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tv   BBC News with Katty and Christian  BBC News  April 8, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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this is bbc news — the white house joins the calls for calm in northern ireland, after yet another night of violence. full blown sectarian clashes broke out last night in west belfast, scenes which have been unanimously condemned by the northern ireland assembly the clashes between northern ireland's catholic and protestant communities threaten an already fragile peace. 50 police officers have been injured in the violence. president biden makes his first moves on gun control, calling the mass shootings in the us an epidemic and an embarrassment. also in the programme... a medical expert on the stand at the derek chauvin trial says george floyd died from a lack of oxygen. plus, the mrs sri lanka beauty contest that ended in tears, after an onstage bust up.
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hello, i'm laura trevelyan in washington, clive myrie is in london. police in northern ireland say last night's violence in west belfast was the worst they've seen in years, a return to the rioting that so many hoped was behind them. during an emergency session of the northern ireland assembly, politicians on all sides condemned the violence, which has been going on for over a week now. the white house joined the chorus calling for calm. the worst of the rioting was in the west of the city, on either side of a wall dividing the largely protestant loyalist and mainly catholic nationalist communities. our ireland correspondent, emma vardy, looks at the roots of the violence. sirens blare. on an already febrile situation,
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more fuel on the fire. shouting. at one of belfast�*s peace lines last night, the peace was broken. in the hands of teenagers, petrol bombs, thrown in both directions over the wall. each evening, these gates are locked to keep the mainly protestant and catholic communities apart. now forced open, rammed by cars and battered closed by police. amidst a running battle between crowds on each side. it's hard to control. lots of kids, when they see someone doing it, theyjoin in. who is encouraging it? the loyalist politicians because they got brexit in and it isn't working. it will take months now for this to be repaired, if ever.
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as the fighting continued between belfast�*s shankill and springfield road, local priests tried to warn young people of the danger, themselves in harm's way. the to and fro attacks, which lasted over an hour have just been interrupted by the arrival of this line of land rovers, who pushed the crowd back from this side of the peace wall. earlier, on the other side of the wall, in the loyalist shankill road, a bus was hijacked and set alight. the disorder last night was at a scale we have not seen in recent years in belfast or further afield. the fact that it was sectarian violence, there were large groups on both sides of the gates at lanark way, again it's something we haven't seen for a number of years. in loyalist communities, who are staunchly british, there is a backlash over the brexit deal, which sets northern ireland apart from the rest of the uk. 19—year—old joel was himself
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arrested in a riot over easter and released without charge. he tells me he was looking out for a friend, but many who have become involved are even younger. why do you think this is happening? i don't think young people really understand the details in terms of the irish sea border. what they are being told and seeing reflected in the media is that sinn fein are winning, the republicans are winning, and that our identity is under attack. when they hear those words and that stuff and then they are told, "all right, and the way you can help "is going out there and throwing bombs, sticks and "stones at people," they are more than willing to do so. people will say, why were you there in the first place? wouldn't it be better to go home? someone i care about was in trouble and i don't think there's anything someone can blame you for or accuse me blame me for or accuse me of wrongdoing. as the clean—up operation
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began in belfast, political leaders gathered for an emergency meeting at stormont to try and bring about calm. there can be no place in our society for violence or the threat of violence and it must stop. what we saw last night at lanark way interface was, i think, a very dangerous escalation of events of recent days, and it's utterly deplorable. there is concern the gates have been opened on something more reminiscent of northern ireland's days of old and they may be difficult to close. that was emma vardy, the bbc�*s ireland correspondent, who joins us now from belfast. are the authorities braced again for another night of trouble? the? are the authorities braced again for another night of trouble? they are, and actually — another night of trouble? they are, and actually in _ another night of trouble? they are, and actually in the _ another night of trouble? they are, and actually in the last _ another night of trouble? they are, and actually in the last hour - another night of trouble? they are, and actually in the last hour some l and actually in the last hour some more _ and actually in the last hour some more has — and actually in the last hour some more has developed. there has been a crowd _ more has developed. there has been a crowd of— more has developed. there has been a crowd of several hundred people gathering again in a similar area to last night — gathering again in a similar area to last night. at this time the crowds we have _ last night. at this time the crowds we have seen, anyway, pictures of on the nationalist area of the peace wall, _ the nationalist area of the peace wall, what near to the areas you saw
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this time _ wall, what near to the areas you saw this time the — wall, what near to the areas you saw this time the crowds we have seen, anyway, _ this time the crowds we have seen, anyway, pictures of on the nationalist area of the peace wall, near nationalist area of the peace wall, hear to— nationalist area of the peace wall, hear to the — nationalist area of the peace wall, near to the areas you saw those pictures. — near to the areas you saw those pictures. to _ near to the areas you saw those pictures, to last night, and this time _ pictures, to last night, and this time a — pictures, to last night, and this time a line _ pictures, to last night, and this time a line of land rovers appeared have with _ time a line of land rovers appeared have with a — time a line of land rovers appeared have with a water cannon. we have 'ust have with a water cannon. we have just had _ have with a water cannon. we have just had some pictures from the police _ just had some pictures from the police who are using the water cannon — police who are using the water cannon against the crowds gathered there~ _ cannon against the crowds gathered there it _ cannon against the crowds gathered there. it looks like a few missiles, rocks. _ there. it looks like a few missiles, rocks, petrol bombs have also been thrown _ rocks, petrol bombs have also been thrown at _ rocks, petrol bombs have also been thrown at police lines again tonight, _ thrown at police lines again tonight, so yes, they are certainly braced _ tonight, so yes, they are certainly braced in— tonight, so yes, they are certainly braced in the same way they have been _ braced in the same way they have been on _ braced in the same way they have been on a — braced in the same way they have been on a succession of nights now. is been on a succession of nights now. is there _ been on a succession of nights now. is there a _ been on a succession of nights now. is there a sense that for the loyalist community that the peace agreement in the late 90s, that really left them with nothing? and that the brexit deal now with this border town the irish sea, effectively cutting off northern ireland from the rest of the united kingdom, that this is adding fuel to that fire? ~ ., ~ kingdom, that this is adding fuel to that fire? ~ ., ,, ., kingdom, that this is adding fuel to that fire? ~ .,~ ., , .,~ that fire? well, make no mistake, the good friday _ that fire? well, make no mistake, the good friday agreement - that fire? well, make no mistake, the good friday agreement and i that fire? well, make no mistake, l the good friday agreement and the belfast _ the good friday agreement and the belfast agreement in the late 1990s did bring _ belfast agreement in the late 1990s did bring an end to a lot of the violence. _ did bring an end to a lot of the violence, but you will often hear it said here — violence, but you will often hear it said here today that perhaps it ended — said here today that perhaps it ended violence then, but didn't
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necessarily lead to reconciliation and really — necessarily lead to reconciliation and really that peace agreement only became _ and really that peace agreement only became really tested in recent years by brexit— became really tested in recent years by brexit because suddenly it created — by brexit because suddenly it created all divisions sort of came back— created all divisions sort of came back to _ created all divisions sort of came back to the — created all divisions sort of came back to the fore and it put people on different sides of a new argument, so it really tested the peace _ argument, so it really tested the peace agreement right from the word io peace agreement right from the word go with— peace agreement right from the word go with the referendum and the outcome — go with the referendum and the outcome of the brexit deal, which has created this new border in trade terms _ has created this new border in trade terms in _ has created this new border in trade terms in the — has created this new border in trade terms in the irish sea, loyalists and lc— terms in the irish sea, loyalists and k as — terms in the irish sea, loyalists and k as a _ terms in the irish sea, loyalists and lc as a weakening of their british— and lc as a weakening of their british identity. so throughout the negotiations there was a lot of emphasis put on the fact that there can be _ emphasis put on the fact that there can be no— emphasis put on the fact that there can be no checks across the land border _ can be no checks across the land border and — can be no checks across the land border and that was needed for peace, — border and that was needed for peace, but now we are seeing the focus _ peace, but now we are seeing the focus on — peace, but now we are seeing the focus on the effect on peace that has been — focus on the effect on peace that has been created by having a new border _ has been created by having a new border somewhere else, which is down the irish— border somewhere else, which is down the irish sea _ border somewhere else, which is down the irish sea. yes, it isjust in trade — the irish sea. yes, it isjust in trade terms, it is really bar codes and paperwork when you dig into it, but it— and paperwork when you dig into it, but it affects what goes to the hearts — but it affects what goes to the hearts of _ but it affects what goes to the hearts of people's ideology and in unionist— hearts of people's ideology and in unionist and loyalist communities they feel— unionist and loyalist communities they feel that undermines their connection with the uk and they feel
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really— connection with the uk and they feel really sold _ connection with the uk and they feel really sold out and betrayed. let me 'ust really sold out and betrayed. let me just add _ really sold out and betrayed. let me just add it _ really sold out and betrayed. let me just add it isn't alljust a direct result— just add it isn't alljust a direct result of— just add it isn't alljust a direct result of brexit, there are layers to what — result of brexit, there are layers to what is— result of brexit, there are layers to what is going on here and local factors— to what is going on here and local factors as — to what is going on here and local factors as well.— to what is going on here and local factors as well. emma, i was there in belfast when _ factors as well. emma, i was there in belfast when the _ factors as well. emma, i was there in belfast when the good - factors as well. emma, i was there in belfast when the good friday . in belfast when the good friday agreement was signed, there was euphoria in the middle of the night, but has it failed to deliver on that fundamental of power—sharing? is fundamental of power—sharing? is that an element here? well, you know, _ that an element here? well, you know. we — that an element here? well, you know, we have seen power—sharing collapse _ know, we have seen power—sharing collapse in — know, we have seen power—sharing collapse in a — know, we have seen power—sharing collapse in a number of times over the years— collapse in a number of times over the years and really only got back up the years and really only got back up and _ the years and really only got back up and running recently, just before the pandemic kicked in after a three—year hiatus at stormont. has it delivered? look, northern ireland is a hugely— it delivered? look, northern ireland is a hugely different place than it was when — is a hugely different place than it was when you were here for the good friday— was when you were here for the good friday agreement negotiation, so on the one _ friday agreement negotiation, so on the one hand people will say, yes, look, _ the one hand people will say, yes, look. for— the one hand people will say, yes, look, for much of northern ireland, the bits— look, for much of northern ireland, the bits you — look, for much of northern ireland, the bits you don't see on the tv at the bits you don't see on the tv at the moment, it is a wonderful place and peopie — the moment, it is a wonderful place and people live completely different lives now. _ and people live completely different lives now, but when things like this happen, _ lives now, but when things like this happen, this is the worst we have seen _ happen, this is the worst we have seen for— happen, this is the worst we have seen for a — happen, this is the worst we have seen fora number of happen, this is the worst we have seen for a number of years in seen fora number of years in northern— seen for a number of years in northern ireland in terms of
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violence _ northern ireland in terms of violence on the streets and violence that has _ violence on the streets and violence that has turned into a bit of a sectarian _ that has turned into a bit of a sectarian conflict last night, it does — sectarian conflict last night, it does lead people to say, well, we have _ does lead people to say, well, we have this — does lead people to say, well, we have this peace agreement. why i think— have this peace agreement. why i think so— have this peace agreement. why i think so fragile? it is because of underlying tensions, big disagreements between the two big fundamental parties, the big tribes of politics, unionism and nationalism, which continue to be almost _ nationalism, which continue to be almost incompatible, if you like, so on one _ almost incompatible, if you like, so on one had — almost incompatible, if you like, so on one had northern ireland is a hugely— on one had northern ireland is a hugely changed place, but on the other— hugely changed place, but on the other hand there are always these bil other hand there are always these big divisions and is very easy in many— big divisions and is very easy in many aspects of life to come back to the big _ many aspects of life to come back to the big dividing line in politics in northern— the big dividing line in politics in northern ireland. of course, that doesn't _ northern ireland. of course, that doesn't always lead to the kind of scenes— doesn't always lead to the kind of scenes we — doesn't always lead to the kind of scenes we are seeing here tonight, but you _ scenes we are seeing here tonight, but you had — scenes we are seeing here tonight, but you had a bit of a storm lately. you know. — but you had a bit of a storm lately. you know, tension is building during iockdown, _ you know, tension is building during lockdown, big divisions over brexit, the recent— lockdown, big divisions over brexit, the recent big row over the funeral we have _ the recent big row over the funeral we have been talking about in recent days has _ we have been talking about in recent days has all— we have been talking about in recent days has all come together and these are the _ days has all come together and these are the kind of scenes we are seeing developing _ are the kind of scenes we are seeing developing now. gk, are the kind of scenes we are seeing devel0ping now— are the kind of scenes we are seeing developing now. 0k, emma thank you for that. developing now. 0k, emma thank you forthat- emma _ developing now. 0k, emma thank you for that. emma vardy _ developing now. 0k, emma thank you for that. emma vardy there, - developing now. 0k, emma thank you for that. emma vardy there, northern j
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for that. emma vardy there, northern ireland correspond. i remember covering the troubles in northern ireland at the end of the 1990s and —— the end of the 1980s, the early 19905, —— the end of the 1980s, the early i990s, and to see those images of petrol bombs being thrown, young kids last night as well, part of the violence, the bricks, the stones, the mortars could... it brings back memories that no one wants to relive, particularly the communities over there and it is appalling. i over there and it is appalling. i know, and it is extraordinary, isn't it? sectarian tensions there in the united kingdom that most people in britain don't really see, but as you say i remember that as well from reporting in northern ireland. it is quite an extraordinary aspect to life in britain. more than 300 people are shot every day here in the united states. that was the stark reminder from president biden today, as he unveiled measures to curb what he called an epidemic of gun violence, following a number of mass shootings here. it's his first attempt to try to bring in gun controls since taking office, and among the steps outlined are plans to stop the spread
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of homemade weapons that can't be traced by the authorities, more than 300 people are shot every day and new restrictions on modifying weapons to make them more lethal. mr biden appealed for action from congress, for the changes. whether congress acts or not, i'm going to use or not, i'm going to use all of the resources at my disposal as president to keep the american people safe from gun violence _ but there is much more that congress can do to help that effort. and they can do it right now. they have offered plenty of thoughts and prayers, members of congress, but they have passed not a single new federal law to reduce gun violence. enough prayers. time for some action. a short while ago we spoke to ryan deitsch, a survivor of the 2018 florida parkland school shooting and founder of the campaign group, march for our lives. ryan, what did you make of what president biden had to say on gun control today?— control today? well, what the
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president _ control today? well, what the president said _ control today? well, what the president said today - control today? well, what the president said today was - control today? well, what the - president said today was certainly a change _ president said today was certainly a change of— president said today was certainly a change of pace for the way the white house _ change of pace for the way the white house has _ change of pace for the way the white house has responded to the issue of uii'i house has responded to the issue of gun violence in the past. and certainly— gun violence in the past. and certainly one that i look forward to, as _ certainly one that i look forward to, as an— certainly one that i look forward to, as an activist for gun violence prevention — to, as an activist for gun violence prevention. certainly, i have some concerns— prevention. certainly, i have some concerns over some of the funding that is— concerns over some of the funding that is being provided to state police, — that is being provided to state police, but beyond that i am absolutely ecstatic over the cultural _ absolutely ecstatic over the cultural shift that seems to be occurring. _ cultural shift that seems to be occurring, both in the department of justice _ occurring, both in the department of justice and _ occurring, both in the department of justice and in the executive branch overaii~ _ justice and in the executive branch overall. , ., ~ overall. the president even talked about trying _ overall. the president even talked about trying to _ overall. the president even talked about trying to bring _ overall. the president even talked about trying to bring in _ overall. the president even talked about trying to bring in some - overall. the president even talked about trying to bring in some kind | about trying to bring in some kind of assault weapons ban. i covered the ending of that man back in 200a. i stood in the gun shop and i held one of these things, and a think it was a aris and i couldn't understand why someone not on a battlefield would want to have won these things in their house. can you understand what some in the gun lobby say is their right to have access to that
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kind of weapon? and, you know, the suggestion that president biden and people like you potentially want to take that right awayand i will say first and foremost that i believe that everyone in this country, if they are looking for a right to defend their home, their family and their way— defend their home, their family and their way of life, i fully support them _ their way of life, i fully support them in — their way of life, i fully support them in that quest to achieve that right, _ them in that quest to achieve that right, but— them in that quest to achieve that right, but at the same time we have to be _ right, but at the same time we have to be fully— right, but at the same time we have to be fully measuring that right with the — to be fully measuring that right with the writer of an existing human beings— with the writer of an existing human being's right to live. —— we have to being's right to live. —— we have to be aware _ being's right to live. —— we have to be aware that we are losing too many peopie _ be aware that we are losing too many peopie in— be aware that we are losing too many people in our society, too many men, women _ people in our society, too many men, women and _ people in our society, too many men, women and children every day throughout this society, especially in black— throughout this society, especially in black and brown communities, that faces violets at a rate, especially in regards — faces violets at a rate, especially in regards to state violence carried out by _ in regards to state violence carried out by police. find in regards to state violence carried out by police-— out by police. and when president biden sa s out by police. and when president biden says that _ out by police. and when president biden says that what _ out by police. and when president biden says that what he _ out by police. and when president| biden says that what he announced todayis biden says that what he announced today is just a first step, are you hopeful that there will be
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meaningful change finally, given the deadlock in congress? i meaningful change finally, given the deadlock in congress?— deadlock in congress? i believe that liven the deadlock in congress? i believe that given the change — deadlock in congress? i believe that given the change of— deadlock in congress? i believe that given the change of pace _ deadlock in congress? i believe that given the change of pace from - deadlock in congress? i believe that given the change of pace from the i given the change of pace from the department ofjustice and from the white _ department ofjustice and from the white house over all, that we will see a _ white house over all, that we will see a significant change and we will see a significant change and we will see it _ see a significant change and we will see it soon — see a significant change and we will see it soon. this is an issue that cannot— see it soon. this is an issue that cannot be — see it soon. this is an issue that cannot be ignored, as the president has said _ cannot be ignored, as the president has said. this is an epidemic and i fully— has said. this is an epidemic and i fully agree — has said. this is an epidemic and i fully agree with president biden in his statement. this is an international embarrassment. the united _ international embarrassment. the united states is absolutely failing at keeping safe their own citizens, keeping _ at keeping safe their own citizens, keeping safe people in places of worship, — keeping safe people in places of worship, in places of shopping, in places— worship, in places of shopping, in places of— worship, in places of shopping, in places of education and just on classic— places of education and just on classic american streets. it is an absolute — classic american streets. it is an absolute absurdity that this violence has gone on for this long. well beyond my lifetime, and i for one believe wholeheartedly that given _ one believe wholeheartedly that given the work that is being done, notjust_ given the work that is being done, notjust by— given the work that is being done, notjust by the given the work that is being done, not just by the white given the work that is being done, notjust by the white house, but by countless _ notjust by the white house, but by countless activists and violence intervention programmes across the country. _ intervention programmes across the country, that we will see a change and we _ country, that we will see a change and we will— country, that we will see a change and we will see it soon, but more
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than _ and we will see it soon, but more than anything we need that support from the _ than anything we need that support from the federal government, from the state _ from the federal government, from the state government. ryan deitsch speaking to us a little earlier there. it's day nine of the trial of the former police officer, derek chauvin, in minneapolis. he's accused of murder in the death of george floyd, after kneeling on his neck for more than nine minutes. prosecutors are trying to prove that mr floyd's death was due to asphyxiation, while mr chauvin's defence claims it was due to illegal drugs in his system and his underlying health conditions. today the court has been hearing from medical expert, dr martin tobin, who was asked if mr floyd's compromised health contributed to his death. do you have an opinion to a reasonable degree of medical certainty as to _ whether a person who had none of those pre—existing health conditions — a healthy person — would have died under the same circumstances as mr floyd? yes, a healthy person subjected to what mr floyd was subjected | to would have died as a result of what he was subjected to. i
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dr martin tobin there. the bbc�*s larry madowo is outside the courthouse for us. how george floyd died is at the heart of this trial, so what impact do you think dr martin tobin's testimony had today? dr do you think dr martin tobin's testimony had today? dr martin tobin is the star witness _ testimony had today? dr martin tobin is the star witness of _ testimony had today? dr martin tobin is the star witness of this _ testimony had today? dr martin tobin is the star witness of this entire - is the star witness of this entire trial and — is the star witness of this entire trial and he delivered. he was the most _ trial and he delivered. he was the most effective witness yet indirectly proving that george floyd died from _ indirectly proving that george floyd died from an oxygen deficiency, which _ died from an oxygen deficiency, which led — died from an oxygen deficiency, which led to brain damage and led to his heart— which led to brain damage and led to his heart stopping, and he blamed it on three _ his heart stopping, and he blamed it on three key things. he was lying on the concrete, which made it hard for him to— the concrete, which made it hard for him to breathe, he was handcuffed behind _ him to breathe, he was handcuffed behind his— him to breathe, he was handcuffed behind his back and there were several— behind his back and there were several officer's bodies on his body — several officer's bodies on his body and _ several officer's bodies on his body. and he talked about the process — body. and he talked about the process of breathing so effectively that he _ process of breathing so effectively that he was instructing the jury to touch— that he was instructing the jury to touch their— that he was instructing the jury to touch their necks so he could e>
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over three — technical morning that went almost over three hours and he had the jury's_ over three hours and he had the jury's attention, they were paying notes. _ jury's attention, they were paying notes, they were listening, looking at the _ notes, they were listening, looking at the actual exhibits, the materials he had, the animations and charts _ materials he had, the animations and charts it— materials he had, the animations and charts. it was such a gripping, dramatic— charts. it was such a gripping, dramatic testimony that all of us who watched it feel like we were pre-med — who watched it feel like we were pre—med and were ready to apply to medical— pre—med and were ready to apply to medical school, even on a day like this _ medical school, even on a day like this i_ medical school, even on a day like this iguess— medical school, even on a day like this. i guess you could say, he was ciinicai~ _ this. i guess you could say, he was clinical. ., , this. i guess you could say, he was clinical. . , , clinical. indeed. so larry, is it the case _ clinical. indeed. so larry, is it the case that _ clinical. indeed. so larry, is it the case that dr _ clinical. indeed. so larry, is it the case that dr martin - clinical. indeed. so larry, is it the case that dr martin tobin | clinical. indeed. so larry, is it. the case that dr martin tobin has completely contradicted the defence? he tried to do a job of that. for instance. — he tried to do a job of that. for instance. it _ he tried to do a job of that. for instance, it came out yesterday and testimony— instance, it came out yesterday and testimony about whether george floyd admitted _ testimony about whether george floyd admitted during his arrest that he did take _ admitted during his arrest that he did take drugs and later on the prosecution got the chief investigator to say, no, prosecution got the chief investigatorto say, no, he heard, i ain't— investigatorto say, no, he heard, i ain't do— investigatorto say, no, he heard, i ain't do no— investigatorto say, no, he heard, i ain't do no drugs. it came out today that he _ ain't do no drugs. it came out today that he had — ain't do no drugs. it came out today that he had fentanyl and his system, an opioid _ that he had fentanyl and his system, an opioid. the defence, eric nelson, tried to _ an opioid. the defence, eric nelson, tried to get — an opioid. the defence, eric nelson, tried to get him to say that because
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he had _ tried to get him to say that because he had fentanyl in his system it could _ he had fentanyl in his system it could have led to death and the prosecution went back to clean up that testimony and say, when somebody dies because they have sentinel— somebody dies because they have sentinel in their system they first io sentinel in their system they first go into— sentinel in their system they first go into a — sentinel in their system they first go into a coma, and george floyd never— go into a coma, and george floyd never went— go into a coma, and george floyd never went into a coma. he talked about— never went into a coma. he talked about the — never went into a coma. he talked about the respiratory rate of 22. he said if— about the respiratory rate of 22. he said if george floyd had fentanyl in his system — said if george floyd had fentanyl in his system to a large amount, his respiratory— his system to a large amount, his respiratory rate would have been around _ respiratory rate would have been around ten, so he completely took apart— around ten, so he completely took apart the _ around ten, so he completely took apart the defence's case so far. i�*m apart the defence's case so far. i'm not sure if— apart the defence's case so far. i'm not sure if we _ apart the defence's case so far. j“n not sure if we have a list of the witnesses who are coming up, i don't think we do, but is it likely, then, that the defence are going to have to put forward some kind of medical expert to rebut the allegations that have been made by dr martin tobin? his suggestion that fentanyl did not play a part, underlying conditions didn't play a part in the death of george floyd?— didn't play a part in the death of george floyd? they intend to do that. george floyd? they intend to do that- they _ george floyd? they intend to do that. they indicated _ george floyd? they intend to do that. they indicated today - george floyd? they intend to do that. they indicated today they l george floyd? they intend to do i that. they indicated today they will be calling _ that. they indicated today they will be calling doctor andrew baker. he is the _ be calling doctor andrew baker. he is the head — be calling doctor andrew baker. he is the head of medical examiner and he conducted the autopsy on george
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floyd and _ he conducted the autopsy on george floyd and he concluded he died of a cardiac— floyd and he concluded he died of a cardiac arrest. what he did not say is that— cardiac arrest. what he did not say is that there — cardiac arrest. what he did not say is that there was oxygen deficiency that might have led to that, and so that might have led to that, and so that is— that might have led to that, and so that is why— that might have led to that, and so that is why the prosecution is not calling _ that is why the prosecution is not calling him, the defence is calling him. _ calling him, the defence is calling him. and — calling him, the defence is calling him, and yes, the defence will be bringing _ him, and yes, the defence will be bringing other medical experts. this is because _ bringing other medical experts. this is because the prosecution we understand will bring five medical experts _ understand will bring five medical experts to prove that, including an expert— experts to prove that, including an expert pathologist. that is a jamaica'sjob. we will we have just been _ jamaica'sjob. we will we have just been hearing from a toxicologist right— been hearing from a toxicologist right now — been hearing from a toxicologist right now. so it is a battle of the medical— right now. so it is a battle of the medical experts.— medical experts. thank you for re ”ortin medical experts. thank you for reporting their— medical experts. thank you for reporting their own _ medical experts. thank you for reporting their own idea - medical experts. thank you for - reporting their own idea absolutely gripping testimony. for those watching on bbc world news, we'll be right back. one of britain's richest men has been found stabbed to death at his home in dorset. 83—year—old sir richard sutton was a hotelier worth more than £300 million. sophie berman reports. worth more than £300 million, sir richard sutton, one of britain's richest men, found stabbed to death
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at his home in dorset. the 83—year—old hotelier counted london's five—star athenaeum among his property empire. last night, his body was found at his home near gillingham. a 60—year—old woman believed to be his wife was critically injured in the attack and is in a serious condition in hospital. dorset police say a vehicle linked to the incident was followed to london, where a 34—year—old man was arrested on suspicion of murder. he is believed to be known to the couple. sir richard's company paid tribute to him, saying his loss will be felt by all who have worked with him and his family, who have lost an incredible individual. sophie berman, bbc news. now, once again americans are waiting with bated breath to find out the results of an election involving mail in voting.
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what's at stake this time is whether or not workers at amazon in alabama want to join a union. the online shopping giant is the second biggest employer here in america, and this could be the first of its us warehouses to have a union. turnout is around 55%, perhaps a little lower than expected, with those pushing for unionization saying they want improved working conditions and better pay. the result is being delayed as amazon have questioned the legitimacy of hundreds of ballots. and the vote counting is under way! let's check in with our business correspondent, samira hussain.. hello there. is there a real likelihood that this could go through? likelihood that this could go throu~h? ~ ., ., ~' likelihood that this could go throu~h? ~ ., ., ,, _, ., through? well, look, the counting of the balance has— through? well, look, the counting of the balance hasjust _ through? well, look, the counting of the balance hasjust begun _ through? well, look, the counting of the balance hasjust begun about - the balance hasjust begun about half an— the balance hasjust begun about half an hour or 45 minutes ago and so far— half an hour or 45 minutes ago and so far it _ half an hour or 45 minutes ago and so far it seems it is going very much — so far it seems it is going very much in — so far it seems it is going very much in amazon's favour. in fact, there _ much in amazon's favour. in fact, there are — much in amazon's favour. in fact, there are more than 140 votes for amazon— there are more than 140 votes for amazon and i don't think the union has even _ amazon and i don't think the union has even cracked the 100 markjust
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yet. has even cracked the 100 markjust yet so— has even cracked the 100 markjust yet. so there are a lot of hopes that— yet. so there are a lot of hopes that were — yet. so there are a lot of hopes that were put in place or put on this particular vote because of the importance of the company and just when _ importance of the company and just when you _ importance of the company and just when you are thinking about unions in america. — when you are thinking about unions in america, they have really come down _ in america, they have really come down in _ in america, they have really come down in popularity, so i think a lot of peopie — down in popularity, so i think a lot of people have been looking to this is possibly— of people have been looking to this is possibly a turning point for unions — is possibly a turning point for unions in _ is possibly a turning point for unions in america. 30 is possibly a turning point for unions in america.— is possibly a turning point for unions in america. so what is amazon's _ unions in america. so what is amazon's argument - unions in america. so what is amazon's argument against l amazon's argument against unionisation?— amazon's argument against unionisation? ., ., ., unionisation? amazon, for its part, sa s that unionisation? amazon, for its part, says that it — unionisation? amazon, for its part, says that it offers _ unionisation? amazon, for its part, says that it offers some _ unionisation? amazon, for its part, says that it offers some of - unionisation? amazon, for its part, says that it offers some of the - unionisation? amazon, for its part, | says that it offers some of the most competitive jobs anywhere that it hires _ competitive jobs anywhere that it hires and — competitive jobs anywhere that it hires and that workers will not be better— hires and that workers will not be better protected under any kind of union. _ better protected under any kind of union. but— better protected under any kind of union, but for workers in this particular— union, but for workers in this particular plant, and as we have heard _ particular plant, and as we have heard anecdotally from workers and other— heard anecdotally from workers and other amazon warehouses across the country. _ other amazon warehouses across the country. the — other amazon warehouses across the country, the working conditions are poor. _ country, the working conditions are poor. they— country, the working conditions are poor, they don't get as many breaks and it— poor, they don't get as many breaks and it is— poor, they don't get as many breaks and it is difficult, gruelling work. and some — and it is difficult, gruelling work. and some people do believe that they are going _ and some people do believe that they are going to get better treatment if they do— are going to get better treatment if they do in— are going to get better treatment if they do in fact unionise. but i want
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to make _ they do in fact unionise. but i want to make sure that people understand that this _ to make sure that people understand that this is _ to make sure that people understand that this is notjust to make sure that people understand that this is not just about something that is happening at some tech company. amazon has fundamentally changed the way people work in _ fundamentally changed the way people work in america. so to see that a union— work in america. so to see that a union vote — work in america. so to see that a union vote is _ work in america. so to see that a union vote is happening in alabama is a significant moment, which is away— is a significant moment, which is away this— is a significant moment, which is away this vote goes. find is a significant moment, which is away this vote goes.— away this vote goes. and as era, there has — away this vote goes. and as era, there has been _ away this vote goes. and as era, there has been tonnes _ away this vote goes. and as era, there has been tonnes of - away this vote goes. and as era, i there has been tonnes of lobbying, hasn't there, both sides? tell us about that. hasn't there, both sides? tell us about that-— hasn't there, both sides? tell us about that. , ., ,, ., ., , about that. indeed, you know, i was s-ueakin about that. indeed, you know, i was speaking with _ about that. indeed, you know, i was speaking with one _ about that. indeed, you know, i was speaking with one of _ about that. indeed, you know, i was speaking with one of the _ about that. indeed, you know, i was speaking with one of the union - speaking with one of the union representatives early today and when she was _ representatives early today and when she was talking about the initial challenges to the ballot, so they were _ challenges to the ballot, so they were challenging the outside of the ballot. _ were challenging the outside of the ballot. so _ were challenging the outside of the ballot, so the envelope which contained the actual vote and she was saying that the contestants or the number of people or the number of ballots— the number of people or the number of ballots that were being disqualified was four to one, compared to amazon, for every ballot you saw _ compared to amazon, for every ballot you saw that — compared to amazon, for every ballot you saw that amazon was contesting for them _
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you saw that amazon was contesting for them versus the union contesting one. for them versus the union contesting one i_ for them versus the union contesting one~ ithink— for them versus the union contesting one. i think itjust goes to show how— one. i think itjust goes to show how worried amazon is, but any large corporation _ how worried amazon is, but any large corporation would be worried when it came _ corporation would be worried when it came to _ corporation would be worried when it came to any— corporation would be worried when it came to any kind of unionisation because — came to any kind of unionisation because of— came to any kind of unionisation because of the fear of what it might do to— because of the fear of what it might do to their— because of the fear of what it might do to their workforce. and because of the fear of what it might do to their workforce.— do to their workforce. and i know ou are do to their workforce. and i know you are keeping _ do to their workforce. and i know you are keeping a _ do to their workforce. and i know you are keeping a very _ do to their workforce. and i know you are keeping a very close - do to their workforce. and i know you are keeping a very close eye| do to their workforce. and i know l you are keeping a very close eye on the tally of the votes with your notebook. how long could this take, especially given all the challenges you are talking aboutso according to the board who is conducting the counting of the ballots, they are supposed to continue until all of the counting is done, but it is possible it could go way into the night and they may make a decision to take a break and reconvene sometime to take a break and reconvene sometim— to take a break and reconvene sometim ., ., ., , , ., , sometime tomorrow, but it is really u . sometime tomorrow, but it is really u- to sometime tomorrow, but it is really up to them — sometime tomorrow, but it is really up to them and _ sometime tomorrow, but it is really up to them and there _ sometime tomorrow, but it is really up to them and there is _ sometime tomorrow, but it is really up to them and there is no - sometime tomorrow, but it is really up to them and there is no clear- up to them and there is no clear decision— up to them and there is no clear decision to _ up to them and there is no clear decision to be made, so it may be a lon- decision to be made, so it may be a iong night— decision to be made, so it may be a long night for this correspondent. ah, long night for this correspondent. ah. well. — long night for this correspondent. ah, well, we know you've got stamina, samira hussain, aftersmall children, the pandemic and working from home, so good luck with that
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onenow, clive... when i think of a beauty queen pageant, what comes to mind is a gracious winner talking about her plans to save the world, and how much she loves animals and small children. the mrs sri lanka contest, however, went right off script. think battle of the beauty queens. yes, it all went wrong when push—pika de silva won the title and former winner — the current mrs world — carolinejurie was meant to crown her. instead, she pulled the crown off mrs de silva's head, claiming she couldn't win as she's divorced — which is against the rules. who knew? it all got very ugly and police later arrested mrsjurie after mrs de silva was left with head injuries. a happy ending — kind of — as mrs de silva pointed out she's actually separated and not divorced, so she's been re—crowned. what antiquated rules! i know, but ou would what antiquated rules! i know, but you would have — what antiquated rules! i know, but you would have thought _ what antiquated rules! i know, but you would have thought if- what antiquated rules! i know, but you would have thought if you - what antiquated rules! i know, but| you would have thought if you were
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going to pull the crown off you would have checked she actually was divorced and notjust separated. i mean, you've got to get it right? i mean, you've got to get it right? ! it turns out it is an ugly business, the beauty business! hello. no one can say it's been a warm day out there but temperatures have been a little bit higher than they have at any stage so far this week, and a less cold feel has helped if you got to see a bit of sunshine and there have been some sunny spells around today though in scotland, this weather front is moving south, bringing some rain into northern ireland and then pushing into parts of england and wales through the night. what's significant about this is that behind it, we're back to the arctic air. so, temperatures coming down again. that's going to lead to a cold weekend. so, this is the progression of that weather system out of northern ireland into northern england with that rain as we go deeper on through the evening. and then we open the door to that arctic air bringing plenty of snow showers into northern scotland as the night goes on. so, icy in places here
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to start the day tomorrow. strong winds especially in the northern isles gusting 60—70 mph for a time. so, possibly disruptive before easing later in the night. elsewhere in scotland away from those wintry showers and northern ireland in northern england, there will be a frost setting in where skies are clear. where you've got the cloud, though, for much of england and for wales, and the chance of seeing a bit of rain, temperatures will hold a few degrees above freezing. and that weather front with its occasional showery rain will make slow progress further south during friday, eventually reaching into southern england. for northern england, for northern ireland and scotland, we're in that arctic air mass and that means there will be some crisp sunshine, but the chance of catching a shower — rain, sleet, hail, snow — most likely to see that snow in northern scotland where it will be a cold day, though the wind easing a bit further. now into the weekend for many of us then, it's cold sunny spells, the chance of a wintry shower but at least for saturday this weather system brings the potentialfor some rain towards the far south
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or south—east of england. there is still something to play for — just how far north any rain will get here — but it will be quite a cold day, particularly where you've got the cloud as opposed to elsewhere where it's cold, but you've got the sunshine and the chance of a wintry shower. but pretty much wherever you are on saturday, temperatures are struggling. that system pulls away on sunday. before it does so, the chance of a bit of sleet and snow on its back edge, and then it's sunny spells and a scattering of wintry showers on sunday. and temperatures, yes — for most, single figures and frosty nights over the weekend.
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you're watching bbc news with me, laura trevelyan, in washington. clive myrie is in london. our top stories... 50 police officers have been injured in the violence as clashes between northern ireland's catholic and protestant communities threaten an already fragile peace. exploring the reasons for rioting. new analysis shows that those arrested in the capitol seige were more likely to come from areas which have seen significant declines in the white population. also in the programme.... as the us state of georgia lifts all coronavirus restrictions we'll speak live to the lieutenant governor about this, and the row over voting rights. and it's the must—have of the moment for those stuck at home — fancy diy meal kits for fine dining a la maison. even airlines are getting in on the action.
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the head chef of british airways explains all. the governor of georgia has declared that his state is 'open for business', lifting all remaining covid—19 restrictions. it means there is no longer a requirement to enforce social distancing rules, and the ban on gatherings will be eliminated. governor brian kemp says hard—working georgians cannot endure another year like the last one. small businesses, especially, have struggled to stay afloat and bring customers in, while keeping the virus out. from today, authorities won't be able to punish businesses who don't follow social distancing rules, although guidance will remain in place that georgians can decide themselves whether to follow. the governor is still urging people to remain vigilant and wear masks.
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georgia's lieutenant governor geoff duncan, a republican, joins us now from atlanta. thank you so much for being on the programme. so, there were 74,000 new coronavirus cases here in the united states on wednesday. is this really the time to be lifting restrictions when left the —— less than half of the us population has received one dose of the vaccine?— “ we —— we continue to watch fatalities decreased — —— we continue to watch fatalities decreased i_ —— we continue to watch fatalities decreased. i think there's a combined effort, but also the vaccine — combined effort, but also the vaccine is _ combined effort, but also the vaccine is continuing to do exactly what _ vaccine is continuing to do exactly what it's— vaccine is continuing to do exactly what it's expected to do. we continue _ what it's expected to do. we continue to make great progress on that _ continue to make great progress on that so _ continue to make great progress on that, y., �* continue to make great progress on that. i. �* ., continue to make great progress on that. �* ., . ., that. so you're not concerned about the sread that. so you're not concerned about the spread of _ that. so you're not concerned about the spread of the _ that. so you're not concerned about the spread of the uk _ that. so you're not concerned about the spread of the uk variant - that. so you're not concerned about the spread of the uk variant here i that. so you're not concerned about the spread of the uk variant here in j the spread of the uk variant here in the spread of the uk variant here in the united states, which is now dominant, and warnings from the cdc about the possibility of another wave? ~ . ., ,
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about the possibility of another wave? . ., , wave? well, we will certainly pay attention to _ wave? well, we will certainly pay attention to it. _ wave? well, we will certainly pay attention to it. the _ wave? well, we will certainly pay attention to it. the department l wave? well, we will certainly pay| attention to it. the department of pubiic— attention to it. the department of public health and others are helping us make _ public health and others are helping us make big decisions. we're certainly— us make big decisions. we're certainly have the metrics in place. the current — certainly have the metrics in place. the current trajectory is one that continues— the current trajectory is one that continues to decline, and hopefully we can— continues to decline, and hopefully we can continue to stay this course and have _ we can continue to stay this course and have the coronavirus in our rear-view— and have the coronavirus in our rear—view mirror. i and have the coronavirus in our rear-view mirror.— and have the coronavirus in our rear-view mirror. i want to get onto the change — rear-view mirror. i want to get onto the change in _ rear-view mirror. i want to get onto the change in voting _ rear-view mirror. i want to get onto the change in voting laws _ rear-view mirror. i want to get onto the change in voting laws in - rear-view mirror. i want to get onto j the change in voting laws in georgia and a second, but continuing laura's point about the easing of coronavirus restriction in georgia in the last month, according to the cdc, it's at the bottom of the list of states when it comes to vaccinating its citizens. that doesn't really allow for the easing of restrictions, does it?— of restrictions, does it? well, we are certainly— of restrictions, does it? well, we are certainly continuing _ of restrictions, does it? well, we are certainly continuing to - of restrictions, does it? well, we are certainly continuing to work l are certainly continuing to work hard _ are certainly continuing to work hard. there a multifaceted approach to getting _ hard. there a multifaceted approach to getting folks vaccinated. there is actual— to getting folks vaccinated. there is actual supply of the vaccine, but also the _
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is actual supply of the vaccine, but also the folks' willingness, and we believe _ also the folks' willingness, and we believe that's an extrication project~ _ believe that's an extrication project. i'm very proud of governor brian— project. i'm very proud of governor brian can's — project. i'm very proud of governor brian can's efforts to balance lives as we _ brian can's efforts to balance lives as we move — brian can's efforts to balance lives as we move through this difficult period _ as we move through this difficult period. and the data shows us we are making _ period. and the data shows us we are making great strides —— brian kemp. let's _ making great strides —— brian kemp. let's look— making great strides —— brian kemp. let's look at — making great strides —— brian kemp. let's look at the very controversial changes to voting rules in georgia. i think we have a slide we can bring up. it shows that there's going to be id requirements for mail and balance, there will be a limit to the drop boxes that can be put around the state and a ban on giving food and water to voters waiting in line. to people outside the united states, this all seems very curious, that you have authorities around the country trying to limit people voting when surely the aim should be to get as many of people voting is possible. i certainly agree with that strategy. i think the more
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people to that strategy. i think the more --eole to ., , ., people to vote, the better and i would continue _ people to vote, the better and i would continue to _ people to vote, the better and i would continue to work- people to vote, the better and i would continue to work hard - people to vote, the better and i would continue to work hard to | would continue to work hard to implore — would continue to work hard to implore folks to vote across our great _ implore folks to vote across our great state and our i was one of the outspoken— great state and our i was one of the outspoken members of my party... i was with— outspoken members of my party... i was with this — outspoken members of my party... i was with this group, with the unfortunate events ofjanuary the 6th playing out in real time, and i was embarrassed at what was going on. certainly, we have seen a lot of movement — on. certainly, we have seen a lot of movement. inappropriate world, we would _ movement. inappropriate world, we would do _ movement. inappropriate world, we would do a — movement. inappropriate world, we would do a few things differently. i do think— would do a few things differently. i do think the outside fridges have taken _ do think the outside fridges have taken over the messaging do think the outside fridges have taken overthe messaging —— in a perfect _ taken overthe messaging —— in a perfect world. and taken us to a point _ perfect world. and taken us to a point where we're talking about... the former— point where we're talking about... the former president's attempts to discredit _ the former president's attempts to discredit the election which has ceded — discredit the election which has ceded a — discredit the election which has ceded a lot of doubts, and that's unfortunate. ceded a lot of doubts, and that's unfortunate-— ceded a lot of doubts, and that's unfortunate. ., �* ., ., unfortunate. you're one of those few --eole unfortunate. you're one of those few people that's — unfortunate. you're one of those few people that's trying _ unfortunate. you're one of those few people that's trying to _ unfortunate. you're one of those few people that's trying to restate - unfortunate. you're one of those few people that's trying to restate the i people that's trying to restate the
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republican party, not in the image of donald trump. does this row over voting rights make it hard for you to do that? i voting rights make it hard for you to do that?— to do that? i think it's about the willingness _ to do that? i think it's about the willingness to _ to do that? i think it's about the willingness to have _ to do that? i think it's about the willingness to have a _ to do that? i think it's about the l willingness to have a conversation and the _ willingness to have a conversation and the willingness to be able to talk to— and the willingness to be able to talk to folks about the realities of the bill. _ talk to folks about the realities of the bill, but at the end of the day, i've the bill, but at the end of the day, i've been— the bill, but at the end of the day, i've been very vocal about this, republicans don't need election reform — republicans don't need election reform to win. we need leadership here in— reform to win. we need leadership here in this — reform to win. we need leadership here in this country. there's an identity— here in this country. there's an identity crisis within the republican party, and we're going to work through that. i think an overwhelming number of americans believe _ overwhelming number of americans believe in _ overwhelming number of americans believe in the republican party's principles, but we need to do that with a _ principles, but we need to do that with a more reassuring tone, different— with a more reassuring tone, different from what we've seen play out the _ different from what we've seen play out the last four years.— out the last four years. former president _ out the last four years. former president donald _ out the last four years. former president donald trump - out the last four years. former president donald trump is - out the last four years. former president donald trump is a i out the last four years. former i president donald trump is a little below you there, holding court in florida. does he still have the same grip on the party, do you think, that he did when he left office? you know, i that he did when he left office? you know. i don't— that he did when he left office? you know, i don't know if on the right know, idon't know if on the right person— know, i don't know if on the right person to — know, i don't know if on the right person to answer that. i'm appreciative of his leadership of
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his~~~ _ appreciative of his leadership of his~~~ that— appreciative of his leadership of his... that he's validated, could makes — his... that he's validated, could makes quick changes but i think we realise _ makes quick changes but i think we realise as— makes quick changes but i think we realise as a — makes quick changes but i think we realise as a party we need to make sure the _ realise as a party we need to make sure the party is more important than _ sure the party is more important than a _ sure the party is more important than a person. moving forward into 2024. _ than a person. moving forward into 2024. we _ than a person. moving forward into 2024, we need a gop to point no, something — 2024, we need a gop to point no, something that embraces real policies. — something that embraces real policies, and if we're and i have a chance _ policies, and if we're and i have a chance to — policies, and if we're and i have a chance to win, i'm been a champion that is— chance to win, i'm been a champion that is much— chance to win, i'm been a champion that is much as possible.— that is much as possible. thanks so much for your— that is much as possible. thanks so much for your time _ that is much as possible. thanks so much for your time today. - that is much as possible. thanks so much for your time today. thank i that is much as possible. thanks so i much for your time today. thank you. you heard the lieutenant governor talking about january the 6th. as someone who was there that day, i could see that the majority were middle—aged white men. what we're learning now is where those who committed crimes came from and the ethnic makeup of their neighbourhoods. the chicago project on security and threats analysed the demographics of the 377 americans arrested or charged in the capitol attack, and one common characteristic emerges.
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counties with the most significant declines in the non—hispanic, white population were the most likely to produce insurrectionists. take texas for example. it's home to 36 people who were charged or arrested in relation to the insurrection. and all 36 of texas's rioters come from just 17 counties, each of which has seen a decrease in their white population over the past five years. to put it another way — across the country, the odds of sending an insurrectionist to the capitol was six times higher in counties where there was a decline in the white population. here to help us unpack these findings is professor of political science at the university of chicago robert pape, who carried out the research. thank you so much for being with us. it's completely fascinating. does your research suggest that it was fear of being crowded out by
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immigrants which was a factor amongst those who rioted? it’s immigrants which was a factor amongst those who rioted? it's fear of bein: amongst those who rioted? it's fear of being crowded _ amongst those who rioted? it's fear of being crowded out _ amongst those who rioted? it's fear of being crowded out by _ amongst those who rioted? it's fear of being crowded out by any - of being crowded out by any non—white population. immigrants are minorities— non—white population. immigrants are minorities who already live in the united _ minorities who already live in the united states. our study was able to look at _ united states. our study was able to look at and _ united states. our study was able to look at and compare whether economic concerns— look at and compare whether economic concerns or— look at and compare whether economic concerns or social concerns were driving _ concerns or social concerns were driving the — concerns or social concerns were driving the insurrectionists, and what _ driving the insurrectionists, and what we — driving the insurrectionists, and what we see when we see 45% of the insurrectionists as ceos, business owners— insurrectionists as ceos, business owners from white—collar occupations, economic concerns don't seem _ occupations, economic concerns don't seem to _ occupations, economic concerns don't seem to be _ occupations, economic concerns don't seem to be doing the job. what we found _ seem to be doing the job. what we found was— seem to be doing the job. what we found was those concerns where they came _ found was those concerns where they came from _ found was those concerns where they came from our losing white population, and the more the county lost white _ population, and the more the county lost white population, the more insurrectionists the county centre. this is— insurrectionists the county centre. this is evidence of what's called the great — this is evidence of what's called the great replacement fear. the fear
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that the _ the great replacement fear. the fear that the rights of hispanic and black— that the rights of hispanic and black populations are overtaking and outpacing _ black populations are overtaking and outpacing the rights of white people _ outpacing the rights of white people. and this is something we further— people. and this is something we further delve into in a separate study. — further delve into in a separate study, when we did a nationally representative stan l mack sample of all americans. we found that 4% of americans— all americans. we found that 4% of americans can be classified in the insurrectionists movement. —— representative sample. said they would _ representative sample. said they would participate in a violent protest~ _ would participate in a violent protest. we further found in other sample _ protest. we further found in other sample that the biggest driver was that a _ sample that the biggest driver was that a fear of the great replacement, again, the same factor. together. _ replacement, again, the same factor. together, these two studies paint powerful— together, these two studies paint powerful evidence that helps us to ekpiain _ powerful evidence that helps us to explain that it's social issues,
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particularly racial issues, that are really— particularly racial issues, that are really at — particularly racial issues, that are really at the bottom of the insurrectionists we saw on january the 6th— insurrectionists we saw on january the 6th and — insurrectionists we saw on january the 6th and the movement we see today _ the 6th and the movement we see toda . . ., _, . , ., today. the idea and the concept of the treat today. the idea and the concept of the great preplacement _ today. the idea and the concept of the great preplacement isn't i today. the idea and the concept of the great preplacement isn'tjust l the great preplacement isn'tjust particular to the united states. it's here in europe as well, the idea that increased immigration is pushing white members of europe as it were. how do you counter that? what is it that the rest of society can say to allay the concerns of those in that white minority, and in some cases, majority, who feel they are going to be replaced? 50. some cases, majority, who feel they are going to be replaced?— are going to be replaced? so, we could apply _ are going to be replaced? so, we could apply these _ are going to be replaced? so, we could apply these tools _ are going to be replaced? so, we could apply these tools directly. l could apply these tools directly. there's — could apply these tools directly. there's nothing standing in the way except— there's nothing standing in the way except doing the research. second, we need _ except doing the research. second, we need to— except doing the research. second, we need to do a little bit more now to get— we need to do a little bit more now to get into — we need to do a little bit more now to get into the specific types of fears — to get into the specific types of fears. once we know this, we want to know— fears. once we know this, we want to know is— fears. once we know this, we want to know is it _ fears. once we know this, we want to know is it lost, is it fear of loss
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of social— know is it lost, is it fear of loss of social status or is it fear of loss — of social status or is it fear of loss of— of social status or is it fear of loss of future income related to social— loss of future income related to social change? this requires us to do a _ social change? this requires us to do a little — social change? this requires us to do a little bit further research, but we — do a little bit further research, but we can _ do a little bit further research, but we can do this also in the near term _ but we can do this also in the near term third. — but we can do this also in the near term. third, we need to create commissions and work with top academic— commissions and work with top academic experts like myself with top policy— academic experts like myself with top policy in government so that we can better— top policy in government so that we can better thicken our understanding and also _ can better thicken our understanding and also develop creative policy initiatives. we don't want to shoot from _ initiatives. we don't want to shoot from the _ initiatives. we don't want to shoot from the hip. what we want to do is we want _ from the hip. what we want to do is we want to— from the hip. what we want to do is we want to respond, and we need to in the _ we want to respond, and we need to in the united states take this seriously now because this study points— seriously now because this study points to — seriously now because this study points to the rise of violence in these — points to the rise of violence in these minorities, which is already happening — these minorities, which is already happening in a dash against asians, and a _ happening in a dash against asians, and a volatile 2022 election season. robert _ and a volatile 2022 election season. robert pape, great to hear all that. very interesting.— very interesting. thank you for havin: very interesting. thank you for having me- _
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the whole idea of the great replacement is part of the right wing, far right narrative. many parts of the developed world. those people, predominantly those who are white, or losing the privileges that they've had. it’s white, or losing the privileges that they've had-— they've had. it's interesting how they've had. it's interesting how the professor— they've had. it's interesting how the professor nailed _ they've had. it's interesting how the professor nailed all- they've had. it's interesting how the professor nailed all that i they've had. it's interesting how. the professor nailed all that down in his research. let's get some of the day's other news. the african union which represents states on the continent, has scrapped plans to secure coronavirus vaccines from the serum institute in india. instead it's turned to the us drugmaker, johnson and johnson. the head of africa's centres for disease control, for disease control says reliable supplies of vaccines are vital. delhi is holding onto doses from the serum institute to combat a rise in infections across india. a woman injapan has become the world's first covid patient to receive a living donor lung transplant. the patient was given organs from her son and husband. her own lungs were severely damaged by coronavirus. in egypt, archaeologists have discovered a lost city
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that dates back more than 3,400 years to the time of the pharaohs. experts searching for a temple in the desert near the city of luxor discovered it after stumbling on walls of houses stretching away in all directions. it's been described as "an egyptian pompeii". stay with us on bbc news. still to come... fine dining without leaving the house — we'll discuss the diy meal kits that are taking the uk by storm. next week sees a further easing of covid restrictions in england. it's what most of us want but shifting back to the old way of doing things may not be as easy as we think. daniela relph reports from northampton. i'm on the thin line between cautious and optimistic. come on up, cheese, thank you. we just need the general public back to make the market blossom again. i
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i can't imagine going to the pub and mingling with everyone. i always have this thought in my head that, oh, my god, there are people too close to me. i think the whole population has been suffering - from lockdown fatigue. the regular rhythm of our everyday is slowly returning, the familiar routines resumed, but for many their mindset has shifted. i think there are some people who we probably will never see in church again because of what we have gone through as a society. it will be very hard for them to get their confidence back and going and doing normal things once more. memories of a life without restrictions — as freedom beckons, some find themselves conflicted. i think i feel a bit more anxious but i still like the idea that i can go out for drinks with my friends again, but, strangers, please stay away, you know?
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yeah, i definitely feel a bit anxious but i'm not too bad. normality will mean readjustment, especially if you feel forever changed. i think it has made me a bit more introspective, if anything. - it's made me value i friendships a lot more. enticing the crowds back in. it comes with responsibility and a need for reassurance. i cannot wait to go to the cinema. spontaneity is what i'm looking forward to. i daniela relph, bbc news, northampton. now, it's the new trend that restaurants across the uk are capitalising on — whilst dining in remains off limits many eateries have found success with diy meal kits. the premise is simple — restaurants will send you all the ingredients and instructions so you can cook fancy meals at home.
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for mrs clive. the kits don't come cheap — they can set you back over a hundred quid! it's a lot of money, but the demand is there. 10% of brits have bought a meal kit over the last year, with a quarter expected to continue buying them once restaurants reopen. even airlines are launching their own ranges. british airways have launched a variety of boxes that allow you to replicate their first class experience in the comfort of your home. sounds alluring. so, is the diy meal kit here to stay, or once the world opens up again, could they be high priced leftovers? here to tell us all about it is jyoti patel, ceo of feast box and tom abbott executive chef at british airways. thank you so much for being with us. jihadi, i can't believe people are willing to fork out 100 quid for a meal box. our people just so bored
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of their own cooking that they want something new? i of their own cooking that they want something new?— of their own cooking that they want something new? i think it's a whole bunch of factors. _ something new? i think it's a whole bunch of factors. i _ something new? i think it's a whole bunch of factors. i think _ something new? i think it's a whole bunch of factors. i think lockdown l bunch of factors. i think lockdown has made — bunch of factors. i think lockdown has made you appreciate the simple pleasures _ has made you appreciate the simple pleasures more. with restaurants closed. _ pleasures more. with restaurants closed, you're missing the taste of your favourite cuisine and your favourite — your favourite cuisine and your favourite restaurant dishes. you aim to recreate _ favourite restaurant dishes. you aim to recreate that at home. i think it's more — to recreate that at home. i think it's more about looking for the inventor— it's more about looking for the inventor and continuing to spike up -- to— inventor and continuing to spike up -- to spice — inventor and continuing to spike up —— to spice up your weeknight meal. tom. _ —— to spice up your weeknight meal. tom. i've _ —— to spice up your weeknight meal. tom. i've got— —— to spice up your weeknight meal. tom, i've got a sample of your wares from your mailboxes. —— jyoti. i've got some very nice cheese. i'm sure it's fabulous. i've also got a glass
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which would normally have champagne. now it's water, that's the bbc for you. and there's other stuff as well. that's quite a lot of money for essentially something that you can get in a supermarket that would be a hell of a lot cheaper.— be a hell of a lot cheaper. yeah, it's a fantastic _ be a hell of a lot cheaper. yeah, it's a fantastic product. - be a hell of a lot cheaper. yeah, it's a fantastic product. you're i be a hell of a lot cheaper. yeah, i it's a fantastic product. you're not answerin: it's a fantastic product. you're not answering my _ it's a fantastic product. you're not answering my question! _ it's a fantastic product. you're not | answering my question! laughter the auali answering my question! laughter the quality of _ answering my question! laughter the quality of the _ answering my question! laughter the quality of the ingredients i answering my question! laughter the quality of the ingredients are l the quality of the ingredients are absentiy— the quality of the ingredients are absently fantastic. _ the quality of the ingredients are absently fantastic. everything i the quality of the ingredients are absently fantastic. everything is. absently fantastic. everything is fresh. _ absently fantastic. everything is fresh, cooked _ absently fantastic. everything is fresh, cooked by— absently fantastic. everything is fresh, cooked by our— absently fantastic. everything is fresh, cooked by our caterers. i| fresh, cooked by our caterers. i believe — fresh, cooked by our caterers. i believe it's— fresh, cooked by our caterers. i believe it's a _ fresh, cooked by our caterers. i believe it's a great _ fresh, cooked by our caterers. i believe it's a great value - fresh, cooked by our caterers. i believe it's a great value for i believe it's a great value for money _ believe it's a great value for money it— believe it's a great value for money. it gives _ believe it's a great value for money. it gives you - believe it's a great value for money. it gives you that i believe it's a great value for - money. it gives you that experience at home _ money. it gives you that experience at home that — money. it gives you that experience at home that you _ money. it gives you that experience at home that you would _ money. it gives you that experience at home that you would experience | money. it gives you that experience i at home that you would experience on at home that you would experience on a first-class _ at home that you would experience on a first—class base. _ at home that you would experience on a first-class base.— a first-class base. tom, so this morning. _ a first-class base. tom, so this morning. i— a first-class base. tom, so this morning. iwas— a first-class base. tom, so this morning, i was also _ a first-class base. tom, so this morning, i was also travelling, | a first-class base. tom, so this i morning, i was also travelling, but i got the train from new york city to washington and in the frequent—flyer lounge, there was a freebie which i'm showing here which was two hard—boiled eggs with some
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crackers. tom, do you think that's glamourous? bill! crackers. tom, do you think that's glamourous?— crackers. tom, do you think that's glamourous? all food is glamourous in conce t! glamourous? all food is glamourous in concept! if— glamourous? all food is glamourous in concept! if you're _ glamourous? all food is glamourous in concept! if you're starving, i in concept! if you're starving, eah! in concept! if you're starving, yeah! jyoti. — in concept! if you're starving, yeah! jyoti, would _ in concept! if you're starving, yeah! jyoti, would this i in concept! if you're starving, yeah! jyoti, would this be i in concept! if you're starving, yeah! jyoti, would this be a i yeah! jyoti, would this be a bestseller? _ yeah! jyoti, would this be a bestseller? they _ yeah! jyoti, would this be a bestseller? they tried, i yeah! jyoti, would this be a bestseller? they tried, it i yeah! jyoti, would this be a i bestseller? they tried, it was three. ,, ., bestseller? they tried, it was three. , , ., , bestseller? they tried, it was three. ,, ., , ., . ., three. our mission is to recreate some of the _ three. our mission is to recreate some of the authentic _ three. our mission is to recreate some of the authentic flavours i three. our mission is to recreate i some of the authentic flavours from the travels— some of the authentic flavours from the travels abroad, so whilst it features— the travels abroad, so whilst it features more familiar recipes, like tea, -- _ features more familiar recipes, like tea. -- curry — features more familiar recipes, like tea, —— curry. the first thing you do when — tea, —— curry. the first thing you do when you _ tea, —— curry. the first thing you do when you book a flight as you choose _ do when you book a flight as you choose your meal option, so that's really— choose your meal option, so that's really where this partnership came to life _ really where this partnership came to life. yourjourney with food essentially starts before you hit the ground. you try to bring the
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taste _ the ground. you try to bring the taste of— the ground. you try to bring the taste of travel home. sadly, some of the familiar— taste of travel home. sadly, some of the familiar favourites aren't on the familiar favourites aren't on the menu. _ the familiar favourites aren't on the menu, but it's also about ekpioring _ the menu, but it's also about exploring other amazing cuisines and being _ exploring other amazing cuisines and being able _ exploring other amazing cuisines and being able to do it conveniently at home _ being able to do it conveniently at home for— being able to do it conveniently at home. for example, there are meals slowly— home. for example, there are meals slowly cooked over 2448 hrs of. better— slowly cooked over 2448 hrs of. better than the exit slowly cooked over 2448 hrs of. better than the exi— slowly cooked over 2448 hrs of. better than the exit exactly. -- 24 to 48 hours _ better than the exit exactly. -- 24 to 48 hours. some _ better than the exit exactly. -- 24 to 48 hours. some of— better than the exit exactly. -- 24 to 48 hours. some of the - better than the exit exactly. -- 24 i to 48 hours. some of the ingredients are precooked because it is a four course _ are precooked because it is a four course dining experience. but also being _ course dining experience. but also being able — course dining experience. but also being able to recreate some of that at home. _ being able to recreate some of that at home, the recipes as well. it's kind _ at home, the recipes as well. it's kind of— at home, the recipes as well. it's kind of having a mixture of both, hence _ kind of having a mixture of both, hence why— kind of having a mixture of both, hence why it is all premium ingredients. we do celebrate the ingredients, and they're hard to find ingredients as well. it's going to really— find ingredients as well. it's going to really cut up the tour of cooking
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and enjoying the best part of cooking. _ and enjoying the best part of cooking, putting things together, enjoying — cooking, putting things together, enjoying the eating of it as well. tom. _ enjoying the eating of it as well. tom. we're _ enjoying the eating of it as well. tom, we're seeing the gradual opening up of the british economy as it were in the next few days or so. at some point in late april getting into may, we will probably be able to eat back inside restaurants. do you see these kinds of kits continuing in their popularity as the economy opens up and as restaurants open up and we get back to what we used to do?— restaurants open up and we get back to what we used to do? yeah, i think there is obviously _ to what we used to do? yeah, i think there is obviously a _ to what we used to do? yeah, i think there is obviously a 1096 _ to what we used to do? yeah, i think there is obviously a 10% increase i to what we used to do? yeah, i think there is obviously a 1096 increase in l there is obviously a10% increase in popularity— there is obviously a 10% increase in popularity of — there is obviously a 10% increase in popularity of the _ there is obviously a 10% increase in popularity of the boxes. _ there is obviously a 10% increase in popularity of the boxes. i— there is obviously a 10% increase in popularity of the boxes. i believe i popularity of the boxes. i believe that it's — popularity of the boxes. i believe that it's a — popularity of the boxes. i believe that it's a fantastic _ popularity of the boxes. i believe that it's a fantastic offering - popularity of the boxes. i believe that it's a fantastic offering to i that it's a fantastic offering to take _ that it's a fantastic offering to take home _ that it's a fantastic offering to take home. it's— that it's a fantastic offering to take home. it's not— that it's a fantastic offering to take home. it's notjust - that it's a fantastic offering to take home. it's notjust a i that it's a fantastic offering to - take home. it's notjust a weeknight meal. _ take home. it's notjust a weeknight meal. it _ take home. it's notjust a weeknight meal. it can— take home. it's notjust a weeknight meal. it can be _ take home. it's notjust a weeknight meal. it can be a _ take home. it's notjust a weeknight meal, it can be a luxurious- take home. it's notjust a weeknight meal, it can be a luxurious meal. i. meal, it can be a luxurious meal. i think— meal, it can be a luxurious meal. i think there's — meal, it can be a luxurious meal. i think there's always _ meal, it can be a luxurious meal. i think there's always going - meal, it can be a luxurious meal. i think there's always going to - meal, it can be a luxurious meal. i think there's always going to be i meal, it can be a luxurious meal. i think there's always going to be ai think there's always going to be a place _ think there's always going to be a place for— think there's always going to be a place for it — think there's always going to be a place for it—
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place for it. tom abbott and jyoti patel, it's good _ place for it. tom abbott and jyoti patel, it's good to _ place for it. tom abbott and jyoti patel, it's good to talk— place for it. tom abbott and jyoti patel, it's good to talk to - place for it. tom abbott and jyoti patel, it's good to talk to you i patel, it's good to talk to you both. thanks forjoining us. both. thanks for 'oining us. thank ou. well, clive, are you going to be cooking one of those boxes for mrs clive or do you want my eggs? i clive or do you want my eggs? i don't know, your eggs look absolutely disgusting. these crackers are actually really quite nice. with a little bit of pickle on. maybe a little bit of cheese, could be quite good. i'm not sure about the cost though. it does strike me... yeah. pretty decent with a hundred quid, never mind food in a box, but hey, there you go. there are many things that we miss about the glamour of air travel beyond the food, of course. but who misses the lack of legroom? however, things could be worse, as you're about to find out. brian robson was a 19—year—old welshman visiting australia in 1965 when he felt homesick.
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but instead of coughing up the £800 air—fare home, he thought he could save himself some money, so he decided to ship himself in a crate, posting himself home as a piece of air cargo. here he is demonstrating the size of the crate, and this was no first class crate. it measured just 36 inches wide and 24 inches tall. and that was when brian's luck turned sour. his crate got lost and he was somehow discovered — alive, just about — in los angeles, california, where american border agents sent him on his way back to london heathrow. here he is arriving at the airport. why are we telling you this? because brian has come forward to share his story in the hope he can find the two men who helped him! paul and john, if you're watching, brian wants to say thank you for nailing the crate shut. only problem is, he can't
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remember their surnames, so the search is on. hello. temperatures may have headed up briefly during thursday but they're about to go right back down again. behind this weather front that's working south across the uk right now is a cold front. the leading edge of notjust colder air but arctic air spilling its way south again with a few wintry showers to come into places particularly to start friday in northern scotland. it could be icy in some spots here. now, a cold front with cloud and a bit of showery rain stretches from wales to midlands across to parts of east anglia during friday morning pushing south into southern england. behind it for northern england, for northern ireland and for scotland, you're back into the sunshine. you may catch a wintry shower especially in northern scotland. it's feeling cold, although a strong wind is slowly easing. now into the weekend, our front clears away but another set of fronts approaching
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from the south just brushing a bit of rain in towards southern southeastern parts of england. still something to play for in how far north that may get on saturday but if you're away from that and particularly through parts of wales, northern england, northern ireland and scotland it's sunny spells, it's a few wintry showers, it's cold. as that system pulls away on saturday night, not out of the question there could be a little bit of sleet or wet snow on its back edge before it does so. and then during sunday, there's some sunshine again with lower air coming down from the north or northeastjust bringing a few more of those wintry showers our way — rain, sleet, hail, a bit of snow possible. could also see just a bit of rain heading towards the far north—west of scotland as the day goes on, that's from this area of low pressure. but for much of the uk, sunday night into monday, it's high pressure nosing its way in. it does mean though under clear skies for many as monday begins, there will be a widespread frost — so gardeners take note — over the weekend and then into the first part of next week some frosty nights to come.
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for monday, that area of low pressure sitting to our north—west could well bring a bit of showery rain into parts of northern ireland, scotland, perhaps north west england and the rest of england and wales closer to higher pressure looking fine and that similar split going into tuesday with high pressure here closer to that. you'll be dry closer to low pressure, you could see a bit of rain on tuesday and that's more especially affecting scotland and northern ireland. and temperatures? well, just a hint they are heading their way up because we've cut off the flow of arctic air, the wind switching round to a more west south—westerly. now beyond that next week, a lot of uncertainty about what might happen. we've looked at a few computer models. what the output is suggesting the actual weather we're going to get is going to be in the second half of next week and this is the european ecmwf model which you can see a predominance of low pressure close by — this is thursday going into friday which would suggest a likelihood of some of us seeing some rain. but contrast that with the american gfs model and this is
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how friday's looking. it's got high pressure close by which suggests it's settled, just slowing the progress and the arrival of this low pressure turning things wetter. so, a difference of opinion about how our weather's going to turn out later next week. now, the preferred idea at the moment, the weight of evidence would suggest that it is fairly unsettled and perhaps showery. whatever happens, we're more confident that this will happen. we'll cut off the flow of the arctic air we have over this weekend and through next weekjust gradually — and this is leeds but many of us in the same boat — gradually bringing those temperatures closer to average. we'll keep you updated on the next weather for the week ahead.
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tonight at ten — police use water cannon in belfast during another night of violence in northern ireland. firework screeches. these are the scenes in west belfast this evening — where fireworks and more petrol bombs have been thrown, despite calls for calm. it comes after violent clashes last night between catholic and protestant communities at the so—called peace wall. the scale of the disorder last night was at a scale that we have not seen in recent years in belfast or further afield. more than 50 police officers have been injured in the past few days. also tonight: the health secretary insists the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine remains safe — with the risk of a blood clot the same as going on a long haulflight. the chancellor, rishi sunak, releases text messages he sent to david cameron after the former prime minister asked the government
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to help a finance company he was involved with.

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