in 0magh — he's speaking to us from belfast. you're both very welcome. 0f you're both very welcome. of course, the violence hasn't been confined to belfast, it's been in other places as well including some in derry, elliejoe, where you are and i wonder as someone who was born after the good friday agreement, and who has been thankfully able to grow up in a largely peaceful community, what it's been like watching these images of young people, teenagers, some of them younger than you,
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writing on the streets? it some of them younger than you, writing on the streets?— some of them younger than you, writing on the streets? it has been shockina. writing on the streets? it has been shocking- i— writing on the streets? it has been shocking- i saw— writing on the streets? it has been shocking. i saw images _ writing on the streets? it has been shocking. i saw images of- writing on the streets? it has been shocking. i saw images of a - writing on the streets? it has been shocking. i saw images of a young | shocking. i saw images of a young person who had set themselves on fire, it is extremely worrying and i think it's really sad, because i'm watching these videos and i'm seeing young people engage in this violence they are being cheered on by adults and that is a really inappropriate action. we have adults that are encouraging this violence, and those adults would have been around a similar age during the troubles. why are we encouraging this violence? it is shocking to me that adults are encouraging their own children to engage in this, especially other bus drivers and themselves, being at risk. why are we encouraging this violence? it risk. why are we encouraging this violence? , ~' risk. why are we encouraging this violence? , ,, a, violence? it shocking. matthew, the same question _ violence? it shocking. matthew, the same question to _ violence? it shocking. matthew, the same question to you, _ violence? it shocking. matthew, the same question to you, really - same question to you, really interested to get your reaction to these sorts of scenes which of course you know about having happened in the past in northern
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ireland but haven't until recent days. being able to see happening on your tv screens, in the present time? , �* , your tv screens, in the present time? , �*, , time? yes, it's disappointing, sure, those would — time? yes, it's disappointing, sure, those would be _ time? yes, it's disappointing, sure, those would be my _ time? yes, it's disappointing, sure, those would be my reactions. - time? yes, it's disappointing, sure, those would be my reactions. 1. time? yes, it's disappointing, sure, those would be my reactions. i was| those would be my reactions. i was convinced _ those would be my reactions. i was convinced that northern ireland had left violence in the past. and that my generation would be able to grow up my generation would be able to grow up free _ my generation would be able to grow up free from any worries of paramilitaries controlling parts of our country. it's also disappointing for me _ our country. it's also disappointing for me because the young people rioting _ for me because the young people rioting would be from my community, the unionist _ rioting would be from my community, the unionist community and i don't feel the _ the unionist community and i don't feel the majority of the people in the unionist community support these actions _ the unionist community support these actions yet _ the unionist community support these actions yet this disgruntled minority are embarrassing unionists, embarrassing northern ireland by going _ embarrassing northern ireland by going onto the streets and throwing petrol— going onto the streets and throwing petrol bombs and it really is a
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seriously— petrol bombs and it really is a seriously endangering the lives of people. _ seriously endangering the lives of people, as well as the lives of those — people, as well as the lives of those in — people, as well as the lives of those in the police service. | those in the police service. wonder, those in the police service. i wonder, and this is for both of you, do you firmly believe, elliejoe, from what you've said already, that seems to be the case, this is more about some adults orchestrating this, ratherthan about some adults orchestrating this, rather than anywhere in the world, i'm sure, young people are able to motivate themselves, although motivate is perhaps not quite the right word, to get together and go out and cause trouble or cause violence, but do you firmly believe this is about a situation that is being orchestrated by older people, elliejoe? i situation that is being orchestrated by older people, ellie joe?- by older people, ellie joe? i would sa so. by older people, ellie joe? i would say so. children _ by older people, ellie joe? i would say so. children as _ by older people, ellie joe? i would say so. children as young - by older people, ellie joe? i would say so. children as young as - by older people, ellie joe? i would say so. children as young as 13, i by older people, ellie joe? i would l say so. children as young as 13, may be, are engaging in this violence, when i was 13 i had no idea about politics, i wouldn't have known anything about the northern ireland protocol, had i been that age now. it seems like it is a political agenda empowered by adults who are kind of convincing these young
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people to engage. these young people don't want to be engaged in violence, i think deep down no one wants to be engaged in violence. i am very lucky to have grown up in a peaceful generation but the effects of the troubles are trickling down and we are seeing that so clearly here and we are seeing people being empowered by adults that want to push their political agenda and young people shouldn't be at risk because this agenda is violent, this is violence towards young people. matthew, the same question to you, there is a concern that there is momentum now, eight consecutive nights and no one wants, very few people want to see it going on beyond that. people want to see it going on beyond that-— people want to see it going on be ond that. , ., , beyond that. yes, i would believe that. i beyond that. yes, i would believe that- i don't _ beyond that. yes, i would believe that. l don't think— beyond that. yes, i would believe that. l don't think the _ beyond that. yes, i would believe that. i don't think the young - that. i don't think the young teenagers would be aware of the intricacies — teenagers would be aware of the intricacies of the northern ireland protocol. — intricacies of the northern ireland protocol, what is causing for northern— protocol, what is causing for northern ireland. i do think it is older— northern ireland. i do think it is older loyalist encouraging younger peopie _ older loyalist encouraging younger people to go onto the street to serve _ people to go onto the street to serve their own political agenda. there's— serve their own political agenda. there's been a lot of in the
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unionist _ there's been a lot of in the unionist community over the last year. _ unionist community over the last year, namely because of the disaster the northern ireland protocol has been _ the northern ireland protocol has been and — the northern ireland protocol has been and the bobby storey funeral fiasco, _ been and the bobby storey funeral fiasco, it— been and the bobby storey funeral fiasco, it was perceived that the police _ fiasco, it was perceived that the police definitely should have pressed charges against the sinn fein leadership because of the fact unionist _ fein leadership because of the fact unionist believed sinn fein clearly broke _ unionist believed sinn fein clearly broke the — unionist believed sinn fein clearly broke the coronavirus restrictions. ellie joe, — broke the coronavirus restrictions. ellie joe, i— broke the coronavirus restrictions. ellie joe, i think you are back with elliejoe, i think you are back with us, we lost it momentarily but i hope you can hear me, the two main parties, and i should say you are a youth member of the sdlp, matthew, youth member of the sdlp, matthew, you are a member of the ulster unionist party, the two biggest parties in the northern ireland assembly, the dup and sinn fein, you know, clearly there has been a huge amount of tension between those parties, it's ongoing. how much has that lack of ability of the biggest
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parties in the northern ireland assembly did not always find ways to work with each other, how much has that trickled down to what we are seeing on the streets of belfast right now or do you think young people are simply not listening or watching what the politicians are doing? watching what the politicians are doinu ? g ., ., , watching what the politicians are doinu? .,, ., , doing? ellie joe. to be honest, i would say _ doing? ellie joe. to be honest, i would say the — doing? ellie joe. to be honest, i would say the instability - doing? ellie joe. to be honest, i would say the instability is - doing? ellie joe. to be honest, i would say the instability is very l would say the instability is very clear, young people, no matter how young we are we still recognise instability. we didn't have a government for three years, we grew up government for three years, we grew up without a government so it's not to say our experiences with our government leaders and it has been great. i think it has been really, if young people are engaged, they are my age, they have got into that are my age, they have got into that a little bit more, they are seeing tweets from arlene foster the other day, it seemed to be nothing but point—scoring, it was completely disgraceful and controversial. i don't really see that from my government leaders, i want to see them calling for an end to violence,
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i want to see no point—scoring, it's about protecting young people and communities, i want them to start investing in integrated schools, these young people don't know anyone else, they don't know anyone else outside their own community and i want them to know that. matthew, do oliticians want them to know that. matthew, do politicians need _ want them to know that. matthew, do politicians need to _ want them to know that. matthew, do politicians need to do _ want them to know that. matthew, do politicians need to do better— want them to know that. matthew, do politicians need to do better at - politicians need to do better at setting the right sort of example? 0ver setting the right sort of example? over the last number of years, for the 0ver the last number of years, for the dup— over the last number of years, for the dup and sinn fein have been controlling the executive, i think northern— controlling the executive, i think northern ireland politics has polarised a little bit which has trickled — polarised a little bit which has trickled down into the eventual violence — trickled down into the eventual violence we have seen over the last number— violence we have seen over the last number of— violence we have seen over the last number of days. we had no government for a number— number of days. we had no government fora number of years number of days. we had no government for a number of years because the dup and _ for a number of years because the dup and sinn fein don't get on and didn't— dup and sinn fein don't get on and didn't get— dup and sinn fein don't get on and didn't get on to form an executive. during _ didn't get on to form an executive. during the — didn't get on to form an executive. during the coronavirus pandemic which _ during the coronavirus pandemic which is — during the coronavirus pandemic which is still going on, the executive seemed to be constantly, the dup— executive seemed to be constantly, the dup and sinn fein, seemed to be constantly— the dup and sinn fein, seemed to be constantly quarrelling with each other~ _ constantly quarrelling with each other~ i— constantly quarrelling with each other. i think there has to be real ieadership— other. i think there has to be real leadership now, shown, at the minute, — leadership now, shown, at the minute, to— leadership now, shown, at the
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minute, to really promote community relations— minute, to really promote community relations otherwise i fear the violence _ relations otherwise i fear the violence will continue. gn relations otherwise i fear the violence will continue. on that oint, violence will continue. on that point. your— violence will continue. on that point, your thoughts, - violence will continue. on that point, your thoughts, both - violence will continue. on that point, your thoughts, both ofl violence will continue. on that i point, your thoughts, both of you come on the future, hopes for the future. do you think this can be contained, that a stop can be put to it and northern ireland can continue to focus on making progress whether thatis to focus on making progress whether that is at a community level, a political level or otherwise? ellie joe? i political level or otherwise? ellie joe? ., ., ., joe? i do have hope for the future, i ho -e joe? i do have hope for the future, i hope the — joe? i do have hope for the future, i hope the violence _ joe? i do have hope for the future, i hope the violence can _ joe? i do have hope for the future, i hope the violence can end - joe? i do have hope for the future, i hope the violence can end soon. | i hope the violence can end soon. but what i want to see it followed up but what i want to see it followed up by its progressive change, i wanted to be consistent change. we haven'tjust been wanted to be consistent change. we haven't just been focusing wanted to be consistent change. we haven'tjust been focusing on a because the violence has been here right now, i want to see plans with the future, to activate these communities, i want an end to this feud, there is a unionist community and nationalist community, i don't like that, i want a unified community where we all work together to progress ourselves and i... it’s to progress ourselves and i... it's not about — to progress ourselves and i... it's not about political labels, first and foremost. matthew, your hopes? i
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have hope for the future of northern ireiand, _ have hope for the future of northern ireland, ever since the good friday agreement — ireland, ever since the good friday agreement northern ireland has been slowly— agreement northern ireland has been slowly and _ agreement northern ireland has been slowly and steadily improving. yes, there's— slowly and steadily improving. yes, there's been some setbacks, the recent— there's been some setbacks, the recent events in belfast however, belfast _ recent events in belfast however, belfast is — recent events in belfast however, belfast is a tech hub, there industrial plans opening up west of the ban, _ industrial plans opening up west of the ban, i'm positive forthe industrial plans opening up west of the ban, i'm positive for the future of northern— the ban, i'm positive for the future of northern ireland and i think community relations are improving in generai~ _ community relations are improving in ueneral. a, ., g ., general. ok, matthew and ellie joe, reall aood general. ok, matthew and ellie joe, really good to _ general. ok, matthew and ellie joe, really good to speak _ general. ok, matthew and ellie joe, really good to speak to _ general. ok, matthew and ellie joe, really good to speak to both - general. ok, matthew and ellie joe, really good to speak to both of - general. ok, matthew and ellie joe, really good to speak to both of you | really good to speak to both of you and thank you for your time. the headlines on bbc news... the uk government announces its plans to reopen international travel in england — if you want to go on holiday you will have to pay for a coronavirus test. airlines argue the cost is too high, and the transport secretary agrees. i think, overall, the pricing should be lower and the reason i say that specifically is i'm looking at what's happening in other countries and i do notice there's
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a very big variation. so we are committing, as a government, to work to drive those costs down. police use water cannon on protesters after coming under attack from petrol bombs and fireworks during another night of violence in belfast. president biden announces plans to tackle gun violence — which he says has reached devastating proportions in the united states. a medical expert in the trial of the former police officer derek chauvin says george floyd died from a lack of oxygen, due to the way he was restrained. from today, everyone in england will be able to access two free rapid coronavirus tests a week, which provide results in around 30 minutes. more on travel. the chief executive of heathrow airport, john holland—kaye told me what he thought of the
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government's proposals. if someone in england wants to go on holiday abroad and then return home. well, first of all, it's a good start and to have this new green category of countries which are low—risk, lower variants of concern, where people can travel to without the need for quarantine when they come home, that's a really good step forward and i think grant shapps has done a good job of steering that through cabinet. it's significant that he's said he's not advising people, for the first time, he's not advising people to go away, to not go away? yes, and that is a good start. it shows that after a year of lockdown, where people have been cut off from their friends and family who live overseas, so they can start to plan with confidence to go and see them again. businesses up and down the country need to get out and visit their clients around the world and they can start to plan to do that. and, of course, we don't know which countries they can go to yet
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or whether travel will restart on may 17th, but we can start making plans and we'll know the list of countries early in may and already, at heathrow, we are starting to get people ready for travel, to come back for the first time in over a year. so, it is a really key moment and we should celebrate that. if we have time, i'll ask you about that process of getting everyone ready at the airport, to facilitate this but first of all, on the point of planning ahead with confidence and the idea of these pcr tests being required for people travelling back from various locations, are you concerned that cost, typically around £120 per test, might be just too prohibitive for too many people? yes, that is a real concern. we all understand that if people are travelling to high—risk countries where there's a high propensity of variants of concern, that we need to have pcr tests so that we can identify anyone who's coming into the country with variants of concern. but, by the summer, we'll have — the majority of the uk population
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will have been fully vaccinated. for those people going to green countries for their holidays or to meet with friends, they will be not exposed to significant levels of covid because they are low—risk, countries with low variants of concern but even so, they'll be required to take a test before they get on the plane home, to make sure they don't have covid and then take a pcr test after they've arrived to check for a variant of concern. now, that's someone who's been fully vaccinated. most people will see that as overkill. that is testing overkill and... but, if i may interrupt, the world health organization says that lateral flow tests are more likely to detect positive cases with high viral loads. they are much less certain about negative results from lateral flow tests, as a basis for decision—making. that is the world health organization. so, you can understand, can't you, we may be in a very different position in a few months' time, depending on other countries with the vaccination rates
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and so forth, but at the moment, you can understand why the government is talking about pcr tests rather than lateral flow tests, can't you? absolutely, but particularly for countries where the risks are high. the pcr test is the gold standard for picking up whether there's a variant of concern. but for low—risk countries with people fully vaccinated, is that necessary? is there a quicker and cheaper way of doing it, as the prime minister has promised? for example, whereby people take a lab test or a lateral flow test, something that's quick and cheap, and only if they test positive do they go on to take a pcr test? perhaps a better solution is to find a way to bring the cost of these pcr tests down and grant shapps says he's going to talk to private providers to see if there's a way of doing that. presumably that's something that you would encourage and very much support? absolutely, but we've been working on this for most of the last year and the costs have not come down significantly. and part of that is because
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the samples have to go off to a lab to be investigated and that just adds to... the logistics and the cost of that lab time is quite high. so we're not going to see the costs of pcr tests coming down to the tens of pounds that most people would think would be reasonable. we do have a good alternative that we use with health care today, which is that you take a quick and cheap test and if that shows you're positive, then you take a pcr test to see if you have a variant of concern. now, why don't we look at doing that for people who have been fully vaccinated and gone to a green country and have tested negative already? that seems far more sensible and will make sure traveljust doesn't become something for the wealthy, it's something that everyone could look forward to. the boss of heathrow airport there, john holland—kaye. some door tweets about this issue. zoe says, would happily pay per testing, i wish they could confirm we would be able to
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travel from the 17th, for england specifically, after this year, she says we need a holiday to stop lots more of you getting in touch. alan says due to pay for a holiday beginning of may, transferred from march 2020. grant shapps should stop prevaricating and pcr tests. he says the cost is prohibitive, just in competition to drive costs down is no answer. he asks, well results return on time if needed for the outward journey? return on time if needed for the outwardjourney? harry return on time if needed for the outward journey? harry says, so even if you have been fully covid vaccinated, you must pay for a pcr test to leave england. why? steph says, are the government making it unaffordable for people to go in broad as to encourage us to stay home and boost the uk economy? diana says, those who can afford another £100 on tests can go on holiday and those with less disposable income can't, which isn't fair. she says if
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the lateral flow test is enough to send thousands of kids to school, why not for travel? really interesting comments, keep them coming in. we will see if we can squeeze in a few more of those. india has reported more than 130,00 new coronavirus infections — a record increase for the third day in a row. it's pushing to increase the number of vaccines given, as it deals with a deadly second wave of infections. covid spreading faster in india than anywhere else in the world. 0ur correspondent yogita limaye is in mumbai and following developments. the situation here is extremely grim from notjust here in mumbai but other parts of the state of maharashtra. people are really struggling to find critical care beds or beds with ventilators for their loved ones. over the past few days, i've spoken to families who have lost members because they couldn't get critical care in time. yesterday, i was speaking to
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a doctor, front line doctor from the worst affected city in india, it's not farfrom mumbai and he was telling me he gets about 100 calls every day looking for critical care beds. he says all of the private hospitals in the city, as well as the government hospitals, are pooling together their resources but even then, they are falling short and if you just look through social media here, you will see urgent pleas of help with people really struggling to find medical care. and while, of course, this is the worst affected region in the country, we are now seeing similar surges in other parts of india as well, even from the capital delhi, the struggle to find the hospital, the struggle to find care, you know. it feels like we are right back in around august or september last year where this was the case. brazil has reported yet another daily record number of deaths caused by coronavirus, with delays in the vaccination programme
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and the collapse of the public health system in many regions. more than 4,200 people have died of covid in the past 2a hours. as we've been hearing, everyone in england is to be given access to two rapid coronavirus tests a week from today, under an extension of the government's testing programme. the lateral flow kits, which can provide esults in around 30 minutes, will be available for free at testing sites, pharmacies and through the post. ben boulos has been speaking to a pharmacist in south—west london to find out how the service will work. in recent weeks, the focus has been very much on this part of the fight against coronavirus, vaccinations, and that has certainly been the case here at copes pharmacy in south london. but up and down the country, attention is also going to shift towards testing because from today, in england, everyone will be entitled to two free home tests a week. a box like this contains seven, so that would last you just over three weeks. if you've got kids at school
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or you've been going into your workplace, you are probably familiar with these. you do the test at home, you get the result in 30 minutes. let's find out a little bit more about how it will work. ash soni is the pharmacist here. ash, do people need to book these in advance or can they show up and collect them? hello. no, just come in and collect them, a bit like many other services at a pharmacy, it's done without an appointment. just come in, ask and they'll be provided to you. and how many boxes can people collect in one go? so, it's one box per person, up to a maximum of four. so, it's limited to four boxes at any one time. and that will be for your family or neighbours, perhaps? absolutely. so, if you need four for your family, come and collect those. if you happen to come into contact with a neighbour and they ask, you can always come back and get them on their behalf. ok, if someone takes the test at home, it comes up positive, they then do a second test to double check and it comes up negative, what should they do? they must take the positive test as being the one they work from. it's really important in those circumstances that they book a pcr test, because that is the gold standard. ok, if people don't feel comfortable
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collecting these in person, can they have them delivered? yes, they can, but they do that through test and trace itself, either on the website or by calling 119. ok, if people have had the vaccination, do they need to bother with these tests? no, absolutely, this does not prevent you getting covid, so it's really important you continue to test. regardless, because you can transmit as much as you can catch. even if you've had the vaccination? absolutely, yes. the vaccine is part of the story, it's not the end of it. 0k. if people don't want to have the vaccine because they've heard about, you know, some of the concerns around it, they think, oh, i'll do the testing instead, is that a viable alternative? no, absolutely not. it's really important people do still have their vaccine and therefore they book their appointments and do attend because that, again, is only part of it. throughout all of this, we've got to make sure that we find ways to deal with this pandemic with every solution that we can. 0k, ash, thank you very much. ash soni there. and the hope is that this increased testing will help spot any early signs of outbreaks and prevent them
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from going much further, especially as we all start to emerge from knockdown. ben boulos reporting. islamic scholars and doctors in britain are urging muslims to continue getting their covid—19 vaccines during ramadan, which begins next week. in a health campaign, muslim leaders say that because the vaccine is not nutritious, it doesn't amount to breaking the ritual fast. harry farley reports. the al—abbas islamic centre in birmingham is one of many that have been converted into a vaccine centre. for now, theirfocus has switched from saving souls to saving lives. there has been some debate among islamic scholars but the majority now say the covid vaccine does not break the fast. we know that a lot of people, a lot of muslims are concerned about having their covid
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vaccination during ramadan, and many people believe that having an injection actually breaks the fast but it doesn't at all because it is not considered nutritious, so it is absolutely fine to have the covid vaccination while we are fasting. ramadan will look different this year to normal. the british islamic medical association has released guidance on how to celebrate safely. there have been fears about vaccine take—up among some ethnic minority groups. but there are signs initiatives like this in birmingham are having an impact. we know that between january and march, there has been an increase in the uptake of the vaccine from ethnic minority groups and that is positive news. a lot of that is due to the grassroots organisations and faith—based organisations going into the community to dispel myths and address concerns communities are having. but there is much work to be done and we need to continue going with this momentum. some vaccine sites will be staying open later during ramadan, so muslims can come
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after they have eaten, but the message from the nhs and public health england is to get the jab — even if you are fasting. harry farley, bbc news. a medical expert has told the george floyd murder trial in minneapolis that the 46—year—old died from "a lack of oxygen", due to the way he was restrained. former us police officer, derek chauvin, was filmed kneeling on george floyd's neck during his arrest last may. he denies the charge of murder. this is what the expert, dr martin tobin, was asked in court, by the special assistant attorney general. have you formed an opinion to a reasonable degree of medical certainty on the cause of mr floyd's death? yes, i have. would you please tell the jury what that opinion or opinions are? yes. mr floyd died from a low level of oxygen. and this caused damage to his brain that we see and it also
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caused a pea arrhythmia that caused his heart to stop. doctor tobin also rejected the suggestion that the drug fentanyl was in any way responsible for george floyd's death. are you familiar with the way people die from fentanyl? yes, very. do they or do they not go into coma before they die from a fentanyl overdose? yes, they will. was mr floyd ever in a coma? no. thank you, doctor tobin. 0k. 0ur correspondent larry madowo has been following the trial in minneapolis. doctor tobin's testimony today has left the defence's case looking weaker than probably it has at any point in the last two weeks. his testimony that george floyd died from oxygen deficiency, which led to his brain to stop was so significant because it's at the centre of what the prosecution are saying here. the three reasons forthat, he says, is because he was lying flat on the concrete,
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he was handcuffed behind his back, and he had several officers kneeling on him. he also calculated that from the moment george floyd stopped breathing, there with three minutes and 27 seconds when the neck restraint continued, so doctor tobin all through his testimony was captivating and masterful and his testimony is potentially devastating to the case because the jury paid attention and took notes. the headlines on bbc news... the uk government announces its plans to reopen international travel in england — if you want to go on holiday you will have to pay for a coronavirus test. airlines argue the cost is too high. police use water cannon on protesters after coming under attack from petrol bombs and fireworks during another night of violence in belfast. and in the us, president biden announces plans to tackle gun violence — which he says has reached devastating proportions in the united states.
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tracey emin has said she's been given an �*all—clear�* diagnosis following a year long battle with bladder cancer. the artist said in light of what she called this �*big milestone', she would spend the next 30 years painting and �*being happy�*. she said her treatment for cancer had taught her a lot about herself. well, i'm tough. i didn't know how tough i was and i'm so much more grateful for everything i have now. like one of the things, when i started getting a bit better, i sort of went on this sort of self—preservation drive of saying i have to look after what i have. so, when you get to... i'm nearly 60 and normally, you sort of moan about this or moan about that but now, i'm looking and mirror thinking, this is really good. this is really positive because when you've been through, like, what i went through, it's like being on a plane crash and getting up and walking away. and when that happens, you are so grateful for life, for every single moment.
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i still shout and scream because that's what i'm like, but i'm gratefulfor everything now and so much more happy and content. tracey emin. some more of your tweets on the issue of travel. this in response to the government's latest announcement on travel from england specifically abroad and the requirement a pcr test, a more expensive pcr test on return. gareth makes the important point, i wish the discussion of travel was not concentrated on holidays. many spouses and families in different countries are barred from seeing each other due to the government's outward travel ban. why can't they address this issue first? and on that subject, there is this tweet from kerry who said, i'd be happy to pay whatever money is needed to fly abroad, ijust want pay whatever money is needed to fly abroad, i just want to pay whatever money is needed to fly abroad, ijust want to be reunited with my us fiance after a year of
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uncertainty. just want confirmation we can definitely fly again from the 17th of may, uses the hashtag love is not tourism. that is a very important angle, as well. not everyone wanting to travel abroad is wanting to go on holiday. it is to be reunited with family and loved ones. new figures from the office for national statistics suggest that disabled people are more likely to say they feel like a burden on others, are lonely, and that coronavirus is making their mental health worse. about two thirds of disabled people said the pandemic was affecting their wellbeing — and they were also more likely than non—disabled people to say they spend too much time alone. dr amy kavanagh is a disability activist and campaigner who is registered blind. amy, good to have you with us today, thank you forjoining us. i wonder how your experience of the pandemic is a person who is blind sit with those latest findings from the 0ns.
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unfortunately, we have lost that line with amy. i'm not sure if we can get back to her, i hope we can. in the meantime, let's talk about greater tony burke. greta thunberg has told the bbc she does not plan to attend the un climate conference scheduled to be held in glasgow this november. the 18—year—old swedish climate campaigner says she believes the british government, which is hosting the conference, should postpone the summit until vaccination rates globally mean all nations can attend the meeting on the same terms. here's our chief environment correspondent, justin rowlatt. for the last 18 months, greta thunberg has been making a documentary series on the science of climate change. i have been going the whole way round the world the wrong way. then, coronavirus hit and the world
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stopped. now, she has told the bbc she does not believe vaccination rates globally mean the crucial un climate conference, planned for glasgow in november, should go ahead. this glasgow in november, should go ahead. �* , , glasgow in november, should go ahead. . , , ., glasgow in november, should go ahead. a , ., ., �* glasgow in november, should go ahead. r , ., ., �* ~ ahead. as it is now, i don't think i will be going _ ahead. as it is now, i don't think i will be going because _ ahead. as it is now, i don't think i will be going because this - ahead. as it is now, i don't think i will be going because this needs i ahead. as it is now, i don't think i l will be going because this needs to happen in the right way. share will be going because this needs to happen in the right way.— happen in the right way. are you sa in: happen in the right way. are you saying the _ happen in the right way. are you saying the british _ happen in the right way. are you saying the british government i happen in the right way. are you - saying the british government should delay or cancel the conference? well, not cancel, maybe postpone it. but, of course, the best thing to do would be to get everyone vaccinated as soon as possible so everyone could take part on the same terms. 0h, could take part on the same terms. oh, my god! it's burning right here. inthe— oh, my god! it's burning right here. in the documentary, she visits paradise, a californian town consumed by wildfires in 2018. we are never getting out of here! consumed by wildfires in 2018. we l are never getting out of here! greta is scathin: are never getting out of here! greta is scathing about _ are never getting out of here! greta is scathing about the _ are never getting out of here! (err— is scathing about the suggestion the uk might authorise the opening of a new coal mine as it hosts a major
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climate conference. it new coal mine as it hosts a ma'or climate conference.�* new coal mine as it hosts a ma'or climate conference. it really shows the true face _ climate conference. it really shows the true face of _ climate conference. it really shows the true face of so-called - climate conference. it really shows the true face of so-called net - climate conference. it really shows the true face of so-called net zero | the true face of so—called net zero emissions by 2050. the true face of so-called net zero emissions by 2050.— the true face of so-called net zero emissions by 2050. explain what you mean, the emissions by 2050. explain what you mean. the true _ emissions by 2050. explain what you mean, the true face _ emissions by 2050. explain what you mean, the true face of _ emissions by 2050. explain what you mean, the true face of net _ emissions by 2050. explain what you mean, the true face of net zero? - emissions by 2050. explain what you mean, the true face of net zero? if. mean, the true face of net zero? if you can commit yourself to something like that, while at the same time that includes the possibility of opening new coal mines and so on, thenit opening new coal mines and so on, then it really doesn't mean that much. �* ~ ,, much. applause whether - much. applause whether that - much. applause | whether that mind much. applause - whether that mind goes much. applause _ whether that mind goes ahead it is now the subject of a public inquiry. the swedish activist has achieved extraordinary world attention so is she worried her star could wane? i wouldn't say i'm worried, i know that will happen. i'm actually surprised people have been listening to me. along. i expected people to get tired like after a few months but they have kept on listening and i don't know why that is. but i guess if people are listening, then i am going to use that opportunity to sort of communicate the message
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as much as i can. that to sort of communicate the message as much as i can.— as much as i can. at 18, she is not as much as i can. at 18, she is not a child any — as much as i can. at 18, she is not a child any more _ as much as i can. at 18, she is not a child any more but _ as much as i can. at 18, she is not a child any more but she - as much as i can. at 18, she is not a child any more but she is - as much as i can. at 18, she is not a child any more but she is back. as much as i can. at 18, she is not| a child any more but she is back at school, making up for the 18 months she took off to campaign. she says she's delighted to be studying again but has no plans to stop campaigning. let's return to the campaign are on disability, dramy let's return to the campaign are on disability, dr amy kavanagh, let's return to the campaign are on disability, dramy kavanagh, on let's return to the campaign are on disability, dr amy kavanagh, on her reaction to the latest stats from the ons, reaction to the latest stats from the 0ns, the office for national statistics. good to have you with us, hopefully the line will stay good. how does your experience of the pandemic is a person who is blind sit with those latest findings from the 0ns and do you feel your concerns have been heard during the last year or so? i concerns have been heard during the last year or so?— last year or so? i think my experience _ last year or so? i think my experience does _ last year or so? i think my experience does sit - last year or so? i think my experience does sit with i last year or so? i think my - experience does sit with those statistics. i'm not surprised by them and i don't think many disabled people will be. as a blind person, the pandemic has been especially challenging, from not being able to social distance, to losing my
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independence when getting out of the house and just a little small changes that have all inconvenienced us, like the layout of the shop changing is completely debilitating for me. ., . , changing is completely debilitating forme. ., ., , . , changing is completely debilitating forme. ., ., . for me. you have deep concerns about the le . a for me. you have deep concerns about the legacy of — for me. you have deep concerns about the legacy of all _ for me. you have deep concerns about the legacy of all of _ for me. you have deep concerns about the legacy of all of this, _ for me. you have deep concerns about the legacy of all of this, of _ for me. you have deep concerns about the legacy of all of this, of the - the legacy of all of this, of the pandemic on disability rights, tell us more about those concerns. i think especially for people who have been labelled vulnerable for a year, being homogenised as a group of people who should just stay indoors while the rest of society carries on. of course, shielding was the right measure to keep people safe but as we get to the new normal, will disability rights be maintained? will we continue to have access or will society are forgotten about us and our needs? you access or will society are forgotten about us and our needs?— about us and our needs? you are obviously campaigning _ about us and our needs? you are obviously campaigning for- about us and our needs? you are obviously campaigning for these | obviously campaigning for these rights but is enough being done on a government or policy level as far as you are aware up to deal with this? no, i think disabled people have been retrofitted in every government
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policy throughout the pandemic. i think it's shocking disabled women are three and a half times more likely to have died from covid and we are not investigating that properly yet. there are no proper inquiries going on. we need to look beyond conditions. there are factors other than health conditions which have led to these deaths and we really need to see some action around that. these statistics shouldn't be just shocking but sparing change and action. stand shouldn't be just shocking but sparing change and action. and 'ust briefly because fl sparing change and action. and 'ust briefly because i i sparing change and action. and 'ust briefly because i know i sparing change and action. and 'ust briefly because i know we �* sparing change and action. and 'ust briefly because i know we are h sparing change and action. and just| briefly because i know we are nearly out of time, you have had to rely on your cited partner but one bright spot has been the arrival of ava, tell us about that. she spot has been the arrival of ava, tell us about that.— tell us about that. she is fast aslee -. tell us about that. she is fast asleep- she _ tell us about that. she is fast asleep. she is _ tell us about that. she is fast asleep. she is my _ tell us about that. she is fast asleep. she is my little - tell us about that. she is fast - asleep. she is my little pandemic miracle, snoozing away. she has made a massive difference to my life. she is not really bothered about the cameras, i'm afraid! she is not really bothered about the cameras, i'm afraid!— is not really bothered about the cameras, i'm afraid! she looks like a fantastic companion. _ cameras, i'm afraid! she looks like a fantastic companion. dr - cameras, i'm afraid! she looks like a fantastic companion. dr amy - a fantastic companion. dr amy kavanagh, disability activist and campaigner, thank you very much for
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your time and how lovely to see ava the guide dog as well, totally nonplussed by the camera. you are watching bbc news. martine croxall will be here next. from me, let me wish you a very good weekend. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith lucas. hello. we have seen a brief spell of slightly milder weather. some of us are just about holding onto that milder air in the south through the course of today but, really, over the next few days, we're all going to be feeling the effect of that colder weather spilling south, bringing further snow showers to parts of scotland. some wet and windy weather in the south, particularly tomorrow and certainly some overnight frosts as well. so, if you've got gardening plans, we are not out of the woods just yet in terms of those late—season frosts. so, there's a cold front working its way south through the rest of today, opening the doors for these cold northerly winds to slowly filter south. this is a line of cloud and some patchy showery rain, it's a cold front.
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it's slowly pushing into some southern counties of england but along the south coast, many places staying dry and bright for the bulk of the day. for the rest of the uk, to the north of that weather front, some sunnier skies but also wintry showers. heavy snow showers packing in across the north of scotland and brisk winds, as well. 4—9 degrees for most of us, 13 possible down in the south—east where you do stick with that milder air for a good part of the day. but this evening and tonight, the mild air pushes away towards the south. the skies are going to be clearing, so for most of us, it's going to be a cold night, sub zero temperatures. a little bit milder for southern england where you hold onto a bit more cloud. through the day tomorrow, southern england will start to feel the effects of this frontal system across the near continent, bringing some cloud and rain. it looks like it should clear off towards the east as we head on into sunday but certainly for saturday, a bit more cloud and some patchy rain. a bit of uncertainty exactly how far north it gets but probably affecting the likes of kent, perhaps essex and east sussex. away from the far south—east, sunny spells, wintry showers on that northerly wind, snow across scotland. some rain and perhaps some sleet and hail mixed in elsewhere across england,
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wales and northern ireland. into saturday night, and gradually we'll start to lose the cloud and the wet weather from the south—east. so, another really cold night. again, quite a sharp frost for many as we start the day on sunday, especially across the northern half of the uk. a really subzero start here. through the day on sunday, then, after that cold, frosty start, we've still got the northerly wind driving in some more showers, particularly across parts of england and wales during the afternoon. temperatures about 6—10 degrees, so still certainly below average for this time of year. after the cold weather through the course of the weekend, it does look like things will gradually turn a little bit milder as we head through the course of next week. bye for now.
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this is bbc news, i'm martine croxall. the headlines at 11. the government announces its plans to reopen international travel in england — if you want to go on holiday you will have to pay for a coronavirus test. airlines argue the cost is too high, and the transport secretary agrees. i think overall, the pricing should be lower and the reason i say that specifically is i'm looking at what's happening in other countries and i do notice there is a very big variation so we are committing as a government to work to drive those costs down. police use water cannon on protesters after coming under attack from petrol bombs and fireworks during another night of violence in belfast. from today, everyone in england will be able to access two free rapid coronavirus tests a week, which provide results in around 30 minutes.
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as theme parks prepare to reopen their doors to visitors on monday we'll be at blackpool pleasure beach which is due to celebrate its 125th birthday this year. also coming up, we meet thejockey bidding to make history in becoming the first female rider to win the grand national. the horse is trained by her mum. good morning. plans to reopen international travel for holidaymakers from england have been unveiled with a requirement to pay for coronavirus tests. the government has stopped short of saying if foreign trips can resume next month, but has outlined a so—called traffic light system, which will be used to categorise countries based on risk.
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for places on the green list, travellers will be asked to take a test before they return to england, and pay for a costly pcr test, typically £120 two days after arriving home. if you're coming to england from countries on the amber list you will also be asked to self—isolate for ten days, and pay for a pcr test on days two and eight. and passengers from red list destinations will be required to pay for ten days in a quarantine hotel. the plans have been met with widespread frustration by the travel industry. caroline davies has this report. we may be dreaming of sunshine and summer getaways, but would you pay around an extra £100 per person when coming back from your trip overseas? the boss of easyjet isn't impressed at this part of the government's plan to reintroduce international travel in england. i think it's a blow to all travellers who were wishing to go and see friends and families and go on a holiday this summer, and i think particularly the concern why there are now two test systems in what they call
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the green category. today's report says that passengers coming from the lowest risk green rated countries will still need to take one of the more expensive pcr tests when they arrive back in england, and pay for it themselves, currently around £100 each. instead, the industry wants to use the quicker and cheaper lateral flow tests. the government says pcr testing will allow them to monitor positive cases and check for variants of concern. the report also says that if travel does go ahead, countries which will be on the green list will be announced in early may. there will be a watchlist for countries at risk of being changed to amber, and there will be new consumer rights for ticket refunds. the industry is already gearing up for international travel on the 17th of may. whether that will happen won't be confirmed either way until early next month. the flight simulators here are in use 2a hours a day, with pilots yearning to get back to the skies. for pilots, we as a group are tremendously looking forward to getting back in the air again.
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pilots don't want to be on the ground any more than aircraft today's report says that passengers coming from the lowest risk green to respond to any pent—up demand so that we are fully ready to go when the government gives the green light on certain routes in the future. this announcement is not the grand reopening the industry was looking for, but after months of travel restrictions, the easing looks likely to take time. caroline davies, bbc news. travellers will be asked to pay for the costly pcr tests on their return to the uk. the transport secretary grant shapps says he wants to bring the cost of those tests down, but he felt confident people could start to plan a foreign holiday in the coming months. i don't know what the scientifically valid cost is but it does seem to me that those higher end should be driven down by there perhaps being more competition in the marketplace and that's what we'll work on. i can't give you the exact figure but i do know that i think the tests are coming out too expensive. we are trying to drive that down and i hope
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people understand that, you know, in this pandemic, we do have to take every single possible precaution, though we will keep the requirements that are in place for the green, amber and red categories under constant review as the situation changes. up until now, when you've had me on the last few months, i've been saying to people don't book a holiday, it's illegal to go away. it is still, of course. you can't still... you can't travel until the 17th of may at the earliest, but this is probably the first time that i can come on and say i'm not advising people not to book to go away this summer. instead, i'm saying to people, in two or three weeks, you're going to have that list of green list countries, amber and red, so people will be able to take some of their own decisions on this. jet2 says it's delaying its resumption of flights and holidays until the 23rd ofjune. the airlines ceo, steve heapy, says he is "extremely disappointed" by a "lack of detail" in the government's traffic light proposals for foreign travel,
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which he says look very similar to what was in place last year. he also expressed concern over the high price of pcr coronavirus tests and said international travel could become just for "business people or the rich" . with the thought of the government have said so far about testing, you need pcr first: was about bit expensive, 100 quid, 125 quid. a family of four going on holiday would be required to spend £500 on pcr tests. that is beyond the resources of a lot of people so we are in danger of international travel in the short term becoming a thing for business people of the rich. d0 thing for business people of the rich. , ., thing for business people of the rich. ,, . thing for business people of the rich. i. ., ., ., ., thing for business people of the rich. ., ., ., ., ., rich. do you have an idea of how many bookings _ rich. do you have an idea of how many bookings you _ rich. do you have an idea of how many bookings you will - rich. do you have an idea of how many bookings you will need - rich. do you have an idea of how many bookings you will need to | many bookings you will need to cancel between now and june? i haven't got the exact number but i do know its tens of thousands, it's a very big number and our colleagues are gearing up to start contacting our customers and of course if our
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customers want a refund we will give it as we have done over the last 12 months. unlike some companies we refund customers.— refund customers. there has been this build op _ refund customers. there has been this build up towards _ refund customers. there has been this build up towards the - refund customers. there has been this build up towards the 17th - refund customers. there has been this build up towards the 17th of i this build up towards the 17th of may. it has been talked about for months. how are you feeling today? disappointed. deflated and dejected, really. this report has been five weeks in the making and it's not really given us anything that we didn't know five weeks ago. it has proposed a traffic light system which is what we had at the end of last year so basically is proposing that we put pretty much in place what we had last year and to wait all this time i think is very disappointing. our correspondent charlotte wright is at gatwick airport. it seems there is a lot more detail required before we really know what sort of travel is going to be
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possible. you heard that they are, a real sense of disappointment and industry around the level of detail for the airlines and also did at gatwick as well. i think broadly this traffic light system is being accepted as a concept but the devil is in the detail our lack of detail as we have it at the moment and you heard it there jet2 as we have it at the moment and you heard it therejet2 holiday as we have it at the moment and you heard it there jet2 holiday saying we don't have enough information to run flights are run holidays and they are suspending their holidays until the 23rd ofjune so that is some time away. gatwick is well feeling a little bit concerned about the lack of detail they have at the moment and also the pcr requirement for passengers coming in from green listed countries, people saying that is incredibly expensive for families. a family of four could be paying up to £500 for the tests alone and that does not include the cost of the holiday as well so sense of nervousness i think from the airlines and the here at gatwick
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that they need a little bit more information. grant shapps seeing that we will get that information into a three week's time so hold still and we will get it and that the government is looking to reduce the government is looking to reduce the cost of pcr tests so people can go on holiday. here at gatwick there are a few people behind me but generally very quiet. they have about 1300 people taking flights out of the airport today. normally that amount would be leaving in the space of half an hour before the pandemic so you can see how quiet it is at the moment and a real sense of urgency i think from the airlines and airport to get a little more detail about exactly how the industry will get up and running again. i'm joined now by justin cooper—marsh. he was due to travel with his family and another family from luton to majorca injuly 2020,
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which they booked in 2019. he says they're now faced with the prospect of each family stumping up another £800 or losing their money. how much extra money are you likely to have to fork out? it all how much extra money are you likely to have to fork out?— to have to fork out? it all depends on the cost _ to have to fork out? it all depends on the cost of _ to have to fork out? it all depends on the cost of pcr _ to have to fork out? it all depends on the cost of pcr four _ to have to fork out? it all depends l on the cost of pcr four predeparture and arrivals and it has been mooted at £200 per person so it would be £800 for us. find at £200 per person so it would be £800 for us— at £200 per person so it would be £800 for us. and if you decide you are not prepared _ £800 for us. and if you decide you are not prepared to _ £800 for us. and if you decide you are not prepared to pay _ £800 for us. and if you decide you are not prepared to pay that - £800 for us. and if you decide you l are not prepared to pay that money what happens to your holiday? the airline will what happens to your holiday? the: airline will still fly what happens to your holiday? ““ii9 airline will still fly to what happens to your holiday? i““i9: airline will still fly to the destinations therefore i suppose we will lose it all. unless we can get something back from them, which i doubt. the comfort very good reputation of not wanting to pay money back if you cannot travel unless holiday insurance. this must feel like the — unless holiday insurance. this must feel like the holiday _ unless holiday insurance. this must feel like the holiday that _ unless holiday insurance. this must feel like the holiday that is - unless holiday insurance. this must feel like the holiday that is never. feel like the holiday that is never going to arrive.—
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feel like the holiday that is never going to arrive. yes, we did move it last ear going to arrive. yes, we did move it last year and _ going to arrive. yes, we did move it last year and we _ going to arrive. yes, we did move it last year and we have _ going to arrive. yes, we did move it last year and we have been - going to arrive. yes, we did move it last year and we have been looking | last year and we have been looking forward to going this year but we want to go, we would love to go but we arejust on want to go, we would love to go but we are just on a really sticky situation. we are just on a really sticky situation-— we are just on a really sticky situation. , :, , ,, situation. some people might think foreian situation. some people might think foreign travel _ situation. some people might think foreign travel is _ situation. some people might think foreign travel is really _ situation. some people might think foreign travel is really not - situation. some people might think foreign travel is really not the - foreign travel is really not the priority at the moment. if you could get out of going, would you be tempted to cancel? i get out of going, would you be tempted to cancel?— get out of going, would you be tempted to cancel? i don't know, ossibl tempted to cancel? i don't know, possibly yes- _ tempted to cancel? i don't know, possibly yes. back _ tempted to cancel? i don't know, possibly yes. back in _ tempted to cancel? i don't know, possibly yes. back in 2019 - tempted to cancel? i don't know, possibly yes. back in 2019 we - tempted to cancel? i don't know, - possibly yes. back in 2019 we booked this and covid wasn't even on the horizon so we didn't think about it. now it is here and people don't do want to travel. we feel that we want to travel and i know some people would be against that but way before any of this was known, it is very difficult for us to see whether or not. i know we want to. but as i say
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it's difficult. not. i know we want to. but as i say it's difficult-— it's difficult. when will you have to make the _ it's difficult. when will you have to make the decision _ it's difficult. when will you have to make the decision by - it's difficult. when will you have to make the decision by as - it's difficult. when will you have to make the decision by as to i it's difficult. when will you have i to make the decision by as to when you go are not? the transport secretary is saying he would like to see the cost of these pcr tests come down but that does not happened yet. we are due to travel injuly so any time from now until then, really. if we cancel then obviously we lose quite a lot of money, to be honest. so really may as the cut—off date if the holiday had to be paid. ijust don't know how much we have lost a friend. , ' : don't know how much we have lost a friend. , , : :, friend. very difficult to get information _ friend. very difficult to get information out _ friend. very difficult to get information out of- friend. very difficult to get information out of holiday | information out of holiday companies. if you do go and get away, enjoy every single penny of it. the welsh government is speeding up the easing of its covid restrictions as infection levels continue to drop.
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gyms will be allowed to reopen and people from two households can bubble up to meet indoors from 3rd may instead of 10th may. the dates for reopening the hospitality industry have not changed. there's been another night of rioting in northern ireland, with petrol bombs, fireworks and stones thrown at the police in belfast. 0fficers used water cannon for the first time in six years in an attempt to restore order, as james reynolds reports. in belfast, the night was lit up. this latest unrest came on the nationalist side, not far from the wall separating the city's two communities. the police responded with water cannon, the first time they have done so in six years. the first minister says these scenes have taken northern ireland backwards.
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last night's clashes weren't on the same scale as wednesday, where rioters on the loyalist side hijacked and firebombed a bus. some of those gathered were in their early teens, far too young to remember the era of troubles that the 1998 good friday agreement pledged to end for good. history has shown very, very clearly in relation to northern ireland, one side acting on its own, whether it's within northern ireland or between the two governments or whatever, doesn't succeed. it only ever succeeds to bring peace and stability when both sides are working together. that's going to require joint action by governments, it is going to require the assembly and the executive working really with a single voice. we join the british, the irish, and the northern irish leaders in their calls for calm. we remain, as you have heard us say before, steadfast supporters
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and prosperous northern ireland, in which all committees have a voice and all communities enjoy the gains of a hard—won peace. this is that the president has spoken to quite passionately in the past. the past itself is what overshadows this unrest. northern ireland's fractures now reach its younger generation. james reynolds, bbc news. let's speak to our correspondent charlotte gallagher. she is in belfast now. this violence followed round condemnation from parties of all stripes in northern ireland yesterday and an appeal for calm. , : , , , ,, calm. yes, incredibly depressing scenes on _ calm. yes, incredibly depressing scenes on the _ calm. yes, incredibly depressing scenes on the streets _ calm. yes, incredibly depressing scenes on the streets of- calm. yes, incredibly depressing scenes on the streets of belfast| scenes on the streets of belfast last night. as you had their police water cannon used here for the first time in six years, petrol bombs, fireworks, rocks thrown at police and it's interesting that the water cannon was actually used on the national side of the community. it had been used previously on the loyalist side and that is because violence is no spread. 0riginally it
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did start within loyalist communities but now has spread to nationalist communities and that water cannon was used just metres from one of those piece wars that symbolically celebrate the two communities in belfast. —— peace walls. 0ne communities in belfast. —— peace walls. one of the saddest things people have said to me is the age of some involved, some of them just 12 and 13 and they don't remember the troubles and the violence that terrorised both communities for decades. we saw people from both communities last night going down to the walls and trying to stop their violence and i saw a video of a younger person having a petrol bomb taken from him by another person saying why are you trying to start this trouble? we saw a line of
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protesters up against one of the peace walls scene you're not going any further, you're going to stop these petrol bombs and fireworks. it is important to see the violence last night was not as bad as on wednesday night when we saw the bus being set alight and rolling down the shankill road. it was incredibly distressing for people to see the return of violence to the streets but not as bad as it was on wednesday. the headlines on bbc news: the uk government announces its plans to reopen international travel in england. if you want to go on holiday you will have to pay for a coronavirus test. airlines argue the cost is too high. police use water cannon on protesters after coming under attack from petrol bombs and fireworks during another night of violence in belfast. and fireworks during another night from today, everyone in england will be able to access two free rapid coronavirus tests a week, which provide results
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in around 30 minutes. let's return to the news that the transport secretary, grant shapps, says he wants to drive down the costs of pcr coronavirus tests required for foreign travel. airline bosses have expressed concerns that the cost will make travel from england this summer unaffordable for many because of the need for testing when they return. in the coming weeks, ministers will say where countries will be come in their new traffic light system of risk. let's speak now to jane hawkes, a consumer rights expert specialising in travel. it's very complicated for people who have holidays booked that have had to delay or are contemplating when or whether they should be booking one this year. where should they start? it has been complicated all the way through stop this has certainly been one huge grey area and i don't think with the announcement today it is any clearer. would you effectively still
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have a traffic light system, ireland being the only country on the green list so to speak so all i see is a development and refinement of that in certain other conditions coming into play. the main concern is the cost of the testing and affordability needs to be reviewed there otherwise many families and holiday—makers are just going to be priced out of them market. ilrrui’e’gre priced out of them market. we've already spoken — priced out of them market. we've already spoken to _ priced out of them market. we've already spoken to somebody - priced out of them market. we've already spoken to somebody this| already spoken to somebody this morning who has been waiting for a holiday for well over two years and booked well in advance without knowing anything about covid—19. he is between a rock and a hard place. we do see stand if the holiday goes ahead because the cost of the pcr testis ahead because the cost of the pcr test is so great?— test is so great? disinclination to travel is not _ test is so great? disinclination to travel is not a _ test is so great? disinclination to travel is not a reason _ test is so great? disinclination to travel is not a reason to - test is so great? disinclination to travel is not a reason to cancel. travel is not a reason to cancel which is unfortunate. it is good to
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check to see if the companies have anything covid related. none of the companies offer full covid cover but some offer options. 0pen companies offer full covid cover but some offer options. open up these conversations with your provider to see what those options are. it might be the could — see what those options are. it might be the could let _ see what those options are. it might be the could let you _ see what those options are. it might be the could let you defer— see what those options are. it might be the could let you defer yet - be the could let you defer yet again, maybe? be the could let you defer yet again. maybe?— be the could let you defer yet again, maybe? be the could let you defer yet auain, ma be? , again, maybe? yes, we hope in the current climate _ again, maybe? yes, we hope in the current climate that _ again, maybe? yes, we hope in the current climate that will _ again, maybe? yes, we hope in the current climate that will still - again, maybe? yes, we hope in the current climate that will still be - current climate that will still be that flexibility with cancellation charges and postponement charges. what is really important is that you do not cancel because if you do could be faced with those hefty charges. i'm afraid it is still a case of will have to wait and see and i do not want to be the voice of doom and gloom this morning, i want to be the voice of positivity and optimism the roll—out will work out as hoped. ii optimism the roll-out will work out as hoed. , :,, optimism the roll-out will work out as hoed. , :, optimism the roll-out will work out ashoed. , :, as hoped. if somebody has not booked as hoped. if somebody has not booked a holiday but — as hoped. if somebody has not booked a holiday but would _ as hoped. if somebody has not booked a holiday but would really _ as hoped. if somebody has not booked a holiday but would really like - as hoped. if somebody has not booked a holiday but would really like to - a holiday but would really like to get away art just needs to travel to meet up with family and friends they have not seen for a year or more,
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what sort of precautions can they take when they book a flight on a trip? take when they book a flight on a tri - ? , , , , :, take when they book a flight on a tri? , , , , :, trip? yes, it is funny you should sa that trip? yes, it is funny you should say that about _ trip? yes, it is funny you should say that about seeing _ trip? yes, it is funny you should say that about seeing family - trip? yes, it is funny you should - say that about seeing family because it's notjust about holidays, this is about far more than that. there are people who have been separated for the families for quite a long time now and were talking about the industry itself, an industry that has been battered for the whole year with very little support so any bookings of course that i made are going to help furnish that industry going to help furnish that industry going forward. what we need to do to increase consumer confidence is make sure any regulations brought in are clear and that there are no grey gaps and grey areas because that is not how full consumer confidence needs to be in order to make a good decision, a well—informed decision, they to have the information available and we advise you do look into travel insurance and you book a
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package travel holiday so you have maximum protection and you book by credit card and plan, plan, plan again. you will have to take on board the fact there could be changes while you are away for the various light system because red could go to amber and amber could go to read but hopefully this time we will have far more notice and that will have far more notice and that will help casino confidence. it was 'ust a will help casino confidence. it was just a matter _ will help casino confidence. it was just a matter of _ will help casino confidence. it was just a matter of a _ will help casino confidence. it was just a matter of a few— will help casino confidence. it was just a matter of a few hours - just a matter of a few hours sometimes last year and lots of due diligence required. thank you for your advice. diligence required. thank you for your advice-— diligence required. thank you for our advice. :, �* , ::, your advice. you're very welcome. wh no your advice. you're very welcome. why go abroad _ your advice. you're very welcome. why go abroad when _ your advice. you're very welcome. why go abroad when you - your advice. you're very welcome. why go abroad when you could - your advice. you're very welcome. why go abroad when you could go | your advice. you're very welcome. l why go abroad when you could go to blackpool? blackpool pleasure beach this year celebrates its 125th anniversary.
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danjohnson has been there to see how preparations are going. blackpool, but without its crowds. it is just not right, is it? it doesn't look itself. for the pleasure beach, it's been the longest winter shutdown they have ever known, after the toughest year. even during the first and second world war, shutdown they have ever known, after the toughest year. even during the first and second world war, the park remained open to entertain people. 0nly covid has forced the business to actually close. newsreel: blackpool's tower stands out as a happy memory _ of the rollicking days of peace. look how times have changed! back then, the beaches were packed and the news readers were patronising. don't be daft, lad, it's blackpool. tha's right, love. it is, an' all. blackpool pleasure beach is ready. 0ur managing director always says there's a little piece of blackpool in everybody. it holds a very special place in many people's hearts. yes, we're ready to open our gates and welcome people back again. some are already eyeing up their place in the queue. i come here 20, 30 times a year — from newcastle. that is quite a journey. it is quite a journey.
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it's about two and a half hours from home to here. it's something we do that often, we're quite used to doing it. why? i have always loved blackpool, blackpool pleasure beach. we used to come here on family holidays — when i was about seven or eight and we'd always come from then. we do call pleasure beach our pleasure beach family. we say that for good reason. there's a lot of people we know who work here and we do keep in touch with them. that theme runs right through. the pleasure beach has been owned by the same family for all of its 125 years. there are other families here, keeping the place running. my dad started here in 1958 as an apprentice fitter. this was one of the first rides he worked on. my sister started here in 1982. she still works here now. i started here in 1983. we have worked for three generations of the thomson family. we look after the rides, all the facilities round here. what is it like feeding these? they've gone off their food — i really don't know why. you can ride some as well in a bit. i've heard i'm going to be the tester. you are. the good thing about pleasure beach,
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it's got the classic rides — like the classic roller coasters like the big dipper, etc. it's got the big rides like the big one. and the newest ride, which is icon. it keeps up with the times as well as looking after its historical rides as well. there is heaps of history here. the flying machines have been in the air since 190a. newsreel: this is the thrill of freedom and for - forgetting your cares. hey, we could all do with a bit of that now! i'm reliably informed this is the oldest continuously operating ride anywhere in europe. let's face it, it's probably the nearest we'll get to flying anywhere any time soon. this is lovely! newsreel: a thrill today, a memory tomorrow. - getting things moving again still means more work and a few finishing touches. covid measures are still in place, including masks. all our staff are temperature tested daily and we are also doing lateral flow testing of our staff as well so it is all about giving guests
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and customers assurances and confidence we are safe and good to go. are you looking forward to having people back? we're so excited. the whole team here at blackpool pleasure beach can't wait. i will be there monday and wednesday next week. twice in a week? twice in a week, yes. can't keep away from the place. it's a great place to come. everyone loves coming to blackpool. george formby sings here we go. this is where i get to make a fool of myself. i'll tell you what, it is high! oh, my word! the uk's leading sports bodies are backing the use of vaccine passports and covid testing as a way of getting full crowds back. in a joint letter to the leaders of the major political parties, the group says a certification
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process could allow fans to return as quickly as possible. but it warns that the system must not be discriminatory, and should protect privacy. islamic scholars and doctors in britain are urging muslims to continue getting their covid—19 vaccines during ramadan, which begins next week. in a health campaign, muslim leaders say that because the vaccine is not nutritious, it doesn't amount to breaking the ritual fast. harry farley reports. the al—abbas islamic centre in birmingham is one of many that have been converted into a vaccine centre. for now, theirfocus has switched from saving souls to saving lives. there has been some debate among islamic scholars but the majority now say the covid vaccine does not break the fast. we know that a lot of people, a lot of muslims are concerned about having their covid vaccination during ramadan, and many people believe that many
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people having an injection actually breaks the fast but it doesn't at all because it is not considered nutritious, so it is absolutely fine to have the covid vaccination while we are fasting. ramadan will look different this year to normal. the british islamic medical association has released guidance on how to celebrate safely. there have been fears about vaccine take—up among some ethnic minority groups. but there are signs initiatives like this in birmingham an increase in the uptake of the vaccine from black, asian and ethnic minority groups and that is positive news. a lot of that is due to the grassroots organisations
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and faith—based organisations going into the community to dispel myths and address concerns communities are having. but there is much work to be done and we need to continue going with this momentum. some vaccine sites will be staying open later during ramadan so muslims can come after they have eaten, but the message from the nhs and islamic leaders is to get the jab, even if you are fasting. harry farley, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah. hello. we have seen a brief slightly milder spell in the weather. some of us are just holding onto that milder air for a time in the south but colder conditions working in from the north, bringing more snow showers today across the northern half of scotland. one or two rain and sleet showers for northern ireland, down the north—east coast of england, as well. we have got a line of cloud and patchy light showery rain pushing south across england and wales but temperatures up to about 13 degrees down towards the south—east. much cold conditions, single figures further north and through this evening and tonight, as we lose the cloud and the rain from the south, it's going to be a cold night, with temperatures down to about —it degrees even for some of our towns
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and cities in the north. colder than that in the countryside. with temperatures down to about —it degrees even for some of our towns and cities in the north. colder than that in the countryside. so, a frosty start to your saturday. high pressure sits out towards the west, bringing quite a bit of dry weather but we will have low pressure that will bring some cloud and some rain to the far south—east through the course of saturday. i think particularly for kent, perhaps east sussex and essex, but some uncertainty about the exact location. sunshine and some wintry showers elsewhere and feeling cold for the time of year. sunshine and some wintry showers elsewhere and feeling cold for the time of year.
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hello, this is bbc news with martine croxall. the headlines... the government announces its plans to reopen international travel in england. if you want to go on holiday you will have to pay for a coronavirus test. airlines argue the cost is too high, and the transport secretary agrees. i think overall, the pricing should be lower and the reason i say that specifically is i'm looking at what's happening in other countries and i do notice there is a very big variation so we are committing as a government to work to drive those costs down. police use water cannon on protesters after coming under attack from petrol bombs and fireworks during another night of violence in belfast. from today, everyone in england will be able to access two free rapid coronavirus tests a week, which provide results in around 30 minutes.
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also coming up, we meet thejockey bidding to make history in becoming the first female rider to win the grand national. the horse is trained by her mother. sport and now a full round—up, from the bbc sport centre. good morning. day two of the masters to come and inevitably all eyes will fall on england'sjustin rose after his sensational start in augusta. he leads by four shots after an opening round of 65. it saw him produce one of his best rounds there. he heads out again atjust after 2.30 this afternoon with play beginning there on day two in around an hour and a half's time. austin halewood reports. spring at augusta. the masters back in its traditional home, the azaleas back in bloom. golf at its most picturesque. under the surface, this iconic course has plenty of bite.
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rory mcilroy once again looking for the final piece of the career grand slam. another poor opening round, at four over par, his hopes perhaps already sunk. big hitting bryson dechambeau has been looking to bully his way around the augusta national but often the big hits are just as important as the small ones. bryson falling short on four over. five months ago, dustinjohnson won his first greenjacket in a record under—20 parfinish. although there were moments of that magic, scoring this year is not that easy. a double bogey on the 18th left the champion two over. tommy fleetwood had the shot of the day. the english man with a hole in one and the par 3 16th. in the end, only a handful of players were under par for their opening round.
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justin rose was the pick of them. the english man with another brilliant round at augusta. a two—time runner—up, he tops the leaderboard on seven under—par. could this be the year he finally goes one better? austin halewood, bbc news. now, one of rory mciroy�*s wayward tee shots, on his it over par, opening round hit a spectator on the leg. you can have a look at the pictures now. this was him in the trees. this was him in the trees. you can see the ball airborne. and it turned out to be his dad gerry. what are the chances of that? a big relief i guess. dad joked he wanted a signed glove as an apology. mcilroy said he would autograph a bag of frozen peas. he finished it over par. not the best of days for rory mcilroy. not the best of days
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for rory mcilroy. it's advantage manchester united as they aim for the semi—finals of the europa league. they beat granada 2—0 in their quarter—final first leg in spain last night. marcus rashford got the first and then bruno fernandez converted a late penalty to put united in control of the tie. it looked like it was going to be a 1—0 but we gladly take the second goal, of course. it's so vital away from home and we've created a good starting point for next week's game for ourselves. frustration for arsenal though. they seemed to have pinched a late victory against slavia prague, with this goal from nicolas pepey, but the czech side snatched an equaliser deep into added time, to leave the tie in the balance ahead of next week's away leg. i think psychologically to go there with 1—0 is completely different to go with 1—1. now we know we have to go there and we know for the game we have to score goals and we cannot play any game. we have to go there with the determination to be
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an attacking team and hurt them. and there are seven more races to come on day two of the grand national festival at aintree ahead of the big race there tomorrow. no doubt who enjoyed the best of it on the opening day after sir alex ferguson celebrated three winners of horses he co—owns. the former manchester united manager, didn't have to worry about the two—time national winner tiger roll in the betway bowl chase as he could only finish a very distant fourth behind clan des oboe, who brought up the hatrick for ferguson, ridden by harry cobden and trained by paul nicholls. he came home 26 lengths clear. sir alex had a share in each of the first three winners. iam sure i am sure he is smiling behind that mask. what a day for him. enjoyed much success in football and plenty on the track yesterday. that is all from me. it is back to you. the body mass index, or bmi, has long been used to determine if someone is a healthy weight.
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but now there are calls for the government to scrap the measure. mps on the women and equalities committee say it doesn't help people with eating disorders and causes anxiety about body imagery, asjohn maguire has been finding out. what do you see when you look at yourself in the mirror, or in a photo? what do others see? and is it important what they think? today's report by mps on body image is wide—ranging. everything from obesity policy to portrayal in advertising. back in the day, i would have edited most of my photos, and i wouldn't have taken a selfie without a filter, so i would just take a photo like this, and then my most common things that i used to do when i edited my photos was to smooth my skin. there was a time that sasha would never post a photo of herself without modifying it. i was constantly comparing myself to the images i would see online, kind of unaware of how much they were edited, and i became addicted to seeing myself in this way,
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so all i've got is this incredible photo of me at my brother's graduation, but i've completely changed my body, i have probably taken off a stone or two through editing. it makes me a bit sad. but now she campaigns for standards in advertising online in whether or not pictures have been edited. now i am seeing my favourite people i have followed for years, and i am seeing their real skin, wrinkles and pores, it's incredible, that will only have a positive effect on everyone else watching it as well. hope has struggled with an eating disorder since she was a young girl. people think it is a choice, it is a diet gone wrong, it is a teenage white girl's illness and somebody grows out of it, but actually it is a battle every single day. she is thrilled that mps are calling on the government to abandon the bmi, which is currently used to determine whether or not a person's weight is healthy. you cannot judge whether someone
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has an eating disorder based on their bmi. only 6% of the people with an eating disorder will ever fall underweight. so we have to scrap it, we need to get rid of it. saul works to help fathers improve their health and fitness, but appreciates that what looks healthy on the outside can be very different on the inside. i would binge so heavily that... i remember being in the cinema with my brother, and i took three boxes of cereal to the cinema, because that was a day that i was allowed to cram things in, which would damage me afterwards, for days i would be thinking about, what have i done? he welcomes the broadening of the debate. the reason i posted about this on social media is that one of my clients is a 32—year—old guy i have known for my whole life, pretty much, he told me he was bulimic, and my first image in my head was that of a young
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teenage girl who didn't look very well, and that came into my head, and i thought to myself, that's really wrong, that needs to change. it is notjust a thing that affects young girls, it is everyone and anyone. the mps' report also cites the impact of lockdown and its after—effects. they call for a wholesale change in how we and the government think, act and speak about our bodies, both in terms of our physical and mental health. john maguire, bbc news. in response to this, a spokesperson for the department of health and social care has said... we are committed to improving outcomes for those with eating disorders and related mental health issues, with record funding to expand dedicated services in the community. our approach is guided by the latest research and emerging evidence. well, we can speak now to the actress and charity manager of seed eating disorder support, gemma oaten who has openly spoken about her own struggle
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with an eating disorder. you have got company. we are fascinated by who is there with you. meet ruby. my anxiety is so high right now. meet ruby. my anxiety is so high riaht now. :, :, :, :, , , right now. you are amongst friends, we are delighted _ right now. you are amongst friends, we are delighted to _ right now. you are amongst friends, we are delighted to have _ right now. you are amongst friends, we are delighted to have joined - right now. you are amongst friends, j we are delighted to have joined you. what do you think of the findings of this report? filth. what do you think of the findings of this re ort? :,, �* this report? oh, gosh, i didn't sleep last _ this report? oh, gosh, i didn't sleep last night. _ this report? oh, gosh, i didn't sleep last night. it _ this report? oh, gosh, i didn't sleep last night. it could - this report? oh, gosh, i didn't sleep last night. it could be i sleep last night. it could be potentially monumental in the treatment for those with eating disorders and it could potentially help save thousands of lives. as hope touched on it this morning, this has been years of us speaking out consistently about it is not going to change what is already there. it is not about weight and numbers. they are constantly drip fed numbers of calories and the scales. anorexia is 10% represented by those with eating disorders. i myself nearly died from a heart
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attack and i have never spoken properly about it before, but it is important i say this, because i have bulimia. sorry, ruby is making a noise. because i have bully me at my electrolytes and my potassium levels were so low that i was having a heart attack and my mum had to drive me to the hospital and thatjourney started when i was ten years old and i was turned away. this is huge. dispensing with the body mass index is a really good idea you think? absolutely. the amount of people who have come to us, especially over lockdown who have presented signs of bulimia and binge eating has increased by 121% from 2019 to 2020. they are not getting the treatment they need. we have a support group and the majority of those there, are those struggling with an eating disorder or bulimia say they could not access the medical care they
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needed. one parent was beside herself because her daughter was fourlbs off from being deemed ill enough to get help. you would not go to a gp and say i am suicidal and the gp say, go and stand on the edge of a cliff and see how you feel. i don't mean to be flippant, but how nonsensical is that? how dangerous and damaging is that? you nonsensical is that? how dangerous and damaging is that?— and damaging is that? you mention the pandemic- _ and damaging is that? you mention the pandemic. how— and damaging is that? you mention the pandemic. how hard _ and damaging is that? you mention the pandemic. how hard has - and damaging is that? you mention the pandemic. how hard has it- and damaging is that? you mention| the pandemic. how hard has it been during the last 12 months when people have faced months at a time of lockdown? why has it been so hard on people with eating disorders? shah on people with eating disorders? jifi eating disorder is a mental health illness and it thrives on being in control and manipulating and making the person feel ashamed and lonely. now we are in a world of lockdown where we are on our own, we are isolated, we have got no control over anything, so of course people will change their habits accordingly. food is the symptom, it
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is not the cause. the root of all of this is about what is going on in the mind and lockdown has put us under this microscope, this pressure cooker, especially when you add in the whole obesity narrative and prescribing bicycles because somebody is a breeze. you cannot address the physical and not address the mental health side as well. the government — the mental health side as well. the government has said in that statement wejust read government has said in that statement we just read that they have got record funding to expand dedicated services which will be based on the latest research and emerging evidence. what change would you want to see to make sure that nobody slips through the net any more? i nobody slips through the net any more? :, :, , :, , more? i want to see where the money is auoin more? i want to see where the money is going and — more? i want to see where the money is going and i— more? i want to see where the money is going and i want _ more? i want to see where the money is going and i want to _ more? i want to see where the money is going and i want to see _ more? i want to see where the money is going and i want to see things - is going and i want to see things being implemented. iam is going and i want to see things being implemented. i am 37 this year. my anorexia started when i was ten years old and we are still going through the same narrative. wherever it is going it needs to be distributed accordingly. they need to look at the voluntary sector, seed, a charity that was set up by
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my parents because we could not get the help that we needed. they need to start collaborating and putting things in place rather than making us go through a system because the system is failing them. 50. us go through a system because the system is failing them.— system is failing them. so, if somebody — system is failing them. so, if somebody has _ system is failing them. so, if somebody has an _ system is failing them. so, if somebody has an eating - system is failing them. so, if - somebody has an eating disorder and they are looking for help, just acknowledging it is a huge step because of the shame and humiliation you have talked about, where would you have talked about, where would you point people in the first instance? it is a lot of women, but also men sufferfrom instance? it is a lot of women, but also men suffer from this as well. eating disorders do not discriminate, as it said in your vt discriminate, as it said in yourvt a discriminate, as it said in your vt a moment ago. i would urge them to speak out to somebody they trust in the initial stages and then also look to go to their gp. obviously we are talking about the fact that gps are talking about the fact that gps are turning people away, so that is not always going to be the answer, but it is the first port of call. if not, we as a charity are here as a support group. i have lived
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experience and they give empathy to people with eating disorders. we need an education or toolkit that would be amazing to get into schools and education is the key. i have been e—mailing and trying to get the attention of mps for years now and fortunately robert halfon has been amazing and we have already had meetings about how we implement this to get into schools. we as normal, everyday people can make a difference. we are not the decision makers, but we can be the change—makers. ii makers, but we can be the change-makers. if somebody is listeninu change-makers. if somebody is listening to _ change-makers. if somebody is listening to this _ change-makers. if somebody is listening to this and _ change-makers. if somebody is listening to this and they - change-makers. if somebody is listening to this and they are i listening to this and they are feeling really desperate, perhaps a person suffering from an eating disorder or friends person suffering from an eating disorder orfriends and person suffering from an eating disorder or friends and family trying to support them, what is your message of hope that you can get better with the right support? look. better with the right support? look, i nearl better with the right support? look, i nearly died — better with the right support? look, i nearly died four _ better with the right support? look, i nearly died four times _ better with the right support? look, i nearly died four times and - better with the right support? look, i nearly died four times and i - i nearly died four times and i remember watching emmerdale and holby city and all the shows i got on and back then i thought i had no
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chance of hope and survival, but there is hope. please, neverfeel ashamed, it does not matter what weight you are, please speak out and get help. there is no embarrassment and no shame attached, you are not alone and we are here to support you and you are doing the bravest thing by stepping up and speaking out and getting the help and support you need because you will not be turned away from us. need because you will not be turned away from us— need because you will not be turned awa from us. , :, :, , , :, away from us. gemma, it has been far stick to talk— away from us. gemma, it has been far stick to talk to — away from us. gemma, it has been far stick to talk to us, _ away from us. gemma, it has been far stick to talk to us, thank _ away from us. gemma, it has been far stick to talk to us, thank you - away from us. gemma, it has been far stick to talk to us, thank you for i stick to talk to us, thank you for sharing that optimism with us. good luck and thank you.— thank you. the headlines on bbc news... the uk government announces its plans to reopen international travel in england. if you want to go on holiday you will have to pay for a coronavirus test. airlines argue the cost is too high. police use water cannon on protesters after coming under attack from petrol bombs and fireworks during another night of violence in belfast. from today, everyone in england will be able to access two free rapid coronavirus tests a week, which provide results in around 30 minutes.
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greta thunberg says she does not plan to attend the un climate conference scheduled to be held in glasgow this november. the 18—year—old swedish climate campaigner says she believes the british government, which is hosting the conference, should postpone the summit until vaccination rates globally mean all nations can attend the meeting on the same terms. she's been speaking to chief environment correspondent, justin rowlatt. for the last 18 months, greta thunberg has been making a documentary series on the science of climate change. i have been going the whole way round the world the wrong way. in 2019, she took a year off school. the programmes show her visiting glaciers. this year we had the fastest melt rate we've ever measured. six metres of ice down. at global conferences and leading big demonstrations. world leaders are behaving like children. then, and during the coronavirus lockdown in her home in stockholm. i have contracted the coronavirus.
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did it change your perspective on the climate issue? now she has told the bbc she doesn't believe vaccination rates globally means the crucial un climate conference, known as the cop, planned for glasgow in november, should go ahead. as it is now, i don't think i will be going to the cop because this needs to happen in the right way. are you saying the british government should delay or cancel the conference? not cancel, maybe postpone it. of course, the best thing to do would be to get everyone vaccinated as soon as possible so everyone could take part on the same terms. greta, you know greta... during the making of the documentaries, greta meets world leaders and a host of scientists. what we measure is the flow. of carbon dioxide between the forest and the atmosphere. and the world's most famous climate campaigner also meets the world's
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most famous naturalist. my generation has made a mess of things. we've known it is happening and we have done nothing. yep, sir david attenborough. we have to make major changes to the way we live. that is where you have done such a lot, you really have. you have spoken for the generation that's going to have to look after it. what would you say to people, especially young people, who feel there is no point doing it because no one is listening anyway? people are listening. greta also visited paradise, the californian town consumed by fire in 2018. please help us. we are never getting out of here- — we are never getting out of here. she said making the documentaries confirmed her belief
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that government and the media needs to recognise tackling climate change is as urgent as tackling the pandemic. the corona pandemic is a tragedy and nothing else. this actually shows we are able to treat an emergency like an emergency and we are able to shift social norms very quickly. imagine if media would start treating the climate crisis like a crisis, that could change everything overnight. the swedish activist has achieved extraordinary world attention. is she worried her star could wane? i would not say i am worried, i know that will happen. i am surprised people have been listening to me for so long. i expected people would get tired after a few months. they keep on listening and i do not know why that is. i guess if people are listening, i am going to use that opportunity to sort of communicate the message as much as i can. it is quite exhausting. at 18, greta thunberg is not a child any more but she is back at school, making up for the 18 months
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she took off to campaign. she says she is delighted to be studying again but has no plans to stop campaigning. we can act but we don't have time to wait. justin rowlatt, bbc news. greta thunberg: a year to change the world, begins on bbc one on monday at 9pm and on iplayer. the world's most famous horse race, the grand national, is back tomorrow. there still won't be crowds, but there will be plenty of interest as a0 riders battle it out, including three who are aiming to become the first female jockey to win the race. one of them is tabitha worsley who's got her mum georgie on her side and mike bushell has been to meet them. a lifelong dream is about to come true for tabatha worsley. it is causing quite a stir on the family farm as she prepares
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to ruffle feathers by riding in the grand national. with her mum georgie, also her trainer, following her rather nervously every step of the way. an absolute quivering wreck. she will be sheet white in the morning. there will be a bit of excitement as well. i think i will spend a lot of time sitting down, absolutely terrifying. it is so exciting. it is dream land, to be honest. i never thought we would have a runner in the grand national and certainly not ridden by tabatha. her daughter broke her back in a fall in 2017 before jumping back into the saddle. she has had injuries over the years. you want your children to follow their dreams but i wish she had taken up tiddlywinks. a lot of people would say i am silly. it was one of those things. i have had worse falls.
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plenty of jockeys are far worse off. i got back in three months and broke my collarbone. she takes any pain for the team. it includes her brother and sister—in—law. she will be leading out sub luke ten aintree. this is what the grand national is all about, a tiny family stables taking on the elite of the sport. do not tell the horse to its face it is a rank outsider because it is in good form. we are a tiny little yard. he has top flight form. that's why he is only 100—1 because of who we are. both jockey and horse had success over the grand national fences two years ago. can they repeat that in the big one, the grand national itself? there has never been a better time to make your debut in this race.
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it was cancelled last year and makes a big return to the relief of everyone around, albeit without the crowds roaring them home. it is behind closed doors. it is running the race. whoever wins, there is always an amazing story. whether it is a rags to riches story or the first female jockey. so many great tales. an unbelievable opportunity for us as a family. to be doing it as a family, it makes it even more special. we will all be there together and a proper team. this is proof you can dream about stuff and it can actually happen, with my daughter. she said she would ride in the grand national since she was this high. sub lieutenant has neverfallen in a race. do not mention it because they are a superstitious family. they will not be buying new outfits for the occasion. nothing new. not new underwear or anything. it will be stuff that has been worn.
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to start down that line of fences will be exciting. to start down that line of fences will be exciting. if we can just get round, it will be unbelievable. we cannot believe it is actually possible. whatever happens, they have already been celebrating this week with the arrival of a potential aintree runner of the future. iamso i am so sorry, i am rattling around because my necklace has stuck on my microphone. and before we go, man's best friend has taken on a new form. meet the alphadog. a chinese tech company has developed a robo—dog that obeys commands. the high—tech hound uses sensors and artificial intelligence technology to hear and see its environment. it can even be taken for walks. the alpha—dogs are quite popular. more than 1800 were sold in their first month alone. and they're not cheap, costing about £1,750.
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they don't moult, so that's good. i'll stick with my rescue mongrel. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah. hello. we have seen a brief spell of slightly milder weather. some of us are just about holding onto that milder air in the south through the course of today but, really, over the next few days, we're all going to be feeling the effect of that colder weather spilling south, bringing further snow showers to parts of scotland. some wet and windy weather in the south, particularly tomorrow and certainly some overnight frosts as well. so, if you've got gardening plans, we are not out of the woods just yet in terms of those late—season frosts. so, there's a cold front working its way south through the rest of today, opening the doors for these cold northerly winds to slowly filter south. this is a line of cloud and some patchy showery rain, it's a cold front. it's slowly pushing into some southern counties of england but along the south coast, many places staying dry and bright for the bulk of the day. for the rest of the uk, to the north of that weather front, some sunnier skies but also wintry showers. heavy snow showers packing in across the north of scotland and brisk winds, as well.
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4—9 degrees for most of us, 13 possible down in the south—east where you do stick with that milder air for a good part of the day. but this evening and tonight, the mild air pushes away towards the south. the skies are going to be clearing, so for most of us, it's going to be a cold night, sub zero temperatures. a little bit milder for southern england where you hold onto a bit more cloud. through the day tomorrow, southern england will start to feel the effects of this frontal system across the near continent, bringing some cloud and rain. it looks like it should clear off towards the east as we head on into sunday but certainly for saturday, a bit more cloud and some patchy rain. a bit of uncertainty exactly how far north it gets but probably affecting the likes of kent, perhaps essex and east sussex. away from the far south—east, sunny spells, wintry showers on that northerly wind, snow across scotland. some rain and perhaps some sleet and hail mixed in elsewhere across england, wales and northern ireland. into saturday night, and gradually we'll start to lose the cloud and the wet weather from the south—east. so, another really cold night. again, quite a sharp frost for many as we start the day on sunday, especially across the northern half
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of the uk. a really subzero start here. through the day on sunday, then, after that cold, frosty start, we've still got the northerly wind driving in some more showers, particularly across parts of england and wales during the afternoon. temperatures about 6—10 degrees, so still certainly below average for this time of year. after the cold weather through the course of their weekend, it does look like things will gradually turn a little bit milder as we head through the course of next week. bye for now.
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this is bbc news, i'm martine croxall. the headlines at midday. the government announces its plans to reopen international travel in england — if you want to go on holiday you will have to pay for a coronavirus test. airlines argue the cost is too high, and the transport secretary agrees. i think overall, the pricing should be lower and the reason i say that specifically is i'm looking at what's happening in other countries and i do notice there is a very big variation so we are committing as a government to work to drive those costs down. police use water cannon on protesters after coming under attack from petrol bombs and fireworks during another night of violence in belfast. from today, everyone in england will be able to access two free rapid coronavirus tests a week,
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which provide results in around 30 minutes.

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