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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 9, 2021 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today — hopes forforeign holidays — the government announces plans to reopen international travel, but there's criticism from airports and airlines. police respond with water cannon after coming under attack in belfast, during another night of violence in northern ireland. justin rose is four shots clear at the masters. the englishman was the star performer on the opening day at augusta, as he finished his round on seven under par.
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and with one day to go until the world's most famous horse race returns, we'll meet the jockey who's preparing to take on the sport's elite in the grand national, hoping to become the first female winner, and her horse's trainer is her mum. roll trainer is her mum. up, all the fun of the fair. good roll up, all the fun of the fair. good morning from blackpool pleasure beach, where they are preparing to reopen on monday morning for their 125th season, and somehow i've got the job of testing the rides. good morning, some colder weather on the cards once again of the next few days. some snow showers across scotland today, patchy rain further south, i'll be here all morning with all your weather details. good morning. it's friday the 9th of april. our top story — plans to reopen international travel for holiday—makers from england have been unveiled with a requirement
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to pay for coronavirus tests. the government has stopped short of saying if foreign trips can resume next month, but has outlined a so—called traffic light system, which will be used to categorise countries based on risk. for places on the green list, travellers will be asked to take a test before they return to england, and pay for a costly pcr test two days after arriving home. if you're coming to england from countries on the amber list, you will also be asked to self—isolate for ten days, with tests on days two and eight. and passengers from red list destinations will be required to spend ten days in a quarantine hotel. the plans have been met with widespread frustration by the travel industry. here's our transport correspondent caroline davies. we may be dreaming of sunshine and summer getaways, but would you pay around an extra £100 per person when coming back from your trip overseas? the boss of easyjet isn't impressed
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at this part of the government's plan to reintroduce international travel in england. i think it's a blow to all travellers who were wishing to go and see friends and families and go on a holiday this summer, and i think particularly the concern why there are now two test systems in what they called the green category. today's report says that passengers coming from the lowest risk green rated countries will still need to take one of the more expensive pcr tests when they arrive back in england, and pay for it themselves, currently around £100 each. instead, the industry wants to use the quicker and cheaper lateral flow tests. the government says pcr testing will allow them to monitor positive cases and check for variants of concern. the report also says that if travel does go ahead, countries which will be on the green list will be announced in early may. there will be a watchlist for countries at risk of being changed to amber, and there will be a new consumer rights for ticket refunds.
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the industry is already gearing up for international travel on the 17th of may. whether that will happen would be confirmed either way until early next month. ——won�*t be. the flight simulators here are in use 2a hours a day, with pilots yearning to get back to the skies. for pilots, we as a group are tremendously looking forward to getting back in the air again. pilots don't want to be on the ground any more than aircraft want to be on the ground, and for us, we are really trying to respond to any pent—up demand so that we are fully ready to go when the government gives the green light on certain routes in the future. this announcement is not the grand reopening the industry was looking for, but after months of travel restrictions, the easing looks likely to take time. caroline davies, bbc news. we will be joined by the transport secretary grant shapps here on breakfastjust after 7.30 this morning.
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there's been another night of rioting in belfast, with petrol bombs, fireworks, and stones thrown at the police. officers used water cannon for the first time in six years in an attempt to restore order, as james reynolds reports. in belfast, the night was lit up. this latest unrest came on the nationalist side, not far from the wall separating the city's two communities. the police responded with water cannon, the first time they have done so in six years. the first minister says these scenes have taken northern ireland backwards. last night's clashes weren't on the same scale as wednesday, where rioters on the loyalist side hijacked and firebombed a bus. some of those gathered were in their early teens,
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far too young to remember the era of troubles that the 1998 good friday agreement pledged to end for good. history has shown very, very clearly in relation to northern ireland, one side acting on its own, whether it's within northern ireland or between the two governments or whatever, doesn't succeed. it only ever succeeds to bring peace and stability when both sides are working together. that's going to require joint action by government, it is going to require the assembly and the executive working really with a single voice. we join the british, the irish, the northern irish leaders in their calls for calm. we remain, as you heard us say before, steadfast supporters and prosperous northern ireland, in which all committees have a voice and all communities enjoy the gains of a hard—won peace. this is that the president has spoken to quite passionately
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in the past. the past itself is what overshadows this unrest. northern ireland's fractures now reach its younger generation. james reynolds, bbc news. from today, everyone in england has access to two rapid coronavirus tests a week, which can provide results in around 30 minutes. the lateral flow kits will be available at testing sites, pharmacies, and through the post. here's our health correspondent dominic hughes. now available at your local pharmacy, lateralflow now available at your local pharmacy, lateral flow tests are the quick and easy way to tell if you are ill with coronavirus. they have already been rolled out in schools and many workplaces. they are also available as testing centres, online, orvia available as testing centres, online, or via work, and pharmacists say they can offer help and advice when needed.— say they can offer help and advice when needed. ~ when needed. when the time come when tests need to _ when needed. when the time come when tests need to be — when needed. when the time come when tests need to be accessed, _ when needed. when the time come when tests need to be accessed, we _ when needed. when the time come when tests need to be accessed, we are - when needed. when the time come when tests need to be accessed, we are an - tests need to be accessed, we are an obvious choice where you can go and
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get a test, get a quick result, and also if you have got any questions about the vaccine or the pandemic, it can all be answered in one setting. it it can all be answered in one settina. ., ~ , it can all be answered in one settina. . ~ , ., , it can all be answered in one settina. .~ , ., , ;;:: it can all be answered in one settina. .,~ , ., , ;;:: , it can all be answered in one settin.. w , ., , xii , ., setting. it takes only 30 minutes to net a setting. it takes only 30 minutes to get a result — setting. it takes only 30 minutes to get a result from _ setting. it takes only 30 minutes to get a result from a _ setting. it takes only 30 minutes to get a result from a lateral - setting. it takes only 30 minutes to get a result from a lateral flow- get a result from a lateral flow test, which involves swabbing the throat and nose. it is believed to be test gives one false positive in every 1000, where someone is wrongly identified as having been infected with the virus, so people are being urged to follow up with a more reliable pcr test if they return a positive result. extra testing is not without its critics. some argue it is a waste of money unless people have more support to isolate when they have to. given more than a third of those who have the virus show no symptoms, ministers argue that testing remains an essential part of the response to the virus. at this macclesfield pharmacy, they are already well into the roll—out of the second jab to those most at risk, and health experts believe it is this combination of vaccinations and testing that will get us out of
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this pandemic. dominic hughes, bbc news, macclesfield. the uk's leading sports bodies are backing the use of "vaccine passports" and covid testing as a way of getting full crowds back. in a joint letter to the leaders of the major political parties, the group says a certification process could allow fans to return as quickly as possible. it warns that the system must not be discriminatory, and should protect privacy. the welsh government is speeding up the easing of its covid restrictions, as infection levels continue to drop. gyms will be allowed to reopen and people from two households can bubble up to meet indoors from 3rd may, instead of 10th may. the dates for reopening the hospitality industry have not changed. muslims who observe the islamic holy month of ramadan are being reassured that receiving a coronavirus vaccination will not break their fast. from monday evening, many will refrain from food and drink during daylight hours.
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harry farley reports. this islamic centre in birmingham is one of many places of worship that has been converted into a vaccine centre. for now, theirfocus has switched from saving souls to saving lives. there has been some debate among islamic scholars, but the majority now say that the covid vaccine does not break the fast. we know vaccine does not break the fast. - know that a lot of muslims are a bit concerned about having their covid vaccination during ramadan, and many people believe that having an injection actually breaks the fast, but it doesn't at all, because it's not considered nutrition, so it is absolutely fine to have the covid vaccination while we are fast and. ramadan will look different this year to normal. the british islamic medical association has issued guidance for how to celebrate safely. there have been fears about
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vaccine take—up among some ethnic minority groups, but there are signs initiatives like this in birmingham are having an impact. we initiatives like this in birmingham are having an impact.— initiatives like this in birmingham are having an impact. we know that between january — are having an impact. we know that between january and _ are having an impact. we know that between january and march, - are having an impact. we know that between january and march, there i are having an impact. we know that i between january and march, there has betweenjanuary and march, there has been an— betweenjanuary and march, there has been an increase in the optic of vaccination _ been an increase in the optic of vaccination in ethnic minority groups. _ vaccination in ethnic minority groups, and that's positive news, a lot of— groups, and that's positive news, a lot of that — groups, and that's positive news, a lot of that is — groups, and that's positive news, a lot of that is due to grassroots organisations and faith —based organisations and faith —based organisations going into the community is to dispel the myths and are-address — community is to dispel the myths and pre—address those concerns that the communities are having. but there is much _ communities are having. but there is much work_ communities are having. but there is much work to be done to make sure we continue _ much work to be done to make sure we continue with _ much work to be done to make sure we continue with this momentum. some vaccine sites — continue with this momentum. some vaccine sites will _ continue with this momentum. some vaccine sites will be _ continue with this momentum. some vaccine sites will be staying - continue with this momentum. fine vaccine sites will be staying open late during ramadan so muslims can come after they have eaten, but the message from nhs and islamic leaders is get the jab, even if you are fasting. is get the “ab, even if you are fastina. ., ., is get the “ab, even if you are fastina. ., ,, i. is get the “ab, even if you are fastina. ., ~' ,, . is get the 'ab, even if you are fastina. ., ~' . har fasting. thank you so much. harry farle , fasting. thank you so much. harry farley. bbc _ fasting. thank you so much. harry farley, bbc news. _ now the weather with sarah.
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good morning. a bit of a roller—coaster and the temperatures. we had a milder spell of weatherfor some of us yesterday, but once again, those temperatures are going to be plummeting through today and the next couple of days as well. in fact, into the weekend, colder conditions to returning from the north. some snow showers in the forecast particularly across scotla nd, forecast particularly across scotland, wet and windy weather in the south, and overnight frosts as well. so it is feeling quite wintry out there. a cold front working its way south today, bringing a line of cloud and showery rain across parts of central england and wales. to the north of that, colder air, with some sunshine and wintry showers, particularly across scotland some fairly heavy snow showers on quite a brisk northerly wind. temperatures around three to nine celsius most of us. up to about 11 in the south—east where there will be a little bit of sunshine into the afternoon stopped this evening and overnight, cloud and rain including from the south, and rain including from the south, and under those clear skies, it will be a cold night. minus four celsius evenin be a cold night. minus four celsius even in some of our towns and
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cities, colder than that in the countryside. a little bit milder towards the south, because we have more planned associated with this frontal system. that could well bring some fairly heavy rain across the far south—east of the day on saturday. elsewhere, sunshine, wintry showers, and it is not meant to feel particularly warm on saturday or sunday, i'm afraid. sarah, thanks very much, see you later. as bars and restaurants across england make preparations to reopen and welcome customers outdoors, some are looking for creative ways to keep punters warm and dry. but one landlord has fallen foul of government guidelines after he spent £50,000 on an outdoor dining area, only to be told it breaks the rules. will glennon has more. at the top of this pub garden in wiltshire, a structure called the chalet. 0wnerjason told me it had been specially designed and built during lockdown.—
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during lockdown. everything is locally sourced _ during lockdown. everything is locally sourced and _ during lockdown. everything is locally sourced and put - during lockdown. everything is. locally sourced and put together. the roof is breathable, annoyingly there is a slight condensation, but at least it shows that something can come through. it at least it shows that something can come through-— come through. it cost more than £50,000. — come through. it cost more than £50,000. but — come through. it cost more than £50,000, but with _ come through. it cost more than £50,000, but with less - come through. it cost more than £50,000, but with less than - come through. it cost more than £50,000, but with less than a i come through. it cost more than - £50,000, but with less than a week to go until he is allowed to reopen, jason has been told it breaks the rules. �* , , ,., jason has been told it breaks the rules. �* , , . ., rules. i've spent so much time and effort making _ rules. i've spent so much time and effort making indoors _ rules. i've spent so much time and effort making indoors and - rules. i've spent so much time and| effort making indoors and outdoors covid secure following every regulation. now not only is seated cable service two metres apart, they now say that over 50% of your internal space needs to be open—air, which is unfeasible for us to open. these are guidelines, not laws, but they can be enforced. the design is to stop the virus spreading, according to the local council. basically, it's pretty clear that structures can be put up, temporary
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shatters— structures can be put up, temporary shelters and marquees can be put up, but only— shelters and marquees can be put up, but only 50% of the wall area can be covered~ _ but only 50% of the wall area can be covered~ it _ but only 50% of the wall area can be covered~ it is— but only 50% of the wall area can be covered. it is certainly challenging in that— covered. it is certainly challenging in that we — covered. it is certainly challenging in that we want people to be enjoying _ in that we want people to be enjoying themselves in their local pubs, _ enjoying themselves in their local pubs, we — enjoying themselves in their local pubs, we want them to make sure that hospitality— pubs, we want them to make sure that hospitality venues can open, but they have — hospitality venues can open, but they have to open safely. that hospitality venues can open, but they have to open safely.- they have to open safely. that is bad news for _ they have to open safely. that is bad news for the _ they have to open safely. that is bad news for the chalet. - they have to open safely. that is bad news for the chalet. so - they have to open safely. that is bad news for the chalet. so the l bad news for the chalet. so the marquee in the beer garden has movable sides, it will probably be ok. this, although it has great airflow has solid sites, and probably doesn't meet the guidelines, meaning they won't be able to open this until the rules are relaxed further. it's another blow in what has been a very hard year. has blow in what has been a very hard ear. �* , ., blow in what has been a very hard ear, �* , ., , , , , blow in what has been a very hard ear. ,, ,, 2 blow in what has been a very hard ear. ,, ,, �*,, year. as a business, it's been terrible- _ year. as a business, it's been terrible- i— year. as a business, it's been terrible. ifeel_ year. as a business, it's been terrible. i feel for _ year. as a business, it's been terrible. i feelfor myself, - year. as a business, it's been terrible. ifeelfor myself, i. year. as a business, it's been l terrible. ifeelfor myself, ifeel terrible. ifeel for myself, ifeel for my suppliers. financially, it has been the worst, it is costing us thousands and thousands every month. so customers are much needed, but in pubs everywhere, structures like the chalet will be out in the cold for a
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little longer. will glennon, bbc news. as marquees go, that looked very nice. it did, but sadly, not within the regulations, there you go. let's take a look at today's papers. the daily telegraph reports on what the government's latest travel plans will mean for holiday—makers. it says even people who are fully vaccinated will have to pay for the more expensive pcr lab test on their return. the metro's front page is partly taken up by this striking image taken during another night of violence in belfast. we will bring you the latest on what happened last night throughout the programme this morning. some good news on the front of the sun as tv presenter kate garraway reveals her husband derek draper is back home after more than a year in hospital with coronavirus. and take a look at this — archaeologists have discovered, in their words, the "ancient egyptian pompeii."
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the city is believed to be the largest ancient city found in egypt, built more than 3,000 years ago. wow, that looks stunning. imagine uncovering all of that. i know. that is so much we don't know, isn't there? i like this story. it is very un—pc at the moment, you would never say this now. this pc here isjohn "tubby" stevens. he is believed to have inspired the 1922 musical hit the laughing policeman, which you will remember. he was seen on postcards and newspapers, and he was really well—known. when he died at age 1t0 8,000 of people lined the streets to remember him. he was really, really loved. this picture
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is 22—year—old dan challis, and coincidence of coincidences, john "tubby" stevens's police number, his collar number, was 23, and dan, who is his great—great—grandson, has been ordered the same colour number. so he has followed in the family footsteps. love to remember people of the community who made an impact. dan is the first in his family since pcjohn "tubby" stevens to join the leicestershire police. there will be some people who have never heard that song, the laughing policeman. look it up, it makes me laugh when i watch it. dan said he wants to live up watch it. dan said he wants to live up to debar his great—great—grandfather set, but but does not want to adopt his size. —— lived up to the bar. this is a study
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from the united states, an unreleased album by prince, you are on the inside track for this. they died five years ago, the new album is going on sale, new material called welcome to america. this was recorded in 2010, so going back sometime, and a lot of people, you probably knew this, he stashed away a lot of material that was literally put in kind of vaults, and is gradually being taken out, so this is material the body has had before. if you are a prince fan, one of the best musicians in the world, this is mega exciting. it is due out onjuly 30. even if you are not a prince fan, there is always some kind of curious fascination and music that is released after someone has passed away, because you kind of think, you heard what they have had to offer, then something new emerges. he was
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so innovative as well, that whatever comes out will feel new and of this time, just because he was... july 30 as the day of that release. coming up as the day of that release. coming up to 6.20, good morning. the body mass index, or bmi, has long been used to determine if someone is a healthy weight. but now there are calls for the government to scrap the phrase. mp5 on the women and equalities committee say it doesn't help people with eating disorders, and causes anxiety about body imagery, as breakfast'sjohn maguire has been finding out. what do you see when you look at yourself in the mirror, or in a photograph? what do others see? and is it important what they think? today's report by mps is it important what they think? today's report by mp5 on body image is wide ranging. everything from obesity policy to portrayal in advertising. obesity policy to portrayal in advertising-— obesity policy to portrayal in advertising. back in the day, i would have — advertising. back in the day, i would have edited _ advertising. back in the day, i would have edited most - advertising. back in the day, i would have edited most of. advertising. back in the day, i j would have edited most of my advertising. back in the day, i - would have edited most of my photos, and i wouldn't have taken a selfie without a filter, so i would just take a photo like this, and then my
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most common things that i used to do when i edited my photos was to smooth my skin.— when i edited my photos was to smooth my skin. there was a time that sasha — smooth my skin. there was a time that sasha would _ smooth my skin. there was a time that sasha would never _ smooth my skin. there was a time that sasha would never post - smooth my skin. there was a time that sasha would never post a - smooth my skin. there was a time i that sasha would never post a photo of herself without modifying it. i of herself without modifying it. i was come comparing myself to the images i would see online, kind of unaware of how much they were edited, and i became addicted to seeing myself in this way, so alive god is this incredible photo of me and my brother's graduation, but i've completely change my body, i have properly taken off a stone or two through editing. it makes me a bit sad. but two through editing. it makes me a bit sad. �* ., , two through editing. it makes me a bitsad. �* ., , ,., , two through editing. it makes me a bit sad. �* ., , ,., , ., bit sad. but now she complains for understand — bit sad. but now she complains for understand advertising _ bit sad. but now she complains for understand advertising online - bit sad. but now she complains for understand advertising online in i understand advertising online in whether or not pictures have been edited. ., ., , , ., ., edited. now i am seeing my favourite --eole i edited. now i am seeing my favourite peeple i have — edited. now i am seeing my favourite people i have followed _ edited. now i am seeing my favourite people i have followed for _ edited. now i am seeing my favourite people i have followed for years, - people i have followed for years, and i am seeing their real skin, wrinkles and pores, it's incredible, that will only have a positive effect on everyone else watching it as well. ., , . , effect on everyone else watching it as well. .,, ., , effect on everyone else watching it as well. ., , ., , , ., as well. hope has struggled with an eatin: as well. hope has struggled with an eating disorder _ as well. hope has struggled with an eating disorder since _
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as well. hope has struggled with an eating disorder since she _ as well. hope has struggled with an eating disorder since she was - as well. hope has struggled with an eating disorder since she was a - eating disorder since she was a young girl. eating disorder since she was a young girl-— young girl. people think it is a choice, young girl. people think it is a choice. it _ young girl. people think it is a choice, it is _ young girl. people think it is a choice, it is a _ young girl. people think it is a choice, it is a diet _ young girl. people think it is a choice, it is a diet gone - young girl. people think it is a | choice, it is a diet gone wrong, young girl. people think it is a i choice, it is a diet gone wrong, it is a teenage _ choice, it is a diet gone wrong, it is a teenage white girl's illness and somebody grows out of it, but actually _ and somebody grows out of it, but actually it — and somebody grows out of it, but actually it is a battle every single day. actually it is a battle every single da . ,, , ., ~ , actually it is a battle every single da. ,, , ., ~ day. she is thrilled that mps are callin: on day. she is thrilled that mps are calling on the — day. she is thrilled that mps are calling on the government - day. she is thrilled that mps are calling on the government to . day. she is thrilled that mps are i calling on the government to scrap the bmi, which is currently used to determine whether or not someone is healthy. determine whether or not someone is health . ., ., healthy. you cannot 'udge whether someone healthy. you cannot 'udge whether seeenem has h healthy. you cannot 'udge whether someone has an — healthy. you cannotjudge whether someone has an eating _ healthy. you cannotjudge whether someone has an eating disorder. healthy. you cannotjudge whether - someone has an eating disorder based on the _ someone has an eating disorder based on the bmi _ someone has an eating disorder based on the bmi. so we have to scrap it, we need _ on the bmi. so we have to scrap it, we need to— on the bmi. so we have to scrap it, we need to get rid of it. saul on the bmi. so we have to scrap it, we need to get rid of it.— we need to get rid of it. saul works to help fathers _ we need to get rid of it. saul works to help fathers improve _ we need to get rid of it. saul works to help fathers improve their - we need to get rid of it. saul works| to help fathers improve their health and fitness, but appreciates that what looks healthy on the outside can be very different on the inside. i would binge so heavily that... is a member being in the cinema with my brother, and i took three boxes of serial to the cinema, because that was a day that i was allowed to cram
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things in, which would damage me afterwards, four days i would be thinking about, what have i done? he welcomes the broadening of the debate. ., , ., welcomes the broadening of the debate. ., ,., ,.,, welcomes the broadening of the debate. ., ., debate. the reason i posted about this on social _ debate. the reason i posted about this on social media _ debate. the reason i posted about this on social media is _ debate. the reason i posted about this on social media is that - debate. the reason i posted about this on social media is that one i debate. the reason i posted about this on social media is that one of| this on social media is that one of my clients is a 32—year—old guy i have known for my whole life, pretty much, he told me he was bulimic, my first image in my head was that of a young teenage girl who didn't look very well, and that came into my head, their thoughts to myself, that's really wrong, that is to change it is notjust the thing that affects young girls, it is everyone and anyone. the affects young girls, it is everyone and anyone-— affects young girls, it is everyone and anyone. the mps' report also cites the impact _ and anyone. the mps' report also cites the impact of _ and anyone. the mps' report also cites the impact of lockdown - and anyone. the mps' report also cites the impact of lockdown and | and anyone. the mps' report also i cites the impact of lockdown and its after—effects. they call for a wholesale change in how we and the government think, act and speak about our bodies, both in terms of our physical and mental health. john maguire, bbc news. in response to this, a spokesperson for the department of health and social care has said,
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"we are committed to improving outcomes for those with "eating disorders and related mental health issues, "with record funding to expand dedicated services "in the community. "our approach is guided by the latest research "and emerging evidence." we will have more on that study throughout the programme this morning, because one way or another, it will affect a lot of people, body imagery, bmi specifically, whether the merits of that... if you have had thoughts on that, do let us know. coming upjust after 6.30 — ben will be live at gatwick airport, as we get more reaction to how the government plans to open holidays abroad from next month. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tarah welsh. children and young people are 'bearing the brunt�* of the pandemic —
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that's a warning from the the royal college of psychiatrists. the number referred for mental health support rose by more than a quarter in the last year. the head of the college is warning the demand for services is reaching breaking point. this weekend marks the 40th anniversary of the brixton riots, sparked by anger at the police against a backdrop of high unemployment. the riots saw buildings burned and police officers injured. alex wheatle was 18 at the time and says the uk is still in denial about racism. it felt like at last i could unleash the rage inside me that so many of us had, not just for that weekend but leading up to months and perhaps years, then almost daily persecuted and oppressed and feeling that you're not wanted in this country. as restrictions ease, some blind and visually—impaired people
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are concerned about how to navigate around restrictions. a recent survey by the royal national institute of blind people found that more than half weren't confident finding their way around new layouts. post lockdown, yes, i am nervous. i am nervous of the two—metre distance rule. i am nervous i cannotjudge distance, i am nervous i do not have 3d vision. i am now that i'm going to be breaking the rules and someone will shout at me and say, can you not see where you're going? let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on all tube lines but tfl rail is partly closed. there are delays on the heathrow express because of a fault on the track. there are queues building towards the blackwall tunnel from blackwall lane. in sutton: a21t stonecot hill remains closed because of a burst water main.
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now the weather. hello, good morning. a frost free start to the day across the capital the temperatures a good few degrees above freezing. some spells of brightness and a little bit about it and shine around for a time this morning, lasting longer toward southern areas because cloud will be beginning from the north and then eventually, but not until the end of the day, the southern home counties will see this band of showery rain made its way southwards. a cold front, behind it colder air. we are set to stay in the milderairfor much of the day. top temperatures in central london of 11, 12 celsius with a fairly gentle westerly breeze blowing. through this evening and overnight, a band of showery rain in place southwards to leave us with a mostly dry night to come that with plenty of cloud. tonight's lowest temperatures will be towards northern home counties. tomorrow there is a band of rain that will be pushing northwards from the near continent. we could see some of this at times
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again towards the south. there will be quite a lot of cloud. we are in the colder air and it will feel chilly with a cool, north—easterly wind. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. coming up on breakfast this morning... you've heard of the great escape, but how about the crate escape? we'll speak to the man who tried to post himself home to wales — all the way from australia back in 1965. going from one rollercoaster of a journey to the big dipper. we'll be live at blackpool pleasure beach as it celebrates 125 years of thrill seeking. and, just after 9 this morning, presenter ade adepitan will be here to tell us about his latest documentary exploring how communities around the world, affected by climate change, are tackling the issue.
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we're waiting to hear more detail about when and how foreign travel can resume. ben is at gatwick airport for us. good morning two years. there has been so much talk around foreign travel, holidays, how it will work, the practicalities. we are finding out how it might play out in practice. still many questions. still a lot of questions. here at gatwick the travel industry is pouring over the details we have had over the last few hours about how the scheme will work to get us lying again and back on holiday. we have some answers but not all. the government will use a traffic light system to categorise countries according to risk. if you are
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heading to orfrom a green according to risk. if you are heading to or from a green list country you will not need to quarantine that you will need to have a test before you go and when you get back. that is for countries on the greenness photo if you go somewhere on the amber list, you will need to quarantine at home for ten days and he will need to have a test before you go and when you get back once again. if you go to a redneck country, that is the full works. you will have to hotel quarantine. —— a red list country. you will need a test before and after. already lots of questions about whether that is affordable and whether only the richest and most wealthy people will be able to go abroad this year. i should also say the government is insisting on pcr tests, the more rigorous, more expensive tests rather than the cheaper lateral flow tests. you will
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have to book those arrangements it for you go on holiday. that is another thing to think about when you are having a summer getaway. the government also wants to introduce a green watchlist to try to avoid problems of last summer. countries leading into different categories and the rush back to get home before needing to quarantine. loads to die just and lots to think that if you are heading off for a holiday this summer. —— played to digest. what do you make of the new guidance, the new rules? it you make of the new guidance, the new rules? , you make of the new guidance, the new rules?— new rules? it is good news that we now have flying — new rules? it is good news that we now have flying opened _ new rules? it is good news that we now have flying opened up - new rules? it is good news that we now have flying opened up again, | now have flying opened up again, from _ now have flying opened up again, from the — now have flying opened up again, from the 17th of may at the earliest _ from the 17th of may at the earliest. this system is a good step forward _ earliest. this system is a good step forward. grant shapps has done a very good — forward. grant shapps has done a very good job to steer that through
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government. we will all welcome the fact if— government. we will all welcome the fact if you _ government. we will all welcome the fact if you are going to a country that is— fact if you are going to a country that is green, where there is low-risk. _ that is green, where there is low—risk, low levels of coronavirus, you will— low—risk, low levels of coronavirus, you will not — low—risk, low levels of coronavirus, you will not need to quarantine when you will not need to quarantine when you get— you will not need to quarantine when you get back. you are right to focus on the _ you get back. you are right to focus on the cost — you get back. you are right to focus on the cost of the tests. if you are a british— on the cost of the tests. if you are a british citizen, you have been fully— a british citizen, you have been fully vaccinated and you are going to somewhere low risk like israel or the united — to somewhere low risk like israel or the united states, not only will you need to— the united states, not only will you need to test before you get on the plane _ need to test before you get on the plane coming back to show you do not have covid _ plane coming back to show you do not have covid to — plane coming back to show you do not have covid to make you will then need _ have covid to make you will then need to — have covid to make you will then need to have an expensive pcr test when _ need to have an expensive pcr test when you _ need to have an expensive pcr test when you arrive most people will say that makes _ when you arrive most people will say that makes no sense. that is a £150 bill you _ that makes no sense. that is a £150 bill you are — that makes no sense. that is a £150 bill you are paying. there are far better— bill you are paying. there are far better ways of delivering on the prime _ better ways of delivering on the prime minister's promise of quick and easy— prime minister's promise of quick and easy testing we already use such as taking _ and easy testing we already use such as taking a _ and easy testing we already use such as taking a lateral flow test and only taking a pcr test if you are
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positive — only taking a pcr test if you are positive in_ only taking a pcr test if you are positive. in that case it is exceptionally unlikely. the government _ exceptionally unlikely. the government says - exceptionally unlikely. the government says it - exceptionally unlikely. tie: government says it wants to make sure it has a rigorous testing programme in place to avoid new variants. if we are all of travelling around the world we know different countries have different vaccination rates and there are different variants. this is the only way they say they are not brought back to the uk and spread in the uk. we all understand that. nobody wants to see _ we all understand that. nobody wants to see covid going back into the uk, which _ to see covid going back into the uk, which is _ to see covid going back into the uk, which is why— to see covid going back into the uk, which is why we have a traffic light system _ which is why we have a traffic light system. any medium risk country you will system. any medium risk country you wiii still— system. any medium risk country you will still had _ system. any medium risk country you will still had to quarantine for up to ten— will still had to quarantine for up to ten days and take a whole suite of tests _ to ten days and take a whole suite of tests. why, if you are fully vaccinated and coming back from a low risk— vaccinated and coming back from a low risk country where there are no variants _ low risk country where there are no variants of — low risk country where there are no variants of concerns which the government in its ownjudgment has said, government in its ownjudgment has said. why— government in its ownjudgment has said, why do you still need to take a £150 _ said, why do you still need to take a £150 pcr— said, why do you still need to take
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a £150 pcr test after you arrive? most _ a £150 pcr test after you arrive? most people would say that makes no sense _ most people would say that makes no sense we _ most people would say that makes no sense. we need to make sure travel becomes— sense. we need to make sure travel becomes something anyone can do and it's not— becomes something anyone can do and it's notjust _ becomes something anyone can do and it's notjust something for the wealthy _ it's notjust something for the wealthy. | it's notjust something for the wealth . ., ., ., ., ., wealthy. i want to ask about that. those tests _ wealthy. i want to ask about that. those tests between _ wealthy. i want to ask about that. those tests between £120, - wealthy. i want to ask about that. those tests between £120, £150 | wealthy. i want to ask about that. - those tests between £120, £150 each, in your view, is a family holiday, a family of four people, is that really likely? iiii family of four people, is that really likely?— family of four people, is that reall likel ? ., ., ,, really likely? if he had to spend £600 on a _ really likely? if he had to spend £600 on a pcr _ really likely? if he had to spend £600 on a pcr test _ really likely? if he had to spend £600 on a pcr test after- really likely? if he had to spend £600 on a pcr test after you i really likely? if he had to spend i £600 on a pcr test after you come back from _ £600 on a pcr test after you come back from a _ £600 on a pcr test after you come back from a green list country, i think— back from a green list country, i think that — back from a green list country, i think that will make it unaffordable for a lot— think that will make it unaffordable for a lot of— think that will make it unaffordable for a lot of hard—working people. why not — for a lot of hard—working people. why not allow them to have a lateral flow test? _ why not allow them to have a lateral flow test? that is updated in our health— flow test? that is updated in our health care system and our schools. why not _ health care system and our schools. why not do — health care system and our schools. why not do it for people coming back from overseas as well? they have already— from overseas as well? they have already taken a test before they go the plaintiffs to show they did they did not—
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the plaintiffs to show they did they did not have covid. it will be like overkill — did not have covid. it will be like overkill fulsome people. that can be changed _ overkill fulsome people. that can be changed very quickly. the prime minister— changed very quickly. the prime minister promised us cheap and quick testing _ minister promised us cheap and quick testing and _ minister promised us cheap and quick testing and that is what we need to see him _ testing and that is what we need to see him deliver. | testing and that is what we need to see him deliver.— testing and that is what we need to see him deliver. i wonder whether aq has had a chance _ see him deliver. i wonder whether aq has had a chance to _ see him deliver. i wonder whether aq has had a chance to look _ see him deliver. i wonder whether aq has had a chance to look through - has had a chance to look through this detail. there are a lot of questions about what we do not know. we do not know what countries will be on which list and how long the rules will be in place for. what official guidance on this and if he had had any from the government about how long these rules will be in place for? taste about how long these rules will be in place for?— about how long these rules will be in lace for? ~ ,, ., , in place for? we know the rules will be stepped — in place for? we know the rules will be stepped down — in place for? we know the rules will be stepped down over— in place for? we know the rules will be stepped down over that - in place for? we know the rules will be stepped down over that is - in place for? we know the rules will be stepped down over that is a - in place for? we know the rules will be stepped down over that is a very| be stepped down over that is a very sensible _ be stepped down over that is a very sensible step to take. there will be reviewed _ sensible step to take. there will be reviewed before the summer holidays at the _ reviewed before the summer holidays at the end _ reviewed before the summer holidays at the end ofjune and another in septemberand a further at the end ofjune and another in september and a further one in october— september and a further one in october stop that makes a lot of sense _ october stop that makes a lot of sense you _ october stop that makes a lot of
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sense. you can imagine, if vaccination levels improve around the world — vaccination levels improve around the world and risks start to reduce and people — the world and risks start to reduce and people get more confident in the uk, will— and people get more confident in the uk, will be _ and people get more confident in the uk, will be able to pull back some of these _ uk, will be able to pull back some of these very high levels of testing checks— of these very high levels of testing checks which have been put into place _ checks which have been put into place. that is a good approach the government has taken. liberty wants to see _ government has taken. liberty wants to see covid — government has taken. liberty wants to see covid brought in to overseas, the travel— to see covid brought in to overseas, the travel industry does not want to see that _ the travel industry does not want to see that -- — the travel industry does not want to see that. —— nobody wants. we need to see _ see that. —— nobody wants. we need to see safe _ see that. —— nobody wants. we need to see safe travel while keeping it affordable. ,., ., to see safe travel while keeping it affordable. ., ., , ., , affordable. good to tilt to you this morninu. -- is —— is good to talk to you this morning. the whole world looking at the guidance and whether summer holidays can go ahead this year. the cost of the pcr test could be prohibitive for some families. £600 when you get back before the one
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before you book a holiday in the first place. these rules applyjust to england. we are expecting further details about wales, scotland and northern ireland in due course. some of those points _ northern ireland in due course. some of those points that _ northern ireland in due course. some of those points that were _ northern ireland in due course. some of those points that were brought up will be discussed with grant shapps at 7:30am. now time for the sport. mike is on standby with news from the masters. we have talked a lot about the flowers and shrubbery. apt it isjustin rose who leads the way with a stunning opening round. he has led on four different occasions, a word of caution. maybe it will be fifth time lucky. that was fun, was howjustin rose reacted. the masters is in full swing at augusta back
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in its traditional spring position in the calendar. it was another disappointing opening round for rory mcilroy though, still looking to complete a career grand slam he finished on four over with some very wayward hitting. but england's rose has had the round of the day, this stunning approach shot on the 17th setting him up for a birdie and he finished his round on seven under par, that's four shots clear. you cannot win the golf tournament today, even with a 65. you cannot win it today, you can only probably lose it today. and i was very aware, being a couple over 37 that rings... i didn't hit the panic button yet but i researched just prior to that and ijust thought, if i can get myself back around even par, that would be a good day's work. manchester united have gone a long way to booking their place in the semi finals of the europa league. they beat granada 2—0 in their quarter final first leg in spain last night. marcus rashford got the first and then bruno fernandez converted a late penalty to put united in control of the tie.
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it looked like it was going to be a 1—0 but we gladly would take the second goal, of course. it is so vital away from home. we have created a good starting point for the next week's game for ourselves. it could be much tougher for arsenal though. they seemed to have pinched a late victory against slavia prague, with this goal from nicolas pepey but the czech side snatched an equaliser deep into added time, to leave the tie, in the balance ahead of next weeks away leg. it was a great opening day for sir alex ferguson at aintree, as the the grand national festival returned after last years' cancellation. the former manchester united manager had a share, in each of the first three winners. all eyes were on the 2 time national winner tiger roll, in the betway bowl chase, but he could only finish a very distant fourth as, clan des oboe, brought up the hatrick for ferguson, ridden by harry cobden and trained by paul nicholls. he came home 26 lengths clear. despite the absence of any fans, sir alex says it's the best day's racing he's had since getting
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involved in the sport 20 years ago. the world's most famous horse race — the grand national — is back tomorrow. there won't be any crowds but there will be plenty of interest, as a0 riders battle it out, including three who are aiming to become the first female jockey to win the race. one of them is tabitha worsley, and i've been to meet her. a lifelong dream is about to come true for tabatha. it is causing quite a stir on the family farm as she prepares to ruffle feathers by writing in the grand national. with her mum georgie can also her trainer, allowing her brother nervously every step of the way. than nervously every step of the way. in absolute quivering wreck. she will be chic white in the morning. there will be a bit of excitement as well.
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i think i will spend a lot of time sitting — i think i will spend a lot of time sitting down, absolutely terrifying. it is dream land, to be honest. i never— it is dream land, to be honest. i never thought they would have a runner _ never thought they would have a runner in — never thought they would have a runner in the grand national and certainly— runner in the grand national and certainly not written by tabatha. her daughter broke her back in a full on 2017 before jumping her daughter broke her back in a full on 2017 beforejumping back into the saddle. she full on 2017 before 'umping back into the saddle.— into the saddle. she has had in'uries into the saddle. she has had injuries over _ into the saddle. she has had injuries over the _ into the saddle. she has had injuries over the years. - into the saddle. she has had injuries over the years. you | into the saddle. she has had - injuries over the years. you want your— injuries over the years. you want your children to follow their dreams that i_ your children to follow their dreams that i wish— your children to follow their dreams that i wish he had taken at tiddlywinks. a that i wish he had taken at tiddlywinks— that i wish he had taken at tiddlywinks. that i wish he had taken at tiddl inks. ., ., , ., tiddlywinks. a lot of people would sa i am tiddlywinks. a lot of people would say i am silly- _ tiddlywinks. a lot of people would say i am silly. it _ tiddlywinks. a lot of people would say i am silly. it was _ tiddlywinks. a lot of people would say i am silly. it was one - tiddlywinks. a lot of people would say i am silly. it was one of- tiddlywinks. a lot of people would | say i am silly. it was one of those. i have had less full. plenty of jockeys are far worse off. i got backin jockeys are far worse off. i got back in three months and broke my collarbone. she back in three months and broke my collarbone. ,, ., ,, , back in three months and broke my collarbone— collarbone. she takes any pain for the team. collarbone. she takes any pain for the team- it _ collarbone. she takes any pain for the team. it includes _ collarbone. she takes any pain for the team. it includes her - collarbone. she takes any pain for the team. it includes her brotherl the team. it includes her brother and sister—in—law. this is what the grand national is all about, a tiny family staples taking on the elite of the sport. to not tell the horse
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to its base it is a rank outsider because it is in good form. == to its base it is a rank outsider because it is in good form. -- do not tell. because it is in good form. -- do not tell- we _ because it is in good form. -- do not tell. we are _ because it is in good form. -- do not tell. we are a _ because it is in good form. -- do not tell. we are a tiny _ because it is in good form. -- do not tell. we are a tiny little - because it is in good form. -- doj not tell. we are a tiny little yard. he has top flight form. he is only 100-1. �* ., he has top flight form. he is only 100-1. 1, ~ , he has top flight form. he is only 100-1. :, ~ , ., he has top flight form. he is only 100-1. , ., ., , ., 100-1. both 'ockey and horse had success 100-1. both jockey and horse had success over _ 100-1. both jockey and horse had success over the _ 100-1. both jockey and horse had success over the grand _ 100-1. both jockey and horse had success over the grand national. success over the grand national fences two years ago. and they repeat that in the big one, the grand national itself? —— can they repeat? it was cancelled last year and makes a return to the relief of everyone around, albeit without the crowds drawing them home. it is behind closed _ crowds drawing them home. it is behind closed doors. it is running the race — behind closed doors. it is running the race. whoever wins, there is always— the race. whoever wins, there is always an — the race. whoever wins, there is always an amazing story. whether it is a rags _ always an amazing story. whether it is a rags to— always an amazing story. whether it is a rags to riches story for the first— is a rags to riches story for the first female jockey. so is a rags to riches story for the first female jockey.— is a rags to riches story for the first female jockey. first female 'ockey. so many great tales. an first female jockey. so many great tales. an unbelievable _ first female jockey. so many greatj tales. an unbelievable opportunity for us as a family. to be doing it
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as a family, it makes it even more special. we will all be there together and a proper team. this is roof ou together and a proper team. this is proof you can _ together and a proper team. this is proof you can dream _ together and a proper team. this is proof you can dream about - together and a proper team. this is proof you can dream about stuff- together and a proper team. this is | proof you can dream about stuff and it can _ proof you can dream about stuff and it can actually happen, with my daughter~ _ it can actually happen, with my daughter. she said she would write in the _ daughter. she said she would write in the grand national since she was this high _ in the grand national since she was this high. sub in the grand national since she was this hiuh. ,, , ., this high. sub lieutenant has never fallen in a race. _ this high. sub lieutenant has never fallen in a race. to _ this high. sub lieutenant has never fallen in a race. to not _ this high. sub lieutenant has never fallen in a race. to not mention - this high. sub lieutenant has never fallen in a race. to not mention it l fallen in a race. to not mention it because they are a superstitious family. they will not be buying new outfits for the occasion.— outfits for the occasion. nothing new. it outfits for the occasion. nothing new- it will _ outfits for the occasion. nothing new. it will be _ outfits for the occasion. nothing new. it will be stuff _ outfits for the occasion. nothing new. it will be stuff that - outfits for the occasion. nothing new. it will be stuff that has - outfits for the occasion. nothing | new. it will be stuff that has been worn. if new. it will be stuff that has been worn- if we _ new. it will be stuff that has been worn. if we can _ new. it will be stuff that has been worn. if we can just _ new. it will be stuff that has been worn. if we can just get _ new. it will be stuff that has been worn. if we can just get round, i new. it will be stuff that has been worn. if we can just get round, it| worn. if we can just get round, it will be unbelievable. we cannot believe it is actually possible. whatever happens, they have already been celebrating this week with the arrival of a potential entry runner of the future. little felix only a week old, an absolute joy. we
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are not really here to talk about felix. it stood straight up. not galloping around that trotting round this table pretty much straightaway. that is quite rare. rachel blackmore, one of the favourites. tabatha is 100—1 on board sad lieutenants. anything can happen. —— sub lieutenant. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. the weather is throwing the safety reminders of winter. there were some cold weather on the way right the way through the weekend. this is a
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picture of the sky above surrey. clouds drifting around. through the day and into the weekend the main theme is things turning colder. there will be showers especially in scotland. if you have gardening plans, you might want to take note there are frosts on the way for the next few nights. a cold front is pushing its way slowly south across the uk stop there will be cold arctic wind in all parts of the uk and overnight. there will be cloud and overnight. there will be cloud and showery rain and central parts of england. through the north of that we are in the cold air mass. a frost and also some icy stretches around best thing. ac showers for northern ireland. sunshine in southern scotland and northern
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england. —— a showers. rain slowly sinking its way south. along the south coast in the menu should keep brighter and drier weather. some sunshine for the northern side of the weather front. 3—9 sunshine for the northern side of the weatherfront. 3—9 for sunshine for the northern side of the weather front. 3—9 for many of us. we could see ten, 11 in the south of england and wales. into the evening we will lose the cloud and patchy rain. more snow showers striding across the north of scotland. clear skies for many and a cold night ahead. a bit milder in the south. we had a weather front not far away. probably clearing away by the time he get to sunday. some uncertainty about how far north it will get. most likely we will see rain across kent, east sussex, perhaps essex could see drizzly rain
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as well. away from that clear skies and sunshine and wintry showers. some sleet and snow mixed in. temperatures for many of us in single figures. three saturday night and into san the rain will sweep away. —— three saturday night and into sunday. sunday probably will be the dryer day of the weekend. we will lose the wet weather. there will lose the wet weather. there will be more showers flowing in on the cold northerly winds which will be very hit and miss. some sleet and hill snow mixed in with the showers with is about six, 7 degrees. we could see temperatures about 10 degrees on the south coast. things will start to warm up next week. you do know that lead of people will be concerned about what is happening on monday. many people will have the
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tables outside. some will escape the rain but not everywhere. i think i will bring my hot water bottle. that is such a good idea. stylish potentially. who knows? as well as pubs, restaurants and retail shops, theme parks in england will be opening their doors once again this coming monday. and that includes blackpool pleasure beach, which this year celebrates its 125th anniversary. danjohnson is there for us this morning to see how preparations are going. good morning. yes, good morning. i have not been _ good morning. yes, good morning. i have not been here _ good morning. yes, good morning. i have not been here since _ good morning. yes, good morning. i have not been here since i _ good morning. yes, good morning. i have not been here since i was - good morning. yes, good morning. i have not been here since i was ten i have not been here since i was ten years old. i am as giddy and excited
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as i was down. just outside to kiss me quick tent. i do not think that it allowed under covid restrictions. i have the place all to myself. health and safety as well as covid measures. and i tall enough? yes, i think i am all right. i am going to ride on the ice blast. lots of things to make it covid secure. i have special permission because i am here on my own. why don't we get ready and you can have a look at how they have been getting things ready as is the last few days in preparations for monday morning? there is lots of work to do. a special year. 125 seasons people have been coming here to the pleasure beach. why don't you let at
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how they have been getting ready? blackpool, that without its crowds. it is not right, does not look itself. it has been the longest winter shutdown they have ever known. even during the first and second world war, the park remains open to entertain people. only covid has forced the business to close. blackpool�*s tower stands out as a blackpool's tower stands out as a happy _ blackpool's tower stands out as a happy memory. is blackpool's tower stands out as a happy memory-— blackpool's tower stands out as a happy memory. is how times have chanced. happy memory. is how times have changed- the _ happy memory. is how times have changed. the beaches _ happy memory. is how times have changed. the beaches where - happy memory. is how times have i changed. the beaches where packed happy memory. is how times have - changed. the beaches where packed a new seat is worse patronising. blackpool pleasure beach is ready. our managing director said there is a little bit of that pull in everybody. it holds a special place in herts. —— blackpool. i
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everybody. it holds a special place in herts. -- blackpool.— in herts. -- blackpool. i can hear 20, 30 times— in herts. -- blackpool. i can hear 20, 30 times a — in herts. -- blackpool. i can hear 20, 30 times a year. _ in herts. -- blackpool. i can hear 20, 30 times a year. that - in herts. -- blackpool. i can hear 20, 30 times a year. that is - in herts. -- blackpool. i can hear| 20, 30 times a year. that is quite in herts. -- blackpool. i can hear. 20, 30 times a year. that is quite a 'ourne . 20, 30 times a year. that is quite a journey- -- — 20, 30 times a year. that is quite a journey- -- i— 20, 30 times a year. that is quite a journey- -- i come _ 20, 30 times a year. that is quite a journey. -- i come here. _ 20, 30 times a year. that is quite a journey. -- i come here. i- 20, 30 times a year. that is quite a journey. -- i come here. i have - journey. -- i come here. i have alwa s journey. -- i come here. i have always loved — journey. -- i come here. i have always loved blackpool, - journey. -- i come here. i have i always loved blackpool, blackpool pleasure _ always loved blackpool, blackpool pleasure beach. it used to come here on family— pleasure beach. it used to come here on family holidays and has always come _ on family holidays and has always come since then. we call it our pleasure — come since then. we call it our pleasure beach family. a lot of people — pleasure beach family. a lot of people we know work here. the leasure people we know work here. the pleasure beach _ people we know work here. tie pleasure beach has been and by the same family for all of its 125 years. same family for all of its 125 ears. ., _ ., , years. -- owned by the same family. m dad years. -- owned by the same family. my dad started _ years. -- owned by the same family. my dad started here _ years. -- owned by the same family. my dad started here in _ years. -- owned by the same family. my dad started here in 1958 - years. -- owned by the same family. my dad started here in 1958 as - years. -- owned by the same family. my dad started here in 1958 as an i my dad started here in 1958 as an apprentice fitter. this was one of the first ride he worked on. my sister started him in 1982. the first ride he worked on. my sisterstarted him in 1982. i started in 1983. we have worked for three generations of the thomson family. we looked after the riots and facilities.—
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and facilities. what is it like? -- lzelackpool- _ and facilities. what is it like? -- blackpool. there _ and facilities. what is it like? -- blackpool. there are _ and facilities. what is it like? -- blackpool. there are big - and facilities. what is it like? -- blackpool. there are big rides. l and facilities. what is it like? -- | blackpool. there are big rides. it kee -s u- blackpool. there are big rides. it keeps up with — blackpool. there are big rides. it keeps up with the _ blackpool. there are big rides. it keeps up with the times - blackpool. there are big rides. it keeps up with the times and - blackpool. there are big rides. it. keeps up with the times and looks after its historical blackpool. the fl in: after its historical blackpool. the flying machines had been in the air since 190a. flying machines had been in the air since 1904. , , ., flying machines had been in the air since 1904-— since 1904. this is for forgetting our since 1904. this is for forgetting your tears- _ since 1904. this is for forgetting your tears- we _ since 1904. this is for forgetting your tears. we could _ since 1904. this is for forgetting your tears. we could all- since 1904. this is for forgetting your tears. we could all do - since 1904. this is for forgetting your tears. we could all do with | since 1904. this is for forgetting | your tears. we could all do with a bit of that — your tears. we could all do with a bit of that now. _ your tears. we could all do with a bit of that now. this _ your tears. we could all do with a bit of that now. this is _ your tears. we could all do with a bit of that now. this is the - your tears. we could all do with a bit of that now. this is the oldest | bit of that now. this is the oldest continuing operating ride in europe. it is probably the nearest we will get to flying anywhere in. this is lovely! getting things moving again still means more work and a few
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finishing touches. covid measures are still in place, including masks. all our staff are temperature tested daily and we had a natural flow testing of our staff as well but it is about giving customers and get assurances and confidence we are safe and good to go. i assurances and confidence we are safe and good to go.— safe and good to go. i looking forward to _ safe and good to go. i looking forward to having _ safe and good to go. i looking forward to having people - safe and good to go. i looking l forward to having people back? safe and good to go. i looking - forward to having people back? we're so excited. the _ forward to having people back? we're so excited. the whole _ forward to having people back? we're so excited. the whole team _ forward to having people back? we're so excited. the whole team here - so excited. the whole team here cannot wait- _ so excited. the whole team here cannot wait. i _ so excited. the whole team here cannot wait. i will— so excited. the whole team here cannot wait. i will go _ so excited. the whole team here cannot wait. i will go monday - so excited. the whole team here| cannot wait. i will go monday and wednesday. | cannot wait. i will go monday and wednesday-— cannot wait. i will go monday and wednesda. ., ~ ., wednesday. i cannot keep away from the lace. wednesday. i cannot keep away from the place. everyone _ wednesday. i cannot keep away from the place. everyone loves _ wednesday. i cannot keep away from the place. everyone loves coming - wednesday. i cannot keep away from the place. everyone loves coming to | the place. everyone loves coming to blackpooi _ the place. everyone loves coming to blackool. ., , , blackpool. here we go. this is where i aet blackpool. here we go. this is where i net to blackpool. here we go. this is where i get to make — blackpool. here we go. this is where i get to make a _ blackpool. here we go. this is where i get to make a fool— blackpool. here we go. this is where i get to make a fool of— blackpool. here we go. this is where i get to make a fool of myself. - blackpool. here we go. this is where i get to make a fool of myself. it - i get to make a fool of myself. it is high! and, my word!
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yes, this is ice blast. if i give roger as thumbs up, i am going to set up. i am beginning to regret breakfast. they have got me down as the tester to give the first ride little people are allowed in. i waited? here we go. not quite sure what to expect. —— are we good? i am about to experience full points fiveg. i am about to experience full points fiveg. iam beginning about to experience full points fiveg. i am beginning to regret having breakfast. —— 4.56. oh, my
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word! good morning. crikey, that is a way to wake up. filth. word! good morning. crikey, that is a way to wake up-— a way to wake up. oh, dan, is fantastic- _ a way to wake up. oh, dan, is fantastic. how— a way to wake up. oh, dan, is fantastic. how are _ a way to wake up. oh, dan, is fantastic. how are you? - a way to wake up. oh, dan, is fantastic. how are you? well. a way to wake up. oh, dan, is - fantastic. how are you? well done on decent language first thing in the morning putting up with that. seriously, had he really enjoyed that? iii seriously, had he really en'oyed that? , ., ., seriously, had he really en'oyed that? ., ., y, ., that? if you had only been to the ark and that? if you had only been to the park and has _ that? if you had only been to the park and has not _ that? if you had only been to the park and has not been _ that? if you had only been to the park and has not been on - that? if you had only been to the. park and has not been on anything more exciting than the swings for the last year, that really is a joke. i recommend it. very bracing. it roger can here ask again, and again. —— hear us. that will be such
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again. —— hear us. that will be such a delight, just round the corner for anyone who is going to go to a theme park. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tarah welsh. children and young people are "bearing the brunt" of the pandemic — that's a warning from the royal college of psychiatrists. the number referred for mental health support rose by more than a quarter in the last year. the head of the college is warning the demand for services is reaching breaking point. this weekend marks the 40th anniversary of the brixton riots, sparked by anger at the police against a backdrop of high unemployment. the riots saw buildings burned and police officers injured. alex wheatle was 18 at the time, and says the uk is still in denial about racism. it felt like at last
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i could unleash the rage inside me that so many of us had, not just for that weekend, but leading up for months and perhaps years of being almost daily persecuted and oppressed and feeling that you're not wanted in this country. some blind and visually—impaired people are concerned about how to navigate around restrictions. a recent survey by the royal national institute of blind people found that more than half weren't confident finding their way around new layouts. post lockdown, yes, i am nervous. i am nervous of the two—metre distance rule. i am nervous i cannotjudge distance, i am nervous i do not have 3d vision. i am nervous that i might be breaking the rules and someone will shout at me and say, "can you not see where you're going?" let's take a look at the travel situation now.
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there's a good service on all tube lines but tfl rail is partly closed. there are delays on the heathrow express because of a fault on the track. there are queues building towards the blackwall tunnel from blackwall lane. in sutton, a24 stonecot hill remains closed because of a burst water main. now the weather. hello, good morning. a frost free start to the day across the capital with temperatures a good few degrees above freezing. some spells of brightness and a little bit about early sunshine around for a time this morning, lasting longest towards southern areas because cloud will be thickening from the north and then eventually, but not until the end of the day, for southern home counties, we'll see this band of showery rain move its way southwards. a cold front, behind it colder air. we are set to stay in the milderairfor much of the day. top temperatures in central london of 11, 12 celsius with a fairly gentle westerly breeze blowing. through this evening and overnight, a band of showery rain clears southwards to leave us
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with a mostly dry night to come but with plenty of cloud. tonight's lowest temperatures will be towards northern home counties. tomorrow there is a band of rain that will be pushing northwards from the near continent. we could see some of this at times again towards the south. there will be quite a lot of cloud. we are in that colder air and it will feel chilly with a cool, north—easterly wind. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today — hopes for foreign holidays, but at a cost — the government announces plans to reopen international travel, but passengers will have to pay for covid tests. a traffic light system will be used to categorise countries based on risk, but with holidaymakers needing to buy a test, there's claims only the wealthy will be able to afford to travel. police respond with water cannon after coming under attack in belfast during another night of violence in northern ireland. rose is in full bloom at the masters. englishman justin rose was the star performer on the opening day at augusta, as he opened up a 4—shot lead, and is 7 under par. the man who flew halfway around the world by air mail, packed into a wooden crate.
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and after a slightly milder spell of weather over the past 24 hours or so, things turn cold are once again through today and into the weekend. some snow showers in the forecast. all the details in about ten minutes. good morning. it's friday the 9th of april. our top story — plans to reopen international travel for holidaymakers from england have been unveiled with a requirement to pay for coronavirus tests. the government has stopped short of saying if foreign trips can resume next month, but has outlined a so—called traffic light system, which will be used to categorise countries based on risk. for places on the green list, travellers will be asked to take a test before they return to england, and pay for a costly pcr test, typically £120, two days after arriving home. if you're coming to england from countries on the amber list you will also be asked
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to self—isolate for 10 days, and pay for a pcr test on days two and eight. and passengers from red list destinations will be required to pay for ten days in a quarantine hotel. the plans have been met with widespread frustration by the travel industry. here's our transport correspondent caroline davies. we may be dreaming of sunshine and summer getaways, but would you pay around an extra £100 per person when coming back from your trip overseas? the boss of easyjet isn't impressed at this part of the government's plan to reintroduce international travel in england. i think it's a blow to all travellers who were wishing to go and see friends and families and go on a holiday this summer, and i think particularly the concern why there are now two test systems in what they call the green category. today's report says that passengers coming from the lowest risk green rated countries will still need
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to take one of the more expensive pcr tests when they arrive back in england, and pay for it themselves, currently around £100 each. instead, the industry wants to use the quicker and cheaper lateral flow tests. the government says pcr testing will allow them to monitor positive cases and check for variants of concern. the report also says that if travel does go ahead, countries which will be on the green list will be announced in early may. there will be a watchlist for countries at risk of being changed to amber, and there will be new consumer rights for ticket refunds. the industry is already gearing up for international travel on the 17th of may. whether that will happen won't be confirmed either way until early next month. the flight simulators here are in use 24 hours a day, with pilots yearning to get back to the skies. for pilots, we as a group are tremendously looking forward to getting back in the air again. pilots don't want to be on the ground any more than aircraft want to be on the ground, and for us, we are really trying to respond to any pent—up demand
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so that we are fully ready to go when the government gives the green light on certain routes in the future. this announcement is not the grand reopening the industry was looking for, but after months of travel restrictions, the easing looks likely to take time. caroline davies, bbc news. then at gatwick airport. —— ben. i spoke rather tojon holland kla about his frustration that while some travel looks likely, it is not yet a green light for everybody to head off on holiday this summer. not least because of the pcr tests that will be required when people get back to the uk, the concern is that
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they are so expensive at about £150 each that if you are a family of four trying to get on holiday this summer, joe custer and extra £600 before paying for the flights, the hotel, or any of the rest of the holiday. a lot of reaction to that news this morning, airlines uk, the group that represents uk airlines, saying it does not represent a reopening of travel in any way. they say the insistence on expensive and unnecessary pcr tests means that people simply will not be able to travel. it poses an unsustainable burden on passengers. and i that has been reflected across the industry, because there are calls instead that if you have a positive lateral flow test, only then would you need to have a pcr test, rather than having to have both, this belt and braces approach that the government says is necessary to protect other variants getting back into the uk. caroline also mentioned the idea of a green watchlist as well, just being seen
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as a very valuable tool for the industry, because you may remember last summer there was a lot of concern about people being away, then the country that they were moving on to a different list, and therefore requiring a quarantine, and we saw that mad dash of people trying to get back from overseas destinations to beat the deadline. the idea of the watchlist is to prevent that, but nonetheless, i think the industry says yes, this is progress, but not the sort of opening up they would have wanted. ben, thanks very much, we will see later. we will be speaking to grant shapps about how that system might work at 7.30. there's been another night of rioting in belfast, with petrol bombs, fireworks and stones thrown at the police. officers used water cannon for the first time in six years in an attempt to restore order, as james reynolds reports. in belfast, the night was lit up.
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this latest unrest came on the nationalist side, not far from the wall separating the city's two communities. the police responded with water cannon, the first time they have done so in six years. the first minister says these scenes have taken northern ireland backwards. last night's clashes weren't on the same scale as wednesday, where rioters on the loyalist side hijacked and firebombed a bus. some of those gathered were in their early teens, far too young to remember the era of troubles that the 1998 good friday agreement pledged to end for good. history has shown very, very clearly in relation to northern ireland, one side acting on its own, whether it's within
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northern ireland or between the two governments or whatever, doesn't succeed. it only ever succeeds to bring peace and stability when both sides are working together. that's going to require joint action by government, it is going to require the assembly and the executive working really with a single voice. we join the british, the irish, the northern irish leaders in their calls for calm. we remain, as you heard us say before, steadfast supporters and prosperous northern ireland, in which all committees have a voice and all communities enjoy the gains of a hard—won peace. this is that the president has spoken to quite passionately in the past. the past itself is what overshadows this unrest. northern ireland's fractures now reach its younger generation. james reynolds, bbc news. our ireland correspondent chris page
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is in belfast this morning. many questions, one about how you stop the unrest in the immediate term, but also about what the wider questions. term, but also about what the wider cuestions. , ., . term, but also about what the wider cuestions. , .. ., questions. yes, the fact that the white house _ questions. yes, the fact that the white house has _ questions. yes, the fact that the white house has now— questions. yes, the fact that the white house has now added - questions. yes, the fact that the white house has now added its . questions. yes, the fact that the - white house has now added its voice to the calls for calm shows really just how these violent images are going right around the world, not the sort of image that northern ireland would want to be projecting internationally, that's for sure. as regards what is causing this unrest, well, most of the trouble so far has been happening in loyalist areas, and police have spoken about a sense of unease in those communities about, for example, the new brexit arrangements for northern ireland, the trade border, in essence, between this part of the uk and england scotland and wales, which the loyalists see as a road in the sense of britishness. there are other factors at play as well, that the police have been cracking down,
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criminal enterprises run by loyalist paramilitaries, and there was anger that prosecutors did not take action against senior sinn fein politicians last week for originally reaching —— allegedly breaching coronavirus restrictions to attend a funeral. deep divisions here at stormont and also for the british and irish governments.— also for the british and irish governments. , ., , governments. chris, thanks very much. from today, everyone in england has access to two rapid coronavirus tests a week, which can provide results in around 30 minutes. the lateral flow kits will be available at testing sites, pharmacies and through the post. here's our health correspondent dominic hughes. now available at your local pharmacy, lateral flow tests are the quick and easy way to tell if you are ill with coronavirus. they have already been rolled out in schools and many workplaces. they are also available as testing centres,
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online, or via work, and pharmacists say they can offer help and advice when needed. when the time come when tests need to be accessed, we are an obvious choice where you can go and get a test, get a quick result, and also if you have got any questions about the vaccine or the pandemic, it can all be answered in one setting. it takes only 30 minutes to get a result from a lateral flow test, which involves swabbing the throat and nose. it is believed to be test gives one false positive in every 1000, where someone is wrongly identified as having been infected with the virus, so people are being urged to follow up with a more reliable pcr test if they return a positive result. extra testing is not without its critics. some argue it is a waste of money unless people have more support to isolate when they have to. given more than a third of those who have the virus show no symptoms, ministers argue that testing remains an essential part of the response to the virus. at this macclesfield pharmacy, they are already well into the roll—out of the second jab
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to those most at risk, and health experts believe it is this combination of vaccinations and testing that will get us out of this pandemic. dominic hughes, bbc news, macclesfield. the uk's leading sports bodies are backing the use of "vaccine passports" and covid testing as a way of getting full crowds back. in a joint letter to the leaders of the major political parties, the group says a certification process could allow fans to return as quickly as possible. it warns that the system must not be discriminatory, and should protect privacy. the welsh government is speeding up the easing of its covid restrictions, as infection levels continue to drop. gyms will be allowed to reopen and people from two households can bubble up to meet indoors from 3rd may, instead of 10th may. the dates for reopening the hospitality industry have not changed.
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it's 7.12. the rspb annual garden birdwatch results are in. which student was the most observed bird in gardens? i were living at the obvious, pigeons? what about a robin? no, it was the tiny house sparrow, most observed in our gardens for a second year running. over a million people took part by watching birds for an hour as part of the big garden birdwatch. it's the world's largest wildlife survey. what about us that, anyone? i don't know what kind of bird it is. it is a pretty little bird. no
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ornithologists in this room. i was talking to someone at the other day who took part in the big bird—watcher event, and there was a specific time, his garden is always full of birds, that was likely birdwell had been told it was going on, they sat there waiting for the bird population to be there, as they always are, not a single bud. literally, almost like on the outcome of the clock ticked to the clock ticked to be time, nothing. word had got out. sarah, did you know what bird that was? i'm going to see a sparrow as well, because some of them are the little brown ones and some have little black masks on, so... you know infinitely more than me, so i am buying into whatever you just said. we have all been spending a bit more times in our gardens, and not as nature and the birds as well. my ten—year—old has been out spotting some sparrows in our gardens recently.
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if you have plans to get out and about over the weekend, where it will be mixed out there. things are turning colder once again, and some snow showers in the forecast particularly across parts of scotland. some wet and windy weather on the way in the south, and in return for overnight frost as well. cold air piling on from the north, whether from cold air piling on from the north, whetherfrom bringing a bit more cloud than some patchy showery rain to central and southern parts of a coming to wales as well, but to the north of that, some sunshine around, but more snow showers are specially across the northern half of scotland, even to low levels, so the snow falling, quite brisk northerly winds as well, three to nine celsius for most, can reach 11 or so in the far south. through this evening and tonight, patchy rain cleaning away from southern england. other under the clear skies, getting down to —4 evenin the clear skies, getting down to —4 even in towns and cities, cold in the countryside. high pressure setting out towards the west, this
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weather front across the near continent which will spill a bit more cloud into parts of south—east england in particular, and bringing a bit of rain. some uncertainty about how far not at all get, likely kent perhaps parts of east sussex as well. sunny spells in wintry showers elsewhere, it will not feel particularly warm, for most of us about five nine celsius. could just reach double figures towards the south. thank you, sarah, we will see you later on. the time is 7.16. "enough is enough". that was the message sent out by football club swansea city football club yesterday as they announced a week long social media boycott to combat online abuse. they were joined by birmingham city and rangers, as calls grow for companies to do more to tackle abuse on their platforms. swansea playerjamal lowe, who has been racially abused on social media, welcomed the move. obviously hopefully we can reach the platforms and make them make the first move, make it so you have to verify the accounts to be a part of the platforms.
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if everyone on twitter or instagram or facebook or wherever had to put their passport details in when they had an account, i'm sure half of them wouldn't post the stuff that they post. but it's just one of them, you're able to create an account in five minutes, post what you want, and then delete it, and it's untraceable. liverpool captain and england internationaljordan henderson, then announced that he was handing over control of his social media accounts to an anti—cyberbullying charity. over the past few years, i've seen some of me friends, team—mates, other players, people within football, out of football, the wider society, suffer some horrendous abuse online, and still i don't really see much changing. again last night, some of me team—mates were racially abused online after a football match, and to me, that's just unacceptable. the anti—cyberbullying charity that jordan henderson hasjoined forces with is called the
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cybersmile foundation, and founder scott freeman joins us now. good morning. it is interesting, i wasjust good morning. it is interesting, i was just listening to jamal say earlier, make them make the first move. this is about the social media companies and how much protection is being offered. would they? yeah. companies and how much protection is being offered. would they?— being offered. would they? yeah, i think it is complex _ being offered. would they? yeah, i think it is complex because, - being offered. would they? yeah, i think it is complex because, when. being offered. would they? yeah, i. think it is complex because, when we think it is complex because, when we think about social media companies, there is so many more than just a handful we see primarily in the news. i think social media companies need to do more, i think they will actually be the first people to accept that they need to do more, but it is such a massive undertaking on a global level for these platforms that, you know, it's a
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goal, and it can be achievable, but there's a lot more to do in terms of education and awareness raising, it is notjust about building bigger walls, it is about people being nicer to each other, understanding the impact they are having, being educated, having empathy, it is a much bigger issue. so educated, having empathy, it is a much bigger issue.— educated, having empathy, it is a much bigger issue. so what feedback have ou much bigger issue. so what feedback have you had — much bigger issue. so what feedback have you had from _ much bigger issue. so what feedback have you had from social— much bigger issue. so what feedback have you had from social media - have you had from social media companies? because this is something we have spoken about a lot. the culture secretary oliver dowden said this is complex, we must get it right, he is absolutely determined to tackle racist abuse online. this isn'tjust to tackle racist abuse online. this isn't just about racism, to tackle racist abuse online. this isn'tjust about racism, this is about billing, this is about trolling, this is about picking up on some trend and not letting it go, and someone has pointed out, anonymous accounts created and then deleted once the hatred and vitriol has been put out there. what is actually going to be done? we
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has been put out there. what is actually going to be done? we are an educational and _ actually going to be done? we are an educational and support _ educational and support organisation, so for us, our main aim is to educate people how to protect themselves online, and to support people that are affected by these issues. 50 support people that are affected by these issues-— these issues. so it interrupts, isn't that _ these issues. so it interrupts, isn't that the _ these issues. so it interrupts, isn't that the problem? - these issues. so it interrupts, isn't that the problem? that. these issues. so it interrupts, - isn't that the problem? that people are online and now having to be taught to protect themselves rather than not actually being there in the first place? that is the point, isn't it? the social media companies, there should be some way off preventing it from being there in the first place and preventing anyone from being exposed to it. yeah, i think for a few years, there has been movement to give people the tools to be in control of their own feeds, which is one of the things platforms do, so you have got filters, blocks, the ability to delete comments and manage comments, that it's something that has been ruled out. so they are giving people more and more control, but absolutely, if you can educate
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people forever, but you're still going to get a number of people who are intent on hatred and affecting people's lives, and it does need to be a larger strategy to address that, and whether that is things like identity verification, tougher laws, i would like identity verification, tougher laws, iwould imagine like identity verification, tougher laws, i would imagine this is a combination of all of them. it has not to the combination of all of them. it has got to the point — combination of all of them. it has got to the point where _ combination of all of them. it has got to the point where swansea i combination of all of them. it has got to the point where swansea city have announced all players and staff are going social media for a week, we have had very high profile individuals leave social media, there has even been talk that gareth southgate has suggested england players could adopt a social media blackout at this summer's euros. that is what this means now, isn't it? that is the message that gets through. it it? that is the message that gets throu~h. , ., ., ., , through. it is one way of raising awareness _ through. it is one way of raising awareness of _ through. it is one way of raising awareness of the _ through. it is one way of raising awareness of the issue, - through. it is one way of raising awareness of the issue, yes, i through. it is one way of raising | awareness of the issue, yes, the message gets through and gets the attention of the media. but in the same way, jordan henderson reached out to us and said, i want to make a difference, he is in tune with the
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power of his platform, he has got about 10 million followers, and thanks to... she was intending to pull his accounts, or considering it, thanks to working with us, just yesterday between 3pm and midnight, the data came through, 13,000 people have access to an interactive module to learn how to take control of their feeds on instagram, to learn how to take control of theirfeeds on instagram, how to block out was that they don't want on their feet, block out was that they don't want on theirfeet, how block out was that they don't want on their feet, how to delete comments. things that some users already know exist, and many users don't know that they have that power. so there is power in the kind of boycotting, there is also power in using the platform to raise awareness, give people support links, promote the real life impact that this is having on people, because quite a high number of people have no idea how deeply this kind of bullying and abuse is
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affecting people, because you've got to be very bad criminal toxic abuse, hate speech, there is laws in place for that, though rooms to be tougher enforcement of them, then you've also got those grey areas of abuse which are beyond opinion, that is the area that is really difficult to define and manage for everyone. scott freeman, founder of the cybersmile foundation, thank you very much for talking to us this morning. very much for talking to us this morninu. ., �* _, very much for talking to us this | morning._ let's very much for talking to us this - morning._ let's pick morning. you're welcome. let's pick u n morning. you're welcome. let's pick u- some morning. you're welcome. let's pick up some of— morning. you're welcome. let's pick up some of those _ morning. you're welcome. let's pick up some of those thoughts - morning. you're welcome. let's pick up some of those thoughts with - morning. you're welcome. let's pick up some of those thoughts with the | up some of those thoughts with the shadow home secretary. we're joined by shadow home secretary nick thomas—symonds. have you had experience personally of the kind of stuff we're talking about, the vitriol, the abuse on social media, and what has been the effect on you? because i think it helps to know sometimes that politicians know that this is about
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personally. politicians know that this is about ersonall . �* . ., , politicians know that this is about ersonall . �* . . , ., politicians know that this is about ersonall. . . , ., , personally. i've certainly had abuse in the time — personally. i've certainly had abuse in the time that _ personally. i've certainly had abuse in the time that i've _ personally. i've certainly had abuse in the time that i've been _ personally. i've certainly had abuse in the time that i've been on - personally. i've certainly had abuse in the time that i've been on social| in the time that i've been on social media. it is never a pleasant experience, it is an awful experience, it is an awful experience for anybody. i have listened carefully then to your piece, and i have a lot of somebody with what footballers and football clubs were saying, because we do have an issue around behaviour on social media. the government has been promising an online harm spill for a number of years now, and that needs to be brought forward to the house of commons urgently. —— online harm is bill. what we need is to have in place an actual set of laws that put a duty on platforms to regulate themselves to remove harmful content, and if they fail to do so, to have a stringent system of penalties in place. it is interesting, _ penalties in place. it is interesting, the - penalties in place. it is. interesting, the swansea penalties in place. it is interesting, the swansea footballer we had from a moment ago, jamal lowe, he was saying, why not have
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verified accounts? so before you have an account, you have to put in your passport details. if you were in government, would you consider that kind of approach? it may be simplistic, i know people can go to other places, but do you think that is a place for that kind of approach?— is a place for that kind of auroach? ., ., approach? we do need a system whereby people _ approach? we do need a system whereby people can _ approach? we do need a system whereby people can be - approach? we do need a system whereby people can be held - approach? we do need a system whereby people can be held to i whereby people can be held to account for their online behaviour, just as they would be if they hold abuse like that on our streets. clearly there is a complexity to it, there may well be part of the world where there are oppressive regimes that we would want people to speak out on social media, that the reviewing of their identity would put them in danger with that regime. what about on a uk basis? i'm just going to clarify what you would do, the areas that you would consider. i take your point internationally that is a slightly different question, but domestically, is that something, the idea of someone having to prove
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who they are before they are allowed to have an account via something like a passport. would you go down that path if you were in government? that kind of pathway where people can be held to account, yes, we would. as i say, that is an issue around whistle—blowers and protecting identity in certain circumstances that you would have to build on, but that accountability would be central to the approach of a liberal government, as would be ensuring that we've put self—regulation behind us, it's not working, making sure too that platforms have a duty to the that harmful content within a period of time, and then to make sure that you have the penalties in place. we do need that regime, and the government should be bringing the online harms bill forward as a matter of urgency. the information we are getting about international travel, holidays, the information we are getting about internationaltravel, holidays, is internationaltravel, holidays, is in what we are talking about, but concerns do you have about the green
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light system, and the requirement of people from a low—risk country that when they come back, they have to have a pcr test at a cost of somewhere between hundred £150 —— £120 to £150. the somewhere between hundred £150 -- £120 to £150-— somewhere between hundred £150 -- £120 to £150. the government has not outlined this — £120 to £150. the government has not outlined this in _ £120 to £150. the government has not outlined this in detail, _ £120 to £150. the government has not outlined this in detail, it _ £120 to £150. the government has not outlined this in detail, it has _ outlined this in detail, it has spoken about factors like vaccination rates, infection rates, the position with variants in the level of genomic sequencing, but i have no idea what the levels of each of those are for the government to place countries into whether it is a green category, amber or red, and instead what we have had this week once again is the system of being drip fed into the media day by day. we then have it announced on a day when parliament isn't setting, so we cannot go to the commons and ask whether the home secretary of the transport secretary to set out the details of this. that is extremely
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frustrating, particularly on a day when it has emerged that 150,000 people since the government introduced the very limited form of hotel quarantine on the 15th of february have entered the country who are totally unaccounted for. so rather than learn from one ad hoc drip fed announcement to another, the government needs to get those protections right on our borders now, particularly the contents of system of hotel quarantine, in order to enable that opening up. that fiuure, to enable that opening up. that figure, 150,000, _ to enable that opening up. that figure, 150,000, whether you caught putting that figure from? —— where are you courting that figure from? the isu, the immigration service union, estimates that around about 800,000 people have entered the country. the government is only accounting for 640,000 at the moment. that is where the figure comes from, it is in the media this morning, that is extraordinarily worrying, that is happening because only 1% of people coming into this
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country are subject to hotel quarantine. it should be comprehensive. and secondly, the home quarantine and we know that the government is only checking a tiny proportion of those people to ensure they are quarantining. so the system we have, the protection of the border right now is not working, the government has to focus on those because we all want the hope of holidays abroad later in the year, but they have to get the protections of our border right now. fiur but they have to get the protections of our border right now.— of our border right now. our time is u -. of our border right now. our time is u. can of our border right now. our time is up- can very — of our border right now. our time is up- can very simple _ of our border right now. our time is up. can very simple question, - of our border right now. our time is up. can very simple question, have| up. can very simple question, have you booked a holiday? i up. can very simple question, have you booked a holiday?— you booked a holiday? i have not booked a holiday _ you booked a holiday? i have not booked a holiday abroad - you booked a holiday? i have not booked a holiday abroad at - you booked a holiday? i have not booked a holiday abroad at the i booked a holiday abroad at the moment. ., �* , , booked a holiday abroad at the moment. . h , . .~' moment. that's fine, 'ust checking. thank you. — moment. that's fine, 'ust checking. rhankyou. gooo _ moment. that's fine, 'ust checking. thank you, good to — moment. that's fine, just checking. thank you, good to chat _ moment. that's fine, just checking. thank you, good to chat to - moment. that's fine, just checking. thank you, good to chat to you - moment. that's fine, just checking. thank you, good to chat to you this | thank you, good to chat to you this morning. we will be speaking to transport secretary grant shapps in a few minutes. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tarah welsh. this weekend marks the 40th anniversary of the brixton riots.
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sparked by anger at the police against a backdrop of high unemployment. the riots saw buildings burned and police officers injured. alex wheatle was 18 at the time and says the uk is still in denial about racism. it felt like at last i could unleash the rage inside me that so many of us had, not just for that weekend, but leading up for months and perhaps years of being almost daily persecuted and oppressed and feeling that you're not wanted in this country. some blind and visually—impaired people are concerned about how to navigate around new restrictions. a recent survey by the royal national institute of blind people found that more than half weren't confident finding thier way around new layouts. post lockdown, yes, i am nervous. i am nervous of the two—metre distance rule. i am nervous i cannotjudge distance, i am nervous i do not have 3d vision.
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i am nervous that i might be breaking the rules and someone will shout at me and say, "can you not see where you're going?" friends of a father of two, who died from covid, have been raising money to fulfil one of his final wishes. femi yussuff had promised his young sons that he would redecorate their bedrooms. now his family and colleagues have raised more than five thousand pounds towards the project. it is so touching that they could even think back about about those thoughts and discussions they had at the time and they want to be able to do something as nice as that for the boys as well, we are touched by it. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service
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on all tube lines but tfl rail is partly closed. there are queues building towards the blackwall tunnel from blackwall lane. now the weather with elizabeth. hello, good morning. a frost—free start to the day across the capital with temperatures a good few degrees above freezing. some spells of brightness and a little bit of early sunshine around for a time this morning, lasting longest towards southern areas because cloud will be thickening from the north and then eventually, but not until the end of the day, for southern home counties, we'll see this band of showery rain move its way southwards. a cold front, behind it colder air. we are set to stay in the milderairfor much of the day. top temperatures in central london of 11, 12 celsius with a fairly gentle westerly breeze blowing. through this evening and overnight, our band of showery rain clears southwards to leave us with a mostly dry night to come but with plenty of cloud. tonight's lowest temperatures will be towards northern home counties. tomorrow there is a band of rain that will be pushing northwards from the near continent. we could see some of this at times again towards the south. there will be quite a lot of cloud. we are in that colder air and it will feel chilly with a cool,
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north—easterly wind. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. plans to allow people in england to go on foreign holidays have been unveiled with a requirement to pay for coronavirus tests. the government has outlined a so—called traffic light system, which will be used to categorise countries based on risk. for places on the green list, travellers will be asked to take a test before they return to england, and pay for a pcr test, which typically cost £120, two days after arriving home. if you're coming to england from countries on the amber list will also be asked to self—isolate for 10 days, and pay for a pcr test on days two and eight. and passengers from red list destinations will be
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required to spend ten days in a quarantine hotel. we're joined now by the transport secretary grant shapps. good morning. good morning. are you comfortable — good morning. good morning. are you comfortable with _ good morning. good morning. are you comfortable with this _ good morning. good morning. are you comfortable with this system - good morning. good morning. are you comfortable with this system being i comfortable with this system being firmly in place? it is comfortable with this system being firmly in place?— firmly in place? it is a framework for people _ firmly in place? it is a framework for people at _ firmly in place? it is a framework for people at the _ firmly in place? it is a framework for people at the moment. - firmly in place? it is a framework for people at the moment. we i firmly in place? it is a framework| for people at the moment. we do firmly in place? it is a framework- for people at the moment. we do not know what countries are in which category, we need to rent nearer the time. we cannot travel at all until 17th of may. this is the framework, red, amber, green. we know how each of these systems will work. there is also a green watchlist. if we have concerns about a country and eight coronavirus variant we are worried about, we should be able to give
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notice, that is a game this year to prevent the quick changes. with coronavirus you can never rule that out. ~ ., , coronavirus you can never rule that out. . . , . ., ., ., out. what will be the criteria for a count ? out. what will be the criteria for a country? level— out. what will be the criteria for a country? level of _ out. what will be the criteria for a country? level of infections - out. what will be the criteria for a country? level of infections and i out. what will be the criteria for a i country? level of infections and the level of vaccinations. _ country? level of infections and the level of vaccinations. we _ country? level of infections and the level of vaccinations. we are - country? level of infections and the level of vaccinations. we are now i level of vaccinations. we are now over 60% of adults vaccinated in this country. we had to wait for other countries to catch up. variance of concern is the main thing we are worried about. we do not want to find out we have ended up not want to find out we have ended up with new variants coming in. then the quality of testing, gene sequencing. i think the uk g nine sequence is half of the world's coronavirus sequencing. —— blackpool
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sequence. they are the four factors that will be looked at and that will help to categorise where a country is on a traffic light system. past is on a traffic light system. post arrival tests _ is on a traffic light system. post arrival tests are _ is on a traffic light system. post arrival tests are pcr _ is on a traffic light system. post arrival tests are pcr tests. - is on a traffic light system. post arrival tests are pcr tests. on average they range from £65 to £200 per test. why have you chosen this costly option compared with lateral flow tests on arrival? hate costly option compared with lateral flow tests on arrival?— flow tests on arrival? we will keep all of that under _ flow tests on arrival? we will keep all of that under review. _ flow tests on arrival? we will keep all of that under review. the - flow tests on arrival? we will keep all of that under review. the pcr i flow tests on arrival? we will keep| all of that under review. the pcr is the gold standard test, it will be processed further to look at things like variants of concern was that it is important to proceed with utmost caution. that is why we have testing at all. i am concerned about the cost of these. they are provided by private providers. we like to see the cost driven down. i am going to
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work between now and the 17th of may, the earliest date for international travel to resume, with the private sector and to see if this price can be brought down. we will take a close look at that. ioiroihozit will take a close look at that. what do ou will take a close look at that. what do you think _ will take a close look at that. what do you think would _ will take a close look at that. what do you think would be _ will take a close look at that. what do you think would be an _ will take a close look at that. what do you think would be an acceptable or reasonable price? it is do you think would be an acceptable or reasonable price?— or reasonable price? it is a technology- _ or reasonable price? it is a technology. you _ or reasonable price? it is a technology. you are - or reasonable price? it is a | technology. you are paying or reasonable price? it is a - technology. you are paying for the lab service and the rest of it. it seems surprising, particularly higher and test. i would think it would be half the price by now. do ou would be half the price by now. do you think £100 would be reasonable? £65 to £200. you think £100 would be reasonable? £65 to £200-— £65 to £200. overall the price should be _ £65 to £200. overall the price should be lower. _ £65 to £200. overall the price should be lower. i— £65 to £200. overall the price should be lower. i am - £65 to £200. overall the price should be lower. i am looking| £65 to £200. overall the price i should be lower. i am looking at what is happening in as a country. i
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notice a very big variation. we are committed to work to drive costs down and in time with the type of tests. there is a predeparture test. pre—departure from there you are overseas. we are looking at whether people can take their own tests with them. people can take lateral flow tests and order them online right now. ~ ., tests and order them online right now. . ., ., ,, ~ tests and order them online right now. . . ., y., 4' , tests and order them online right now. . ., ., ~ now. what do you think is a reasonable _ now. what do you think is a reasonable cost _ now. what do you think is a reasonable cost of - now. what do you think is a reasonable cost of a - now. what do you think is a reasonable cost of a test? . now. what do you think is a i reasonable cost of a test? you now. what do you think is a - reasonable cost of a test? you know where i am going with this. i'm a little four could be looking at up to £800 at the higher end, what do you think is a reasonable cost for a family of four who has had a holiday which has been rebooked? what do you think is reasonable? first which has been rebooked? what do you think is reasonable?— think is reasonable? first of all, i
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wish there _ think is reasonable? first of all, i wish there was _ think is reasonable? first of all, i wish there was not _ think is reasonable? first of all, i wish there was not a _ think is reasonable? first of all, i wish there was not a cost - think is reasonable? first of all, i wish there was not a cost at - think is reasonable? first of all, i wish there was not a cost at all. . wish there was not a cost at all. there is, that is the nature of the pandemic. it there is, that is the nature of the -andemic. , there is, that is the nature of the pandemic-— pandemic. it is easy to forget the oandemic pandemic. it is easy to forget the pandemic is _ pandemic. it is easy to forget the pandemic is still _ pandemic. it is easy to forget the pandemic is still raging _ pandemic. it is easy to forget the pandemic is still raging in - pandemic. it is easy to forget the pandemic is still raging in other i pandemic is still raging in other parts of the world. i do not know the scientifically valid cost. the higher end should be driven down by perhaps a more competition in the marketplace. i cannot give an exact figure but i know is that tests are coming out too expensive and we are trying to drive down. in this pandemic we do have to take every single possible precaution. we will keep the requirements in place for the green, amberand red keep the requirements in place for the green, amber and red categories under constant review as the situation changes. i hope our neighbours in europe, where a lot of people might be travelling, as they catch up with the level, the proportion of the population vaccinated, there are risks to
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decline. we have three specific checkpoints in june, decline. we have three specific checkpoints injune, july decline. we have three specific checkpoints in june, july and october. ., , , ., ., checkpoints in june, july and october. ., , ., ., october. you will be very aware of how people _ october. you will be very aware of how people feel — october. you will be very aware of how people feel at _ october. you will be very aware of how people feel at the _ october. you will be very aware of how people feel at the moment, i october. you will be very aware of - how people feel at the moment, some people are desperate to get on holiday, read that holidays. have struggled financially. you are aware of this. you know what it costs to go on holiday. what looks reasonable for this government to say to us, we are in a pandemic, this is a reasonable amount to go on holiday? i would love for that to be no cost. you have said that. i i would love for that to be no cost. you have said that.— you have said that. i know you are drivin: you have said that. i know you are driving me — you have said that. i know you are driving me for— you have said that. i know you are driving me for the _ you have said that. i know you are driving me for the exact _ you have said that. i know you are driving me for the exact price. - you have said that. i know you are driving me for the exact price. we | driving me for the exact price. we are going to see what that can be driven down to and i am committed to making that happen. there are
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additional costs involved because of coronavirus and people will make decisions about whether or not to go abroad on the back of that. families have been separated all this time. the office of national statistics says that of children have at least one parent born overseas. families in the uk are uniquely spread across the world and a lot of those families will not see each other for months. we have this domestic unlock on monday. we want to make sure people can rejoin their families. that is more depressing than the holiday issue.— holiday issue. with that borne in mind and your — holiday issue. with that borne in mind and your consciousness i holiday issue. with that borne in mind and your consciousness of| holiday issue. with that borne in - mind and your consciousness of how difficult it is for these families, what about the government subsidising the costs for the pcr tests? ., ., , , subsidising the costs for the pcr tests? ., . , , . subsidising the costs for the pcr tests? ., ., , , . ., tests? you are focusing very much on the tests when _ tests? you are focusing very much on the tests when people _ tests? you are focusing very much on the tests when people come - tests? you are focusing very much on the tests when people come back. i tests? you are focusing very much on the tests when people come back. at| the tests when people come back. at
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the tests when people come back. at the moment there is very little travel going on. in the future there is also a requirement for a predeparture test when coming into the uk. we are going to look at the bring your own model. you could take lateral flow test. that bring your own model. you could take lateral flow test.— lateral flow test. that is that end. this and is — lateral flow test. that is that end. this and is the _ lateral flow test. that is that end. this and is the pcr _ lateral flow test. that is that end. this and is the pcr test. - lateral flow test. that is that end. this and is the pcr test. that - lateral flow test. that is that end. this and is the pcr test. that is i this and is the pcr test. that is another chunk of the cost. that could potentially remove the cost for the predeparture test. when people come home, we will be driving down the cost to get to a cheaper test. ., ,., down the cost to get to a cheaper test. . ,., just down the cost to get to a cheaper test-_ just let - down the cost to get to a cheaper test._ just let me | test. on that point... just let me sa this. test. on that point... just let me say this- i _ test. on that point... just let me say this. i would _ test. on that point... just let me say this. i would love _ test. on that point... just let me say this. i would love it - test. on that point... just let me say this. i would love it if - test. on that point... just let me say this. i would love it if we - say this. i would love it if we could get to the point where we could get to the point where we could use a lateral flow test when people come home and not to have a test at all. that is why we have different viewpoints in place. we do not want to have people bringing
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home variants of concern. your view is the degree that we have been through too much to not be cautious in return. —— your theories would agree. in return. -- your theories would aoree. y in return. -- your theories would aoree. g , ., , in return. -- your theories would aoree. g ,. , ., ., agree. my understanding is not what tablet will face _ agree. my understanding is not what tablet will face come _ agree. my understanding is not what tablet will face come may _ agree. my understanding is not what tablet will face come may the - agree. my understanding is not what tablet will face come may the 17th, i tablet will face come may the 17th, is that date is put forward as the time people can travel abroad. the bi time people can travel abroad. tie big difference today, up until now, when you have had me on the last two months, do not book a holiday, it is illegal to go away. it is probably the first time i could come on and say i am not advising people to go away in the summer, i am saying you will have the list of green, amber and red and people can take their
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own decisions, looking carefully at travel policies and refunds. that has improved a lot since last year. airlines have much better policies in place for refunds and aged a year ago. people will be able to take more informed choices this is what the fray m. —— dan day did a year ago. i the fray m. -- dan day did a year aoo. ~' , ago. i think everything might chance? ago. i think everything might change? we _ ago. i think everything might change? we had _ ago. i think everything might change? we had not - ago. i think everything might i change? we had not published ago. i think everything might - change? we had not published which countries are — change? we had not published which countries are in _ change? we had not published which countries are in which _ change? we had not published which countries are in which category - change? we had not published which countries are in which category yet. . countries are in which category yet. it is still too far away. i am very mindful of the time. one more question. are you telling people they should wait two to three weeks and then they can book a holiday? hate and then they can book a holiday? we are and then they can book a holiday? - are not advising people against thinking about booking. that is the big change. two or three weeks' time, they will have different
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countries and that will give people some guidance. we will give carefully and securely the tests we have been talking about and for the first time families will be able to reunite my businesses get under way and people can potentially think about their holidays. haste and people can potentially think about their holidays.— about their holidays. have you booked a holiday _ about their holidays. have you booked a holiday abroad? - about their holidays. have you booked a holiday abroad? not| about their holidays. have you - booked a holiday abroad? not yet. i am waitin: booked a holiday abroad? not yet. i am waiting to _ booked a holiday abroad? not yet. i am waiting to see _ booked a holiday abroad? not yet. i am waiting to see what _ booked a holiday abroad? not yet. i am waiting to see what the - am waiting to see what the information is about green left countries. i do not know the answer. it will be down to a four criteria. we will see where we are. there is hopein we will see where we are. there is hope in the air this summer. we have done so well this summer. we need to wait for everyone to catch up in destination countries. we have a framework in place to see how it will work. ., ., framework in place to see how it will work. ., ,, , ., framework in place to see how it will work. ., ~' , ., ., framework in place to see how it will work. ., ,, ., will work. thank you for your time this morning- _
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you can whisk us away to a different place altogether. to look after, where the azaleas are in full bloom and the rows. —— roses. england's justin rose loves the opening day of the masters. he's led on four occasions at this stage but has never won the green jacket. hopefully, for him, this time, he can keep his blistering start going. whatever happens, the masters is blossoming again. back in its usual place in the calendar, and with around 15,000 fans allowed in. that doesn't make it any easier for many of the big names though, as austin halewood reports. spring at augusta. the masters back in its traditional home, the azaleas back in bloom. golf at its most picturesque. under the surface, this iconic course has plenty of bite. rory mcilroy once again looking for the final piece of the career grand slam. another poor opening round, at four over par, his hopes perhaps already sunk.
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big hitting bryson dechambeau has been looking to bully his way around the augusta national but often the big hits are just as important as the small ones. bryson falling short on four over. five months ago, dustinjohnson won his first greenjacket in a record under—20 parfinish. although there were moments of that magic, scoring this year is not that easy. a double bogey on the 18th left the champion two over. tommy fleetwood had the shot of the day. the english man with a hole in one and the par 3 16th. in the end, only a handful of players were under par for their opening round. justin rose was the pick of them. the english man with another brilliant round at augusta. a two—time runner—up, he tops the leaderboard on seven under—par. could this be the year he finally goes one better?
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austin halewood, bbc news. rory mcilroy�*s wayward tee shot, on his four over par opening round, hit a spectator on the leg. it turned out to be his dad gerry. what on earth are the chances of that? big relief, i guess. dad joked he wanted a signed glove as an apology. mcilroy said he would autograph a bag of frozen peas. he finished 4 over par. their riches. he was wearing shorts as well. no trousers for protection. —— verities. it's advantage manchester united, as they aim for the semi finals of the europa league they beat granada 2—0 in their quarter final first leg in spain last night. marcus rashford got the first and then bruno fernandez converted a late penalty to put united in control of the tie. frustration for arsenal though. they seemed to have pinched a late victory against slavia prague, with this goal from nicolas pepey but the czech side snatched
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an equaliser deep into added time, to leave the tie, in the balance ahead of next weeks away leg. we will be looking ahead to the grand national later. i have been hit on the ankle by a gospel. it doesn't matter if you are wearing trousers or not, it stings so much. —— golf ball. let's say the persons who hit the ball was not my friend afterwards. accidents happen, let's be honest. accidents happen, even in wetter times. be honest. accidents happen, even in wettertimes. —— be honest. accidents happen, even in wetter times. —— weather. this morning some of us are still in the mild air. this is the picture at
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sandown in the isle of wight. the code i will filter its way south. there are snow showers in the forecast. —— is the cold air. that held up air piling its way in, pushing this weather front further south stop this line of gladly showers across parts of central england and wales. some sunshine and wintry showers. quite icy conditions. temperatures about three to 9 degrees. we could say ten, 11 in the far south. this evening and tonight, as we lose that cloud from the south and that we are going to keep clearing skies and temperatures plummeting quickly. away from the south where it is milder and in this area of cloud. this weather front across the near continent will spin
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weigh in on saturday, bringing patchy rain. —— established in its way in. nothing to write home about four the time of year. greta thunberg has travelled the world as an environmental campaigner, but she won't be attending the un climate conference scheduled to be held in glasgow this november. she wants the uk to postpone the summit until global vaccination rates allow all nations to attend on the same terms. she's been talking to our chief environment correspondent, justin rowlatt. for the last 18 months, greta thunberg has been making a documentary series on the science of climate change. i have been going the whole way round the world the wrong way. in 2019, she took a year off school. the programmes show her visiting glaciers. this year we had the fastest melt rate we've ever measured. six metres of ice down.
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at global conferences and leading big demonstrations. world leaders are behaving like children. then, and during the coronavirus lockdown in her home in stockholm. i have contracted the coronavirus. did it change your perspective on the climate issue? now she has told the bbc she doesn't believe vaccination rates globally means the crucial un climate conference, known as the cop, planned for glasgow in november, should go ahead. as it is now, i don't think i will be going to the cop because this needs to happen in the right way. are you saying the british government should delay or cancel the conference? not cancel, maybe postpone it. of course, the best thing to do would be to get everyone vaccinated as soon as possible so everyone could take part on the same terms. greta, you know greta... during the making of the documentaries,
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greta meets world leaders and a host of scientists. what we measure is the flow of carbon dioxide between the forest and the atmosphere. and the world's most famous climate campaigner also meets the world's most famous naturalist. my generation has made a mess of things. we've known it is happening and we have done nothing. yep, sir david attenborough. we have to make major changes to the way we live. that is where you have done such a lot, you really have. you have spoken for the generation that's going to have to look after it. what would he say to people, especially young people, who feel there is no point doing it because no one is listening anyway? people are listening. greta also visited paradise, the californian town consumed by fire in 2018.
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confirmed her belief that government and the media needs to recognise tackling climate change is as urgent as tackling the pandemic. the corona pandemic is a tragedy and nothing else. this actually shows we are able to treat an emergency like an emergency and we are able to shift social norms very quickly. imagine if media would start treating the climate crisis like a crisis, that could change everything overnight. the swedish activist has achieved extraordinary world attention. is she worried her star could wane? i would not say i am worried, i know that will happen. i am surprised people have been listening to me for so long. i expected people would get tired after a few months. they keep on listening and i do not know why that is. i guess if people are listening, i am going to use that opportunity to sort of communicate the message as much as i can.
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it is quite exhausting. at 18, greta thunberg is not a child any more but she is back at school, making up for the 18 months she took off to campaign. she says she is delighted to be studying again but has no plans to stop campaigning. we can act but we don't have time to wait. justin rowlatt, bbc news. greta thunberg: a year to change the world, begins on bbc one on monday at 9pm and on iplayer. let's ta ke let's take you back in time a little bit. in 1965, 19—year—old welshman brian robson was 10 months in to a two—year working visa in australia, but overwhelmed by homesickness. what followed next was a remarkable story.
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unable to afford the plane ticket home, brian — with the help of his irish friends paul and john — packed himself into a crate and mailed himself back to the uk. however, things went a little wrong when the crate was diverted from its original 36—hourjourney from melbourne to london and rerouted to los angeles. in the end, brian spent a total of 4 days in his crate, which measured less than a metre wide on a journey of 8,000 miles. incredibly, brian eventually arrived at heathrow airport safe and sound, and now 56 years later, he is hoping to find his old friends, to say thank you for the help they gave him. brian joins us now. good morning. good morning. lovely
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to see you- — good morning. good morning. lovely to see you- what _ good morning. good morning. lovely to see you. what an _ good morning. good morning. lovely to see you. what an extraordinary i to see you. what an extraordinary story it is! we have seen a little bit of the geography. can you describe what it was like inside the crate? how much movement did you have? ., . . crate? how much movement did you have? ., ., ., ., , crate? how much movement did you have? ., . . . , , have? none at all. i was sitting with my knees _ have? none at all. i was sitting with my knees up _ have? none at all. i was sitting with my knees up to _ have? none at all. i was sitting with my knees up to my - have? none at all. i was sitting with my knees up to my chest. have? none at all. i was sitting i with my knees up to my chest and have? none at all. i was sitting - with my knees up to my chest and did not move at all. i had a suitcase, an empty bottle, for reasons we can work out, a pint of water, a torch, a hammer and a work out, a pint of water, a torch, a hammerand a book work out, a pint of water, a torch, a hammer and a book of the beatles songs. a hammer and a book of the beatles sonos. ., , a hammer and a book of the beatles sonos. . , ., , songs. that is the full itinerary. i resume songs. that is the full itinerary. i presume the _ songs. that is the full itinerary. i presume the hammer— songs. that is the full itinerary. i presume the hammer is - songs. that is the full itinerary. i presume the hammer is in - songs. that is the full itinerary. i presume the hammer is in case . songs. that is the full itinerary. i i presume the hammer is in case you had to hammer yourself out, in case of an emergency. that had to hammer yourself out, in case of an emergency-— of an emergency. that is correct. when did you _ of an emergency. that is correct. when did you realise _ of an emergency. that is correct. when did you realise things - of an emergency. that is correct. when did you realise things had . of an emergency. that is correct. i when did you realise things had not gone to plan?—
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when did you realise things had not gone to plan? when did you realise things had not one to olan? ., , ., . gone to plan? from the start. when i not to gone to plan? from the start. when i got to melbourne _ gone to plan? from the start. when i got to melbourne airport, _ gone to plan? from the start. when i got to melbourne airport, i _ gone to plan? from the start. when i got to melbourne airport, i had - gone to plan? from the start. when i got to melbourne airport, i had to - got to melbourne airport, i had to got to melbourne airport, i had to go from melbourne to sydney. i was less upside on the tarmac for about 23 hours. that is the first thing to go wrong. then i was loaded onto an aircraft, three to sydney, waited for a while, put on a boeing 747 jumbo and i thought, finally, we are off. i lived a nightmare. quite a long time. during that time, all my muscles and joints will seize up, i could not speak and i could not drink, could not do anything. he has the world record _ drink, could not do anything. he has the world record for _ drink, could not do anything. he has the world record for being _ drink, could not do anything. he has the world record for being on - drink, could not do anything. he has the world record for being on your i the world record for being on your head for the longest period of time and how did you cope? i head for the longest period of time and how did you cope?— and how did you cope? i actually have the world _ and how did you cope? i actually have the world record _ and how did you cope? i actually have the world record in - and how did you cope? i actually have the world record in the - have the world record in the guinness book of world records as the first and only person to ever fly the pacific ocean in a crate.
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you must find these gentlemen who helped you. what clues do you have about these two men, these two irish quys about these two men, these two irish guys who helped you? taste about these two men, these two irish guys who helped you?— guys who helped you? we were great friends. guys who helped you? we were great friends- over — guys who helped you? we were great friends. over the _ guys who helped you? we were great friends. over the past _ guys who helped you? we were great friends. over the past 56 _ guys who helped you? we were great friends. over the past 56 years, - guys who helped you? we were great friends. over the past 56 years, my i friends. over the past 56 years, my memory has faded a bit. their names werejohn and paul, they both worked. victorian railways and lived in the railway hospital in melbourne. they work in the ticket department. before we were great friends apart from that, i cannot remember their surnames aware in ireland they came from. that is all where in ireland. do, ireland they came from. that is all where in ireland.— where in ireland. a fascinating sto . where in ireland. a fascinating story- way _ where in ireland. a fascinating story- way are _ where in ireland. a fascinating story. way are you _ where in ireland. a fascinating story. way are you able - where in ireland. a fascinating story. way are you able to - where in ireland. a fascinating story. way are you able to see outside? iih
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story. way are you able to see outside? , , ., ., outside? in between the planks of wood, outside? in between the planks of wood. there _ outside? in between the planks of wood, there were _ outside? in between the planks of wood, there were slight _ outside? in between the planks of wood, there were slight doubts, i wood, there were slight doubts, which we left as they were because the idea was oxygen would come in. nobody thought of the fact there was no oxygen on the aircraft. ioiroihat no oxygen on the aircraft. what ha-oens no oxygen on the aircraft. what happens when _ no oxygen on the aircraft. what happens when you've _ no oxygen on the aircraft. what happens when you've got - no oxygen on the aircraft. what happens when you've got to - no oxygen on the aircraft. what happens when you've got to the other end? who unpacked you and what happened? i end? who unpacked you and what ha -ened? ., .,, ., ., happened? i thought i was in london, i did not realise _ happened? i thought i was in london, i did not realise i _ happened? i thought i was in london, i did not realise i was _ happened? i thought i was in london, i did not realise i was in _ happened? i thought i was in london, i did not realise i was in los _ i did not realise i was in los angeles. i spent ages and ages trying to get my hands to a torch to look at my watch to see what time it was. i intended to get out of the crate in darkness and walk home, you see. i got the torch. i must have turned it on the same time and dropped it. because of the medical problems, i could not reach it. it was shining out through the slats in
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the crate. a little while later, two airport workers walked past and said there was a light in the crate. they stopped. one of them bent his knees and looked down through a little hole in their side and met me sort of head on. had there been an olympic games in that time, there would —— he would probably have one for his backflip. at the same time, screaming, there is a body in there. they had to persuade doubtful men or bosses that there was a body. they thought they were joking. about half an hour later, half of the los angeles airport turned up. its, angeles airport turned up. a fantastic story. i wish you well in your mission to find your old
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friends. i know you wrote a book about everything you went through. if that rings a bell... paul and john, they went to the same school in ireland. brian's book will be released later this month. stay with us, headlines coming up. good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today — hopes for foreign holidays, but at a cost —
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the government announces plans to reopen international travel, but passengers will have to pay for covid tests. a traffic light system will be used to categorise countries based on risk, but with holidaymakers needing to buy a test, there's claims only the wealthy will be able to afford to travel. police respond with water cannon after coming under attack in belfast during another night of violence in northern ireland. one day to go until the world's most famous horse race returns. we'll meet the jockey, who's preparing to take on the sport's elite, as the grand national returns tomorrow, hoping to become the first female winner, and is trained by her mum. good morning from sunny blackpool, where they are hoping the crowds will return, because here the pleasure beach they are preparing to open next week for their 125th
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season, and i've got the unique opportunity this morning to test ride some of the roller—coaster. and after a brief mild spell, things turning colder again as we had to because of the weekend, but a bit of sunshine in the forecast, too. more details on about ten minutes. good morning. it's friday the 9th of april. our top story — plans to reopen international travel for holiday—makers from england have been unveiled with a requirement to pay for coronavirus tests. in the past half hour, the transport secretary grant shapps has told breakfast that the government will look at trying to cut the costs of the pcr tests, typically £120. to make them more affordable forfamilies. for places on the green list, travellers will be asked to take a test before they return to england, and pay for a pcr test, two days after arriving home. if you're coming to england from countries on the amber list,
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you will also be asked to self—isolate for ten days, and pay for a pcr test on days two and eight. and passengers from red list destinations will be required to pay for ten days in a quarantine hotel. the plans have been met with widespread frustration by the travel industry. ben is at gatwick airport for us this morning and ben lots of reaction to the plans already. some detail but not all, crucially we know that the traffic light system that tells us where we will be able to go, and what you will need to do to get there, crucially to get back. but the industry i think is a little frustrated by the requirements for pcr tests, because we know that those are in some cases more robust, costing about £150 for
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a test. and that to the industry is prohibitive, it means and with the wealthiest will be able to afford to travel this summer. even if family of four going somewhere on the green list, it could cost them £600 just for the test before they have paid for the test before they have paid for flights or hotels. earlier, spoke to the boss of heathrow, and he explained to me his frustration. he said if you have a negative test, or you have had the vaccine, why do you need to have this expensive test on your return? this is what he told me. ii on your return? this is what he told me. . ., . ~ on your return? this is what he told me. ., ., ., me. if coming back from a low-risk country and — me. if coming back from a low-risk country and you — me. if coming back from a low-risk country and you are _ me. if coming back from a low-risk country and you are fully _ country and you are fully vaccinated, and you're coming from a country that has no variants of concern according to the government, why do you still need to take a pcr test after you have arrived? i think for most people, that would make no sense, this is why we need to make sure that travel becomes something that anyone can do not do something
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the wealthy. that anyone can do not do something the wealth . ., , that anyone can do not do something the wealthy-— the wealthy. that is the both of heathrow- _ the wealthy. that is the both of heathrow. that _ the wealthy. that is the both of heathrow. that sentiment - the wealthy. that is the both of. heathrow. that sentiment echoed the wealthy. that is the both of- heathrow. that sentiment echoed by so many in the travel industry this morning. they were looking for some detail about how industry would be open, we could all get away for a summer holiday, a couple of weeks in spain, italy or greece this year. they say that perhaps could not happen. grant shapps spoke to breakfast earlier, he said he is trying to work with industry now to bring down the cost of those tests to make them more affordable to get more of us on holiday this year. it seems to me that others should be driven— seems to me that others should be driven down by more competition in the marketplace, that is what we will work — the marketplace, that is what we will work on. i cannot give you the e>
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do have to take every single possible precaution. grant shapps ex-alainin possible precaution. grant shapps explaining why — possible precaution. grant shapps explaining why they _ possible precaution. grant shapps explaining why they feel - possible precaution. grant shapps explaining why they feel those - possible precaution. grant shapps| explaining why they feel those pcr tests are still necessary to prevent further variants getting back into the country from people who have been overseas. they also talked about a green watchlist, the idea being that if there is a country thatis being that if there is a country that is borderline between green and amber, and requiring you to quarantine, that will give someone a bit of advance notice to stop a repeat of those scenes we saw last summer, people rushing back to beat a deadline, cramming onto flights and ferriesjust to a deadline, cramming onto flights and ferries just to get back to the uk. some progress, some opening up on the industry, but by no means the sort of opening up the industry wanted to see to get us flying again. we should also be very clear, these rules applyjust to england. we are expecting details about the plans for scotland, wales and northern ireland in due course. thank you very much, ben. there's been another night of rioting in belfast, with petrol bombs, fireworks and stones thrown at the police. officers used water cannon for the first time in six years in an attempt to restore order.
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our ireland correspondent chris page is in belfast and can tell us more. it looks beautiful behind you, but there are real concerns now but this is not being tampered down, and is still continuing. yes, the violence last night happen mainly in the nationalist springfield road area, where police did turn a water cannon on rioters, several dozen of them. some of them to my mind looked like they were not any older than their early teens. they threw petrol bombs, bricks and fireworks at police, for at least a couple of hours. there was also some trouble on the loyalist shankill road area as well, where again petrol bombers and stonethrowers attacked police. the event was not on the skill of the riots which happens 24 hours previously, where republicans and loyalists attacked each other across
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a peace barrier which is designed to prevent clashes between rival factions, but there is growing concern here in northern ireland but now that we have had a week of street violence in various parts of northern ireland, and in several different towns and cities, that really quelling this period of violence might be very difficult indeed. politicians in the stunned executive, the devolved government here, have been: for the british and irish governments to get involved. even the white house has called for this as well. that is nervousness now about what might come over the weekend that there is certainly potential for further disorder. chris, thanks very much. the uk's leading sports bodies are backing the use of "vaccine passports" and covid testing as a way of getting full crowds back. in a joint letter to the leaders of the major political parties, the group says a certification process could allow fans to return
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as quickly as possible. it warns that the system must not be discriminatory, and should protect privacy. the welsh government is speeding up the easing of its covid restrictions, as infection levels continue to fall. gyms will be allowed to reopen and people from two households can bubble up to meet indoors from 3rd may, instead of 10th may. the dates for reopening the hospitality industry have not changed. in amongst all the talk of restrictions lifting, and continues along the way, what you want to know is how the weather is going to help us. be prepared for all eventualities if you have plans to be out and about next week. snow showers have fallen overnight in the parts of scotland, a winter wonderland in the highlands
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even though we are now in the middle of spring. in that colder air will move south for all us as we head through the course of the weekend. further snow showers particularly for scotland, some wet and windy weather towards the south, and certainly some billy sharp overnight frost as well. so conference weeping south, introducing this cold air map which is spilling down from the arctic, and it is bringing the snow showers which will continue through the day across the northern half of scotland. a couple of wintry showers across northern ireland, some of and sweetish as possible around the north—east coast of finland as well. further south, this line of cloud and patchy showed in pushing south. on the brighter spells, southern england up to around 13 celsius. through this evening and overnight, the milder air through this evening and overnight, the milderairand through this evening and overnight, the milder air and the cloud gets pushed away towards the south, so we are all in the colder air mass with the clear skies. it particularly cold night for the stage in april, —4 celsius or so, even in some far more urban areas. so tomorrow, high pressure setting out towards the west, this weather front sitting
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across the near continent. some uncertainty about its out how far northup will get, but probably spilling some rain into the likes of kent, perhaps essex and sussex as well. away from the far south—east, sunny spells, wintry showers, and not going to feel very warm for the time of year. sarah, thank you. the time of year. sarah, thank you. the time is 8.13. the body mass index, or bmi, has long been used to determine if someone is a healthy weight. but now there are calls for the government to scrap the phrase. mp5 on the women and equalities committee say it doesn't help people with eating disorders, and causes anxiety about body imagery, as breakfast'sjohn maguire has been finding out. what do you see when you look at yourself in the mirror, or in a photo? what do others see? and is it important what they think? today's report by mp5 on body image is wide—ranging. everything from obesity policy to portrayal in advertising. back in the day, i would have
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edited most of my photos, and i wouldn't have taken a selfie without a filter, so i would just take a photo like this, and then my most common things that i used to do when i edited my photos was to smooth my skin. there was a time that sasha would never post a photo of herself without modifying it. i was constantly comparing myself to the images i would see online, kind of unaware of how much they were edited, and i became and i became addicted to seeing myself in this way, so all i've got so all i've got is this incredible photo of me at my brother's at my brother's graduation, but i've completely changed my body, i have probably taken off a stone or two through editing. it makes me a bit sad.
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but now she campaigns for standards in advertising online in whether or not pictures have been edited. now i am seeing my favourite people i have followed for years, and i am seeing their real skin, wrinkles and pores, it's incredible, that will only have a positive effect on everyone else watching it as well. hope has struggled with an eating disorder since she was a young girl. people think it is a choice, it is a diet gone wrong, it is a teenage white girl's illness and somebody grows out of it, but actually it is a battle every single day. she is thrilled that mps are calling on the government to abandon the bmi, which is currently used to determine whether or not a person's weight is healthy. you cannot judge whether someone has an eating disorder based on their bmi. only 6% of the people with an 18 disorder— only 6% of the people with an 18 disorder will ever fall under late. so we have to scrap it, we need to get rid of it. saul works to help fathers improve their health and fitness, but appreciates that what looks healthy on the outside can be very different on the inside.
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i would binge so heavily that... i remember being in the cinema with my brother, and i took three boxes of cereal to the cinema, because that was a day that i was allowed to cram things in, which would damage me afterwards, for days i would be thinking about, what have i done? he welcomes the broadening of the debate. the reason i posted about this on social media is that one of my clients is a 32—year—old guy i have known for my whole life, pretty much, he told me he was bulimic, and my first image in my head was that of a young teenage girl who didn't look very well, and that came into my head, and i thoughts to myself, that's really wrong, that needs to change. it is notjust a thing that affects young girls, it is everyone and anyone. the mps' report also cites the impact of lockdown and its after—effects. they call for a wholesale change in how we and the government think, act and speak about our bodies, both in terms of our physical and mental health. john maguire, bbc news.
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in response to this, a spokesperson for the department of health and social care has said, "we are committed to improving "outcomes for those with eating disorders and related mental health "issues, with record funding to expand dedicated "services in the community. "our approach is guided by the latest research "and emerging evidence." let's pick this up with our regular gp dr ellie cannon. this message will hit home to many people, specifically when it comes to bmi, how useful has it been up to you when people have said, am i ok, am i in ok shape? i you when people have said, am i ok, am i in ok shape?— am i in ok shape? i think what's important. _ am i in ok shape? i think what's important, which _ am i in ok shape? i think what's important, which you _ am i in ok shape? i think what's important, which you have - important, which you have highlighted right now in your report is that people are suffering from eating disorders, is that it can only ever be one measure. it is a
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pretty crude measure. for example, in eating disorders, clinics, they often use bmi for weight, use a more useful measure looking at the percentage that our children should be according to their height. when we are looking at obesity, the other end of the spectrum, we know that waist circumference is a better indicator of somebody�*s out in terms of cardiovascular. so if bmi is to be used, it has to be part of a holistic health measurement which is clearly what you have highlighted right now in that report. ioiroihg clearly what you have highlighted right now in that report. why was it ever deemed _ right now in that report. why was it ever deemed to _ right now in that report. why was it ever deemed to be _ right now in that report. why was it ever deemed to be useful? - right now in that report. why was it ever deemed to be useful? i - right now in that report. why was it ever deemed to be useful? i can i ever deemed to be useful? i can about a time when that phrase didn't really exist, bmi, and then it came into being. why was it deemed to be useful if now we are thinking,
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whereas the advantage? —— i can remember a time. it whereas the advantage? -- i can remember a time.— whereas the advantage? -- i can remember a time. it was originally a measure used _ remember a time. it was originally a measure used in _ remember a time. it was originally a measure used in terms _ remember a time. it was originally a measure used in terms of _ measure used in terms of anthropology, looking at studies of different types of populations. we know that different ethnic groups have different shapes and sizes and different bmi, it was looked at as a measurement in those terms. rather than anything that ever should have been used as a clinical indicator. then i think it became something that we have regularly got used to doing. it became part of the narrative. but as i have said over the years, does particularly useful. for babies, it often becomes a big source of anxiety for new parents what the weight is. but it is not a
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true measure of how well a baby is. across the board, it is a pretty crude tool that we probably need to get enough. crude tool that we probably need to net enou:h. ., crude tool that we probably need to get enough-— get enough. your services are in demand this _ get enough. your services are in demand this morning. _ get enough. your services are in demand this morning. we - get enough. your services are in demand this morning. we will. get enough. your services are in. demand this morning. we will get get enough. your services are in - demand this morning. we will get you to hold on for a minute, because we were to pick up on another subject i know you are well across this morning. that is the news that today people in england will have access to two lateral flow tests a week, starting today. the kits are cheaper than laboratory tests and the results take around 30 minutes. let's take a look at how the test is carried out. first of all, wash your hands, once they are _ first of all, wash your hands, once they are nice — first of all, wash your hands, once they are nice and clean, the first thing _ they are nice and clean, the first thing to— they are nice and clean, the first thing to get as your bottle of extraction solution. put thing to get as your bottle of extraction solution.— thing to get as your bottle of extraction solution. put it into our extraction solution. put it into your tube. _ extraction solution. put it into your tube. put _ extraction solution. put it into your tube, put six _ extraction solution. put it into your tube, put six drops - extraction solution. put it into your tube, put six drops of. extraction solution. put it into i your tube, put six drops of liquid in here. ~ , ., your tube, put six drops of liquid in here. ~ i. ., ., your tube, put six drops of liquid in here. ~ , ., ., ., ., in here. when you have done that, out the in here. when you have done that, put the lid — in here. when you have done that, put the lid on. _ in here. when you have done that, put the lid on, and _ in here. when you have done that, put the lid on, and then _ in here. when you have done that, put the lid on, and then you - in here. when you have done that, put the lid on, and then you need l put the lid on, and then you need your— put the lid on, and then you need your actual— put the lid on, and then you need your actual throat swab which will come _ your actual throat swab which will come in _ your actual throat swab which will come in packetsjust like this. then come in packets 'ust like this. then ou aet come in packets 'ust like this. then you get your — come in packetsjust like this. then you get your swab _ come in packetsjust like this. then you get your swab and _ come in packetsjust like this. then you get your swab and you have a
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mirror~ _ you get your swab and you have a mirror. ., , , ., mirror. four times the side, four times that _ mirror. four times the side, four times that side, _ mirror. four times the side, four times that side, then _ mirror. four times the side, four times that side, then you - mirror. four times the side, four times that side, then you are - mirror. four times the side, four i times that side, then you are going to put it up your nose.— to put it up your nose. about an inch. to put it up your nose. about an inch- you _ to put it up your nose. about an inch. you will _ to put it up your nose. about an inch. you will need _ to put it up your nose. about an inch. you will need some - to put it up your nose. about an - inch. you will need some resistance. don't _ inch. you will need some resistance. don't you _ inch. you will need some resistance. don't you have — inch. you will need some resistance. don't you have done _ inch. you will need some resistance. don't you have done that, _ inch. you will need some resistance. don't you have done that, that - inch. you will need some resistance. don't you have done that, that is - don't you have done that, that is unpleasant — don't you have done that, that is unpleasant but over. put don't you have done that, that is unpleasant but over.— unpleasant but over. put the straiaht unpleasant but over. put the straight into _ unpleasant but over. put the straight into your _ unpleasant but over. put the straight into your tube - unpleasant but over. put the straight into your tube and i unpleasant but over. put the - straight into your tube and swell around for 15 seconds. then you pinch the bottom of the tube to get any excess stuff off. itleatt pinch the bottom of the tube to get any excess stuff off.— any excess stuff off. next you need our any excess stuff off. next you need your actual — any excess stuff off. next you need your actual lateral _ any excess stuff off. next you need your actual lateral flow _ any excess stuff off. next you need your actual lateral flow test, - any excess stuff off. next you need your actual lateral flow test, which | your actual lateral flow test, which looks _ your actual lateral flow test, which looks something like this, and you put two _ looks something like this, and you put two dropsjust looks something like this, and you put two drops just onto that bit of the test — put two drops 'ust onto that bit of the test. ~ ., ., q; :: put two drops 'ust onto that bit of the test. ~ ., ., g; :: , the test. with that for 30 minutes. one lane the test. with that for 30 minutes. 0ne lane next _ the test. with that for 30 minutes. one lane next to _ the test. with that for 30 minutes. one lane next to the _ the test. with that for 30 minutes. one lane next to the c _ the test. with that for 30 minutes. one lane next to the c shows - the test. with that for 30 minutes. one lane next to the c shows that l one lane next to the c shows that the test is negative. for the positive test result, you will get one line next to the c and one when
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next to the t. even if it is a faint still shows the test is positive. you must report the test results to the nhs. if there is only one line at next to the t, the test is void and you will need to take a fresh test kit. that is how to do _ need to take a fresh test kit. that is how to do it. _ need to take a fresh test kit. that is how to do it. what _ need to take a fresh test kit. that is how to do it. what about getting them? ben boulos is at pharmacy in south london, from where you can get one of these tests. i expect it will be quite busy. it could well be. in the last few weeks. — could well be. in the last few weeks, the focus on the fight against — weeks, the focus on the fight against coronavirus has been on the vaccination — against coronavirus has been on the vaccination part of the process. but from _ vaccination part of the process. but from today, — vaccination part of the process. but from today, the attention turns to the home — from today, the attention turns to the home test kit. everyone in england — the home test kit. everyone in england will be able to get two tickets — england will be able to get two tickets a — england will be able to get two tickets a week, two tests a week. in this box, _ tickets a week, two tests a week. in this box, there are seven, so one of these _ this box, there are seven, so one of these would — this box, there are seven, so one of these would lasted just over three
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weeks _ these would lasted just over three weeks. anyone who has got kids at school— weeks. anyone who has got kids at school or— weeks. anyone who has got kids at school or their workplace does testing — school or their workplace does testing will be familiar with how these _ testing will be familiar with how these work, you do it at home and -et these work, you do it at home and get the _ these work, you do it at home and get the result in 30 minutes. the practicalities of getting the test, we can— practicalities of getting the test, we can speak to ash, the pharmacist here _ we can speak to ash, the pharmacist here. people need to make an appointment to collect these? n0, appointment to collect these? no, the whole point _ appointment to collect these? iifr, the whole point about community pharmacies is that people can just walk in. pharmacies is that people can 'ust walk in. ., pharmacies is that people can 'ust walk in. . , pharmacies is that people can 'ust walkin. . . ., pharmacies is that people can 'ust walkin. . ., walk in. can people collect and for other family _ walk in. can people collect and for other family members _ walk in. can people collect and for other family members or - walk in. can people collect and for other family members orjust - other family members or just themselves? other family members or 'ust themselves?i other family members or 'ust themselves? ., . ., ., themselves? you can collect one for ourself themselves? you can collect one for yourself and — themselves? you can collect one for yourself and up _ themselves? you can collect one for yourself and up to _ themselves? you can collect one for yourself and up to four _ themselves? you can collect one for yourself and up to four in _ themselves? you can collect one for yourself and up to four in total, - themselves? you can collect one for yourself and up to four in total, so i yourself and up to four in total, so a family of four.— yourself and up to four in total, so a family of four. and if you have an elderly neighbour, _ a family of four. and if you have an elderly neighbour, can _ a family of four. and if you have an elderly neighbour, can you - a family of four. and if you have an elderly neighbour, can you pick - a family of four. and if you have an i elderly neighbour, can you pick them up elderly neighbour, can you pick them up for— elderly neighbour, can you pick them up for people who are not related to you? _ up for people who are not related to ou? ., . . , up for people who are not related to ou? ., .. , ., ., you? theoretically within that four, we 'ust you? theoretically within that four, we just need _ you? theoretically within that four, we just need to _ you? theoretically within that four, we just need to know— you? theoretically within that four, we just need to know that - you? theoretically within that four, we just need to know that is - you? theoretically within that four, we just need to know that is who i you? theoretically within that four, we just need to know that is who it | we just need to know that is who it is for. ii we just need to know that is who it is for. , ., ., , we just need to know that is who it is for. i. ., , ., ., is for. if you do the test at home, ou aet is for. if you do the test at home, you get a — is for. if you do the test at home, you get a positive _ is for. if you do the test at home, you get a positive result, - is for. if you do the test at home, you get a positive result, you - you get a positive result, you think. — you get a positive result, you think. i— you get a positive result, you think, iwill you get a positive result, you think, i willjust double—take, you do think, iwilljust double—take, you do another— think, i willjust double—take, you do another test and comes up negative _ do another test and comes up negative, does that mean you are all clear? _ negative, does that mean you are all clear? ~ , ,., , negative, does that mean you are all clear? ~ ,,., , ., ,, negative, does that mean you are all clear? ~ , , ., i. ., clear? absolutely not. if you have any positive _ clear? absolutely not. if you have any positive test _ clear? absolutely not. if you have any positive test whatsoever, - clear? absolutely not. if you have any positive test whatsoever, you| any positive test whatsoever, you should book yourself in for a full pcr test, because that is the gold standard. this is to give you a view
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for asymptomatic patients, but if you are positive, you need a pcr test. ii you are positive, you need a pcr test. ,., ., you are positive, you need a pcr test. ., ., , ., test. if someone has had the vaccine. _ test. if someone has had the vaccine. to — test. if someone has had the vaccine, to the _ test. if someone has had the vaccine, to the still- test. if someone has had the vaccine, to the still needs i test. if someone has had the vaccine, to the still needs to | test. if someone has had the i vaccine, to the still needs to do this test. — vaccine, to the still needs to do this test, can disregard it? the vaccine as _ this test, can disregard it? the vaccine as part _ this test, can disregard it? the vaccine as part of _ this test, can disregard it? tie vaccine as part of the programme, but it does not stop you completely getting coronavirus, so you still need to be able to test because you can still get it and transmitted to other people, you can still be asymptomatic.— other people, you can still be asymptomatic. other people, you can still be as m-tomatic. ~ , ,, ., ., asymptomatic. ok. ash, i know! have . iven asymptomatic. ok. ash, i know! have oiven ou asymptomatic. ok. ash, i know! have given you a — asymptomatic. ok. ash, i know! have given you a lot — asymptomatic. ok. ash, i know! have given you a lot of— asymptomatic. ok. ash, i know! have given you a lot of questions _ asymptomatic. ok. ash, i know! have given you a lot of questions this - given you a lot of questions this morning. — given you a lot of questions this morning, that will be hugely helpful to people _ morning, that will be hugely helpful to people watching at home. thank you very— to people watching at home. thank you very much. i hope that doesn't of some _ you very much. i hope that doesn't of some of— you very much. i hope that doesn't of some of your questions. we were sittin: of some of your questions. we were sitting here — of some of your questions. we were sitting here saying _ of some of your questions. we were sitting here saying exactly _ of some of your questions. we were sitting here saying exactly that, - of some of your questions. we were sitting here saying exactly that, it i sitting here saying exactly that, it is precisely what people want, they want to know how, where they can get it, too far, so we have tick those boxes. thank you very much. thank you so much, ben. our gp dr ellie cannon is still with us. dr ellie, more lateral flow tests available to the public, that can only be a good thing, presumably?
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i think ithink so, i think so, at this stage. we are on our road map toward opening things up, and i think this is appropriate at this stage. i don't like it is good we are going to be doing for the whole year, but i think it's pretty useful. in my household, there are two kids going to school who are doing lateral flow tests twice a week. i do them twice a week, and my husband works somewhere where they have asked for lateral flow test, so it has just become part of our routine, really. itide]!!! flow test, so it hasjust become part of our routine, really. well we have you. — part of our routine, really. well we have you, obviously _ part of our routine, really. well we have you, obviously a _ part of our routine, really. well we have you, obviously a lot _ part of our routine, really. well we have you, obviously a lot of- have you, obviously a lot of attention this week on astrazeneca and the connection with the possibility of that very rare blood clot connection. i don't know what sort of impact that had a new, questions are being asked and how
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that has worked out in practice. there has been quite a significant impact in general practice, and i know on a&e colleagues as well. because of the news of the last couple of days, we are finding that many people are phoning up concerned about symptoms, they may develop a blood clot, so we are trying to help us many people as possible. we are really looking for people who have a significant severe headache between days four to 20 after having had an astrazeneca maxim, that is really the red flag for us to seek further investigations. but the absolute majority of people will not suffer from this blood clot. it will be described as an extremely rare side
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effect. ., , described as an extremely rare side effect. . , ., , , effect. that is worth emphasising that is. thank _ effect. that is worth emphasising that is. thank you _ effect. that is worth emphasising that is. thank you much. - time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tarah welsh. this weekend marks the 40th anniversary of the brixton riots. sparked by anger at the police against a backdrop of high unemployment. the riots saw buildings burned and police officers injured. alex wheatle was 18 at the time and says the uk is still in denial about racism. it felt like at last i could unleash the rage inside me that so many of us had, not just for that weekend, but leading up for months and perhaps years of being almost daily persecuted and oppressed and feeling that you're not wanted in this country. some blind and visually—impaired people
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are concerned about how to navigate around new restrictions. a recent survey by the royal national institute of blind people found that more than half weren't confident finding thier way around new layouts. post lockdown, yes, i am nervous. i am nervous of the two—metre distance rule. i am nervous i cannotjudge distance, i am nervous i do not have 3d vision. i am nervous that i might be breaking the rules and someone will shout at me and say, "can you not see where you're going?" friends of a father of two, who died from covid, have been raising money to fulfil one of his final wishes. femi yussuff had promised his young sons that he would redecorate their bedrooms. now his family and colleagues have raised more than £5,000 towards the project. it is so touching that they could even think back about about those thoughts and discussions they had at the time and they want to be able to do something as nice as that
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for the boys as well, we are touched by it. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tubes... earls court rd: queues due to the roadworks by the station. now the weather with elizabeth. hello, good morning. a frost—free start to the day across the capital with temperatures a good few degrees above freezing. some spells of brightness and a little bit of early sunshine around for a time this morning, lasting longest towards southern areas because cloud will be thickening from the north and then eventually, but not until the end of the day, for southern home counties, we'll see this band of showery rain move its way southwards. a cold front, behind it colder air. we are set to stay in the milderairfor much of the day. top temperatures in central london of 11, 12 celsius with a fairly gentle westerly breeze blowing.
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through this evening and overnight, our band of showery rain clears southwards to leave us with a mostly dry night to come but with plenty of cloud. tonight's lowest temperatures will be towards northern home counties. tomorrow there is a band of rain that will be pushing northwards from the near continent. we could see some of this at times again towards the south. there will be quite a lot of cloud. we are in that colder air and it will feel chilly with a cool, north—easterly wind. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. "morning live" follows breakfast on bbc one. let's find out what's on today's show with kym and gethin.
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we are one big team. coming up on morning live... with news that the infection rate dropped by 60% in march due to our vaccination programme. dr vanessa apea is here to tell us why so many who first refused the jab, have now changed their minds about getting it. and as the race to vaccinate the elderly continues, we meet the military personnel, who got a few honest words from one raf veteran, when they turned up to vaccinate care home residents. also on the show, whether you are young or old, age shouldn't get in the way of your ambitions. in fact we'll finding out why the very best time to try new things is when you are 70. and as the final of masterchef reaches boiling point, we'll be joined by hostsjohn and gregg join us to talk about the series that's had millions of us dreaming of a restaurant—cooked meal, and to tell us why they'd like to ban balsamic vinegar! iam i am totally getting into this. i will not argue because i have
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learned my lesson. iwill will not argue because i have learned my lesson. i will be polite. but if diy's more your thing than cooking — will kirk's here to help with some fool—proof advice for all the paint—stripping beginners out there. i will be giving advice about stripping your furniture. plus, neiljones is back with an end of week energiser for strictly fitness. he is ready. all that and more, at 9:15am! that is after breakfast, that is when morning lives will be on. —— morning live. as well as pubs, restaurants and retail shops, theme parks in england will be opening their doors once again this coming monday.
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i'r excited about that? it is not my thing. i know for sure there are people who love theme parks. they go week in and week out bypasses. i had not thought of it as something people would be looking forward to. and that includes blackpool pleasure beach, which this year celebrates its 125th anniversary. danjohnson is there for us this morning to see how preparations are going. were you a roller—coaster fan? did she volunteer for this day of reporting? —— you. i she volunteer for this day of reporting? -- you.— reporting? -- you. iwas volunteered. _ reporting? -- you. iwas volunteered. i— reporting? -- you. iwas volunteered. i do - reporting? -- you. iwas volunteered. i do like i volunteered. i do like roller—coasters is. it has been so long since any of us have done anything this exciting, i was keen to take it on. it has been really exciting. this is the hottest ticket
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in town. i have the whole theme park to myself this morning. in perhaps a bold move into broadcasting, we are going to try and introduce this report live from a roller—coaster. i had to wear my mask. this is icon, their nearest roller—coasters here. what do i need to do? put my hands up? put your hands up for me. i am getting strapped in. this is a roller—coaster that bias you are. apparently i am going to go from knock— 50 in two seconds. —— that fires you off. this apparently will put me through the g4s equivalent to an f1 car. —— g—force. it is
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supposed to be twice as quick as an airliner taking off. that is quite something! blimey! oh, no. there is a lot of work to do here at blackpool pleasure beach, getting ready for the crowds to come back on monday. here is a bit of the work they have got to do. it is going even quicker. blackpool, but without its crowds. it is just not right, is it? it doesn't look itself. for the pleasure beach, it's been the longest winter shutdown they have ever known, after the toughest year. even during the first and second world war, the park remained open to entertain people. only covid has forced the business to actually close. newsreel: blackpool's tower stands out as a happy memory _
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of the rollicking days of peace. look how times have changed! back then, the beaches were packed and the news readers were patronising. don't be daft, lad, it's blackpool. tha's right, love. it is, in all. blackpool pleasure beach is ready. our managing director always says there's a little piece of blackpool in everybody. it holds a very special place in many people's hearts. yes, we're ready to open our gates and welcome people back again. some are already eyeing up their place in the queue. i come here 20, 30 times a year — from newcastle. that is quite a journey. it is quite a journey. it's about two and a half hours from home to hear. it's something we do that often, we're quite used to doing it. why? i have always loved blackpool, blackpool pleasure beach. we used to come here on family holidays — when i was about seven or eight and we'd always come from then. we do call pleasure beach our pleasure beach family. we say that for good reason.
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there's a lot of people we know who work here and we do keep in touch with them. that theme runs right through. the pleasure beach has been owned by the same family for all of its 125 years. there are other families here, keeping the place running. my dad started here in 1958 as an apprentice fitter. this was one of the first rides he worked on. my sister started here in 1982. she still works here now. i started here in 1983. we have worked for three generations of the thomson family. we look after the rides, all the facilities round here. what is it like feeding these? they've gone off their food — i really don't know why. you can ride some as well in a bit. i've heard i'm going to be the tester. you are. the good thing about pleasure beach, it�* got the classic rides — like the classic roller coasters like the big dipper, etc. it's got the big rides like the big one. and the newest ride, which is icon. it keeps up with the times as well as looking after its historical rides as well. there is heaps of history here. the flying machines have been in the air since 1904. archive: this is the thrill of freedom and for -
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forgetting your cares. hey, we could all do with a bit of that now! i'm reliably informed this is the oldest continuously operating ride anywhere in europe. let's face it, it's probably the nearest we'll get to flying anywhere any time soon. this is lovely! arhive: a thrill today, a memory tomorrow. i getting things moving again still means more work and a few finishing touches. covid measures are still in place, including masks. all our staff are temperature tested daily and we are also doing lateral flow testing of our staff as well so it is all about giving guests and customers assurances and confidence we are safe and good to go. are you looking forward to having people back? we're so excited. the whole team here at blackpool pleasure beach cannot wait. i will be there monday
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and wednesday next week. twice in a week? twice in a week, yes. i cannot keep away from the place. it's a great place to come. everyone loves coming to blackpool. here we go. this is where i get to make a fool of myself. i'll tell you what, it is high! oh, my word! i have made it, i am back. these are sacrifices i make in the name of public service broadcasting, just to remind people of the fun you can have. i have really enjoyed it. let me bring in andy stott what is it like having been closed for so long,
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not having people around to enjoy the rights? it is not having people around to en'oy the riohts? , , ., not having people around to en'oy the riohts? , , . , the rights? it is strange. it is about people _ the rights? it is strange. it is about people having - the rights? it is strange. it is about people having fun. - the rights? it is strange. it is about people having fun. we| the rights? it is strange. it is- about people having fun. we cannot wait to _ about people having fun. we cannot wait to mandates for people to have a safe _ wait to mandates for people to have a safe and _ wait to mandates for people to have a safe and good day out. how wait to mandates for people to have a safe and good day out.— a safe and good day out. how much work to you — a safe and good day out. how much work to you had _ a safe and good day out. how much work to you had to _ a safe and good day out. how much work to you had to do? _ a safe and good day out. how much work to you had to do? -- - a safe and good day out. how much work to you had to do? -- kill- work to you had to do? —— kill monday. work to you had to do? -- kill monday-— work to you had to do? -- kill monda . ., ., ., ., monday. you had done some of the fun bits, like testing _ monday. you had done some of the fun bits, like testing the _ monday. you had done some of the fun bits, like testing the rides. _ monday. you had done some of the fun bits, like testing the rides. you - bits, like testing the rides. you had to be _ bits, like testing the rides. you had to be covid _ bits, like testing the rides. gm. had to be covid secure. bits, like testing the rides. you had to be covid secure. what i bits, like testing the rides. you i had to be covid secure. what will bits, like testing the rides. you - had to be covid secure. what will be different? the _ had to be covid secure. what will be different? the main _ had to be covid secure. what will be different? the main difference - had to be covid secure. what will be different? the main difference is- different? the main difference is you have — different? the main difference is you have to buy a ticket in advance, online _ you have to buy a ticket in advance, online when — you have to buy a ticket in advance, online. when you get here, going to the supermarket, social distancing, cleaning _ the supermarket, social distancing, cleaning your hands, that kind of thing _ cleaning your hands, that kind of thing we — cleaning your hands, that kind of thing. we ask our guests to wear a mask— thing. we ask our guests to wear a mask on— thing. we ask our guests to wear a mask on the — thing. we ask our guests to wear a mask on the rides. will thing. we ask our guests to wear a mask on the rides.— thing. we ask our guests to wear a mask on the rides. will a mask day on? it
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mask on the rides. will a mask day on? it does- _ mask on the rides. will a mask day on? it does. people _ mask on the rides. will a mask day on? it does. people have - mask on the rides. will a mask day on? it does. people have a - mask on the rides. will a mask day i on? it does. people have a tendency to scream and _ on? it does. people have a tendency to scream and shout _ on? it does. people have a tendency to scream and shout on _ on? it does. people have a tendency to scream and shout on a _ on? it does. people have a tendency to scream and shout on a ride. - on? it does. people have a tendency to scream and shout on a ride. it - on? it does. people have a tendency to scream and shout on a ride. it is i to scream and shout on a ride. it is for everyone's safety.— for everyone's safety. what about food and drink? _ for everyone's safety. what about food and drink? it _ for everyone's safety. what about food and drink? it will— for everyone's safety. what about food and drink? it will be - for everyone's safety. what about food and drink? it will be taken i food and drink? it will be taken awa at food and drink? it will be taken away at the _ food and drink? it will be taken away at the moment. - food and drink? it will be taken away at the moment. fish - food and drink? it will be taken away at the moment. fish and| food and drink? it will be taken - away at the moment. fish and chips and hotdog — away at the moment. fish and chips and hotdog skill taste great. i and hotdog skill taste great. believe and hotdog skill taste great. i believe there is a threat. it is a special year for the pleasure beach. we are celebrating 125 years this year~ _ we are celebrating 125 years this year. twice as long as disneyland. we are _ year. twice as long as disneyland. we are proud of that. we have a hot ice show. _ we are proud of that. we have a hot ice show, halloween. it is a big year— ice show, halloween. it is a big year and — ice show, halloween. it is a big yearand we're ice show, halloween. it is a big year and we're really proud of it. time _ year and we're really proud of it. time to— year and we're really proud of it. time to get— year and we're really proud of it. time to get crowds back to back. we want people to come back to the park and have _ want people to come back to the park and have a _ want people to come back to the park and have a great time. time want people to come back to the park and have a great time.— and have a great time. time for another go _ and have a great time. time for another go round. _ and have a great time. time for another go round. i— and have a great time. time for another go round. i cannot - and have a great time. time for i another go round. i cannot believe and have a great time. time for - another go round. i cannot believe i am not allowed of yet. i had to
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experience the g4s once again. —— i have. credit to our technical team. if i am able to broadcast live from the roller—coaster, as it shoots me around at 50 miles an hour. if he has not seen my breakfast yet, it might be coming. —— if you have not. flipping heck! he is such a good sport. well done. well endured. this he is such a good sport. well done.
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well endured.— well endured. this is where it s-eeds well endured. this is where it speeds up _ well endured. this is where it speeds up again. _ you did a piece saying science said screaming out. it was proved to your heart rate lowest if you let it all out and scream. i am lowest if you let it all out and scream. iam not lowest if you let it all out and scream. i am not sure about hysterical tackling did you say the silent screen is naked? take us to the big event happening tomorrow. the grand national is the ultimate roller—coaster. it is back. could it finally be the year we see a first female winner? rachel blackmore needs a race to achieve this.
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tabitha is realising her lifetime dream tomorrow. for her it is a family affair. a lifelong dream is about to come true for tabatha worsley. it is causing quite a stir on the family farm as she prepares to ruffle feathers by riding in the grand national. with her mum georgie, also her trainer, following her rather nervously every step of the way. an absolute quivering wreck. she will be sheet white in the morning. there will be a bit of excitement as well. i think i will spend a lot of time sitting down, absolutely terrifying. it is so exciting. it is dream land, to be honest. i never thought we would have
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a runner in the grand national and certainly not ridden by tabatha. her daughter broke her back in a fall on 2017 before jumping back into the saddle. she has had injuries over the years. you want your children to follow their dreams but i wish she had taken up tiddlywinks. a lot of people would say i am silly. it was one of those things. i have had worse falls. plenty of jockeys are far worse off. i got back in three months and broke my collarbone. she takes any pain for the team. it includes her brother and sister—in—law. this is what the grand national is all about, a tiny family stables taking on the elite of the sport. do not tell the horse to its face it is a rank outsider because it is in good form. we are a tiny little yard. he has top flight form.
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that's why he is only 100—1 because of who we are. both jockey and horse had success over the grand national fences two years ago. can they repeat that in the big one, the grand national itself? return to the relief of —— it was cancelled last yearand makes a big return to the relief of everyone around, albeit without the crowds drawing them home. it is behind closed doors. it is running the race. whoever wins, there is always an amazing story. whether it is a rags to riches story or the first female jockey. so many great tales. an unbelievable opportunity for us as a family. to be doing it as a family, it makes it even more special. we will all be there together and a proper team. this is proof you can dream about stuff and it can actually happen, with my daughter.
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she said she would ride in the grand national since she was this high. sub lieutenant has neverfallen in a race. do not mention it because they are a superstitious family. they will not be buying new outfits for the occasion. nothing new. not new underwear or anything. it will be stuff that has been worn. if we can just get round, it will be unbelievable. we cannot believe it is actually possible. whatever happens, they have already been celebrating this week with the arrival of a potential aintree in that case, i pronounced it the american way. on the farm, they refer to the horse and dave, named
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after the man who helped them by the horse. do not look to him on the betting slip or sweepstakes because he is not in the race. i will be careful. good luck to everyone tomorrow. it is a very different event that the challenge remains exactly the same. it is an event where you get to know is challenging the elite. —— minnows. cast your minds back to this time last year, april 2020, it was the sunniest april on record, warmer than average for this time of year. what a difference a year makes! it is cold. cold air filling its way
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south across the uk. we are holding on to the market conditions this morning for some. over the next few days you will notice things will feel cold and i will be snow showers around across parts of scotland. wet and windy weather in the south and south—east as well and a return to overnight frosts. all down to the fact we have a cold front working its way south. hold up to care will come down from the north. the cold air is pushing its way across ireland and down into england and wales. patchy rain as to whether front flips south. there is sunshine across scotland and northern ireland. sharon is coming down on the brisk northerly wind, falling as snow across scotland. quite a lot of
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sunshine. in scotland. feeling chilly stops the panda cloud across wales, towards east anglia. much of the south of england sticks with the sunny spells. —— is the vicar cloud across wales. not great for the middle part of april. this evening and tonight, we will lose the cloud gradually in the south of the clearest skies and further snow showers across scotland. some towns and cities getting down to —3, —4, code in more rural spots. tomorrow there will be a weather front across there will be a weather front across the near continent. —— cooler and more rural spots. it will be a disappointing day in the likes of kent and essex and east sussex. away
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from the south—east corner for the rest of the uk, a day of sunny spells and cold wintry showers. shakiness in the south. a cold feeling day. still the northerly wind with us. it will be another cold start to the day, sub zero temperatures with a sharp frost testing on sunday. more sunshine on sunday. proud and patchy showers clearing away. still a northerly breeze bringing the wintry showers and temperatures not great. most of us could just about see 10 degrees in the south west. it will warm up if you bear with the weather into next week. for anyone who is managing to go out on monday, hospitality, you will need to wrap up. bring a brolly as well.
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the 74th british academy film awards are being held this weekend at the royal albert hall, honouring the best national and foreign films of the past year. instead of walking the red carpet, stars will instead be tuning in virtually to see who wins the prestigious awards. the nominees were announced last month, and we can take a look at some of those now. we not only accept the tyranny of the marketplace, we embrace it. we gladly throw the yoke of the tyranny of the dollar on and led by yet our whole lives. of the dollar on and led by yet our whole lives-— whole lives. don't get that. don't aet whole lives. don't get that. don't net that. whole lives. don't get that. don't get that- you _ whole lives. don't get that. don't get that. you are _ whole lives. don't get that. don't get that. you are and _ whole lives. don't get that. don't get that. you are and ulsterman. whole lives. don't get that. don't - get that. you are and ulsterman. how am i an get that. you are and ulsterman. how am i an old — get that. you are and ulsterman. how am i an old woman? _
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get that. you are and ulsterman. how am i an old woman? -- _ get that. you are and ulsterman. how am i an old woman? —— and old woman. who is— am i an old woman? —— and old woman. who is going— am i an old woman? —— and old woman. who is going to— am i an old woman? —— and old woman. who is going to be— am i an old woman? —— and old woman. who is going to be with _ am i an old woman? —— and old woman. who is going to be with you? _ am i an old woman? —— and old woman. who is going to be with you? mgr- am i an old woman? -- and old woman. who is going to be with you?— who is going to be with you? my mum is aooin who is going to be with you? my mum is oooin to who is going to be with you? my mum is going to come _ who is going to be with you? my mum is going to come back. _ who is going to be with you? my mum is going to come back. the _ who is going to be with you? my mum is going to come back. the next - is going to come back. the next generations _ is going to come back. the next generations can _ is going to come back. the next generations can know _ is going to come back. the next generations can know where - is going to come back. the next. generations can know where they is going to come back. the next - generations can know where they came from. the line thatjoins them to theirforebears. isn't from. the line thatjoins them to their forebears. isn't that what you always say?— their forebears. isn't that what you alwa ssa ? ~ ., ,, always say? something like that. she has to -a always say? something like that. she has to pay for— always say? something like that. she has to pay for her— always say? something like that. she has to pay for her incompetence? - always say? something like that. she has to pay for her incompetence? is i has to pay for her incompetence? [£3 it has to pay for her incompetence? it about money chamakh now. is it about what people think? it is about ou. i am about what people think? it is about you- i am facing _ about what people think? it is about you. i am facing it! _ the awards take place over two nights, with edith bowman and dermot o'leary hosting on sunday. edith joins us now. morning to you. good morning. how
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are you? ifeel a little bit like tan on that roller—coaster. that is my information right now. tan on that roller-coaster. that is my information right now.- my information right now. mega excited and _ my information right now. mega excited and slightly _ my information right now. mega excited and slightly check- my information right now. mega excited and slightly check dishes. yes. really excited to be able to celebrate these films. they have given us these stories and escapism during the past year. ioiroi’hat given us these stories and escapism during the past year.— during the past year. what will it be like? the _ during the past year. what will it be like? the only _ during the past year. what will it be like? the only real— during the past year. what will it be like? the only real difference | during the past year. what will it i be like? the only real difference is that the royal _ be like? the only real difference is that the royal albert _ be like? the only real difference is that the royal albert hall- be like? the only real difference is that the royal albert hall will- be like? the only real difference is that the royal albert hall will be i that the royal albert hall will be more empty. dermot and i will be in the royal albert hall with nice music, live citation readers. some of the names announced, tom hiddleston, cynthia reid lies in the studio also a massive virtual audience. film fans and the public arejoining us factually audience. film fans and the public are joining us factually as we record it. the idea is all the nominees willjoin us virtually from
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around the world. everyone will be there together, being part of the show in some way shape or form. goad show in some way shape or form. good mornino b show in some way shape or form. good morning by the — show in some way shape or form. good morning by the way- — show in some way shape or form. good morning by the way. good _ show in some way shape or form. good morning by the way. good morning. i morning by the way. good morning. the are morning by the way. good morning. they are all — morning by the way. good morning. they are all at _ morning by the way. good morning. they are all at home. _ morning by the way. good morning. they are all at home. some - morning by the way. good morning. they are all at home. some people | they are all at home. some people will be on zoom. in theory you could have a major star stressing as they wish. sitting at home, they might be just chilling. they could be in a tracksuit bottoms, it could be a whole different thing. it tracksuit bottoms, it could be a whole different thing.— tracksuit bottoms, it could be a whole different thing. it could be like most of _ whole different thing. it could be like most of us _ whole different thing. it could be like most of us for _ whole different thing. it could be like most of us for the _ whole different thing. it could be like most of us for the last - whole different thing. it could be like most of us for the last year, | like most of us for the last year, dressed from the waist up. what has been lovely is the award season has been lovely is the award season has been so encouraging. everyone has taken the opportunity, a real chance to get dressed up. that is part of
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the fun of it. a massive event to get the heels out, get the make—up on and get your hair done, that kind of thing. most of them will make an effort. ., ., ,~' of thing. most of them will make an effort. . ., , ., of thing. most of them will make an effort. . . ., ., of thing. most of them will make an effort. ., ., o, ., ., , effort. can i ask? you love movies. everybody — effort. can i ask? you love movies. everybody loves — effort. can i ask? you love movies. everybody loves midis. _ effort. can i ask? you love movies. everybody loves midis. what - effort. can i ask? you love movies. everybody loves midis. what we i effort. can i ask? you love movies. i everybody loves midis. what we have not been able to do is to go to the cinema. —— the movies. i quite like to go to the movies, like a lot of people. maybe it is not that far away. it has been very different, hasn't it? it away. it has been very different, hasn't it? ., , , , hasn't it? it has been very different _ hasn't it? it has been very different yeah. _ hasn't it? it has been very different yeah. what - hasn't it? it has been very different yeah. what good j hasn't it? it has been very i different yeah. what good to hasn't it? it has been very - different yeah. what good to come out of it, we have seen the majority of films still not released on streaming services are quite a lot of the big sounds. they have pushed themselves back. that has given way for a lot of smaller, independent
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films to have their moment and shine and grab the headlines. films like sound of metal. moving forward, i would love the cinema to embrace these firms who have not had their moments on the big screen to be seen by an audience in the cinema. it feels like it is around the corner and we're about to get back into cinema. it was so emotional —— i got to see some films in the little window we had. it makes is so grateful for things like that that we normally take for granted. it was a 'o . i do we normally take for granted. it was ajoy. i do remember— we normally take for granted. it was a joy. i do remember going - we normally take for granted. it was a joy. i do remember going to - we normally take for granted. it was a joy. i do remember going to the i a joy. i do remember going to the cinema stop it was joyful. a joy. i do remember going to the cinema stop it wasjoyful. iie
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a joy. i do remember going to the cinema stop it was joyful. cinema stop it was 'oyful. he took his composes — cinema stop it was 'oyful. he took his composers and — cinema stop it was joyful. he took his composers and huge _ cinema stop it was joyful. he took his composers and huge actors, i his composers and huge actors, really influential composers. when you have spoken to them about people not going into cinema, especially composers, the experience of sound all around, composers, the experience of sound allaround, how composers, the experience of sound all around, how have they felt about it? has it changed attitudes? not in terms of quality that in terms of how they will touch the audience. it is not something i had talked much about. one thing which came out of one of my chants, two people who started their composing career on social network, they are nominated in one category twice. they had to record one school remotely. every orchestra member was recorded individually and they had to piece it together. when you hear the score
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for manc, you cannot believe how beautiful it is. a lot have had to adapt had a record the scores. lovely had. adapt had a record the scores. lovely had-— adapt had a record the scores. lovely had. adapt had a record the scores. lovel had. ., ,, , ., , ., lovely had. thank you. it hides a multitude of _ lovely had. thank you. it hides a multitude of sins! _ the ee bafta film awards start tomorrow night at 8 o'clock on bbc two, while edith's podcast is called soundtracking. you're watching bbc breakfast.
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this is bbc news. i'm annita mcveigh with the latest headlines the government announces its plans to reopen international travel in england — if you want to go on holiday you will have to pay for a coronavirus test. airlines argue the cost is too high, and the transport secretary agrees. i think overall, the pricing should be lower and the reason i say that specifically is i'm looking at what's happening in other countries and i do notice there is a very big variation so we are committing as a government to work to drive those costs down. have you booked a holiday abroad this summer? are you willing to pay hundreds of pounds more for a covid test or will you have a staycation in the uk instead? you can get in touch with me on this on twitter, i'm on @annita—mcveigh and use the hashtag bbc your questions.

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