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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 8, 2021 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 8.00pm: police say last night's rioting in belfast was the worst they've seen in years — the northern ireland secretary holds urgent talks. we do believe that there was a level of preplanning. don't come by such volumes of petrol bombs and missiles and fireworks without preplanning. the missiles and fireworks without preplanning-— missiles and fireworks without “relanninu. l, a, preplanning. the way to deal with these things _ preplanning. the way to deal with these things is _ preplanning. the way to deal with these things is through _ preplanning. the way to deal with these things is through a - these things is through a diplomatic, democratic political process — diplomatic, democratic political process. there is no legitimisation or excuse — process. there is no legitimisation or excuse for taking to violence to deal with— or excuse for taking to violence to deal with any of these issues. england's health secretary says the risk of getting a blood clot after the astrazeneca jab is the same as getting one from a long—haul flight. one of britain's richest men has been stabbed to death at his home in dorset. the multi—millionaire hotelier, sir richard sutton, was attacked and killed in his
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home in gillingham. and coming up... in this idyllic underwater world about to be wrecked by deep sea mining, a warning from environmental campaigners. and... a pandemic boost for online fashion retailer asos, with sales and profits surging, but will it continue its momentum, after high street stores reopen? hello, welcome. police in northern ireland say last night's violence in parts of belfast was the worst they have seen for years, the kind of rioting so many had hoped was a thing of the past. during an emergency session of the northern ireland assembly today politicians on all sides lined up to condemn the attacks which have been going on for nearly a week now.
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the worst of the unrest was in the west of the city, on both sides of a wall between the loyalist and nationalist communities. this report from our ireland correspondent, emma vardy, contains some violent scenes. sirens blare. on an already febrile situation, more fuel on the fire. shouting. at one of belfast�*s peace lines last night, the peace was broken. in the hands of teenagers, petrol bombs, thrown in both directions over the wall. each evening, these gates are locked to keep the mainly protestant and catholic communities apart. now forced open, rammed by cars and battered closed by police. amidst a running battle between crowds on each side. it's hard to control.
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lots of kids, when they see someone doing it, theyjoin in. who is encouraging it? the loyalist politicians because they got brexit in and it isn't working. it will take months now for this to be repaired, if ever. as the fighting continued between belfast�*s shankill and springfield road, local priests tried to warn young people of the danger, themselves in harm's way. the to and fro attacks, which lasted over an hour have just been interrupted by the arrival of this line of land of this line of land rovers, who pushed the crowd back from this side of the peace wall. earlier, on the other side of the wall, in the loyalist shankill road, a bus was hijacked and set alight. the disorder last night was at a scale we have not seen in recent years in belfast or further afield. the fact that it was sectarian
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violence, there were large groups on both sides of the gates at lanark way, again it's something we haven't seen for a number of years. in loyalist communities, who are staunchly british, there is a backlash over the brexit deal, which sets northern ireland apart from the rest of the uk. 19—year—old joel was himself arrested in a riot over easter and released without charge. he tells me he was looking out for a friend, but many who have become involved are even younger. why do you think this is happening? i don't think young people really understand the details in terms of the irish sea border. what they are being told and seeing reflected in the media is that sinn fein are winning, the republicans are winning, and that our identity is under attack. when they hear those words and that stuff and then they are told, "all right, and the way you can help "is going out there
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and throwing bombs, sticks and "stones at people," they are more than willing to do so. people will say, why were you there? wouldn't it be better to go home? someone i care about was in trouble and i don't think there's anything someone can blame you for or accuse me of wrongdoing. as the clean—up operation began in belfast, political leaders gathered for an emergency meeting at stormont to try and bring about calm. there can be no place in our society for violence or the threat of violence and it must stop. what we saw last night at lanark way interface was, i think, a very dangerous escalation of events of recent days, and it's utterly deplorable. there is concern the gates have been opened on something more reminiscent of northern ireland's days of old and they may be difficult to close. and emma vardy sent us this update a short time ago. belfast is very good at getting back
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on its feet and those piece gates you saw there, where the worst of the balance was last night, and well, they are already being fixed today, but there are protests planned in the days ahead and unauthorised parades, where there is the potential for more disorder. prime minister borisjohnson spoke with the irish prime minister, the taoiseach, today by phone and they agreed that the way forward would be by dialogue. but we have also seen unity from politicians on all sides here in northern ireland today when it comes to condemning the violence, but there are still grievances and divisions being played out between the main unionist and nationalist parties and sometimes it is the blow for blow nature of politics here in northern ireland that gets reflected on the streets. emma body reporting. —— emma vardy reporting. we can speak now to sarah creighton, who's a lawyer, writer and political commentator on northern ireland. we have heard a lot about the level
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of violence, but little agreement about what was behind it. of course, different reasons, a complicated situation, but is there one particular thing that you can pin this down on or is it a mixture? it is a mixture. it is very hard to be definitive about what has caused this. i think certainly the bobby storey funeral, i think there was a lot of anger about that, not just within unionism and loyalism, but in the community across northern ireland i think for some people that was the straw that broke the camel's back, but when i say that i think what i mean as some people have used that to push this forward and start violence. i think there are criminal elements who are are trying to stir things up and rile people up and the majority of people, whatever they feel about the incident with the funeral, do not believe in violence. there are issues with the brexit protocol, but also issues with the communities who feel alienated from their political leaders and feel the political leaders do not represent
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them. 50 political leaders do not represent them. ., ., , ., them. so given that in a couple of da s' them. so given that in a couple of days' time. _ them. so given that in a couple of days' time. on — them. so given that in a couple of days' time, on the _ them. so given that in a couple of days' time, on the 10th _ them. so given that in a couple of days' time, on the 10th of - them. so given that in a couple of days' time, on the 10th of april. days' time, on the 10th of april will be marking 20 three years since the signing of the good friday agreement, —— a 23 years. that created a coalition government, is that something that is difficult to represent what is going on on the streets for the people of these communities? i streets for the people of these communities?— streets for the people of these communities? ~ ., , , communities? i think that everybody in northern ireland _ communities? i think that everybody in northern ireland support - communities? i think that everybody in northern ireland support the - communities? i think that everybodyj in northern ireland support the good friday agreement and it is not going away, just because blood frustrated with it and everybody gets frustrated with that at times, that does not mean it is going to collapse. but i do get a sense from some of the i speak to that some people are feeling the good friday agreement has not worked for them. rightly or wrongly, that is how they feel and they look at the issues within their communities and they see that the peace process does not —— but has not delivered for them. but there are widespread issues with the assembly in northern ireland in general, that is notjust loyalism, there are issues across northern ireland with people being frustrated with the politics here, that is
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something that has a ways been a constant here. i something that has a ways been a constant here.— constant here. i wonder what you make at the _ constant here. i wonder what you make at the age _ constant here. i wonder what you make at the age of— constant here. i wonder what you make at the age of people - constant here. i wonder what you make at the age of people taking| make at the age of people taking part and what kind of level of organisation was set behind this? because of course children are not going to be able to organise themselves in such a way. yes, some ofthe themselves in such a way. yes, some of the peeple — themselves in such a way. yes, some of the people that _ themselves in such a way. yes, some of the people that are _ themselves in such a way. yes, some of the people that are rioting - themselves in such a way. yes, some of the people that are rioting were . of the people that are rioting were as young as 13 or ia. 0bviously of the people that are rioting were as young as 13 or ia. obviously i cannot speak for loyalism or the people in those communities, but what they are saying now is some of this has been orchestrated. they are quite cynical about this and the politicians today in the assembly were calling upon each other to ask young people not to engage in violence and go out and throw rocks and stones at the police. it is very sad, i think, and stones at the police. it is very sad, ithink, to and stones at the police. it is very sad, i think, to see young people doing this 23 years after the good friday agreement, but the question needs to be asked why are they doing this and what of the circumstances of their communities that they feel they have to go out to do this? those of the bigger questions that need to be answered.— those of the bigger questions that need to be answered. when it comes to the ultimate _ need to be answered. when it comes to the ultimate question _ need to be answered. when it comes to the ultimate question of— need to be answered. when it comes to the ultimate question of when - need to be answered. when it comes to the ultimate question of when we | to the ultimate question of when we will see the stop, what is your
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feeling? we have heard the condemnation of the level of violence, but what is your feeling in terms of actually getting this to calm down? tensions to ease somewhat? it is hard to say. certainly a lady i'd talked to... i don't talk to as many people as some of the other commentators in northern ireland, but the people i talk to are worried, they are concerned we are in a very difficult place right now and if something doesn't happen in terms of leadership or there are some fruitful dialogue is here this could spiral out of control. to what extent, i don't know, but i think the atmosphere here is very worrying and the people i tough talk to are quite wary of the situation and everybody is just hoping this does settle down. you know, the summer has always been a moment of clashes, we have always seen these type of scenes, but for the past few years this has been very quiet, so i think we will hope is that this will settle down and we will see some leadership, but i think everyone is
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very cynical at the moment.- very cynical at the moment. sarah creighton. — very cynical at the moment. sarah creighton, thank _ very cynical at the moment. sarah creighton, thank you _ very cynical at the moment. sarah creighton, thank you so _ very cynical at the moment. sarah creighton, thank you so much - very cynical at the moment. sarah creighton, thank you so much for| creighton, thank you so much for your thoughts there from northern ireland. scientists at imperial college in london say they have new evidence about the effectiveness of the uk's vaccination programme. a study involving nearly 150,000 people shows that the jabs are breaking the link between infections and deaths. it comes as england's health secretary and several medical specialists have spent the day giving reassurances about the vaccine programme, following yesterday's announcement of a link between the astrazeneca jab and rare blood clots. 0ur medical editor, fergus walsh, looks at the risks and benefits of the vaccine. business as usual in north—east london. headlines about blood clots didn't put people off getting the astrazeneca vaccine. the thought of catching covid is more risky than having a blood clot. taking any medicine has a side effect so i wasn't unduly concerned. 79 rare blood clots have been identified out of 20 million doses of the astrazeneca vaccine.
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the link isn't proven, but in future the under 30s will be offered a different vaccine. for nearly all age groups, the benefits of the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine far outweigh any potential harms. for people in their 60s, with the current low level of virus circulation, for every 100,000 vaccinated, ia icu admissions would be prevented. at the same time, there would be a 0.2 or one in 500,000 risk of a rare serious plot. 500,000 risk of a rare serious clot. for people in their 20s, it's a finerjudgment. there, less than one icu admission would be prevented, but there would be just over one serious blood clot per 100,000 immunised. but if we look at a period of high virus transmission, such as january, there, among the over 60s, 127 icu
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admissions would be prevented and nearly seven in the over 20s. neil began suffering headaches and nausea a week after having the astrazeneca vaccine. he died of a blood clot on the brain on easter sunday. his sister, a pharmacist, says he was extraordinarily unlucky. despite what has happened to neil and the impact on ourfamily, i still strongly believe that people should be going ahead and having the vaccine. if you have had one dose, go ahead and have your second. if you haven't had a dose yet, make sure you do. because overall, we will save more lives by people having the vaccine than not. the government says there will be enough pfizer and moderna doses for 8.5
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million 18—29—year—olds yet to be vaccinated. the message from ministers one of reassurance. is one of reassurance. we know the roll—out is working, the safety system is working and we are on track to meet goal of offering to all adults by the end ofjuly, and the speed of the roll—out would be affected by of the roll—out won't be affected by these decisions. when you get the call, get the jab. scientists tracking the epidemic in england say vaccines are weakening the link between cases and deaths. there are now far fewer fatalities per infection, because so many of us are protected. a reminder why all of this really matters. fergus walsh, bbc news. for more on this, let's speak to dr clare gerada, who is a gp and former chair of the royal college of general practitioners. we have heard a lot of reassurances when it comes to the oxford astrazeneca vaccine, but if you are somebody in your 30s, and i'm thinking particularly may be a woman
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who takes the pill and is concerned, as a gp, what do you say?— who takes the pill and is concerned, as a gp, what do you say? thank you and eah, as a gp, what do you say? thank you and yeah. i— as a gp, what do you say? thank you and yeah. i am _ as a gp, what do you say? thank you and yeah. i am a _ as a gp, what do you say? thank you and yeah, i am a gp _ as a gp, what do you say? thank you and yeah, i am a gp and _ as a gp, what do you say? thank you and yeah, i am a gp and this - as a gp, what do you say? thank you and yeah, i am a gp and this is - as a gp, what do you say? thank you and yeah, i am a gp and this is my i and yeah, i am a gp and this is my bread—and—butter, trying to explain risk to patients and the benefits versus the risks of particular treatments. the example you give of a woman on the contraceptive pill is a woman on the contraceptive pill is a very good example because i think, though women might not fully articulate this, i think women in particular are very good at looking at risk because every time a woman put the pill in her mouth, she is being told so often about the risk of clots and the increased risk of smoking and all of that, so i think it is that we are much more attuned to dealing with risk. what i would actually say to this patient is i would say, aren't we in the fortunate position now in april of being able to choose? aren't we in the absolute fortunate position, that we have got hopefully the epidemic under control in this country, we've got enough people
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vaccinated that we are heading for herd immunity, that we can offer a choice? and i would say to her, there is a risk, one on 100,000 of you in your age group of getting this very, very rare clot in the brain and risking dying, so it is up to you if you want to take the risk and have the injection you will probably be absolutely fine, but if not you can delay and have won at the other vaccines that are coming along. but that is now. if we were as we were in november or december, when we had a virus that was out of control, then the best vaccine to have the one on your arm, not to delay. have the one on your arm, not to dela . �* . ~ have the one on your arm, not to dela . �* ., ~',, , delay. and when we talk about this idea... i delay. and when we talk about this idea- -- i am _ delay. and when we talk about this idea... i am assuming _ delay. and when we talk about this idea... i am assuming that - delay. and when we talk about this idea... i am assuming that you - delay. and when we talk about this idea... i am assuming that you are| idea... i am assuming that you are going into the risks, the benefits outweighing the risks, injust lame in�*s terms, what does that mean when we think about whether we should take this vaccine are not? in layman's terms, i think it take this vaccine are not? i�*i layman's terms, i think it is about the under 30s group because as you heard in that really excellent piece
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by fergus walsh, in the under 30s the risk of people dying or ending up the risk of people dying or ending up in intensive care from covid is very small, so on the whole under 30s, very small, so on the whole under 305, dc very small, so on the whole under 30s, dc saw, the balance of risk tips to making sure that we don't create harm giving them something, ie the injection, that is there to protect me and my age group. so it is a balance of risk. i heard today that what you're actually talking about if you took the stadium full, 90,000 -100,000 about if you took the stadium full, 90,000 —100,000 people, one person in that whole stadium is at risk of getting this side effect, so it depends what your appetite for risk is. if one in 100,000 is a risk to much, that is fine, you can wait and have the vaccine that theoretically don't have these side effects. if thatis don't have these side effects. if that is a risk you are willing to take, and some people will, and we know for example that if you get in a car today if you are under 30 you have a one on 100,000 chance of dying within the next three months
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of an accident, so it is the same sort of risk, but it depends on your appetite for risk. but to repeat, we are in the absolute fortunate position now that we can offer a choice. if we were in... many countries cannot because they are still in the midst of this pandemic. if we were like we were in december and january, then the bestjob it is the one on your arm. dr and january, then the best 'ob it is the one on your armh the one on your arm. dr clare gerada, _ the one on your arm. dr clare gerada, really _ the one on your arm. dr clare gerada, really good _ the one on your arm. dr clare gerada, really good to - the one on your arm. dr clare gerada, really good to get. the one on your arm. dr clare i gerada, really good to get your opinion on this and your frankness as well. thank you for your time. we are going to stay on this because there is so much to discuss. let's speak now to peter openshaw — professor of experimental medicine at imperial college london and also a member of the uk vaccine network. really good of you do speak to us. we heard dr clare gerada their talk about risks and how you have to weigh that up. in terms of what we have been hearing over the past few days, what is your advice to people? i think it is really excellent that there has been so much openness and transparency, and i think for anyone who has been looking at the way in
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which the story has been explained, i think it is really good that we have been able to be completely open and honest about this. i mean, the risk is not zero and it is obviously an absolute tragedy for those people who are affected by this very, very rare side effect, but as dr clare gerada was saying, you have to put this in perspective in terms of the risk that people take when they get in the car and go driving or when they take an oral contraceptive pill or when they take an aspirin. you know, those are... those all carry significant risks, which is often greater than the risk you would be taking by having this vaccine. let’s taking by having this vaccine. let's turn to the — taking by having this vaccine. let's turn to the study _ taking by having this vaccine. let's turn to the study from _ taking by having this vaccine. let's turn to the study from scientists at imperial college london, which spoke about this breakage in the link between infections and deaths. help us to understand that. yes. between infections and deaths. help us to understand that.— us to understand that. yes, so it is im ortant us to understand that. yes, so it is
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important to _ us to understand that. yes, so it is important to say — us to understand that. yes, so it is important to say that _ us to understand that. yes, so it is important to say that i _ us to understand that. yes, so it is important to say that i am - us to understand that. yes, so it is important to say that i am not - us to understand that. yes, so it is important to say that i am not a i important to say that i am not a person who has done the study, this is from paul elliott and helen ward and others at imperial, but it is a really good large study which regularly surveys the population to try to work out what is happening in terms of infection and i think it is very clear that just as terms of infection and i think it is very clear thatjust as in... and other parts of the world, where there is very, very high vaccine rates, like in israel, in this country we can now see a very clear effect, which is due to the vaccination being rolled out, starting with the older population and coming down through the population, through the age ranges and you can see that there is a reduction in deaths, which can really only be ascribed to the very high level of the vaccination that we have now achieved, so that is really good news. 50 we have now achieved, so that is really good news.— really good news. so in terms of where you _ really good news. so in terms of where you would _ really good news. so in terms of where you would have _ really good news. so in terms of where you would have expected| really good news. so in terms of. where you would have expected to really good news. so in terms of- where you would have expected to be, given that... the incredible pace at which these vaccines have been rolled out, what is your commentary on that? i
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rolled out, what is your commentary on that? ~ , , on that? i think it is 'ust extraordinary. �* on that? i think it is 'ust extraordinary. noneh on that? i think it isjust extraordinary. none of. on that? i think it isjust l extraordinary. none of us on that? i think it isjust - extraordinary. none of us would on that? i think it isjust _ extraordinary. none of us would have predicted this. indeed, the academy of medical sciences's report that we wrote back injune of last year... we sort of mentioned vaccines are something for the future, but we didn't really think that within that year we would actually have, not only a vaccine that is capable of protecting 90% of the population from severe disease and death, but a range of vaccines, and these vaccines are really stunning. they are not only highly effective, but they are also using very novel technology, which will have knock—on benefits in terms of being able to prevent other diseases in the very near future and they are quite flexible technology as well, so from the point of view of the banksy neurologist and immunologist, it is very, very exciting time. you know, it is just remarkable. find very, very exciting time. you know, it isjust remarkable.— it isjust remarkable. and 'ust auoin full it isjust remarkable. and 'ust going full circle i it isjust remarkable. and 'ust going full circle back i it isjust remarkable. and 'ust going full circle back to h it isjust remarkable. and just going full circle back to your | going full circle back to your initial point that we are talking about this and being incredibly transparent about this, we are
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getting a lot of information. if people sit feel simply bamboozled by all this, your ultimate advice is... 7 . all this, your ultimate advice is... ? . all this, your ultimate advice is... ? well, i can quite understand. i think you — ? well, i can quite understand. i think you just — ? well, i can quite understand. i think you just have _ ? well, i can quite understand. i think you just have to _ ? well, i can quite understand. i think you just have to keep - ? well, i can quite understand. i. think you just have to keep talking, keep taking advice, keep reading, keep taking advice, keep reading, keep listening to the media. the media have been extremely important in terms of being able to get the message out and get it out so clearly, with reporting like fergus walsh's reportjust now, which is so clear and so direct that has been a tremendous boost in terms of being able to communicate science to the public and communicate risk and talk about, you know, the science behind covid and the science behind vaccines. it is an extraordinary unveiling of science, i think, which we have all been involved in and the media i think we have to thank for that as well. aha, media i think we have to thank for that as well-— that as well. a big thank you to ou, that as well. a big thank you to you. peter _ that as well. a big thank you to you, peter openshaw, - that as well. a big thank you to you, peter openshaw, and - that as well. a big thank you to i you, peter openshaw, and thank that as well. a big thank you to - you, peter openshaw, and thank you to fergus walsh as well, yes, he has done a terrificjob. thank you for your time and done a terrificjob. thank you for yourtime and your done a terrificjob. thank you for your time and your expertise, of course. . ~' your time and your expertise, of
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course. . ~ ,, let's take a look at the latest government coronavirus figures. there were just over 3,000 new coronavirus infections recorded in the latest 2a—hour period, which means that on average the number of new cases reported per day in the last week is 2,865. across the uk the latest figures show 3,12a people were in hospital with coronavirus. 53 deaths were reported — that's people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—i9 test. on average in the past week, 31 deaths were announced every day. the total number of deaths so far across the uk is 126,980. the uk is continuing its programme of mass vaccinations — and in the last 2a—hour period, nearly 100,000 people had theirfirst dose, taking the overall number of people who've had their first jab to 31.8 million. a little over
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a00,000 have had their second dose in the latest 2a hour period. overall, more than 6 million people have had their second jab. we will of course be finding out how this story and many others are covered into my�*s front pages at 10:30pm and 11:30pm this evening in the papers. joining us tonight will be these people on the screen. i hope you can join be these people on the screen. i hope you canjoin us be these people on the screen. i hope you can join us as well. the mother of 19—year—old richard okorogheye says his disappearance wasn't taken seriously by police. evidence joel claims he was discriminated against, because he was black. the student was found dead in a pond in essex after being reported missing by his family two weeks earlier. his death is currently being treated as unexplained. today the police watchdog opened up an investigation as a matter of course. sangita myska reports.
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the search for richard okorogheye, accompanied by desperate pleas from his motherfor his safe return, captured the country's conscience. the 19—year—old university student went missing two weeks ago. richard had sickle cell disease, yet he left his home on the 22nd of march without a coat or medication. he caught a bus at 8.a5pm and was next seen on this cctv footage a short distance from epping forest in essex. his body was eventually found in this large pond. i worship the ground he walks on. today his mother, who works night shifts as a nurse, described the last time she saw her son. he said, "are you going to work? "drive safely, don't drive too fast, mummy." i said, "i love you." he said, "i love you too." he held the door and he said, "i will be going to my friend." the metropolitan police say
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richard's death currently remains unexplained and his body shows no sign of injury. his mother says she does not believe he took his own life. she also says her concerns about his vulnerability were dismissed by the police. the initial treatment was... it was disgusting. that is a very strong thing to say, why do you say that? everything i said it was dismissed. it meant nothing. i was told by one of the officers i called, if richard is in pain, i called, "if richard is in pain, "and he has sickle cell disease, he will find his way to hospital." i said, "hold on a minute, if he is in pain, he can't move." his mother claims his race was the reason for the police's alleged slow response. if that was somebody else, i feel that they would have acted quicker. more quickly. when you say that, what do you mean
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if you were someone else? if richard was a different colour, if he wasn't black. i know it is hard to say that, but the discrimination was quite obvious. in response to these allegations, the metropolitan police say they have worked tirelessly on richard's case, using the full range of their resources, including work behind the scenes. bbc news, west london. now to the political row surrounding david cameron and his lobbying for the finance company, greensill capital. the chancellor rishi sunak has taken the unusual step of publishing two text messages sent to mr cameron a year ago, after he had contacted mr sunak privately on behalf of the company. our deputy political editor vicki young has the background. david cameron, the former prime minister... there have been lots of stories in the papers about this, the financial times and the sunday times in particular, finding out that david cameron had contacted the
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chancellor, rishi sunak, on behalf of that company, greensill, who david cameron was working for. so we knew that there had been some texts sent from the former prime minister and he has been accused of intervening where he shouldn't have been, but he has been cleared of any wrongdoing — he was working for the company and that was transparent. now, of course, the chancellor, rishi sunak, has been dragged into this because he was the recipient of those text messages, so what he has done tonight, very unusually, is to publish his responses to david cameron. now, he obviously wants to clear his name, to make it plain that he has done nothing wrong, so those have just been published. there are two responses. i have been told that he was texted multiple times by the former prime minister. in the first response, mr sunak on the 3rd of april last year says, "hi,
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david, thanks for your message. "i am stuck in back—to—back meetings on "calls, but will try you later this evening or first thing tomorrow. "best, rishi." and then on the second one, on the 23rd of april 2020, he says he apologises for the delay, but he says "the proposals in the end did require a change to "the market notice, but i have pushed the team an alternative with the bank that might work. "no guarantees, but the bank are currently looking at it." and he says that a treasury official will be in touch. now, this is because greensill wanted to be part of a government backed scheme where the government were going to guarantee loans that were being lent to companies struggling with covid. now, greensill didn't qualify for that. david cameron was trying to say here that they should. now, a spokesperson for the chancellor has suggested that he was making it clear to david cameron here that what he was proposing, what greensill wanted, simply wasn't going to happen, that there was an official process and they insist that the chancellor has done absolutely nothing wrong here.
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and they are publishing these messages, a source says, in order to reassure beyond doubt that there was no wrongdoing and that the chancellor acted with integrity and propriety. any comment from david cameron orfrom mr greensill? no, not yet. david cameron hasn't said anything in response to any of the stories over the last few weeks. he has been working for this company... and really this goes to the heart of lobbying rules. the lobbying rules are not particularly strict. what happens if a minister or prime minister leaves government? they have to wait a couple of years before they can get a job in certain areas. david cameron did that. he worked openly for this company, but there of course will be others, including the labour party, who say that former prime ministers shouldn't be doing this, using access, using their contacts to try to get something for a company in which they have investments. but the rules don't prohibit that. others say this is exactly what lobbying is
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all about, people like former prime ministers can get lucrative jobs because of course they do have the contacts. vicki young they�* re vicki young they're speaking to my colleague, reeta chakrabarti. i will be back in just colleague, reeta chakrabarti. i will be back injust a moment, let's bring you up—to—date with all the weather. here is nick miller. hello. temperatures may have been a little higher today, but it's turning colder again — the return of arctic air, a cold weekend ahead. the arctic air following this area of cloud and rain southwards tonight and tomorrow, through northern ireland this evening and then across northern england, into parts of wales later in the night. it clears up in northern england, northern ireland and scotland to frost settling in, and plenty of snow showers in northern scotland. icy in places, strong, cold northerly winds gusting in the northern isles — 60—70 mph, so possibly disruptive. slowly easing tomorrow, further snow showers coming in here, though. elsewhere in scotland, northern ireland, northern england, the odd wintry shower. plenty of sunny spells. lots of cloud from wales, the midlands across two east anglia,
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the midlands across to east anglia, where it's a damp start. some showery rain spreading south into southern england. the breeze continuing to ease as we go through the day, but while some in southern england and south wales hold onto temperatures into double figures, elsewhere, it will be a colder day and a cold weekend to come. hello, this is bbc news with kasia madera. the headlines... police say last night's rioting in belfast was the worst they've seen in years. the northern ireland secretary holds urgent talks. we do believe that there was a level of preplanning. you don't come by such volumes of petrol bombs and missiles and fireworks without preplanning. the way to deal with these things is through a diplomatic, democratic political process. there is no legitimisation or excuse for taking to violence to deal with any of these issues. england's health secretary says the risk of getting a blood clot after the astrazeneca jab is the same as getting one
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from a long—haul flight. one of britain's richest men has been stabbed to death at his home. the multi—millionaire hotelier, sir richard sutton, was attacked and killed in his home in dorset. is this idylic underwater world about to be wrecked by deep sea mining? a warning from environmental campaigners. a pandemic boost for online fashion retailer asos, with sales and profits surging, but will it continue its momentum, after high street stores reopen? rioting in belfast on wednesday night was on a scale not seen in northern ireland for years, police have said. during several hours of violence, police officers were attacked, petrol bombs were thrown and a bus was burnt. northern ireland's power—sharing executive said it was "gravely concerned" by the recent violence and has called for calm to be restored. well, we can speak
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now to duncan morrow, who's professor of politics at ulster university, as well as being the former chief executive of the northern ireland community relations council. let's just get your initial reaction to what we've been seeing for the past days. to what we've been seeing for the ast da s. . , �*, to what we've been seeing for the astda s. . , v , past days. clearly, it's extremely disturbing- _ past days. clearly, it's extremely disturbing. this _ past days. clearly, it's extremely disturbing. this is _ past days. clearly, it's extremely disturbing. this is something - past days. clearly, it's extremely| disturbing. this is something that has been building, or at least the tension has been building over a while, and there was speculation that it hadn't been for the covert regulations, there might be street demonstrations by now. —— covid regulations. it's been growing since then. so there is a level of threat. from your experience, how does this build and is there one particular focus point that started all of this, or is it far more deep rooted? i'm referring to the funeral back in
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june, and of course we've got the irish sea border agreed with the eu. these tension points that have led up. these tension points that have led u . _ , . ., these tension points that have led u a . , . ., ., , these tension points that have led u . _ , . ., ., , ., , , up. this can develop in layers. there is the _ up. this can develop in layers. there is the underlying - up. this can develop in layers. - there is the underlying constitution which hasn't gone all the way for a long time. on top of that, we've had the brexit issue. but then i think last week, tensions boiled over because there was the issue of the funeral, there was really action in the community around that. which seems to create some lack of confidence. at that moment, some speculation that paramilitaries would be waiting in the wings for an opportunity to encourage young people onto the streets. the exact way in which that happens always emerges, but these tensions and
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expectations has been —— have been in the air and the opportunity seems to have been taken in certain heartland areas where it usually happens. a lot of people have identified that it's usually young working—class boys who get into trouble. working-class boys who get into trouble. , . , ., trouble. tell us a little bit about that specifically, _ trouble. tell us a little bit about that specifically, because - trouble. tell us a little bit about that specifically, because as - trouble. tell us a little bit aboutj that specifically, because as you point out, it's happening in deprived areas. the whole coronavirus situation has exacerbated any qualities. does that add to what we've been seeing these past few nights? it add to what we've been seeing these past few nights?— past few nights? it may well add to the frustration _ past few nights? it may well add to the frustration and _ past few nights? it may well add to the frustration and the _ past few nights? it may well add to the frustration and the tension, - past few nights? it may well add to j the frustration and the tension, but also to the kind of horrifying element of excitement until there is a terrible disaster. we saw last night how close that can come, because of the use of petrol bombs, attacks on buses and all sorts of incidents that happen. these things
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can spread without control. but certainly, the covid lockdown may have added to the way in which young people in particular gathered at that point. these things are multicausal. they come from different places and they are certainly not disconnected from politics. certainly not disconnected from olitics. ~ . , ., certainly not disconnected from olitics. ~ ., .,~ certainly not disconnected from olitics. ., ., politics. what you make of the way the government _ politics. what you make of the way the government is _ politics. what you make of the way the government is dealing - politics. what you make of the way the government is dealing with - politics. what you make of the way i the government is dealing with this? northern ireland's secretary is holding talks. should borisjohnson have gotten involved as well? i think there's quite a strong feeling, a good part of the political alienation is due to the fact that the brexit negotiations played out very badly and that there is a deep sense of being misled and a lot of denial on the part of the british government about the consequences of the protocol for unionism and northern ireland. i think to sort this out, some of the issues, particularly with brexit, cannot be sorted out at local level.
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they require engagements of outside parties. certainly, the prime minister's involvement is going to be important in stabilising it. really interesting point. professor, thank you so much for your time. you're welcome. the health secretary, matt hancock, has tried to reassure people about the safety of the astrazeneca jab, saying there was "no evidence" of rare blood clots after the second dose of the vaccine. he said the uk's vaccination programme was breaking the link between covid cases and deaths and saving "thousands of lives". so, how safe is the astrazeneca vaccine if you're young? our health correspondent catherine burns has been having a look at some of the questions about the vaccine. based on the doses being given in the uk, about four in a million people have developed these clots after being given the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine. just under one in a million have died. to give context, that's about the same as your chances of dying
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on a 250 mile carjourney. regulators think it's riskier for adults under 30 though, so, if you imagine wembley stadium packed full of 18 to 29—year—olds who have been vaccinated, one of them would possibly need to be taken to intensive care after developing this kind of unusual blood clot. it's still a very small risk, but it's one they don't need to take because they will be offered alternative vaccines instead. once you hit your 30th birthday, you won't get a choice of vaccine. one quick thought, right now, we are mainly vaccinating the over 50s. by the time we get to younger people, we will have a lot more information and, if the evidence has changed, the advice could be tweaked. unrelated, if you are pregnant or taking some female hormones, you would also be more likely to develop blood clots so, for example, the combined pill, the numbers seem to be higher than what's happening with the vaccine so, if a million women
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were taking it for a year, maybe 500 of them would go on to develop kind of plot. on to develop some kind of clot. most clots are pretty easily treatable. the types linked to the vaccine do appear to be more serious though. when you have a vaccine, you might feel a bit ropey for a few days, and that's normal, but there are some symptoms to look out for four more days after the jab. they include a headache, blurred vision, chest pain, shortness of breath, stomach aches, swollen legs, unusual bruises or little red spots. there are treatments for this, the earlier the better. overall, the message is clear, if you are our health correspondent catherine burns reporting there. the online fashion retailer, asos, has announced surging sales, profits and customer numbers for the six months to the end of february.
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the company said it was helped by its pivot to casual clothing during the pandemic. but what's the outlook for e—commerce when high street shops reopen? our reporter nina nanji joins me. let's start with the results, because they were really strong. that's right and chances are if you bought any new clothes over the past year, you probably bought them online. clothing website have been a major winner of the pandemic. today we heard from one of the leading companies out there, asos, and those results were very strong. they reported sales which were up by almost a quarter of 2a%, that's for the six months of the ends of february. they also reported even more eye—catching profits. those were up by more than 250% for that period. that's pre—tax profits. asos mentioned they had an increase in the number of customers as well, so customers of asos have gone up by
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one and a half million. that taste of —— take the total cost of 25 million. this is interesting because this is adding customer, but it's also happening at the time when some of the biggest high street names have also been disappearing. for example, topshop and some of the other arcadia brands were bought off by asos during this period. asos credits some of its success to its ability to pivot in its sales. for example, it's selling more casual wear and fewer items for going out. that's why they talked about the success, but the main question is, can they continue this momentum once the high streets reopen? nick mason is the chief executive and he said there could be some uncertainty ahead. but he is optimistic about the outlook. going forward, we actually are looking forward to shops opening. we think online and shops can coexist quite nicely. we think online will be about 50% clothing going forward,
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and we've always thought so. over the last 12 months, we've seen a massive step change online. but we think stores are vibrant, lovely places to hang out, but more customers will continue to shop online because of its convenience and compelling nature, too. he's got a point, but i'm looking and forward to going back into a shop. he said we will find out next week. . �* , shop. he said we will find out next week. . �*, ~., ._ shop. he said we will find out next week. . �*, ,., shop. he said we will find out next week. . �*, «r, week. that's right. monday is a key date that many _ week. that's right. monday is a key date that many of— week. that's right. monday is a key date that many of us _ week. that's right. monday is a key date that many of us have - week. that's right. monday is a key date that many of us have been - date that many of us have been looking forward to. that's when we will see the reopening of nonessential retail in england. it was a really interesting report. it was a really interesting report. it was basically looking at how high street sales could actually soar by as much as 50% once those lockdown restrictions are eased. the report was out by a company who looks at all sort of data such as rising footfall, and they pointed in particular to the month of march. they said there was evidence that people have been going out and about
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to retail parks and also to essential stores that were opened, and they see that as evidence that people are keen to go out and spend invisible stores rather than buying everything online. so, as we've been saying, it's been a difficult time for the high street retailers. they'll be looking for this report and hoping it is a need to correct and hoping it is a need to correct and they'll seek to pick up and demand. brute and they'll seek to pick up and demand. ~ ., ~' demand. we will find out next week. many thanks- — one of britain's richest men, hotel owner sir richard sutton, has been found dead at his home in dorset. it's understood he'd been stabbed. the police have arrested a 3a—year—old man and a murder investigation has begun. worth more than £300 million, sir richard sutton, one of britain's richest men found stabbed to death at his home in dorset. the
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83—year—old hotel —— hotiel was featured in the sunday times rich list in 2017. last night, his body was found in his home near gillingham. a woman believed to be his wife was critically injured and in serious condition. dorset police say of billy upholding to the incident was followed to london —— a vehicle link. a man was arrested on suspicion of murder. the mp for north dorset new sir richard well and described him as a charming man with a very good sense of humour, describing him as the picture of a country gentleman. sir richard's company released a statement in which they paid tribute to him for setting the highest standards for quality in the hotel, farming and property interest within the group. they said his loss will be felt by everyone within the company. those who have worked with him and his
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family, who have lost an incredible individual. covid—19 has had a profound impact on end—of—life care for millions across the uk, with official figures showing that the number of people dying at home rose by more than a0% in the last year. and a report by the marie curie charity, seen by the bbc, suggests that drug shortages caused by the pandemic meant that some patients suffered unnecessary pain. karen morrison reports. my mum was a really brave and beautiful woman. she loved her life and she lived it to the full. she really loved playing tennis — she'd play every week up until she became ill with the cancer. sheila lowe was 7a when she died last year from bowel cancer. after deciding to be looked after at home, her daughter susan became her main carer — but the country went into lockdown weeks later.
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we had a lot of difficulties getting hold of medicine. it would be sent electronically over to the local pharmacy. the pharmacy didn't have stocks. it was so frustrating. i think a couple of times i burst into tears in the... ..in the actual pharmacy. in a new survey of 1,000 unpaid carers, commissioned by marie curie, nearly two thirds of respondents said they didn't get all the support they needed to manage the pain of their loved one. 65% said they needed more respite care, and just over three quarters said they took on more emotional burdens. we need to make sure now that care that is got right— for people in the future, our loved ones, peoplel who we know and we care for, is available for them - when they need it, and that means us prioritising| end—of—life and palliative care services in the home but also means that as a nation we should _ properly resource that. the elephant in the room - here is there isn't enough resource to make sure all that care
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is available for people - when they need it. terri was diagnosed with terminal cancer three days before christmas. when michelle received the devastating news about her wife terri, she wanted to ensure she could care for her at home. she said two things when we got back to the hospital car park. the first one was, "i don't want to go because i don't want to leave you." and the second was, "i want to die at home." when i needed respite, they struggled to get me somebody. i was lucky they got me somebody — i had a night sitter for one night. and on the second night when the sitter arrived, i had to tell her that terri had died. many people, when given the option, will choose to spend their final weeks at home, but these problems were seen in professional settings too. at the start of the pandemic, hospices were not classed as a front—line nhs service,
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and they experienced shortages of ppe, medicines and staff. the department of health says it has funded support for unpaid carers throughout the pandemic, and that they continue to perform an incredibly important role. my biggest regret is that my mum died in pain — or more pain she needed to be in. or more pain thsn she needed to be in. karen morrison, bbc news. as the world begins to move away from petrol and diesel—powered cars, there are questions over how the metals needed for batteries in electrical vehicles will be sourced. one possibility is to mine the deep ocean floor. a number of companies are lining up to exploit the minerals found there, but campaigners warn it could have a disastrous impact on the marine environment. here's our chief environment correspondent, justin rowlatt. it is one of the most remote regions on earth,
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the vastness of the pacific ocean. but more than two miles beneath the surface lie incredible reserves of the metals needed to make electric vehicle batteries. so, this is what the mining companies are after. this is a poly—metallic nodule. it's a kind of nugget of crucial battery metals, so in here you've got cobalt, nickel, copper, manganese and there are hundreds of millions of these lying on the deep sea floor in some areas of ocean. we can dramatically reduce our environmental and social impact... the mining companies say sourcing metals from the deep ocean has a lower environmental impact than mining metals on land. and theyjust sit there like golf balls on a driving range. so we don't have to drill or blast to find them. also, they happen to sit in an environment where there are no forests, no plants, and we compare that with land—based mining
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in these areas of rich, bio—diverse forests where we are having to destroy these carbon sinks to get access to these metal deposits. it's a no—brainer where we should be getting our metals from. environmental campaigners disagree. they say mining will destroy fragile ecosystems that have developed over hundreds of millions of years. with the climate and biodiversity crisis facing this planet, deep—sea mining would just be another scandalous threat to the health of our oceans. petrol. or electric. bmw, google, samsung and volvo trucks announced they would not be using any metals sourced from the deep ocean in their products. at the natural history museum, zoologist adrian glover studies the creatures that live on the deep ocean floor. of course, james cameron was inspired by deep sea animals for all of his movies. he says the impact of
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mining will be profound. it means humanity faces a difficult decision. it will be a dramatic shift in the ecology of that environment. and that's something that you just have to accept. some areas of the planet will have to be impacted if humans are going to move forward in a zero—carbon future. the decision about whether to allow mining will be taken by the un body that controls exploitation of the deep ocean. but, as sales of electric vehicles increase, pressure to allow mining in the deep oceans is also likely to grow. justin rowlatt, bbc news. a pig has saved its own bacon after escaping from a trailer on its way to the abbatoir. it's thought that milton, as he's since been named, leapt from the backs of two larger pigs to make his escape. smallholder sarah allan explains. my husband got out of the car and he sort of tractored the trailer, and he was like, "sarah, we're missing a pig."
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and i honestly did not believe him, so i got out and there was only two out of the three pigs in the trailer. it's about 11 miles from where we live to the local abattoir, and someone posted on the milton damerel community page, "has anyone lost a pig?" and there is a pig in the middle of a field in milton damerel. i mean, there's no way that he could have just jumped out of the trailer. the backboard of the trailer is higher than his fence ever has been, so i believe that he stood on one of the others and just leapt out. my children have named him milton because he was found in milton damerel, so he's quite happy not having to share his food and getting lots of scratches and lots of attention. so, i don't think i have it in me to send him back. he did so well to get out of that situation!
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smallholder sarah allen. he certainly did! i'm sure there will be a film about milton coming up soon. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. hello. temperatures may have headed up briefly during thursday but they're about to go right back down again. behind this weather front that's working south across the uk right now is a cold front. the leading edge of notjust colder air but arctic air spilling its way south again with a few wintry showers to come into places particularly to start friday in northern scotland. it could be icy in some spots here. now, a cold front with cloud and a bit of showery rain stretches from wales to midlands across to parts of east anglia during friday morning pushing south into southern england. behind it for northern england, for northern ireland and for scotland, you're back into the sunshine. you may catch a wintry shower especially in northern scotland. it's feeling cold, although a strong wind is slowly easing. now into the weekend, our front clears away but another set of fronts approaching from the south just brushing a bit of rain in towards southern
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southeastern parts of england. still something to play for in how far north that may get on saturday, but if you're away from that and particularly through parts of wales, northern england, northern ireland and scotland it's sunny spells, it's a few wintry showers, it's cold. as that system pulls away on saturday night, not out of the question there could be a little bit of sleet or wet snow on its back edge before it does so. and then during sunday, there's some sunshine again with lower air coming down from the north or northeastjust bringing a few more of those wintry showery rain — rain, sleet, hail, a bit of snow possible. could also see just a bit of rain heading towards the far north—west of scotland as the day goes on, that's from this area of low pressure. —— wintry showers our way. but for much of the uk, sunday night into monday, it's high pressure nosing its way in. it does mean though under clear skies for many as monday begins, there will be a widespread frost — so gardeners take note — over the weekend and then into the first part of next week some frosty nights to come. for monday, that area of low
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pressure sitting to our north—west could well bring a bit of showery rain into parts of northern ireland, scotland, perhaps north west england and the rest of england and wales closer to higher pressure looking fine and that similar split going into tuesday with high pressure here closer to that. you'll be dry closer to low pressure, you could see a bit of rain on tuesday and that's more especially affecting scotland and northern ireland. and temperatures? well, just a hint they are heading their way up because we've cut off the flow of arctic air, the wind switching round to a more west south—westerly. now beyond that next week, a lot of uncertainty about what might happen. we've looked at a few computer models. what the output is suggesting the actual weather we're going to get is going to be in the second half of next week and this is the european ecmwf model which you can see a predominance of low pressure close by — this is thursday going into friday which would suggest a likelihood of some of us seeing some rain. but contrast that with the american gfs model and this is how friday's looking. it's got high pressure close
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by which suggests it's settled, just slowing the progress and the arrival of the slow pressure turning things wetter. so, a difference of opinion about how our weather's going to turn out later next week. now, the preferred idea at the moment, the weight of evidence would suggest that it is fairly unsettled and perhaps showery. whatever happens, we're more confident that this will happen. we'll cut off the flow of the arctic air we have over this weekend and through next weekjust gradually — and this is leeds but many of us in the same boat — gradually bringing those temperatures closer to average. we'll keep you updated on the next weather for the week ahead.
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this is bbc news — the white house joins the calls for calm in northern ireland, after yet another night of violence. full blown sectarian clashes broke out last night in west belfast, scenes which have been unanimously condemned by the northern ireland assembly the clashes between northern ireland's catholic and protestant communities threaten an already fragile peace. 50 police officers have been injured in the violence. president biden makes his first moves on gun control, calling the mass shootings in the us an epidemic and an embarrassment. also in the programme... a medical expert on the stand at the derek chauvin trial says george floyd died from a lack of oxygen. plus, the mrs sri lanka beauty contest that ended in tears, after an onstage bust up.

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