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tv   BBC News with Katty and Christian  BBC News  April 7, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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this is bbc news — "side effect" or "red flag"? the eu's medicines regulator says blood clots do occur with the astrazeneca vaccine. the risk is extremely low, but those under 30 in the uk will be offered a differentjab if they want it. uk government scientists assure the public that the vaccine is safe — and is still the country's best hope for ending the pandemic. changes in preference for vaccines are business as usual and this is a course correction. going from bad to worse in brazil. the country has recorded 4000 deaths in a single day, its highest ever total. we'll speak live to a critical care doctor. also on the programme.... former president trump weighs in on the matt gaetz scandal.
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he denies the congressman asked him for a pardon, amid an ongoing investigation into an alleged relationship with a 17—year—old. and, interstellar icon william shatnerjoins us to talk about star trek, his astonishing career, and making movies, at the age of 90. hello, i'm katty kay in washington, clive myrie is in london. the uk's medicines regulator has revised its guidance on who should take the oxford/astrazeneca vaccine. the new advice comes following evidence that, in extremely rare cases, people who've had the astrazeneca jab develop blood clots. according to the new guidance, from today people aged between 18 and 29 will be offered an alternative vaccine. for those who've already had a first dose of astrazeneca, the advice is to go ahead and get the second.
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the head of the medical regulator insisted that the benefits of taking the astrazeneca jab, still far outweigh the risks for the vast majority of people. our medical editor, fergus walsh, looks at the evidence that has led to today's changes. turn up, get yourjab. the message remains the same. but in future for the first time, the covid vaccine you receive will depend on your age. that's because evidence is emerging of a link between the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine and very rare blood clots. the uk regulator the mhra said up to the end of march there have been 79 cases of rare clots with low platelets following a first dose of the astrazeneca vaccine. 19 people have died. that's out of 20 million who received the jab. that's one rare clot in every 250,000 vaccinations. these monitoring systems are now detecting a potential side effect
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of the covid—19 vaccine astrazeneca, in an extremely small number of people. the evidence is firming up. the balance of benefits and known risks of the vaccine is still very favourable for the vast majority of people. very few adults under 30 have died from covid, so that changes the risk—benefit balance from getting a vaccine. it's thought younger adults are at higher risk from clots after the astrazeneca jab. about one in every 100,000 doses. so they will be offered a different vaccine when their time comes. are you worried that this change of course might damage vaccine confidence, especially in the young? these are really carefully considered decisions, and it remains vitally important that people who are called back for their second dose come for it and it remains vitally important
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that all adults in the uk come forward for vaccination when they are offered at. the european medicines agency has come to the same conclusion — there is a possible link between the astrazeneca vaccine and very rare blood clots. mostly in women under 60. several eu countries had already restricted the astrazeneca vaccine to older adults. france to those over 55. germany to those over 60. scientists who analyse risk say this change of course should not put people off getting a vaccine. this vaccine is extraordinarily effective and it would be tragic if this led to distrust of this vaccine, even worse if it was for vaccines in general for covid because it has been shown to be amazingly effective. it's saved thousands of lives already. the prime minister believes the path
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to lifting restrictions should not be disrupted. i don't see any reason at this stage at all to think we need to deviate from the road map, and we are also very secure about our supply. it's thought covid vaccines have already prevented 6000 deaths in the uk, and they remain the key to ending lockdown and returning life to normal. fergus walsh, bbc news. dr mike 0sborne is president of the royal college of pathologists, as well as being an nhs consultant. hejoins us from south london. hello to you, thanks for being with us. the facts seem to be getting a little bit clearer on the link between these very rare blood clots and the astrazeneca vaccine. but why is it the astrazeneca vaccine is in this position when all the others
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don't seem to be causing this kind of rare occurrence?— of rare occurrence? well, the no definitive absolute _ of rare occurrence? well, the no definitive absolute make - of rare occurrence? well, the no definitive absolute make has - of rare occurrence? well, the no i definitive absolute make has been identified that although as you say the evidence is firming up and that is why the action has been taken today. the different vaccines we have available in the uk work in different ways and so each of them is likely to have different side effects affecting different groups and so forth. so that may well explain why that has happened and it's affecting this vaccine and not the other vaccines although the exact mechanisms involved in the set presents are still poorly understood and a lot of research is going into that as we speak. d0 and a lot of research is going into that as we speak.— and a lot of research is going into that as we speak. do you believe or fear of the — that as we speak. do you believe or fear of the controversy _ that as we speak. do you believe or fear of the controversy over - that as we speak. do you believe or fear of the controversy over all - that as we speak. do you believe or fear of the controversy over all of l fear of the controversy over all of this could now make some people to wait about getting any kind of vaccine? i wait about getting any kind of vaccine? ~ , ., , , ., vaccine? i think people should really take _ vaccine? i think people should really take reassurance - vaccine? i think people should really take reassurance from l vaccine? i think people should - really take reassurance from what has happened today, that the nhra and the jcb has happened today, that the nhra and thejcb i have worked very quickly to look at the data and have
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come to this conclusion. —— mhr and jcvi and have taken the cautious step they have given today of using alternatives in people who are under 30. i think people should take that and be reassured by that and i'm not worried, and hopefully people will continue to take up the vaccine because that is the way to get us out of the covid pandemic. doctor osborne i spoke _ out of the covid pandemic. doctor osborne i spoke today _ out of the covid pandemic. doctor osborne i spoke today to - out of the covid pandemic. doctor osborne i spoke today to one - out of the covid pandemic. doctor osborne i spoke today to one of. out of the covid pandemic. doctor. osborne i spoke today to one of the 0sborne i spoke today to one of the task force members at president biden�*s white house who said he had rarely seen a medical company that had such a good product but such terrible communications and lack of transparency. do you think this is a messaging problem with astrazeneca rather than a problem with the vaccine itself? i rather than a problem with the vaccine itself?— rather than a problem with the vaccine itself? ~' ._ , vaccine itself? i think there may be an element — vaccine itself? i think there may be an element of— vaccine itself? i think there may be an element of that. _ vaccine itself? i think there may be an element of that. i _ vaccine itself? i think there may be an element of that. i think - vaccine itself? i think there may be an element of that. i think it's - an element of that. i think it's important to understand that this sort of thing happens all the time in medicines, the nhra send out regular updates on medicines we use
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all the time altering the groups they are used in so this is nothing unusualfor they are used in so this is nothing unusual for this to happen with a vaccine but we are looking at a vaccine but we are looking at a vaccine that has been ruled out and is being used on huge numbers of people under an immense media spotlight. so all of the things that you are talking about come much more to the fore in this case than they would in normal circumstances. i agree completely that this is a course change rather than anything else. i course change rather than anything else. , ., ,., course change rather than anything else. , ., , course change rather than anything else. ,, , ., course change rather than anything else. , else. i get your point but to pick u . else. i get your point but to pick u- on else. i get your point but to pick up on what _ else. i get your point but to pick up on what clive _ else. i get your point but to pick up on what clive was _ else. i get your point but to pick up on what clive was saying - else. i get your point but to pick up on what clive was saying at l else. i get your point but to pick l up on what clive was saying at the beginning, this has not been the case with thejohnson &johnson job, the pfizer or the modernityjab and they too have had millions of people taking those vaccines. —— them a dharna jab. they haven't had those same concerns and some people thought maybe there were some politics involved but canada has raised some concerns with astrazeneca and what when i they are different to make a report to be motivated. different to make a report to be motivated-— different to make a report to be motivated. , ' _, , ., motivated. different countries have taken different _ motivated. different countries have taken different action _ motivated. different countries have taken different action because - motivated. different countries have taken different action because they| taken different action because they have different demographics and are dealing with at the covid outbreak
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in their own countries and their own way. so whilst we can learn and take information from other countries, we can't really assume that what is right for one country is right for another country because they are dealing with their own demographics and their own situation. i think what the mhra, the government and dj cvi is exactly correct... what the mhra, the government and dj cvi is exactly correct. . ._ cvi is exactly correct... finally, do ou cvi is exactly correct... finally, do you believe _ cvi is exactly correct... finally, do you believe that _ cvi is exactly correct... finally, do you believe that there - cvi is exactly correct... finally, | do you believe that there should cvi is exactly correct... finally, - do you believe that there should be some kind of analysis now as to whether or not it is possible to use two different facts and needs bearing in mind that there are no concerns over, very minor concerns it has to be said, because of the rarity of blood clots but do you believe now that should be studies looking into possibly combining two vaccines? my looking into possibly combining two vaccines? g , ., , vaccines? my understanding is studies are — vaccines? my understanding is studies are ongoing _ vaccines? my understanding is studies are ongoing all - vaccines? my understanding is studies are ongoing all the - vaccines? my understanding is. studies are ongoing all the time with the use of vaccines in multiple ways and the best ways to use these vaccines to get out of the covid pandemic in our country and to deal with our pandemic. so as those studies are going on. i think you have highlighted the fact that this
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is an important month, —— a very important but very unusual side effect and we must bear that in mind. the risk for covid itself for the majority of the population far outweighs any risk from the fixation a debt from the vaccination and i would urge people to keep taking the vaccine and take it when it is offered to them according to the guidance available.— guidance available. doctor mike osborne, thank _ guidance available. doctor mike osborne, thank you _ guidance available. doctor mike osborne, thank you for - guidance available. doctor mike osborne, thank you forjoiningl guidance available. doctor mike i osborne, thank you forjoining us. 0sborne, thank you forjoining us. thank you. i have some stats for you, the incidence of suffering a blood clot that is fatal is one and 100,000 for those who are under the age of 20. the risk of dying in a road accident is one and 100,000 every three months. that shows you how rare this event is and i suspect people under the age of 20 are not likely to feel that they shouldn't be getting into motorcars because of the incidences is higher. 20 million brits have had the astrazeneca vaccine so far in the uk. if you put
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20 million people on aspirin in order to deal with strokes for instance, then the incidence of blood clots would be many, many times higher than the incidence of blood clots as a result of taking the vaccine. these are the steps that the authorities here are trying to put out there for the public to say "it's very rare you will get one of these blood clots. it is for the vast majority of people safe and it is the only way we are going to get out of this mess and move on to having a normal life again." yet and of course the _ having a normal life again." yet and of course the astrazeneca _ having a normal life again." yet and of course the astrazeneca vaccine i of course the astrazeneca vaccine crucial for emerging economies as well, poorer countries because it is one of the cheaper vaccines and there has to be confidence. it was interesting speaking to this white house transition official from the covid task force saying he believes it is safe but there has to be clarity from astrazeneca and people have to feel confident, it is very critical people notjust in the uk but around the world is will feel confident in that vaccine so perhaps the company has to do a betterjob of giving a clear message that
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inspires confidence in people. because the product itself as you say is much worse, you do not want to get covid. having had two family members with covid, you do not want to get it. get it. brazil has become one of the deadliest battlegrounds in the global fight against covid. for the first time ever, the country recorded more than 4,000 deaths in a single, 24—hour period. it took the nation over a year to reach the point where it was recording over 2000 deaths a day, but it has taken less than a month for that figure to double. just more proof — if it were needed — of how contagious and how lethal this virus can be. hospitals in many regions are overcrowded, people are dying in some cities waiting for treatment, and the health system is stretched to its limit. this graph from the brazilian newspaper, folha de sau paolo, shows the scale of the problem. the red areas are those where the virus is accelerating, the orange areas where the virus is stable.
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only one region has seen a fall in infections — the amazon. despite the crisis, brazil's president jair bolsonaro continues to oppose lockdowns. the vaccine roll—out is also leaving much to be desired — less than 10% of the population has been vaccinated. joining us now is dr hermeto paschoalick, head of the critical care unit at university hospital of grande dourados in midwestern brazil. doctor thank you so much forjoining us. you are in one of the regions where the problem is growing, not declining. what is it like at the university hospital there? we are living in a catastrophic situation here in brazil. in our hospital, our capacity is full... all our hospitals are crowded and we have a lot of patience waiting for an icu bed and it is very moment. i
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an icu bed and it is very moment. i imagine the staff, you doctors and nurses are exhausted, you have been doing with this for a year now. it is very difficult for us and sometimes we arejust is very difficult for us and sometimes we are just in our moments out of the icu and some people will start crying and losing lovers and... ., ., ., and... doctor, are you and your colleagues _ and... doctor, are you and your colleagues having _ and... doctor, are you and your colleagues having to _ and... doctor, are you and your colleagues having to decide - colleagues having to decide essentially who lives or dies because of the volume of patients and potentially the lack of oxygen and potentially the lack of oxygen and facilities and icu units? are you having to say "we will help this person. this other person is too far gone." are you having to make those kinds of decisions? yes. gone.�* are you having to make those kinds of decisions?— kinds of decisions? yes, it is very difficult especially _ kinds of decisions? yes, it is very difficult especially for _ kinds of decisions? yes, it is very difficult especially for our - kinds of decisions? yes, it is very difficult especially for our region | difficult especially for our region here because we have some difficult
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issues with the weight of care because i think some cultural notions... and we had the revelation, it is very difficult say which person that aren't that bad... we can't discuss this with the whole population opening and... it we can't discuss this with the whole population opening and. . ._ we can't discuss this with the whole population opening and... it must be so difficult but _ population opening and... it must be so difficult but do _ population opening and... it must be so difficult but do you _ population opening and... it must be so difficult but do you believe - population opening and... it must be so difficult but do you believe in - population opening and... it must be so difficult but do you believe in a . so difficult but do you believe in a national lockdown would help deal with the situation, something the president has said he is not willing to entertain?— to entertain? yeah, i think it's a little crazy _ to entertain? yeah, i think it's a little crazy to — to entertain? yeah, i think it's a little crazy to think _ to entertain? yeah, i think it's a little crazy to think like - to entertain? yeah, i think it's a little crazy to think like that - little crazy to think like that because we don't have any other option. we can't increase our beds. we don't have space, we don't have a
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team. we don't have enough persons equipped to work that kind of bed. we don't have the equipment. we have a lack of sedatives. i don't know what we do in the next weeks. and, what we do in the next weeks. and, what can you do? just keep watching people dying? what can you do? just keep watching peeple dying?— people dying? doctor, we wish you and our people dying? doctor, we wish you and your hospital _ people dying? doctor, we wish you and your hospital workers - people dying? doctor, we wish you and your hospital workers under i and your hospital workers under nurses and doctors the very best. thank you for telling us just how critical the situation is in the university hospital there. thank you forjoining us. it is grim, isn't it, clive? you can hear the exhaustion and the doctor pots by voice.— doctor pots by voice. yeah, it is one of those — doctor pots by voice. yeah, it is one of those situations - doctor pots by voice. yeah, it is one of those situations where i doctor pots by voice. yeah, it is l one of those situations where you may have expected a year ago at the beginning of this crisis countries have managed to work out ways of dealing with it whether it is with
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lockdowns, mass mandates, social distancing, shutting economies down. jair bolsonaro isn't interested in that. it jair bolsonaro isn't interested in that. , , '. ., that. it is very difficult for brazilians _ that. it is very difficult for brazilians to _ that. it is very difficult for brazilians to get - that. it is very difficult for brazilians to get out - that. it is very difficult for brazilians to get out of i that. it is very difficult for| brazilians to get out of the country. there is a real travel lockdown but interestingly i was speaking to the head of the international monetary fund and we will have more of the interview i had with her earlier and later on in the programme but i did ask her about brazil because they are looking at global economic growth and asked whether the situation in brazil could track the rest of the world's economy down too? here is what she said. it is tragic when covid hits so hard. and it is a very clear case why accelerating vaccinations is so important. there is no other way to protect resilience, but also protect the world community from new variants of covid. —— to protect brazilians. and what we believe brazil can do more of it is to use this difficult moment to build a stronger
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foundation of its economy — and of course the international community, the international institutions, we are there to help. kristalina georgievea there, but they do need more vaccinations in that country. let's get some of the day's other news. police in california say the golfer, tiger woods, was driving at nearly double the speed limit before a crash that left him seriously injured. the los angeles county sheriff said woods' car had been travelling at up to 87mph when it careered off the road in february. he was taken to hospital with a shattered leg. derek chauvin, the police officer accused of murdering george floyd, used inappropriate "deadly force" when kneeling on his neck for more than nine minutes, according to witness testimony today. sergeantjody stiger, a use—of—force expert for the los angeles police department, told the court in minneapolis that mr floyd was not actively resisting when excessive force was used. india has recorded its highest
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number of daily coronavirus cases, crossing the 100,000 mark for the second time in a few days. almost half the new cases are in the western state of maharashtra. the surge in infections is putting pressure on the central government to expand its vaccination programme. greenland's main opposition party, which opposes a rare earth mining project, has won a general election. the result could halt plans to mine for rare earth metals on the arctic island — which is an autonomous territory of denmark. the governing siumut party had argued that the project could yield an economic windfall. for those watching on bbc world news — we'll be right back. a man who was denied a £1.7 million prize by the gambling firm betfred has won a three—year high court battle to get his payout. andy green believed he'd won the jackpot while blackjack online.
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but betfred claimed there'd been a software glitch and refused to pay out. after the court's verdict, this was mr green's reaction. —— while playing blackjack online. taking on a multi—billion company isn't easy. but it proves there is justice and if you've done nothing wrong, you will win in the end. but in that time scale where you're trying to decide what to do about it, what was the impact on your life of knowing you had this money offered to you and then taking away? well, as i say, it was absolutely gut—wrenching to have it taken away, and then three and a half years of battling... ..in courts and having to put money up myself financially to go to court... bit of a gamble. a bit of a gamble. congressman matt gaetz was an unwavering supporter of donald trump during his presidency.
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the florida firebrand stuck by mr trump through thick and thin. he even signed a letter nominating him for the nobel peace prize. but the question now is, did he look for a favour in return? the new york times is reporting that mr gaetz asked the trump white house for a blanket pardon for any crimes he may have committed. that coincided with a department ofjustice investigation looking into allegations of six trafficking, though its unclear what mr gaetz knew of the inquiry. —— sex trafficking. earlier today mr trump came out denying the congressman had asked him for a pardon, in one of his shortest statements yet. he also said that it must... let's bring in our senior north america reporter, anthony zurcher. anthony, why would you ask for a pardon for crimes committed, a blanket pardon, if you weren't worried that you might�*ve a crime? that is a very good question. and
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let's be honest, matt gaetz knew thatjoel greenberg his friend from florida, a local politician, had already been arrested and charged on numerous counts including forgery and sex trafficking in the summer of last year. so by the time matt gaetz was asking for these pardons reportedly, he already knew that his friend was in serious legal jeopardy. whether he knew he was under investigation as well is an open question but you would not have to draw a very long line to see the connection between him and his friend. he connection between him and his friend. . , �* connection between him and his friend. ., , �* , . connection between him and his friend. �* , . ., , ., . friend. he wasn't such a staunch suaporter- _ friend. he wasn't such a staunch suaporter- we — friend. he wasn't such a staunch supporter. we are _ friend. he wasn't such a staunch supporter. we are seeing - friend. he wasn't such a staunch supporter. we are seeing him i friend. he wasn't such a staunch i supporter. we are seeing him there at the republican national convention, such a staunch report of donald trump's. do you think you might be disappointed by this harsh i put it rather short statement that donald trump has put out of him? —— this rather short... if donald trump has put out of him? -- this rather short. . .— this rather short... if he was bankin: this rather short... if he was banking on _ this rather short... if he was banking on a _ this rather short... if he was banking on a wholehearted l this rather short... if he was - banking on a wholehearted defence from the former president this was not it. it is indicative of the reception that gaetz is getting
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across the board in washington right now, but politicians here are distancing themselves from him left and right, he made a lot of enemies notjust on the left with is very aggressive appearances on conservative radio and confronting put go up on us but also within his own party. remember he went to campaign against wiz cheney after liz cheney voted to impeach donald trump injanuary of this year. he has made a lot of enemies and i think the sense is from a lot of politicians here that this story is just getting started. the initial allegation that was published in the new york times was having sex with a 17—year—old but not there are reports that this is a much larger inquiry into sex trafficking that connects gaetz to joel greenberg, both of them allegedly frequently websites and meeting women and exchanging gifts for money and sex and if that is the he case gets close to what you would characterise as a prostitution inquiry.— as a prostitution inquiry. indeed anthon , as a prostitution inquiry. indeed anthony. that — as a prostitution inquiry. indeed anthony, that is _ as a prostitution inquiry. indeed anthony, that is the _ as a prostitution inquiry. indeed anthony, that is the point i as a prostitution inquiry. indeed anthony, that is the point is i as a prostitution inquiry. indeed| anthony, that is the point is and as a prostitution inquiry. indeed i anthony, that is the point is and it was at the department ofjustice
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investigation is ongoing, you say he is losing friends and shutting colleagues. theyjust have no idea how much further this thing could go. how much further this thing could no. how much further this thing could .o, ., how much further this thing could no. ., , ., �* , go. right, and you're getting these re orts go. right, and you're getting these reports like — go. right, and you're getting these reports like the _ go. right, and you're getting these reports like the report _ go. right, and you're getting these reports like the report cnn - go. right, and you're getting these reports like the report cnn ran i go. right, and you're getting these| reports like the report cnn ran with yesterday of matt gaetz showing nude photos to the house colleagues on the four of the house of representatives, of his behaviour throughout the course of his political career going back to local representative in florida and then also allocations out of florida that say a security video tape showed matt gaetz and joel greenberg and matt gaetz and joel greenberg and matt gaetz�*s tax office several years ago after hours on a weekend where greenberg was rummaging through a box of old drivers licences. that is related to charges perhaps brought against greenberg forforgery but if perhaps brought against greenberg for forgery but if matt gaetz was there again there is a strong connection between these two people. they are friends, photos of them at the white house, photos of them with donald trump confidant roger ailes. the connection is there for some is
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how much ofjoel greenberg's legal jeopardy is going to expand to reach gaetz? ~ ., , , , g ., gaetz? who is the bigger fish, joel greenber: gaetz? who is the bigger fish, joel greenberg or _ gaetz? who is the bigger fish, joel greenberg or matt _ gaetz? who is the bigger fish, joel greenberg or matt gaetz _ gaetz? who is the bigger fish, joel greenberg or matt gaetz for - gaetz? who is the bigger fish, joel greenberg or matt gaetz for the i greenberg or matt gaetz for the feds? anthony zurcher, thank you very much forjoining us. it is about the company you keep, isn't it, clive. ., .., , ., it, clive. you could put it that wa ! it, clive. you could put it that way! we _ it, clive. you could put it that way! we have _ it, clive. you could put it that way! we have all _ it, clive. you could put it that way! we have all heard i it, clive. you could put it that way! we have all heard but i it, clive. you could put it that i way! we have all heard but being stuck u- way! we have all heard but being stuck on the _ way! we have all heard but being stuck up the creek _ way! we have all heard but being stuck up the creek without - way! we have all heard but being stuck up the creek without a i way! we have all heard but being i stuck up the creek without a paddle and that is what happened when kayaker from and that is what happened when kayakerfrom england and that is what happened when kayaker from england who and that is what happened when kayakerfrom england who is and that is what happened when kayaker from england who is thought to have broken strict covid rules to go to have broken strict covid rules to 9° up to have broken strict covid rules to go up and walk alum and in scotland. at loch lomond in scotland. yes, the man had been for a walk around inchtavannach island. but when he returned to his kayak he found something quite critical was missing — his paddle. the police were alerted and a rescue boat had to take him back to the mainland. a lesson for anyone not keeping a close eye on their paddle when it's your only means of escape. a bit like losing your car keys. after you have been out driving. fir after you have been out driving. (1) going for a long bike ride with the
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wheels on the bike or something. but then he did break over the regulations so... he then he did break over the regulations so. . .— then he did break over the regulations so... then he did break over the reaulations so... ., regulations so... he did! so what are ou regulations so... he did! so what are you saying. — regulations so... he did! so what are you saying, divine _ regulations so... he did! so what are you saying, divine justice i regulations so... he did! so what are you saying, divine justice or. are you saying, divine justice or something? i’m are you saying, divine 'ustice or somethingafi are you saying, divine 'ustice or somewhat are you saying, divine 'ustice or somethin:? ., ., , hello. it's hard to think of two weeks of spring weather that could be more opposite. last week, we had the warmth, temperatures into the 20s. this week, it's the cold, the frost, the snow, not even as much sunshine around the wintry showers today. we are turning things for the next couple of days a little less cold, the arrows not pointing down from the north, but coming in from the atlantic instead. but it'll be very short—lived, because the arctic air comes right back at us into the weekend. now with this less—cold air coming in from the atlantic, we're starting to bring in a bit more cloud today, and we may see a bit of rain out of that, as well. northern ireland through the evening, overnight pushing them toward scotland, the western side, some rain into wales and western parts of england. east of all of that, with any clear spells, temperatures will still fall low
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enough for a touch of frost, but not as cold as it was last night. so tomorrow, plenty of cloud around again — out of that cloud, some rain, particularly northwest scotland with a strengthening wind here. elsewhere, it willjust be very patchy in nature — some sunny spells in northeast scotland until the afternoon, and for east anglia and the southeast, although a fair amount of cloud, a few brighter breaks, but not much of any rain as we get into the evening. the winds are picking up with the rain in scotland, it's a breezier day elsewhere — but remember, this is that less—cold air coming in from the west, which is why there are actually some double—figure temperatures showing for thursday. now as we go on through the evening, we'll take this area of rain, clear it away from scotland, push it across northern ireland and into northern england — that's our cold front, behind which the arctic air is coming back. on friday, it's very slowly moving further south through england and wales where it clears from northern england, northern ireland, and scotland back into the cold arctic air. there'll be some sunshine around again, also a few wintry showers,
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and these snow showers are packing in once again to northern scotland. now looking at the picture going into the weekend, the cold front clears away only to be replaced by more weather fronts heading up from the south this time, toward southern england. some uncertainty about how far north any rain will get from those on saturday before clearing on into sunday, so keep across the forecast. but for many areas over the weekend, it's cold, quite sunny, chance of a few wintry showers — and coming back will be those frosty nights again.
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you're watching bbc news with me, katty kay, in washington. clive myrie is in london. our top stories: under—30s in the uk are to be offered an alternative covid vaccine to the astrazeneca jab, due to the evidence linking it to rare blood clots. president biden indicates that he's willing to compromise on a proposal to raise the corporate tax rate to 28%, to help pay for his bold infrastructure plan. also coming up in the programme: the imf managing director tells me why richer countries should do more to help poorer countries get covid vaccines. to boldly go where no man has gone before... and from space to studio c — william shatner boldly joins clive and me later.
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$2.3 trillion. that's how much presidentjoe biden is seeking to pay for his massive infrastructure plan. to put that in perspective, it's worth almost the entirety of britain's gdp last year. mr biden says the american jobs plan — as it's called — is a once—in—a—generation chance for the country to invest in itself, on par with the space race. it's one thing to aim big. it's another thing to get congress to sign off on it. and the plan is underfire from both poles of the political spectrum. liberal democrats think it doesn't go far enough on issues like climate change. the right, meanwhile, doesn't like the tax hikes that the biden team has said would be needed to pay for it. mr biden addressed those concerns today, saying that america's foes want nothing more than for lawmakers to take no action. you think the rest of the world's waiting around? we're not going to make those kind of investments,
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the rest of the world's saying. take a look. do you think china is waiting around on investing in its digital infrastructure or in research and development? i promise you, they are not waiting. but they're counting on american democracy to be too slow, too limited and too divided to keep pace. let's bring in republican congresswoman nicole malliotakis, who joins us now from new york. hello to you. thanks for being with us. president biden, he has a point, doesn't he? the rest of the road is not hanging around, and we know george w bush, barack 0bama, donald trump, they'll talk big about big structure proposal but never did anything. 2.3 troy in dollars is a big number, but it is what is needed, isn't it? we big number, but it is what is needed, isn't it? we certainly do
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needed, isn't it? we certainly do need to make — needed, isn't it? we certainly do need to make sure _ —— investor infrastructure, and we should _ —— investor infrastructure, and we should have — —— investor infrastructure, and we should have been investing all along little by— should have been investing all along little by little, making sure there are upgrades and modernisation, but here we _ are upgrades and modernisation, but here we are — are upgrades and modernisation, but here we are and i do believe it is critically— here we are and i do believe it is critically important that at least for the — critically important that at least for the di — critically important that at least for the di represent, critically important that at least forthe di represent, new critically important that at least for the di represent, new york city, where _ for the di represent, new york city, where we _ for the di represent, new york city, where we have for structure needs, we have _ where we have for structure needs, we have a _ where we have for structure needs, we have a robust transportation system — we have a robust transportation system that needs modernisation, we have a _ system that needs modernisation, we have a maritime industry that is going _ have a maritime industry that is going to — have a maritime industry that is going to rely on upgrades, these are all areas _ going to rely on upgrades, these are all areas we — going to rely on upgrades, these are all areas we do need to agree, and i think— all areas we do need to agree, and i think that _ all areas we do need to agree, and i think that there is an agreement to be achieved here on a bipartisan fashion, — be achieved here on a bipartisan fashion, but it needs to focus on true _ fashion, but it needs to focus on true transportation infrastructure. unfortunately, roughly 25% of this package _ unfortunately, roughly 25% of this package is focused on what the average — package is focused on what the average american would consider true transportation infrastructure. there's— transportation infrastructure. there's a _ transportation infrastructure. there's a lot of additional spending in here, _ there's a lot of additional spending in here, and we are facing some difficult — in here, and we are facing some difficult times fiscally and we need to he _ difficult times fiscally and we need to be conservative and tailored, so i to be conservative and tailored, so hust— to be conservative and tailored, so ijust hope — to be conservative and tailored, so ijust hope that the president is sincere — ijust hope that the president is sincere when he says he wants to work _ sincere when he says he wants to work in _ sincere when he says he wants to work in a — sincere when he says he wants to work in a bipartisan fashion, to try
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to hash _ work in a bipartisan fashion, to try to hash this— work in a bipartisan fashion, to try to hash this out, because i do believe — to hash this out, because i do believe there are many people that do support this investment, this type do support this investment, this tyue of— do support this investment, this type of investment in congress, we 'ust type of investment in congress, we just have _ type of investment in congress, we just have to— type of investment in congress, we just have to find the right ways to id just have to find the right ways to go about— just have to find the right ways to go about it. just have to find the right ways to go about it-_ go about it. congresswoman, the - resident go about it. congresswoman, the president says — go about it. congresswoman, the president says that _ go about it. congresswoman, the president says that the _ go about it. congresswoman, the president says that the definition | president says that the definition of infrastructure that was applicable 20 years ago is no longer what we mean by infrastructure today, and that it has to include things like broadband and other areas of technology. if you look at the polls, it is interesting, it gets broad support, limits of this and projector plan, from republican voters, including for water pipes, for schools, for veterans hospitals. it is interesting, the number of places, even for caregivers, for health caregivers. would republicans be on the wrong side of the public if they did not support a beacon for checker plan that included these other things as well? == checker plan that included these other things as well?— checker plan that included these other things as well? -- being in for structure _ other things as well? -- being in for structure plan? _ other things as well? -- being in for structure plan? i _ other things as well? -- being in for structure plan? i support i for structure plan? i support investing _ for structure plan? i support investing in our sewer systems, they
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need upgrades, water, you mentioned veterans— need upgrades, water, you mentioned veterans hospitals. there are a lot of capital — veterans hospitals. there are a lot of capital needs, whether it be the veterans, — of capital needs, whether it be the veterans, our parks, capitol police. capital _ —— their capital —— theircapitaland —— their capital and protection needs— —— their capital and protection needs in— —— their capital and protection needs in these departments, no doubt about— needs in these departments, no doubt about it. _ needs in these departments, no doubt about it. but _ needs in these departments, no doubt about it, but we start going into these _ about it, but we start going into these areas of medicaid and pre—k, which _ these areas of medicaid and pre—k, which should be funded at the local level. _ which should be funded at the local level, these are not infrastructure issues _ level, these are not infrastructure issues and — level, these are not infrastructure issues and so if you differentiate. there _ issues and so if you differentiate. there is— issues and so if you differentiate. there is more money in this package now to _ there is more money in this package now to subsidise electric cars than there _ now to subsidise electric cars than there are — now to subsidise electric cars than there are for actual roads, bridges, ports— there are for actual roads, bridges, ports and _ there are for actual roads, bridges, ports and airports. i do not know that the — ports and airports. i do not know that the american people would agree with that, _ that the american people would agree with that, sol that the american people would agree with that, so i think that there is in agreement to be made, but he needs— in agreement to be made, but he needs to — in agreement to be made, but he needs to be tailored, we need to also look— needs to be tailored, we need to also look at areas where we can cut back on— also look at areas where we can cut back on spending, notjust automatically look at tax increases or taking _ automatically look at tax increases or taking on more debt, and i think that is— or taking on more debt, and i think that is going to be the overall discussion we are going to be having, — discussion we are going to be having, republicans and democrats together~ _ having, republicans and democrats touether. ., ., ., , ., ., together. you agree, congers woman, that something —
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together. you agree, congers woman, that something has _ together. you agree, congers woman, that something has got _ together. you agree, congers woman, that something has got to _ together. you agree, congers woman, that something has got to be - together. you agree, congers woman, that something has got to be done i that something has got to be done about infrastructure, it depends on how far you want to go in defining infrastructure, but you agree something needs to be done. president biden is talk about it when fall tax, 28% on corporations, does that make sense to you? i when fall tax, 28% on corporations, does that make sense to you? i agree with some of — does that make sense to you? i agree with some of the _ does that make sense to you? i agree with some of the democrats - does that make sense to you? i agree with some of the democrats who i does that make sense to you? i agree j with some of the democrats who have expressed _ with some of the democrats who have expressed concern over the 20% numben — expressed concern over the 20% numben i— expressed concern over the 20% number. ithink expressed concern over the 20% number. i think we are in an econornic— number. i think we are in an economic recovery right now and we need _ economic recovery right now and we need to— economic recovery right now and we need to be _ economic recovery right now and we need to be cautious about making it more _ need to be cautious about making it more difficult for these businesses to rehire _ more difficult for these businesses to rehire people they may have had to rehire people they may have had to lay-off. — to rehire people they may have had to lay—off, create the jobs necessary. part of this idea behind infrastructure is to create jobs as well, _ infrastructure is to create jobs as well, and — infrastructure is to create jobs as well, and if— infrastructure is to create jobs as well, and if we are going to discourage some of the company from expanding. _ discourage some of the company from expanding, that is going be problematical to look at the keystone pipeline, by the way, the biggest _ keystone pipeline, by the way, the biggest in — keystone pipeline, by the way, the biggest in projector projects —— introductory project, and joe biden coated _ introductory project, and joe biden coated with the stroke of a pen. must— coated with the stroke of a pen. must be — coated with the stroke of a pen. must be mindful about we are talking
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about— must be mindful about we are talking about here, there is a balance. any benefit _ about here, there is a balance. any benefit with — about here, there is a balance. any benefit with infrastructure investment, we are not killing it with a _ investment, we are not killing it with a tax— investment, we are not killing it with a tax increase. congresswoman, while we have — with a tax increase. congresswoman, while we have you _ with a tax increase. congresswoman, while we have you come _ with a tax increase. congresswoman, while we have you come we - with a tax increase. congresswoman, while we have you come we were i with a tax increase. congresswoman, j while we have you come we were just talking with anthony zurcher about the fate of matt gates, and i wonder how much you support the congressman still ——. it how much you support the congressman still --. , , ., , still --. it is interesting to see how this _ still --. it is interesting to see how this entire _ still --. it is interesting to see how this entire story _ still --. it is interesting to see how this entire story is - still --. it is interesting to see i how this entire story is unraveling. i do how this entire story is unraveling. i do not _ how this entire story is unraveling. i do not know too much about what is going _ i do not know too much about what is going on— i do not know too much about what is going on there, quite frankly, because — going on there, quite frankly, because it seems that there is many different— because it seems that there is many different versions of the story, so ithink— different versions of the story, so i think the — different versions of the story, so i think the bottom line is the truth needs— i think the bottom line is the truth needs to _ i think the bottom line is the truth needs to come out and... he needs to be held _ needs to come out and... he needs to be held accountable if those allegations are true, absolutely, and so _ allegations are true, absolutely, and so i'm — allegations are true, absolutely, and so i'm very consistent in my views, _ and so i'm very consistent in my views, uploading people from both parties _ views, uploading people from both parties accountable, and i think it is a matter— parties accountable, and i think it is a matter of time and try to get to the _ is a matter of time and try to get to the bottom of what is exactly happening —— of holding people from both parties. it is happening -- of holding people from both parties-— both parties. it is a very bizarre sto . both parties. it is a very bizarre story- before — both parties. it is a very bizarre story. before we _ both parties. it is a very bizarre story. before we let _ both parties. it is a very bizarre story. before we let you - both parties. it is a very bizarre story. before we let you go, i both parties. it is a very bizarre l story. before we let you go, this both parties. it is a very bizarre i
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story. before we let you go, this is breaking news from the us state apartment coming in, issuing a you are interested in, which is that the us is prepared to remove sanctions on iran to resume compliance with the iran nuclear deal —— us state department for some that just from ned price at the state department for du think that is what the us needs to be doing in order to get these talks moving? look needs to be doing in order to get these talks moving? look cabaye 'ob believe we should i these talks moving? look cabaye 'ob believe we should be i these talks moving? look cabaye 'ob believe we should be withdrawingi believe we should be withdrawing sections — believe we should be withdrawing sections without getting any concrete concessions from iran —— look, _ concrete concessions from iran —— look. i_ concrete concessions from iran —— look. i do — concrete concessions from iran —— look. i do not _ concrete concessions from iran —— look, i do not think we should be full to— look, i do not think we should be full to yesterday's conversation was a good _ full to yesterday's conversation was a good discussion, it i think it is initial. — a good discussion, it i think it is initial. but— a good discussion, it i think it is initial, but there would be workgroups created to move to try and find _ workgroups created to move to try and find a — workgroups created to move to try and find a resolution. that must include — and find a resolution. that must include the _ and find a resolution. that must include the release of american hostages — include the release of american hostages who have been injail, including — hostages who have been injail, including one who has been injail and was _ including one who has been injail and was supposed to be released as part of— and was supposed to be released as part of the _ and was supposed to be released as part of the previous deal and never was _ part of the previous deal and never was we _ part of the previous deal and never was. we need to also make sure that _ was. we need to also make sure that they— was. we need to also make sure
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that... they are to be in compliance for some _ that... they are to be in compliance for some and — that... they are to be in compliance for some and the deal these to be now extended cab because some of the provisions— now extended cab because some of the provisions are sunsetting, sol think— provisions are sunsetting, sol think this _ provisions are sunsetting, sol think this is a much larger discussion, it cannotjust be all or nothing — discussion, it cannotjust be all or nothing we — discussion, it cannotjust be all or nothing. we need to make sure we have _ nothing. we need to make sure we have concessions, but at least having — have concessions, but at least having the discussion is part of that, _ having the discussion is part of that, and — having the discussion is part of that, and we are appreciative of that _ that, and we are appreciative of that. ., , , ., ., that, and we are appreciative of that. ., ,, ., ., ., .«r , that. congresswoman malliotakis, thank ou that. congresswoman malliotakis, thank you very _ that. congresswoman malliotakis, thank you very much. _ that. congresswoman malliotakis, thank you very much. very - thank you very much. very interesting use dummett news coming out of state department, the us is willing to remove sanctions... does not say which _ willing to remove sanctions... does not say which sanctions. _ the international monetary fund has a suggestion on how the world can pay the economic cost of covid. the group is suggesting a temporary tax on wealthy individuals, to help those worst affected by the pandemic. that could mean taxes on inheritance or property. but the imf warned that governments should consider the potential "trade—offs" of such measures. this extends to access to covid vaccines as well. the organisation says that any recovery must be inclusive and sustainable,
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so that everyone has a fair shot — quite literally. i spoke earlier to kristalina georgieva, managing director of the imf, outside their headquarters here in washington. do you think rich countries understand the degree to which poorer countries also need to have access to the vaccine and have it fast? , .., , , access to the vaccine and have it fast? , i, , fast? this recovery is very uneven, it is a multispeed _ fast? this recovery is very uneven, it is a multispeed recovery, - fast? this recovery is very uneven, it is a multispeed recovery, and i fast? this recovery is very uneven, it is a multispeed recovery, and a i it is a multispeed recovery, and a bil it is a multispeed recovery, and a big driver— it is a multispeed recovery, and a big driver of— it is a multispeed recovery, and a big driver of accelerating the recovery— big driver of accelerating the recovery everywhere is access to vaccines — recovery everywhere is access to vaccines. we talk related that our world _ vaccines. we talk related that our world will— vaccines. we talk related that our world will be $19 richer between now and 2025— world will be $19 richer between now and 2025 if we —— we calculated that our world _ and 2025 if we —— we calculated that our world will be $9 trillion riches — our world will be $9 trillion riches if— our world will be $9 trillion richer. if we vaccinate every really fast _ richer. if we vaccinate every really fast what — richer. if we vaccinate every really fast. what does it mean? it means that, _ fast. what does it mean? it means that, today, — fast. what does it mean? it means that, today, the best use of public
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money— that, today, the best use of public money is — that, today, the best use of public money is vaccinations around the world _ money is vaccinations around the world it — money is vaccinations around the world. it means that advanced economies can geti world. it means that advanced economies can get 1 trillion more in tax revenues if poorer countries catch _ tax revenues if poorer countries catch up — tax revenues if poorer countries catch up with vaccinations. the key there seems _ catch up with vaccinations. the key there seems to _ catch up with vaccinations. the key there seems to be _ catch up with vaccinations. the key there seems to be "very _ catch up with vaccinations. the key there seems to be "very fast", i there seems to be "very fast", because there is some talk that some african countries may not have vaccines until 2023. that is too slothful to what is it specifically richer countries can do right now, today? because in some cases, those countries do not want money, they want vaccines, and some vaccines want vaccines, and some vaccines want done i have supplies of vaccines. are you asking them to hand over those vaccines now? we are askin: hand over those vaccines now? we are asking them — hand over those vaccines now? we are asking them to — hand over those vaccines now? we are asking them to relocate _ hand over those vaccines now? we are asking them to relocate vaccines i hand over those vaccines now? we are asking them to relocate vaccines to i asking them to relocate vaccines to oorer asking them to relocate vaccines to poorer countries _ asking them to relocate vaccines to poorer countries now. _ asking them to relocate vaccines to poorer countries now. we - asking them to relocate vaccines to i poorer countries now. we understand they are _ poorer countries now. we understand they are making projections as to when _ they are making projections as to when their— they are making projections as to when their vaccination would be advanced — when their vaccination would be advanced enough for this to be done. why? _ advanced enough for this to be done. why? because producers need to be
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assured _ why? because producers need to be assured that they are not going to end up— assured that they are not going to end up with access capacity and lose money— end up with access capacity and lose money on _ end up with access capacity and lose money on something that benefits the world _ money on something that benefits the world so _ money on something that benefits the world. so advanced purchase commitment is the technical term for stubby— commitment is the technical term for stubby needs put the money in front of the _ stubby needs put the money in front of the producer and say, please produce — of the producer and say, please produce as much as you can. if you have _ produce as much as you can. if you have too— produce as much as you can. if you have too much, that's fine, but if you have — have too much, that's fine, but if you have too _ have too much, that's fine, but if you have too little, the whole world would _ you have too little, the whole world would suffer. you you have too little, the whole world would suffer-— would suffer. you are the head of the international _ would suffer. you are the head of the international monetary - would suffer. you are the head of the international monetary fund. | would suffer. you are the head of i the international monetary fund. at the international monetary fund. at the beginning of the pandemic, there was quite a lot of speculation the emergence of the coronavirus could lead to, if not the end of globalisation, globalisation being out of fashion. have you seen that happen? it out of fashion. have you seen that ha en? , out of fashion. have you seen that ha . en? , ., . , out of fashion. have you seen that hauen? , , happen? it is exactly the opposite. the pandemic— happen? it is exactly the opposite. the pandemic made _ happen? it is exactly the opposite. the pandemic made us _ happen? it is exactly the opposite. the pandemic made us all- happen? it is exactly the opposite. the pandemic made us all aware i happen? it is exactly the opposite. | the pandemic made us all aware of how interdependent we are, and it brought— how interdependent we are, and it brought a —
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how interdependent we are, and it brought a soberness, at an individual level come at a country level— individual level come at a country level and — individual level come at a country level and internationally, about the importance of working together. what is pulling _ importance of working together. what is pulling us out of the pandemic? it is is pulling us out of the pandemic? it is the _ is pulling us out of the pandemic? it is the court needed action to support— it is the court needed action to support the economies —— coordinated action _ support the economies —— coordinated action and _ support the economies —— coordinated action. and on that basis, protect us against — action. and on that basis, protect us against a — action. and on that basis, protect us against a catastrophe. it would have _ us against a catastrophe. it would have been— us against a catastrophe. it would have been three times worse if we did not— have been three times worse if we did not work together. and also, the fact that _ did not work together. and also, the fact that only scientists working together, only supply lines working together, only supply lines working to assemble this vaccine that gets into her_ to assemble this vaccine that gets into herarms, to assemble this vaccine that gets into her arms, only that is what brought— into her arms, only that is what brought us— into her arms, only that is what brought us that —— to ——toa —— to a point that we can enjoy it some _ —— to a point that we can enjoy it some sunshine in our global forecast _ some sunshine in our global forecast-— some sunshine in our global forecast. ., , ., ., forecast. kristalina georgieva, s - eakin . forecast. kristalina georgieva, speaking to — forecast. kristalina georgieva, speaking to me _ forecast. kristalina georgieva, speaking to me earlier, - forecast. kristalina georgieva, - speaking to me earlier, recommending of course the rich countries do as much as they can — in their own
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interest as well — to get vaccines around the world. before moving on, my end's ambassador says he has been locked out of the embassy by the military attache because, the ambassador says, military attache because, the ambassadorsays, he military attache because, the ambassador says, he opposes the military coup takeover in myanmar. he is describing this as a kind of coup in the middle of london. the ambassador has previous lee called for the release of aung san suu kyi... for the release of aung san suu k i... ., , , for the release of aung san suu kyi. .. he has been locked out of his own embassy? _ kyi. .. he has been locked out of his own embassy? the _ kyi. .. he has been locked out of his own embassy? the ambassador- kyi. .. he has been locked out of his own embassy? the ambassador has kyi. .. he has been locked out of his i own embassy? the ambassador has been locked out of his _ own embassy? the ambassador has been locked out of his own _ own embassy? the ambassador has been locked out of his own embassy _ own embassy? the ambassador has been locked out of his own embassy by - own embassy? the ambassador has been locked out of his own embassy by the i locked out of his own embassy by the main —— the myanmar military attack shea, by his own people. we will get more on that. stay with us on bbc news. still to come: he's been in the business for over 70 years and he's still going strong. we'll talk to william shatner about his new movie, next. a carer from carmathenshire has become the first person in the uk to receive
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the moderna coronavirus vaccine. the government has ordered 17 million doses of the jab, which is the third to be offered in britain. huw thomas reports. a new weapon in the fight against coronavirus. 24—year—old elle taylor from ammanford was the first person in the uk to get the moderna vaccine, in carmarthen. thousands of doses will be administered here, beginning with unpaid carers. very excited, very happy. why were you so keen to get it? i'm an unpaid carerfor my grandmother, so it's very important for me that i can get it, so i can care for her properly and be safe. vaccines offer personal protection and they're part of the exit strategy from the pandemic. as with the other two vaccines being used in wales, the moderna jab needs two doses to be most effective. # vaccine, vaccine, vaccine! #
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the moderna vaccine has some big supporters, not least singer dolly parton. she helped fund its development and had herjab last month. the moderna vaccine follows a familiarformat, given in two doses several weeks apart. and, like the pfizer vaccine, the moderna jabs are based on rna, part of the virus' genetic code. 0nce injected, it stimulates a immune response which means the body will be ready to fight the virus in the future. the uk government, which is managing the vaccine programme, has bought 17 million doses, with the first 5,000 doses now being administered in west wales. on another front, more asymptomatic testing is happening in parts of wales. a second phase of community testing began in bridgend today, aimed at people aged 11 and over who aren't showing symptoms of the virus. it's designed to stop the unwitting spread of covid—19 between family members and work colleagues. vaccinating carers in carmarthen today will help protect the most vulnerable. the arrival of the moderna vaccine is another tool to tackle a pandemic
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that still has a tight grip on all of our lives. now, for over 70 years, william shatner has been doing what he does best — which, if you look at his resume, turns out to be just about everything. he's a writer, director, author, screenwriter and singer. and at 90, he is still going strong! yes, he is. his new movie senior moment tells the story of a retired nascar driver who loses his driving licence and has to adapt to life outside of the fast lane. i'm hereby revoking your driver's licence _ i'm hereby revoking your driver's licence until— i'm hereby revoking your driver's licence until you _ i'm hereby revoking your driver's licence until you are _ i'm hereby revoking your driver's licence until you are fit _ i'm hereby revoking your driver's licence until you are fit to - i'm hereby revoking your driver's licence until you are fit to drive. i licence until you are fit to drive. opened — licence until you are fit to drive. opened the _ licence until you are fit to drive. opened the door! _ licence until you are fit to drive. opened the door! open - licence until you are fit to drive. opened the door! open the i licence until you are fit to drive. i opened the door! open the door! licence until you are fit to drive. - opened the door! open the door! lire opened the door! open the door! are ou opened the door! open the door! arc. you ok? opened the door! open the door! are you 0k? just — opened the door! open the door! are you 0k? just getting _ opened the door! open the door! are you ok? just getting a _ opened the door! open the door! are you ok? just getting a beer... - opened the door! open the door! are you ok? just getting a beer... that i you ok? just getting a beer... that looks very funny- — you ok? just getting a beer... that looks very funny. and _ you ok? just getting a beer... that looks very funny. and it _ you ok? just getting a beer... that looks very funny. and it can - you ok? just getting a beer... that looks very funny. and it can be i looks very funny. and it can be found on a number of streaming platforms. and i'm really place to
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take the legend himself william shatnerjoins us now. hi, william. hi, everyone for some of this earthshaking news, and here i am with a _ earthshaking news, and here i am with a movie opening! it is funny, you will— with a movie opening! it is funny, you will laugh, and we all need that in the _ you will laugh, and we all need that in the midst of this... you you will laugh, and we all need that in the midst of this. . .— in the midst of this. .. you are so riaht, in the midst of this. .. you are so right. we — in the midst of this. .. you are so right. we all— in the midst of this. .. you are so right, we all need _ in the midst of this. .. you are so right, we all need that, - in the midst of this. .. you are so right, we all need that, but i in the midst of this. .. you are so right, we all need that, but you i right, we all need that, but you look amazing. you are 90 years of age, you are as fit as a butcher's dog. what is it that your drinking? what is going on? how are you managing to do all this? that butcher is _ managing to do all this? that butcher is hiding _ managing to do all this? that butcher is hiding different things next! _ butcher is hiding different things i am butcher is hiding different things i am just— butcher is hiding different things iamjust there! butcher is hiding different things i am just there! that is the way my jeans _ i am just there! that is the way my jeans work— i am just there! that is the way my jeans work and i am not getting in the way _ jeans work and i am not getting in the way i— jeans work and i am not getting in the way. i am so happy to talk to —— in england. senior moment is opening — —— in england. senior moment is opening of— —— in england. senior moment is opening of a _ —— in england. senior moment is opening of a funny film and how to make _ opening of a funny film and how to make the —
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—— the unexplained, all that is happening _ —— the unexplained, all that is happening around us, what is precognition? it is so mysterious and fun— precognition? it is so mysterious and fun to — precognition? it is so mysterious and fun to think about, and i'm doing— and fun to think about, and i'm doing an— and fun to think about, and i'm doing an album and i have got another— doing an album and i have got another tv show, sol doing an album and i have got another tv show, so i am very busym — another tv show, so i am very bus ., �* another tv show, so i am very bus... ., �* ., busy... yeah, you're telling me! you have 'ust busy... yeah, you're telling me! you have just exhausted _ busy... yeah, you're telling me! you have just exhausted and _ busy... yeah, you're telling me! you have just exhausted and i _ busy... yeah, you're telling me! you have just exhausted and i just - have just exhausted and ijust talking about what you're doing. you must be one of the most prolific 90 roads on twitter. you have 2.5 million followers — i follow you roads on twitter. you have 2.5 million followers — ifollow you — and you tweet about everything, from... j and you tweet about everything, from... ., i, ., from... i look at myself, i am already from _ from... i look at myself, i am already from the _ from... i look at myself, i am already from the sun. - from... i look at myself, i am already from the sun. i i from... i look at myself, i am already from the sun. i have i from... i look at myself, i am i already from the sun. i have just been _ already from the sun. i have just been outside in the sun quite a bit this morning in southern california, so, yes, _ this morning in southern california, so, yes, i_ this morning in southern california, so, yes, i am — this morning in southern california, so, yes, lam busy, and i am there! ihave— so, yes, lam busy, and i am there! ihave not— so, yes, lam busy, and i am there! i have not fallen off the horse, the
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jokes _ i have not fallen off the horse, the jokes i _ i have not fallen off the horse, the jokes i tell— i have not fallen off the horse, the jokes i tell still get laughs, and that's— jokes i tell still get laughs, and that's my— jokes i tell still get laughs, and that's my way!— jokes i tell still get laughs, and that's my way! i've got a question for ou, that's my way! i've got a question for you, william. _ that's my way! i've got a question for you, william. chelsea - that's my way! i've got a question for you, william. chelsea footballj for you, william. chelsea football club, 0k? who are they playing tonight? club, ok? who are they playing toniaht? , ., , club, ok? who are they playing toniht? , ., , ., club, ok? who are they playing toniaht? , ., , ., . , tonight? they are playing that city down by the _ tonight? they are playing that city down by the coast _ tonight? they are playing that city down by the coast there, - tonight? they are playing that city down by the coast there, by i tonight? they are playing that city down by the coast there, by the i down by the coast there, by the river~ _ down by the coast there, by the river~ you — down by the coast there, by the river. you know the city i mean. is river. you know the city i mean. [55 it a river. you know the city i mean. is it a portuguese city? river. you know the city i mean. is it a portuguese city? it's - river. you know the city i mean. is it a portuguese city? it's a - it a portuguese city? it's a portuguese _ it a portuguese city? it's a portuguese city. _ it a portuguese city? it's a portuguese city. but i it a portuguese city? it's a portuguese city. but it i it a portuguese city? it's a portuguese city. but it is i it a portuguese city? it's a j portuguese city. but it is a it a portuguese city? it's a i portuguese city. but it is a little, it is near— portuguese city. but it is a little, it is near spain... just portuguese city. but it is a little, it is near spain. . .— it is near spain... just for our confused _ it is near spain... just for our confused viewers, _ it is near spain... just for our confused viewers, william i it is near spain... just for our| confused viewers, william has claimed... confused viewers, william has claimed- - -_ confused viewers, william has claimed... ~ , ., , ., claimed... the los angeles rams are auoin to claimed... the los angeles rams are going to do. — claimed... the los angeles rams are going to do. or- -- _ claimed... the los angeles rams are going to do, or... yes, _ claimed... the los angeles rams are going to do, or... yes, but _ claimed... the los angeles rams are going to do, or... yes, but to - claimed... the los angeles rams are going to do, or... yes, but to be - going to do, or... yes, but to be fair, william, _ going to do, or... yes, but to be fair, william, you _ going to do, or... yes, but to be fair, william, you did _ going to do, or... yes, but to be fair, william, you did claim - going to do, or... yes, but to be fair, william, you did claim that| fair, william, you did claim that you're the world's most famous chelsea football club ten, and they have a very important game tonight. and you are close, it is a place off spain. and you are close, it is a place off
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sain. , and you are close, it is a place off spain.- puerto. _ and you are close, it is a place off spain.- puerto. -- _ and you are close, it is a place off spain. yes. puerto. —— porto. it is spain. yes. puerto. -- porto. it is porto. spain. yes. puerto. -- porto. it is porto- and _ spain. yes. puerto. -- porto. it is porto- and they — spain. yes. puerto. -- porto. it is porto. and they are _ spain. yes. puerto. —— porto. it is porto. and they are winning 2—0, i'm being told? i porto. and they are winning 2-0, i'm bein: told? .,, porto. and they are winning 2-0, i'm bein: told? ., , ., porto. and they are winning 2-0, i'm being told?— being told? i was right on the edge of sain! i being told? i was right on the edge of spain! i suspect _ being told? i was right on the edge of spain! i suspect will _ being told? i was right on the edge of spain! i suspect will ferrell, - of spain! i suspect will ferrell, who also claims _ of spain! i suspect will ferrell, who also claims to _ of spain! i suspect will ferrell, who also claims to be - of spain! i suspect will ferrell, who also claims to be a - of spain! i suspect will ferrell, | who also claims to be a famous chelsea fan, he will of no straight off, i suspect! chelsea fan, he will of no straight off. i sowed!— off, i suspect! laughter look, off, i suspect! laughter look. you _ off, i suspect! laughter look, you have _ off, i suspect! laughter look, you have to - off, i suspect! laughter look, you have to tell- off, i suspect! laughter look, you have to tell us| off, | suspect! laughter - look, you have to tell us about off, | suspect! laughter _ look, you have to tell us about star trek. you've got to tell, do you miss it at all? do you wish you were still back there with the great days? or was itjust so much fun for all of us to watch you? i days? or was itjust so much fun for all of us to watch you?— all of us to watch you? i wish i looked like — all of us to watch you? i wish i looked like that _ all of us to watch you? i wish i looked like that picture, - all of us to watch you? i wish i looked like that picture, yes. i all of us to watch you? i wish i i looked like that picture, yes. you do, looked like that picture, yes. you do. william. — looked like that picture, yes. you do, william, you _ looked like that picture, yes. gm. do, william, you do. looked like that picture, yes. you do, william, you do. star- looked like that picture, yes. you do, william, you do. star trek. looked like that picture, yes. you do, william, you do. star trek is| looked like that picture, yes. you| do, william, you do. star trek is a phenomenon- _ do, william, you do. star trek is a phenomenon. it _ do, william, you do. star trek is a phenomenon. it is _ do, william, you do. star trek is a phenomenon. it is something - do, william, you do. star trek is a phenomenon. it is something thatj phenomenon. it is something that will never— phenomenon. it is something that will never happen again in our lifetime — will never happen again in our lifetime because it took 55 or 58 years— lifetime because it took 55 or 58 years to — lifetime because it took 55 or 58 years to get here, with it, so a
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comparable show will not show itself for another _ comparable show will not show itself for another 50 years, so it is a phenomenon. it is unique. and being part of— phenomenon. it is unique. and being part of it. _ phenomenon. it is unique. and being part of it, being in the beginning of it, _ part of it, being in the beginning of it, helping it start, is a great honour. — of it, helping it start, is a great honour. and _ of it, helping it start, is a great honour, and i never put it down or regretted — honour, and i never put it down or regretted it~ — honour, and i never put it down or regretted it. it is a wonderful thing — regretted it. it is a wonderful thin. ~ .. regretted it. it is a wonderful thin. ~ ., ., , regretted it. it is a wonderful thin _ . ., ., , ~' thing. william, what is it like bein: 90 thing. william, what is it like being 90 and _ thing. william, what is it like being 90 and having - thing. william, what is it like being 90 and having one - thing. william, what is it like being 90 and having one of. thing. william, what is it like - being 90 and having one of those sort of... i being 90 and having one of those sort of... .. .. r' being 90 and having one of those sortof... ., i, being 90 and having one of those| sort of- - -_ 0ne sort of... i am asking myself! one of those slashed _ sort of... i am asking myself! one of those slashed careers, - sort of... i am asking myself! one of those slashed careers, your- sort of... i am asking myself! one| of those slashed careers, your film actor recording artist, slash producer, slash everything. like some 20—year—olds. this is incredible. how do you keep going? i incredible. how do you keep going? i find myself talking to people like you and — find myself talking to people like you and being energised. gr find myself talking to people like you and being energised. or really anno ed! you and being energised. or really annoyed! it _ you and being energised. or really annoyed! it is _ you and being energised. or really annoyed! it is a _ you and being energised. or really annoyed! it is a matter _ you and being energised. or really
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annoyed! it is a matter of - you and being energised. or really| annoyed! it is a matter of accepting all these things _ annoyed! it is a matter of accepting all these things that _ annoyed! it is a matter of accepting all these things that come - annoyed! it is a matter of accepting all these things that come at - annoyed! it is a matter of accepting all these things that come at you i all these things that come at you and try— all these things that come at you and try and deal with them, but being _ and try and deal with them, but being 90 — and try and deal with them, but being 90 is like a shock. that is the most — being 90 is like a shock. that is the most shocking part. and every time _ the most shocking part. and every time you _ the most shocking part. and every time you stumble or you cannot think of a name. _ time you stumble or you cannot think ofa name, like time you stumble or you cannot think of a name, like chelsea's competition, it is, is that because i competition, it is, is that because lam _ competition, it is, is that because lam 90 _ competition, it is, is that because lam 90 or— competition, it is, is that because lam 90 or is— competition, it is, is that because i am 90 or is that because i am stupid? — i am 90 or is that because i am stupid? i— i am 90 or is that because i am stupid? i do— i am 90 or is that because i am stupid? i do not know it 90 is like because _ stupid? i do not know it 90 is like because i'm — stupid? i do not know it 90 is like because i'm living it and i have not done _ because i'm living it and i have not done it— because i'm living it and i have not done it before. i can talk you about what _ done it before. i can talk you about what 80 _ done it before. i can talk you about what 80 is — done it before. i can talk you about what 80 is like.— what 80 is like. william, can i ask ou and what 80 is like. william, can i ask you and ernest — what 80 is like. william, can i ask you and ernest bbc— what 80 is like. william, can i ask you and ernest bbc type - what 80 is like. william, can i ask you and ernest bbc type question| you and ernest bbc type question rather than, you know, chelsea football club. what has changed for the better since you have started out filming? if you had to point to something that is great about filming now and doing your new movie, compared to doing what you used to do when you are in your 30s, was the best thing? the used to do when you are in your 30s, was the best thing?— was the best thing? the release of all that entertainment, _ was the best thing? the release of all that entertainment, there - was the best thing? the release of all that entertainment, there is -
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was the best thing? the release of all that entertainment, there is so | all that entertainment, there is so much, _ all that entertainment, there is so much. so — all that entertainment, there is so much, so many ways for people to see what you're _ much, so many ways for people to see what you're doing for the fact that i can, _ what you're doing for the fact that i can. nry— what you're doing for the fact that i can, my face can be shown on the bbc news. — i can, my face can be shown on the bbc news, which i watch all the time, _ bbc news, which i watch all the time, watch all the time, bbc news, from america, and i'm so happy to be a part— from america, and i'm so happy to be a part of— from america, and i'm so happy to be a part of it. _ from america, and i'm so happy to be a part of it, but i could never have been _ a part of it, but i could never have been that — a part of it, but i could never have been that weight if zoom and the devices _ been that weight if zoom and the devices like i did not exist here we are, devices like i did not exist here we are. the _ devices like i did not exist here we are, the three of us, i am in los angeles. — are, the three of us, i am in los angeles, you're in london, i presume. _ angeles, you're in london, i presume, and it is face—to—face, and that conditions everything in the enchantment industry. gk that conditions everything in the enchantment industry.— that conditions everything in the enchantment industry. ok can i tell ou what, enchantment industry. ok can i tell you what. next _ enchantment industry. ok can i tell you what, next time _ enchantment industry. ok can i tell you what, next time we _ enchantment industry. ok can i tell you what, next time we are - enchantment industry. ok can i tell you what, next time we are going l enchantment industry. ok can i tell| you what, next time we are going to do this, next time, we are ready to go to face—to—face and have this conversation because i would love to continue this. we are going to visit you, go riding with you and have an afternoon, and that is a promise. we will be there. ok, william shatner,
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thank you so much forjoining the programme. thank you so much for 'oining the programmefi thank you so much for 'oining the programme. thank you. itell you, when i get — programme. thank you. itell you, when i get to _ programme. thank you. itell you, when i get to 90, _ programme. thank you. itell you, when i get to 90, in _ programme. thank you. itell you, when i get to 90, in about - programme. thank you. itell you, when i get to 90, in about 85 - programme. thank you. i tell you, | when i get to 90, in about 85 years time... i wish i was as fit as that! hello. it's hard to think of two weeks of spring weather that could be more opposite. last week, of course, it was the warmth, temperatures into the 20s. this week, it's the cold, the frost, the snow. the warmth was short—lived, the cold is hanging on. anything here blue is the temperature below average for the time of year, so i'm not telling you anything you don't know. it's clearly cold, but over the next couple of days, try to turn things whiter, which would bring the temperature closer to average, but only briefly before the blue takes hold again, the arctic air comes back into the weekend. so what's going on? we have low pressure running across to the north of us, so, around that, the flow of air is a less cold one coming
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in from the west, rather than the north, but, around that low pressure system, there's a cold front moving south on friday, behind which the arctic air comes back, along with that, the return of some wintry showers — rain rather than snow and we get to see it on thursday. it's this less cold air coming in from the atlantic with plenty of cloud, some patchy rain, more substantial rain during the day, running south across scotland, with strengthening winds here. elsewhere, it's a breezy day, only very limited sunny spells, but that air is coming in from a different direction and we'll see more of us getting temperatures just into double figures. now, on through thursday night and into friday, that cold front continues very slow movement southwards and it is england and wales seeing that on friday, with an area of cloud, a little bit of rain along that. south of that, you're still not yet in the arctic air, but north of it, northern england, northern ireland and scotland, the sunshine's come back, but it's that arctic air once again, so it's colder and there'll be some wintry showers — snow showers again in northern scotland. now, going into the weekend, that front begins to clear away, but across southern parts only to be replaced with more weather fronts coming in.
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uncertainty about how far north they're going to take their rain on saturday, but in southern england, east anglia, maybe parts of the midlands and wales, the potentialfor seeing some rain out of this, whereas north of that, much of northern england, northern ireland and scotland, it's sunny spells and scattered wintry showers. however far north that rain gets, it will clear away going into sunday and then high pressure beginning to nose in, around that it's a low of fairly chilly air coming down from the north or north—east, although the wind, thankfully, isn't particularly strong. there will be sunshine. there's a chance of catching a wintry shower, but actually a fair amount of dry weather around on sunday, but temperatures rooted into single figures for most areas. now, into monday and this area of high pressure becomes a little bit more established, though there are some weak weather fronts trying to push in for scotland on monday. but underneath that area of high pressure with clear skies, another cold, frosty start on monday morning.
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in fact, over the weekend, into early next week, it does look like widespread frost once again, so gardeners take note of that. but after that cold start on monday with high pressure, plenty of fine weather, some cloud building and those weather fronts i showed you trying to bring some rain into north—west scotland. now after that, looks like high pressure next week towards the south, keeping it dry for a time. low pressure maybe closer to scotland, northern ireland, northern england, you could see a bit of rain. and then we end up in a bit of weather no—man's—land, but there is the potential for high pressure to become established later next week and really settle things down, but there's also the potential for low pressure and some rain — a lot to play for in the detail later next week and we'll at that on the next weather for the week ahead.
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tonight at ten, the safety of the astrazeneca vaccine for young adults comes under the spotlight. from now on, because of a possible link between the vaccine and blood clots, adults under 30 will be offered an alternative as a precaution. this is a course change. it is based on a clinical preference, based on newly emerging data. it will be kept under very careful review. the official regulator says there's no proof the vaccine causes clots, and the prime minister is urging people to come forward to get theirjabs. these vaccines are safe. they have saved many thousands of lives, and people should come forward to get theirjabs, and we'll make sure they get the rightjabs. but the eu's medicines regulator
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says unusual blood clots should be listed as a very rare side effect

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