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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  April 8, 2021 6:00pm-6:31pm BST

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today at 6pm, police say last night's rioting in belfast was the worst they've seen in years. there were clashes between northern ireland's catholic and protestant communities at the so—called peace wall — no sign of peace last night. the two and four attacks, which lasted over an hour, havejust been interrupted by the arrival of this line of police land rovers, who pushed the crowd back from this side of the peace wall. eight officers were injured — that's more than 50 in total after several nights of rioting. we do believe that there was a level of preplanning. we don't come by such volumes of petrol bombs and missiles and fireworks without preplanning. northern ireland's assembly went into emergency session today. we'll be looking at what's behind the violence. also tonight... england's health secretary says
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the risk of getting a blood clot after the astrazeneca jab is the same as getting one from a long—haul flight. the police watchdog is looking into how the met handled richard okorogheye's death — his mother asks whether they acted quickly enough. is this idylic underwater world about to be wrecked by deep sea mining? a warning from environmental campaigners. and coming up on the bbc news channel... the first round at augusta national is under way. with crowds able to watch on this year as england's lee westwood teed off at his 20th masters. good evening and welcome to the bbc news at six. police in northern ireland say last
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night's violence in parts of belfast was the worst they have seen for years, the kind of rioting so many had hoped was a thing of the past. during an emergency session of the northern ireland assembly today politicians on all sides lined up to condemn the attacks which have been going on for over a week now. the worst of the unrest was in the west of the city, on both sides of a wall between the loyalist and nationalist communituies. our ireland correspondent, emma vardy, sent this report from the scene. this report contains some violent scenes. on an already febrile situation, more fuel on the fire. at one of belfast�*s peace lines last night, the piece was broken. in the hands of teenagers, petrol bombs, thrown in both directions over the wall.
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each evening, these gates are locked to keep the mainly protestant and catholic communities apart. now forced open, rammed by cars and battered closed by police. amidst a running battle between crowds on each side. it’s running battle between crowds on each side. �* , ., ., running battle between crowds on each side. �*, ., ., ., each side. it's hard to control. lots of kids, _ each side. it's hard to control. lots of kids, when _ each side. it's hard to control. lots of kids, when they - each side. it's hard to control. lots of kids, when they see i each side. it's hard to control. - lots of kids, when they see someone doing it, theyjoin in. who lots of kids, when they see someone doing it, they join in.— doing it, they 'oin in. who is encouraging— doing it, they join in. who is encouraging it? _ doing it, they join in. who is encouraging it? dear- doing it, they join in. who is| encouraging it? dear loyalist politicians— encouraging it? dear loyalist politicians because - encouraging it? dear loyalist politicians because they - encouraging it? dear loyalist politicians because they got| encouraging it? dear loyalist. politicians because they got exit encouraging it? dear loyalist - politicians because they got exit in it isn't working. figs politicians because they got exit in it isn't working.— it isn't working. as the fighting continued between _ it isn't working. as the fighting continued between belfast's i it isn't working. as the fighting - continued between belfast's shankill continued between belfast�*s shankill and springfield road,
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line of land rovers, who pushed the crowd back from this side of the peace wall. earlier, on the other side of the wall, in the loyalist shankill road, a bus was hijacked and set alight. the shankill road, a bus was hi'acked and set alightfi and set alight. the disorder last niuht and set alight. the disorder last ni . ht was and set alight. the disorder last night was at _ and set alight. the disorder last night was at a — and set alight. the disorder last night was at a scale _ and set alight. the disorder last night was at a scale we - and set alight. the disorder last night was at a scale we have - and set alight. the disorder last| night was at a scale we have not seenin night was at a scale we have not seen in recent years in belfast or further afield. the fact that it was sectarian violence, there were large groups on both sides of the lanark way, it's something we haven't seen for a number of years. way, it's something we haven't seen fora number of years. in way, it's something we haven't seen for a number of years.— for a number of years. in loyalist communities, _ for a number of years. in loyalist communities, who _ for a number of years. in loyalist communities, who are _ for a number of years. in loyalist communities, who are staunchly| communities, who are staunchly british, there is a backlash over the brexit deal, which sets northern ireland apart from the rest of the uk. 19—year—old joel was himself arrested in a riot over easter and released without charge. he tells me he was looking out for a friend, but many who have become involved are even younger. why do you think this is happening? i even younger. why do you think this is happening?— is happening? i don't think young --eole is happening? i don't think young peeple really _ is happening? i don't think young people really understand - is happening? i don't think young people really understand the - is happening? i don't think young i people really understand the details in terms of the irish sea border.
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what they are being told and seen reflected in the media is that sinn fein are winning, the republicans are winning, and that our identity is under attack. when they hear those words and that stuff and then they are told, all right, and the way you can help is going out there and throwing bombs, sticks and stones at people, they are more than willing to do so.— willing to do so. people will say, wh were willing to do so. people will say, why were you — willing to do so. people will say, why were you there? _ willing to do so. people will say, why were you there? wouldn't i willing to do so. people will say, why were you there? wouldn't itj willing to do so. people will say, i why were you there? wouldn't it be better to go home?— why were you there? wouldn't it be better to go home? someone i care about is in trouble _ better to go home? someone i care about is in trouble and _ better to go home? someone i care about is in trouble and i _ better to go home? someone i care about is in trouble and i don't i about is in trouble and i don't think there's anything someone can blame you for or accuse me of wrongdoing. i5 blame you for or accuse me of wrongdoing-— wrongdoing. is the clean-up operation — wrongdoing. is the clean-up operation began _ wrongdoing. is the clean-up operation began in - wrongdoing. is the clean-up operation began in belfast, | operation began in belfast, political leaders gathered for an emergency meeting at stormont to try and bring about calm. there emergency meeting at stormont to try and bring about calm.— and bring about calm. there can be no lace and bring about calm. there can be no place in — and bring about calm. there can be no place in our— and bring about calm. there can be no place in our society _ and bring about calm. there can be no place in our society for - and bring about calm. there can be no place in our society for violence | no place in our society for violence or the threat of violence and it must stop. or the threat of violence and it must stop-— or the threat of violence and it must sto-. ~ . or the threat of violence and it must sto -. ~ . h, ., , ., must stop. what we saw last night at lanark way interface _ must stop. what we saw last night at lanark way interface was _ must stop. what we saw last night at lanark way interface was i _ must stop. what we saw last night at lanark way interface was i think i must stop. what we saw last night at lanark way interface was i think a i lanark way interface was i think a very dangerous escalation of events of recent_ very dangerous escalation of events of recent days, and it's utterly deplorable.
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of recent days, and it's utterly deplorable-— of recent days, and it's utterly delorable. , _, . deplorable. there is concern the . ates deplorable. there is concern the gates have _ deplorable. there is concern the gates have been _ deplorable. there is concern the gates have been opened - deplorable. there is concern the gates have been opened on i deplorable. there is concern the i gates have been opened on something more reminiscent of northern ireland boss michael days of old and they may be difficult to close. —— northern ireland's days of old. emma's in belfast for us tonight. these are scenes we'd hoped we'd not see again. these are scenes we'd hoped we'd not see aaain. , ., these are scenes we'd hoped we'd not see aain. , . , these are scenes we'd hoped we'd not see aaain. , . , ., ., see again. they are, but then again belfast is very _ see again. they are, but then again belfast is very good _ see again. they are, but then again belfast is very good at _ see again. they are, but then again belfast is very good at getting i see again. they are, but then again belfast is very good at getting back| belfast is very good at getting back on its feet, and those peace gates you saw, where the worst of the violence was, they are already being fixed today. there are protests planned in the days ahead and unauthorised parades, with the potential for more disorder. the prime minister, borisjohnson, spoke with the irish prime minister, the taoiseach micheal martin today by phone and they agreed the way forward would be through dialogue, but we have also seen unity on all sides from politicians in northern ireland today, and it comes to condemning the violence, but are still grievances and divisions being played out between the main unionist and nationalist parties. sometimes
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it is the blow for blow nature of politics here in northern ireland which gets reflected on the streets. emma, thank you. scientists at imperial college in london say they have new evidence about the effectiveness of the uk's vaccination programme. a study involving nearly 150,000 people shows that the jabs are breaking the link between infections and deaths. it comes as england's health secretary and several medical specialists have spent the day giving reassurances about the vaccine programme following yesterday's announcement of a link between the astrazeneca jab and rare blood clots. our medical editor, fergus walsh, looks at the risks and benefits of the vaccine. business as usual in north—east london. headlines about blood clots didn't put people off getting the astrazeneca vaccine. the didn't put people off getting the astrazeneca vaccine. the thought of catchin: astrazeneca vaccine. the thought of catching covid _ astrazeneca vaccine. the thought of catching covid is _ astrazeneca vaccine. the thought of catching covid is more _ astrazeneca vaccine. the thought of catching covid is more risky - astrazeneca vaccine. the thought of catching covid is more risky than i catching covid is more risky than having a blood clot. fight;
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catching covid is more risky than having a blood clot. any medicine has a side effect _ having a blood clot. any medicine has a side effect so _ having a blood clot. any medicine has a side effect so i _ having a blood clot. any medicine has a side effect so i wasn't i having a blood clot. any medicine l has a side effect so i wasn't unduly concerned~ — has a side effect so i wasn't unduly concerned. 3�*9 has a side effect so i wasn't unduly concerned-— has a side effect so i wasn't unduly concerned. ' . , . ., , ., concerned. 79 rare blood clots have been identified _ concerned. 79 rare blood clots have been identified out _ concerned. 79 rare blood clots have been identified out of— concerned. 79 rare blood clots have been identified out of 20 _ concerned. 79 rare blood clots have been identified out of 20 million i been identified out of 20 million doses of the astrazeneca vaccine. the link isn't proven but in future the under 30s will be offered a different vaccine. for nearly all age groups, the benefits of the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine far outweigh any potential harms. for people in their 60s, with the current low level of virus circulation, for every 100,000 vaccinated, 1a icu admissions would be prevented. at the same time, there would be a 0.2 or one in 500,000 risk of a rare serious plot. for people in their 20s, it's a fine judgment. there, less than one icu admission would be prevented but there would be just over one serious blood clot per 100,000 immunised. if
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we look at a period of high virus transmission, such as january, there, among the over 60s, 127 icu admissions would be prevented and nearly seven in the over 20s. neela stills began suffering headaches and nausea a week after having the astrazeneca vaccine. he died of a blood clot on the brain on easter sunday. his sister, a pharmacist, says he was extraordinarily unlucky. despite what has happened to neil and the impact on ourfamily, i still strongly believe that people should be going ahead and having the vaccine. if you have had one dose, go ahead and have your second. if you haven't had a dose yet, make sure you do. overall, we will save more lives by people having the vaccine than not. the government sa s vaccine than not. the government says there — vaccine than not. the government says there will _ vaccine than not. the government says there will be _ vaccine than not. the government says there will be enough - vaccine than not. the government says there will be enough pfizer. vaccine than not. the government l says there will be enough pfizer and moderna doses for 8.5 million 18 to
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29—year—oldss to be vaccinated. the message from ministers one of reassurance. taste message from ministers one of reassurance-— message from ministers one of reassurance. we know there are letters working, _ reassurance. we know there are letters working, the _ reassurance. we know there are letters working, the safety i reassurance. we know there are i letters working, the safety system is working and we are on track to meet goal of offering to all adults by the end ofjuly, and the speed of the roll—out would be affected by these decisions. when you get the call, get the jab. these decisions. when you get the call, get the jab-— call, get the 'ab. scientists trackin: call, get the 'ab. scientists tracking the i call, get the jab. scientists tracking the epidemic- call, get the jab. scientists tracking the epidemic in i call, get the jab. scientists i tracking the epidemic in england call, get the jab. scientists - tracking the epidemic in england say vaccines are weakening the link between cases and deaths. there are now far fewer fatalities per infection, because so many of us are protected. a reminder why all of this really matters. fergus walsh, bbc news. so how safe is the astrazeneca vaccine if you're young? our health correspondent catherine burns has been having a look at some of the questions about the vaccine. based on the doses being given in
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the uk, about four in a million people have developed these clots after being given the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine. just under one in a million have died. to give context, that's about the same as your chances of dying on a 250 mile carjourney. regulators think it's riskierfor adults mile carjourney. regulators think it's riskier for adults under 30 though so, if you imagine wembley stadium packed full of 18 to 29—year—oldss who have been vaccinated, one of them would possibly need to be taken to intensive care after developing this kind of unusual blood clot. it's still a very small risk, but it's one they don't need to take because they will be offered alternative vaccines instead. once you hit your 30th birthday, you won't get a choice of vaccine. one quick thought, right now, we are mainly vaccinating the over 50s. by the time we get to younger people, we will have a lot more information and, if the evidence has changed, the advice could be tweaked.
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unrelated, if you are pregnant or taking some female hormones, you would also be more likely to develop blood clots so, for example, the combined pill, the numbers seem to be higher than what's happening with the vaccine so, if a million women were taking it for a year, may be 500 of them would go on to develop kind of plot. most clots are pretty easily treatable. the types linked to the vaccine do appear to be more serious though. when you have a vaccine, you might feel a bit ropey for a few days, and that's normal, but there are some symptoms to look out for four more days after the jab. they include a headache, blurred vision, chest pain, shortness of breath, stomach aches, swollen legs, unusual bruises or little spots. there are treatments for this, the earlier the better. overall, the message is clear, if you are offered the vaccine, don't hesitate to come forward. our health correspondent, catherine burns, reporting there. let's take a look at the latest government coronavirus figures. there were just over 3,000
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new coronavirus infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period which means that on average the number of new cases reported per day in the last week is 2,865. across the uk the latest figures show 3,124 people were in hospital with coronavirus. 53 deaths were reported, that's people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—19 test. on average in the past week, 31 deaths were announced every day. the total number of deaths so far across the uk is nearly 127,000. the uk is continuing its programme of mass vaccinations and, in the last 24—hour period, nearly 100,000 people had their first dose, taking the overall number of people who've had theirfirst jab to 31.8 million. the number of people who've had their second dose of the vaccine in the latest 24—hour period is a little over 400,000. that takes the overall number of people who've had their second jab to more than six million people.
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now to the political row surrounding david cameron and his lobbying for the finance company greensill capital. the chancellor, rishi sunak, has taken the unusual step of publishing two text messages sent to mr cameron a year ago, after he had contacted mr sunak privately on behalf of the company. our deputy political editor, vicki young, is in westminsterfor us. you had better start by giving us some of the background to this. david cameron was working for this company, greensill, and they wanted access to a government backed loan scheme, so mr cameron contacted the chancellor, rishi sunak, to make the case. he contacted him several times, i am told. case. he contacted him several times, iam told. in case. he contacted him several times, i am told. in one of the replies, there werejust times, i am told. in one of the replies, there were just two, according to the chancellor, rishi sunak said, i have pushed the team to explore an alternative that might
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work, because he was rejecting the original idea that mr cameron made. rishi sunak went on to say, no guarantees. rishi sunak is insisting tonight he acted with integrity and propriety, and treasury sources say the chancellor was pushing mr cameron to go through officials in the treasury, rather than contacting him personally. this shows a former prime minister getting access to the highest levels of government stop david cameron hasn't broken any rules on lobbying but labour say that's because the rules just aren't strict enough. it's very hard to know with lobbying really what makes a difference at whether in this case mr cameron's intervention made a difference, but some people think it shouldn't have been allowed to happen at all. the mother of 19—year—old richard okorogheye says his disappearance wasn't taken seriously by police. evidence joel claims he was discriminated against because he was black. the student was found dead in a pond in essex after being reported missing by his family two weeks earlier.
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his death is currently being treated as unexplained. today, the police watchdog opened up an investigation as a matter of course. sangita myska reports. the search for richard okorogheye, accompanied — the search for richard okorogheye, accompanied by— the search for richard okorogheye, accompanied by desperate - the search for richard okorogheye, accompanied by desperate pleas i the search for richard okorogheye, . accompanied by desperate pleas from his mother_ accompanied by desperate pleas from his mother fcn— accompanied by desperate pleas from his mother for his— accompanied by desperate pleas from his mother for his safe _ accompanied by desperate pleas from his mother for his safe return, - his mother for his safe return, captured — his mother for his safe return, captured the _ his mother for his safe return, captured the country - his mother for his safe return, captured the country was i his mother for his safe return, captured the country was my. captured the country was my conscience _ captured the country was my conscience.— conscience. the 19-year-old university — conscience. the 19-year-old university student _ conscience. the 19-year-old university student went i conscience. the 19-year-old i university student went missing conscience. the 19-year-old - university student went missing two weeks ago. richard had sickle cell disease, yet he left his home on the 22nd of march without a coat or medication. he caught a bus and was next seen on this cctv footage a short distance from epping forest in essex. his body was eventually found in this large pond. i worship the ground he walks on. today his mother, who works night shifts as a nurse, describes the last time she saw her son. he describes the last time she saw her son. describes the last time she saw her son, , ., ., describes the last time she saw her son. ., _, describes the last time she saw her son. ., ,, ., ., describes the last time she saw her
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son. ., ., ., ., son. he said are you going to work? drive safely. — son. he said are you going to work? drive safely, don't _ son. he said are you going to work? drive safely, don't drive _ son. he said are you going to work? drive safely, don't drive too - son. he said are you going to work? drive safely, don't drive too fast, i drive safely, don't drive too fast, mummy. isaid, i love drive safely, don't drive too fast, mummy. i said, i love you. drive safely, don't drive too fast, mummy. isaid, i love you. he drive safely, don't drive too fast, mummy. i said, i love you. he said drive safely, don't drive too fast, mummy. isaid, i love you. he said i love you too. he held the door and he said i will be going to my friend. ~ ., ., ., . he said i will be going to my friend. ~ ., ., . friend. the metropolitan police say richard's death _ friend. the metropolitan police say richard's death currently _ friend. the metropolitan police say richard's death currently remains l richard's death currently remains unexplained and his body shows no sign of injury. his mother says she does not believe he took his own life. she also says her concerns about his vulnerability were dismissed by the police. the initial treatment was... _ dismissed by the police. the initial treatment was... it _ dismissed by the police. the initial treatment was... it was _ dismissed by the police. the initial| treatment was... it was disgusting. that is a very _ treatment was... it was disgusting. that is a very strong _ treatment was... it was disgusting. that is a very strong thing - treatment was... it was disgusting. that is a very strong thing to i treatment was... it was disgusting. that is a very strong thing to say, l that is a very strong thing to say, why do you say that?— why do you say that? everything i said it was _ why do you say that? everything i said it was dismissed. _ why do you say that? everything i said it was dismissed. it - why do you say that? everything i said it was dismissed. it meant i said it was dismissed. it meant nothing. i was told by one of the officers i called, if richard is in pain, and he had sickle cell disease, he will find his way to hospital. i said, disease, he will find his way to hospital. isaid, hold on disease, he will find his way to hospital. i said, hold on a minute, if he is in pain, he can't move. his mother claims _ if he is in pain, he can't move. his mother claims his race was the reason for the please's alleged a slow response. if
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reason for the please's alleged a slow response.— reason for the please's alleged a slow resonse. . .,, , slow response. if that was somebody else, ifeel slow response. if that was somebody else, i feel that _ slow response. if that was somebody else, i feel that they _ slow response. if that was somebody else, i feel that they would _ slow response. if that was somebody else, i feel that they would have i else, i feel that they would have acted quicker. else, i feel that they would have acted quicker-— else, i feel that they would have acted quicker. more quickly. when ou sa acted quicker. more quickly. when you say that. _ acted quicker. more quickly. when you say that, what _ acted quicker. more quickly. when you say that, what you _ acted quicker. more quickly. when you say that, what you mean i acted quicker. more quickly. when you say that, what you mean if i acted quicker. more quickly. when| you say that, what you mean if you someone else? if you say that, what you mean if you someone else?— someone else? if richard was a different colour, _ someone else? if richard was a different colour, if _ someone else? if richard was a different colour, if he _ someone else? if richard was a different colour, if he wasn't i different colour, if he wasn't black. i know it is hard to say that, but the discrimination was quite obvious. ih that, but the discrimination was quite obvious.— that, but the discrimination was cuite obvious. , , ., , quite obvious. in response to these alleaations quite obvious. in response to these allegations the _ quite obvious. in response to these allegations the metropolitan i quite obvious. in response to these allegations the metropolitan police | allegations the metropolitan police say they have worked tirelessly on richard it was my case, using the full range of their resources, including work behind the scenes. our top story this evening... police say last night's clashes between northern ireland's catholic and protestant communities in belfast was the worst they've seen in years. and still to come... it's what we've all been waiting for but wait a minute, are we really ready for an end to lockdown uk? coming up on sportsday
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on the bbc news channel... three winners for part—owner sir alex ferguson at the aintree grand national festival, including clan des obeaux, coming home 26 lengths clear at the betway bowl chase. as the world begins to move away from petrol and diesel—powered cars, there are questions over how the metals needed for batteries in electrical vehicles will be sourced. one possibility is to mine the deep ocean floor. a number of companies are lining up to exploit the minerals found there, but campaigners warn it could have a disastrous impact on the marine environment. here's our chief environment correspondent, justin rowlatt. it is one of the most remote regions on earth, the vastness of the pacific ocean. but more than two miles beneath the surface lie incredible reserves of the metals needed to make electric vehicle batteries. so this is what the mining
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companies are after. this is a poly metallic nodule. it's a kind of nugget of crucial battery metal, so in here you've got cobalt, nickel, copper, manganese and there are hundreds of millions of these lying on the deep sea floor in some areas of ocean. we can dramatically reduce our environmental and social impact... the mining companies say sourcing metals from the deep ocean has a lower environmental impact than mining metals on land. and theyjust sit there like golf balls on a driving range. so we don't have to drill or blast to find them. also, they happen to sit in an environment where there is no forests, or no plants, and we compare that with land—based mining in these areas of rich, bio—diverse forests where we are having to destroy these carbon sinks to get access to these metal deposits. it's a no—brainer where we should be getting our metals from. environmental campaigners disagree. they say mining will destroy fragile
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ecosystems that have developed over hundreds of millions of years. with the climate and biodiversity crisis facing this planet, deep—sea mining would just be another scandalous threat to the health of our oceans. petrol. or electric. bmw, google, samsung and volvo trucks announced they would not be using any metals sourced from the deep ocean in their products. at the natural history museum, zoologist adrian glover studies the creatures that live on the deep ocean floor. of course james cameron was inspired by deep sea animals for all of his movies. he says the impact of mining will be profound. it means humanity faces a difficult decision. it will be a dramatic shift in the ecology of the environment. and that's something that you just have to accept. some areas of the planet will have to be impacted if humans are going to move forward
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in a zero carbon future. the decision about whether to allow mining will be taken by the human mining will be taken by the un body that controls exploitation of the deep ocean. but as sales of electric vehicles increase, pressure to allow mining in the deep oceans is also likely to grow. justin rowlatt, bbc news. as elections to the scottish parliament draw closer young people across the country are considering which party they'll back on may the 6th. 16 and 17—year—olds are eligible to vote and, as our scotland editor sarah smith found, many are eager to hear bold ideas on education and climate change, as well as hoping to see more diversity in scottish politics. over 100,000 young people like paisley art student, 17—year—old isla, will be voting for the first time next month. like most of their age group they support independence for scotland and want more political focus on the environment. you need to get young people on your side so, number one, you don't lose interest in politics. and, number two, if you have a young person on your side
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they have the probable pattern that will continue to vote for you. you know, who wouldn't want that under their belt? on the same day the weather is radically different in aberdeen, where16—year—old david is concerned by the economic future and opportunities for those who risk becoming part of a lost generation. when i go to the polling station i'll be thinking about a number of things, but mostly which party is going to rebuild scotland for the better as we exit this pandemic? who can lead the country out of the pandemic, focusing on the economy, jobs and opportunities for young people? we gathered together a group of under 18, including david and isla, from all over scotland to explore their priorities in this election. after a year of school closures education is high on the list. the big problem i have with it is the inability, it seems, to reduce the attainment gap between the rich and the poor, the affluent and the less affluent, and that was compounded by the manner in which results were awarded last year
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after the coronavirus cancelled the exams. it was quite frankly shocking. education in this country is undoubtedly good, but there is always room for improvement. we now have the opportunity i as we recover from covid to take a look at our education system i and say what is important in it? is it more about- learning about values? is it about learning how. to use your brain to make the world a better place? is independence a big issue for you? will it determine how you vote? i believe the union isn't working, although independence isn't the only solution to this problem. we can consider a new style of union. the main point that would lead me to support a second referendum is that decision for brexit. i'm in favour of remaining part of the united kingdom, - i believe there's many benefits to it and i wouldn't vote - for a party that goes against that. these voters want to see parliamentary candidates from a more diverse range of backgrounds. we need people who are from poorer areas, we need people who are asian, black,
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trans, more gay people in politics. we don'tjust need more young people, we need more people of every type. the majority of people we listen to are middle—aged, white men who are straight and cis. what's the deal with that? the deal is, it seems, these under 18s know very well what they want and politicians will be well advised to listen. sarah smith, bbc news, glasgow. welsh labour says it will train 12,000 new medical staff for the nhs if it wins the senedd election on the 6th may. welsh labour leader, mark drakeford, speaking at the launch of the party's manifesto, said the plans would "build the wales of tomorrow". today, we launch a manifesto that sets out welsh labour's plan to go on investing in ourfuture. a plan to help us not only to recover from coronavirus, but to do something far more. to build the wales of tomorrow.
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a plan to build a greener, stronger and fairer wales. next week sees a further easing of covid restrictions in england. it's what most of us want, but shifting back to the old way of doing things may not be as easy as we think. the changes to our lives over the past year have had a huge impact and for some the weeks ahead are both exciting and daunting. daniela relph reports from northampton. i am on the thin line between cautious and optimistic. come on up, cheese, thank you. we just need the general public back to make the market blossom again. i i can't imagine going to the pub and mingling with everyone. i always have this thought in my head that, oh, my god, there are people too close to me. i think the whole population has been suffering - from lockdown fatigue. the regular rhythm of our every day is slowly returning,
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the familiar routines resumed, but for many their mindset has shifted. i think there are some people who we probably will never see in church again because of what we have gone through as a society. it will be very harsh to get the confidence back and going and doing normal things once more. memories of a life without restrictions, as freedom beckons some find themselves conflicted. i think i feel a bit more anxious but i still like the idea that i can go out for drinks with my friends again, but, strangers, please stay away, you know? yeah, i definitely feel a bit anxious but i'm not too bad. normality will mean readjustment, especially if you feel forever changed. i think it has made me a bit more introspective if anything. it's made me value
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friendships a lot more. enticing the crowds back in. it comes with responsibility and a need for reassurance. it's hard to imagine so many people close up together as scenes you would have seen in the past and i do think we need to demonstrate that we have a safe environment, that we have thought about those issues. a thriving business and a long waiting list, but even then the weeks ahead will be edged with restraint. we are going to be busy, it is certainly going to be a change of pace because i have gone from not working at all to back into six days a week, full—blown life again. so i am a little bit nervous, i'd be lying if i said i wasn't, but i am trying to be optimistic, i think it's the best way to be. the message is both hopeful and careful, both optimistic and cautious, but everyone has that thing that they crave.
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i just want to go to the beach in a bikini, like, ijust want to go on holiday. i cannot wait to go to the cinema. spontaneity is what i'm looking forward to. i i don't think you can beat the roar of the crowd with a winning six. you can see the light, it is getting closer, but we've all got to stay careful still, that's the way i see it. daniela relph, bbc news, northampton. time for a look at the weather here's nick miller. it hasn't been a warm day, but temperatures have been a bit higher today, helped where you got to see some sunshine, but rain has become more widespread in scotland, part of northern ireland and northern england. from this weather front it is a cold front. notjust cold air, but arctic air because that is coming back, spreading south across the uk tonight and into tomorrow and we have a cold weekend to come. here is the rain from that weather front
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into northern ireland. pushing into northern england this evening. behind it, clearing up, but turning colder, snow showers on northern scotland, gusting 60 to 70 miles an hour, so potentially disruptive. icy patches with the snow showers in northern scotland, a frost in scotland, northern ireland and northern england. but where you keep the cloud and patchy rain, the temperatures are a few degrees above freezing. so tomorrow from wales across the midlands and into east anglia and push it into southern england, that weather front, anglia and push it into southern england, that weatherfront, cloud, patchy rain turning showery. for northern england, northern ireland and scotland there is plenty of sunshine. snow showers in northern scotland. cold in northern scotland, colder elsewhere, but still a few spots in southern england and south wales into double figures. a few showers as we go into friday night. rain preaching into the

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