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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 7, 2021 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news, i'm reeta chakrabarti. the headlines... people under the age of 30 in the uk are to be offered an alternative to the astrazeneca covid vaccine, because of evidence linking it to extremely rare blood clots in a very small number of cases. this is of course change. it is based on a clinical preference based on newly emerging data. it will be kept under very careful review of. the eu drug regulator also updated its guidance, concluding that unusual blood clots should be listed as a very rare side effect. both the european and uk regulators agree that the benefits of the astrazeneca jab heavily outweigh the risks. also tonight... the uk now has its third coronavirus vaccine. the first doses of the moderna
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vaccine have been given in wales and scotland, with a 24—year—old carer the first to receive it. a study of us patients suggests people diagnosed with covid—19 appear to be at greater risk of developing conditions including depression and psychosis. a gambler who was denied a £1.7 millionjackpot over an alleged software glitch wins his legal battle against betfred to claim the playout, plus interest. and a team of scientists based in the united states say they've found strong evidence for the existence of a new force of nature. hello, good afternoon. the uk medicines watchdog say
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the benefits of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine continue to outweigh any risks for the vast majority of people. but due to a very small number of blood clots in younger people, those under the age of 30 will be offered the pfizer or moderna vaccine instead. a review carried out by the mhra found that by the end of march, of the 20 million people who have received the astrazeneca jab, 79 people in the uk suffered rare blood clots after vaccination, 19 of whom died. the regulator said this was not proof the jab had caused the clots, but that the link was getting firmer. and the prime minister said he had not seen anything that would cause the uk to deviate from its road map for relaxing covid restrictions in the coming weeks. speaking in the last hour, the chief executive of the mhra june raine gave more details about those who had been affected by the rare blood clots. based on the current evidence, the benefits of the covid—19 vaccine astrazeneca against covid—19 and its associated risks, hospitalisation and death,
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continues to outweigh the risks for the vast majority of people. our review has reinforced that the risk of this rare suspected side effect remains extremely small. by 31 march, over 20 million doses having been given, we have had 79 case reports, up to including that date, 31 march. all 79 cases occurred after the first dose. of these 79 cases, 19 people have sadly died. these cases occurred in 51 women and 28 men, aged from 18 to 79 years. and from these reports, the risk of this type of rare blood clot is about four people in a million who receive the vaccine. three out of the 19 were under 30 years. 1a of the 19 were of the cerebral venous sinus thrombosis with low platelets, and five or other kinds
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of thrombosis in major veins. the balance of benefits and risks is very favourable for older people, but it is more finely balanced for the younger people. and we at the mhra are advising that this evolving evidence should be taken into account when considering how the vaccine is used. today, we will be communicating information and advice to health care professionals on how to minimise risks, and this will provide a lot of guidance including how to report any suspected cases. the information for health care professionals will be updated, and there will also be information for the public, things to look out for as we continue to monitor this issue. anyone who has symptoms for days after vaccination or more should seek prompt medical advice — a new onset of a severe or persistent headache or blurred vision, shortness of breath, chest pain, leg swelling, persistent abdominal pain,
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or indeed, unusual skin bruising or pinpoint spots beyond the injection site. june raine there. professor wei shen, chairman of thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation, said the recommendation to prefer other vaccines to astrazeneca for the under—30s was "out of the utmost caution" rather than because of "any serious safety concerns". acting really in the interest of safety and for public benefit, jcvi feel that there are three points of advice that we would like to put across. the first is that information given to individuals who are being offered vaccination and information given to health professionals should be appropriately updated to reflect the latest considerations and deliberations byjcvi and by mhra. the second point is that those who have received their first dose of astrazeneca vaccine should
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continue to be offered the second dose of astrazeneca vaccine according to the set schedule. and the final bit of advice is that adults who are aged 18 to 29 years old who do not have an underlying health condition that puts them at higher risk from serious covid—19 disease should be offered an alternative covid—19 vaccine in preference to the astrazeneca vaccine where such an alternative vaccine is available. and perhaps it is useful to state what is not advised as well. we are not advising a stop to any vaccination for any individual in any age group. we are advising a preference for one vaccine over another vaccine for a particular age group, really out of the utmost caution rather than because we have any serious safety concerns.
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england's deputy chief medical officer, professorjonathan van—tam, said it was important to remember the success of the vaccination programme so far. if you had said to me back in march 2020, and predicted how far we would have come so far with our vaccine programme, then i am not sure i would have believed that we would have got as far as we have. the uk vaccine programme has been the most enormous success indeed. and if you'd said to me that by march 2021, we would not have needed a course correction, that also would have amazed me. so we must keep this in the context of the enormous success we have achieved so far. professor calum semple, is a member of the sage advisory group of scientists, but is speaking to us in a personal capacity.
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good afternoon to you, professor. so jonathan van tam they're talking about a course correction — is that how you see this move? trier? about a course correction - is that how you see this move? very much so. an important — how you see this move? very much so. an important point _ how you see this move? very much so. an important point made _ how you see this move? very much so. an important point made by _ how you see this move? very much so. an important point made by professorl an important point made by professor rain is that all affected medicines are recognised to have some side effects. that has to be put into context, for example, women will take the contraceptive pill out of choice to prevent pregnancy, and there is a 1% risk of a deep vein thrombosis over ten years. but if they get pregnant, there's a massively increased risk of deep vein thrombosis. so there you have a commonly used medicine people take out of choice which reduces just risk of pregnancy and reduce vein thrombosis. risk of pregnancy and reduce vein thrombosis-_
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risk of pregnancy and reduce vein thrombosis. ~ ., ., ., thrombosis. when women go on the ill, the thrombosis. when women go on the pill. they are — thrombosis. when women go on the pill, they are able _ thrombosis. when women go on the pill, they are able to _ thrombosis. when women go on the pill, they are able to inform - pill, they are able to inform themselves of the risks, the pill has been around for a long time whereas the astrazeneca jab is brand—new — and that is why people may be feeling concerned to. you make a good _ may be feeling concerned to. 7m, make a good point. but at the same time, 29 million doses of astrazeneca have now been given, and tragically there's been 19 deaths. putting that into context, that's a tiny number of deaths in this population, and there's been far more deaths caused by covid. so again, in context, the vaccine is safe, it's preventing death by covid, but tragically a very small number of people may have died as a result of it. but we aren't entirely sure — there's quite a lot of complexity here, could these have been people who had a rare reaction to the vaccine, or did they catch covid around the time of the vaccination and were some of them going to get a clot anyway? it's a
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very complex area, the regulatory authorities are taking careful decisions with an abundance of caution. but if people are called for a vaccine today and they are in the risk groups and right age groups, they should still be taking the vaccine because at present, only people that have been called for the vaccine are the ones that will be benefiting from the virus at the moment. because we aren't calling people under the age of 30 for the easy vaccine at the moment. indeed. you talk about _ easy vaccine at the moment. indeed. you talk about an _ easy vaccine at the moment. indeed. you talk about an abundance - easy vaccine at the moment. indeed. you talk about an abundance of - you talk about an abundance of caution by stopping the astrazeneca vaccine for the under 30s. can you explain to people what the head of the medicines regulatory meant when she talked about the balance of risks being more finely balanced for young people? if risks being more finely balanced for young people?— young people? if that's the one sliuhtl young people? if that's the one slightly easier _ young people? if that's the one slightly easier question - young people? if that's the one slightly easier question to - young people? if that's the one i slightly easier question to answer. because young people are less likely
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to die of covid providing they are otherwise healthy, then if you are very unlikely to be harmed by the virus, then the balance is quite small. and that's what is tipping the balance in this case, it's not that the group is higher at risk from the vaccine, it's at the benefit of the vaccine is slightly smaller, that's why the decision is going in this direction. a, smaller, that's why the decision is going in this direction.— going in this direction. a very clear, nuanced _ going in this direction. a very clear, nuanced response. - going in this direction. a very| clear, nuanced response. how going in this direction. a very - clear, nuanced response. how do you explain that the people? it’s explain that the people? it's tric , i explain that the people? it's tricky. i worry _ explain that the people? it�*s tricky, i worry that and to vaccinate or does willjump on this, but any drug that's good has some recognised side effects stopped it's the nature of biological drugs, if they're going to have good effect, you'll have to have some backwards effects, as well. in fact, the models shown by the cambridge group that in a high prevalence of covid, then the benefits outweigh the risks in all age groups. that was really interesting, it'll only be when we
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go into this dip a very low covid activity that the balance of risks for under 30s tips away from astrazeneca and towards the other vaccines out of there. a word of caution, other vaccines haven't been used as much, so it may well be that we find some similar rare side effects and some of the other vaccines that are out there. a, effects and some of the other vaccines that are out there. a good oint. vaccines that are out there. a good point. investigations _ vaccines that are out there. a good point. investigations will _ vaccines that are out there. a good point. investigations will be - vaccines that are out there. a good point. investigations will be going l point. investigations will be going on into a link between these very rare blood clots in the astrazeneca vaccine, if one does exist. how long will that take? i vaccine, if one does exist. how long will that take?— will that take? i really don't know. the tood will that take? i really don't know. the good thing _ will that take? i really don't know. the good thing is _ will that take? i really don't know. the good thing is that _ will that take? i really don't know. the good thing is that in _ will that take? i really don't know. the good thing is that in britain, i the good thing is that in britain, we have a killer card system, and we encourage people to self—report as well. we have this thing called a co. vigilance, which is about monitoring the side effects of drugs after they've been in use in a large
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population. how long it'll take will carry going on. people don'tjust stop vigilance after a certain number of weeks. if you've had the effect and you fill in the yellow card, people will look at the drugs you've had recently and the drugs and vaccines you've had recently, as well as your own medical situation, and that all goes into a large analysis. and that all goes into a large anal sis. ., ~ , ., and that all goes into a large anal sis. ., ~' ,, and that all goes into a large anal sis. ., ~ . ~ analysis. thank you so much. a rollin: analysis. thank you so much. a rolling analysis, _ analysis. thank you so much. a rolling analysis, indeed. - analysis. thank you so much. a rolling analysis, indeed. thank| analysis. thank you so much. a . rolling analysis, indeed. thank you so much for your time. that word is now one we can all add to our lexicon. thank you so much. just before the press conference here in the uk, the european medicines agency also held a press briefing following a safety review into the astrazeneca vaccine. its executive director, emer cooke, said that the benefits of the astrazeneca jab outweigh the risks of side—effects. first of all, i want to start by stating that our safety committee, the pharmacovigilance
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and risk assessment committee of european medicines agency, has confirmed that the benefits of the astrazeneca vaccine in preventing covid—19 overall outweigh the risks of side—effects. covid—19 is a very serious disease with high hospitalisation and death rates, and every day, covid is still causing thousands of deaths across the eu. this vaccine has proven to be highly effective in preventing severe disease and hospitalisation, and it is saving lives. vaccination is extremely important in helping us in the fight against covid—19 and we need to use the vaccines we have to protect us from the devastating effects. the prac, after very in—depth analysis, has concluded that the reported cases of unusual blood clotting following vaccination with the astrazeneca vaccine should
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be listed as possible side effects effects of the vaccine. 0ur correspondent, anna holligan, is at their headquarters in amsterdam. a clear message there from the ema — is it now up to individual eu countries to listen to that advice, and then act accordingly? and countries to listen to that advice, and then act accordingly? and decide how to interpret _ and then act accordingly? and decide how to interpret it, _ and then act accordingly? and decide how to interpret it, exactly. - and then act accordingly? and decide how to interpret it, exactly. the - how to interpret it, exactly. the ema's a team that specialises in looking at adverse reactions to viruses came up with a conclusion, and they've shifted the advice so that it's gone from a possible to a probable causal link between the use of the astrazeneca vaccine and these extremely rare blood clots. they said it was strongly associated. now the majority of these cases have
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occurred in women under the age of 60, but because more women have been vaccinated across europe and because of the different ways, the different countries are vaccinating people, the ema concluded that it couldn't determine whether age and gender were clear risk factors. just in terms of the numbers, as of the ltth of april, the ema had recorded 169 cases among the approximately 31t million people who've receive the oxford astrazeneca vaccine across 0xford astrazeneca vaccine across europe. and it's now up to the individual governments to decide, they said, they have to make up their minds who they'd like to vaccinate and with what kind of vaccine. and as we've already seen, the uk has already decided to offer people under the age of 30 and alternative if it exists, and they're not in the high risk factor category. european health ministers
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are holding an informal or virtual meeting now to decide whether there needs to be some kind of eu wide coordinated response to this. because as we've been hearing, there is this risk it could undermine public confidence and the vaccines might be out of the pandemic, but it depends on people it having the confidence to take them so we can return to a normal kind of society. confidence has already been undermined in the astrazeneca vaccine, so how do you think today's ruling will affect that?— ruling will affect that? people are lookin: for ruling will affect that? people are looking for clarity, _ ruling will affect that? people are looking for clarity, governments i ruling will affect that? people are i looking for clarity, governments are also looking for clarity. ten countries across europe suspended the use of astrazeneca amongst the under 60s. now astrazeneca has been asked to conduct further
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investigation into a possible causal and probable causal link. and the hope is that this kind of transparency, the further investigation could actually help to determine what that link might be and improve the vaccines in the future to remove these risks. but even paracetamol is have some level of risk, so to put it in context, the ema has continued to issue the same advice that the overall benefits of this vaccine outweigh the risks associated with covid—19. many thanks. a third coronavirus vaccine, by the american firm, moderna, is being rolled out in the uk. a 24—year—old carer from carmarthenshire was the first person to receive the vaccine. the government has ordered 17 million doses of the jab. some 5,000 doses are being distributed across west wales, while another batch is being administered in glasgow.
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brazil has recorded more than 4,000 coronavirus deaths in 21t hours — a grim record for the country. the public health system has been overwhelmed by a surge in the number of cases since the beginning of the year — as paul adams reports. sobbing 0vercrowded hospitals, a health system on the brink of collapse, and a population living in fear. covid's spotlight has ranged across the globe and now has brazil locked in its harsh glare. for the first time, the country has recorded more than 4,000 covid—related deaths in just 21t hours. brazil's death toll now stands at around 337,000 — second only to the united states. still behind both the us and britain in terms of death per capita, but a contagious new variant is fuelling the latest surge — the death toll in march twice as high as the previous month. i think brazil now is not only the epicentre of the pandemic
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worldwide, it's a threat to the entire effort of the international community to control the pandemic on the planet. if brazil is not under control, the planet is not going to be under control — it's not going to be safe — because we are brewing variants, new variants every week. the country's defiant president, jair bolsonaro, continues to oppose a lockdown. damaging the economy, he says, would be worse than the virus itself. without citing evidence, he's linked quarantine measures with obesity and depression. he's even tried to reverse restrictions imposed by local authorities. what we are facing here in brazil, what we have here, it is a sad situation that is the consequence of the lack of coordination in the federal level by the national government. we have here, it is president bolsonaro confronting governors and mayors. the government is under pressure.
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it knows the world is watching with a critical eye. the country's new foreign minister says there's a balance to be struck. translation: this is urgent, and president bolsonaro has l instructed me to face this mission. i emphasise the urgency of health, the urgency of the economy, and the urgency of sustainable development. scenes like this are undermining confidence in the government. the president says 2021 will be the year of vaccinations, but fewer than 10% of brazilians have had their firstjab. some say much more drastic action is needed. paul adams, bbc news. people diagnosed with covid—19 appear to be at greater risk of developing psychological and neurological conditions, including depression, psychosis and stroke. a study by oxford university examined the health records of more than half a million patients in the united states, and found almost all the main brain
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illnesses were more common in people who'd caught the virus. here's our health reporter, rachel schraer. coronavirus breaks into our cells and multiplies wherever in the body it finds itself. that's why it causes such a wide range of symptoms from the lungs, to the gut, to the brain. the team at the university of oxford looked over half a million the team at the university of oxford looked at over half a million patient records in the us to see if conditions affecting the brain were more common in those who'd had covid. they looked at 11t conditions including anxiety, depression and psychosis, stroke, brain haemorrhage, and dementia. all of these conditions were seen more often in people who'd had a covid infection in the previous six months. but these conditions all have very different causes. it could be that in some people, the virus actually gets into the brain and causes some damage. it could be the way your body is reacting to the virus, produces a sort of immune or inflammatory response that, again, contributes to the problems. and for other people, it may simply be a psychological
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effect, if you like, of the stress that having covid and thinking what might happen to you next is the important factor. the study couldn't prove the virus itself was definitely causing the changes, but patients recovering from covid were more likely than similar people who'd had flu or another infection to develop a psychological or neurological condition. and the sicker coronavirus patients had been, the more likely they were to develop these complications. rachel schraer, bbc news. a judge has told the gambling firm, betfred, it was wrong to deny a customer a prize worth £1.7 million. andy green believed he'd won the jackpot while playing the frankie dettori magic seven blackjack game in 2018. but betfred claimed there'd been a software glitch in the game and refused to pay out. the judgment means mr green, from lincolnshire, will finally receive his payout, plus interest, after a three—year battle. a man who followed and murdered a woman on a night out before an international team of scientists,
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working on a project at the fermi particle accelerator, just outside chicago, say they have found "strong evidence" for the existence of a new force of nature. they have found that sub—atomic particles, called muons, are not behaving in the way predicted by the current theory of sub—atomic physics. the uk funders of the research say that scientists are "on the precipice of a new era of physics". 0ur science correspondent, pallab ghosh, has the details. the theories of modern physics have given scientists a new understanding of how the universe works. but the current ideas aren't able to solve some of the biggest scientific puzzles, such as how the universe as we know it came into existence. now, scientists at fermi lab, a particle accelerator just outside chicago, have got a result that might take us a big step forward in answering those questions. they've been accelerating particles inside this giant ring close to the speed of light, and they found that they might be behaving in a way that can't be explained by the current theory of physics at the subatomic level.
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we found that the interaction of a muon, which is a heavy electron with a magnetic field is not in agreement with our current best theory of physics, and clearly that's very exciting, because it potentially points to a future of new laws, new particles and new forces in physics which we haven't seen up to date. you have heard of electrons, well, there are similar particles called muons which are much heavier and spin like tops. in the experiment, they were made to wobble using magnets. the current theory suggests they should wobble at a certain rate, instead, they wobbled faster. this might be caused by a mystery force that in turn is created by another yet to be discovered particle. scientists believe that there are four fundamental forces of nature, one for gravity, another for electricity and two nuclear forces, which control the behaviour of atoms. together, they explain the way the world works,
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but in recent years, astronomers began noticing things in space that can't be explained by the four forces, such as galaxies spinning faster than they should. and they can't explain why the stars and planets and everything on them, including us, exist at all. the new result suggests there might be a fifth force which could explain some of these mysteries. i think it's quite mind—boggling, and they have the potential to turn physics on its head. we have a number of mysteries that remain unsolved, and this could give us the key answers to solve these mysteries. evidence for the fifth force has been growing, just two weeks ago, researchers at the large hydron colliderjust outside geneva had a similar result. the race is really on now to try and get one of these experiments to really get the proof that this really is something new. they will take more data and make more measurements and hopefully show evidence that these effects are real. these very early results aren't definitive yet,
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but they are generating a lot of excitement about the prospect of a giant leap forward in our understanding of the universe. pallab ghosh, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. hello. it's another cold day out there. more cloud around than many of us have seen over the past couple of days. despite the cloud, though, most places are looking dry, just still a few snow showers peppering the far north and north—east of scotland. some rainjust edging in towards northern ireland as we get into this evening. temperatures still very much rooted into single figures. some less cold air moving in from the atlantic with the cloud and the rain to northern ireland, into western scotland into parts of wales, and the western side of england overnight. towards the south and far east, here is where there still are some clear spells, still a frost going into tomorrow morning, just not as cold as it has been over the last few nights. now, tomorrow is looking very wet in north—west scotland.
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we'll see some patchy rain elswhere for northern ireland, for england and wales, though for east anglia and south—east england it will stay mainly dry here and these westerly winds are introducing that less cold air. temperatures for some back into double figures. that is not going to last very long — colder again by the weekend.
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hello this is bbc news with reeta chakrabarti. the headlines... people under the age of 30 in the uk are to be offered an alternative to the astrazeneca covid vaccine, because of evidence linking it to extremely rare blood clots in a very small number of cases. this is, of course, change. it is based on a clinical preference based on newly emerging data. it will be kept under very careful review.
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the eu drug regulator also updated its guidance, concluding that unusual blood clots should be listed as a very rare side effect. the uk now has its third coronavirus vaccine. they both agreed that the benefits of the astrazeneca job heavily outweigh the risks. the uk now has its third coronavirus vaccine. the first doses of the moderna vaccine have been given in wales and scotland — with a 24—year—old carer the first to receive it. a study of us patients suggests people diagnosed with covid—19 appear to be at greater risk of developing conditions including depression and psychosis. a gambler who was denied a 1.7 million pound jackpot over an alleged software glitch wins his legal battle against betfred to claim the playout, plus interest. and a team of scientists based in the united states say they've found strong evidence for the existence of a new force of nature.
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time for sports, and for a full round up, here is sarah. round up, here is sarah. thank you very much, rita. good news for football fans in scotland with the first confirmation of supporters returning to stadia. the scottish government has given approval for 12,000 fans to attend each of the euro 2020 matches at hampden park in june. this works out at about 25% of the capacity. ua for had given to cities until today to submit plans for fan attendance changes likely. hampden is set to host four games — with scotland starting their campaign against the czech republic there. meanwhile, the football association of ireland has told uefa that they are not in position to guarantee that fans can attend the four matches scheduled for the aviva stadium in dublin. this is due to current governement advice. the fai said it will continue
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to discuss all the issues with uefa. meanwhile, the riverside stadium has been selected as a covid—secure venue, to stage the england's warm up games for the euros injune. gareth southgate will return to his old home ground for their matches against austria and romania. there could be fans there too, if the easing of lockdown goes to plan. the riverside last staged a senior england men's international in 2003, when southgate was playing for middlesbrough — liverpool say racist abuse on social media "cannot be allowed to continue" after their players, trent alexander—arnold and naby keita were targeted. both had racist emojis sent to them on the platform instagram in the lead up to tuesday's champions league tie with real madrid. in a statement, the club said...
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the club will work with relevant authorities to try to identify and prosecute offenders and added that it "will not be enough, until the strongest possible preventative measures are taken". and ahead of their europa league match against slavia prague tomorrow — arsenal's willian had his say on the online racial abuse. we share it with you guys and we speak about that, but we want action, you know? we don't see any action, you know? we don't see any action, you know? we don't see any action, you know, from the authorities in that case, you know? yeah, i think we have to try better a way to stop it. the final of the world snooker championship is set to be played in front of a capacity crowd
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on the third of may. it's one of the pilot events designed to find ways to get fans back safely, without social distancing. the crucible can hold 980 spectators, and the plan is for it to be a third full for the opening round, increasing as the tournament progresses. face coverings will be required and fans will have to take a covid—19 test before arriving, and another five days afterwards. the first men's major of the golfing year gets— the first men's major of the golfing year gets under way tomorrow with the masters at agusta.— the masters at agusta. dustin johnson is _ the masters at agusta. dustin johnson is the _ the masters at agusta. dustin johnson is the defending - the masters at agusta. dustin - johnson is the defending champion and after winning the delayed 2020 addition that finally took place last november, the last player to win back—to—back masters was tiger woods. to win back—to—back masters was tigerwoods. he to win back—to—back masters was tiger woods. he is missing as he recovers from a car crash. and johnson is not quite as sure about his form as he was last year. maybe not quite as good a shape as i was in november, but i feel like it is coming together, i am starting to hit a lot of the same shots and getting a lot more comfortable with the golf ball and ifeel like it is
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in a pretty good form. coverage a cross coverage across the bbc over the coming four days. that's it from me. 0lly foster will be here with sportsday at 6.30pm. thank you, sarah. you are watching bbc news. a man who followed and murdered a woman on a night out before disposing part of her body in an alleyway has been jailed for life. this 24—year—old killed lorraine cox in his flat above a kebab shop in exeter. he was found murdered. —— he was found guilty of murder. the case has caused outrage in exeter, especially amid the recent national campaign highlighting male violence against women. thejudge said highlighting male violence against women. the judge said that he should serve at least 20 years in jail. police looking for the student have been searching the forest in essex following the discovery of a body in a lake there on monday. the 19 euros
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has been missing from his home for more than a fortnight. it remains a mystery —— it remains a mystery as to what happened to richard 0korogheye. an intelligent, quiet, focused boy, his family say. a gentle giant, loved by everyone. his family last saw him more than two weeks ago on march the 22nd when he left home in west london. here he is that night in the area, captured on cctv, without a jacket and without medication. the 19—year—old has sickle cell disease. the oxford brookes business and technology student was then seen again — this time in loughton in essex in the early hours of the following day. police say he had taken a taxi to a residential street and was heading towards epping forest. it's what led officers here, to this ancient woodland. the metropolitan police, supported by colleagues from the essex force,
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have been carrying out extensive searches. on monday they found a body in this lake. it has yet to be formally identified. richard's mother says her son had been shielding since the start of the pandemic, which took its toll. imagine staying in for that length of time, without seeing friends. the only opportunity he had to go out was going to his appointments, really. and really, that's it. nothing else other than that. searches in the area where a body was found are continuing. what was it that drew this 19—year—old from his home in west london? why did he head towards the forest? what happened to him? his family desperately need to know. helena wilkinson, bbc news.
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the uk regulators included that the benefits of the astrazeneca coronavirus vaccine outweigh the risks, but it is recommended that people under the age of 30 b offered an alternative jab because of concerns over rare blood clots. the review found that 79 blood clots and 19 deaths among people who had received at least one of the 20 million astrazeneca doses administered in the uk. jeremy brown is a professor of respiratory infection at the university college london, and he sits on thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation. hejoins me now. he is speaking today in a personal capacity. good afternoon to you, professor. is this the right decision by the right decision by uk watchdog? decision by the right decision by uk watchdo: ? , , , , watchdog? yes, it is. there is this rare syndrome _ watchdog? yes, it is. there is this rare syndrome where _ watchdog? yes, it is. there is this rare syndrome where you - watchdog? yes, it is. there is this rare syndrome where you get - watchdog? yes, it is. there is this. rare syndrome where you get clots, mainly in the vein in the centre of the brain, associated with the low platelet count, platelets of the cell would circulate in the blood which prevent clots. it's quite an
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unusual combination of problems. it seems to occur in the first two or three weeks after vaccination. the data suggests it's largely the astrazeneca vaccine. so the decision to offer a different vaccine to people who are at low risk of severe covert infection is a sensible one. the point was made by some the also ever speak into this afternoon, that the vaccine has been given to many more people than the pfizer and certainly modernity has onlyjust come on stream today, so in a way, it is the vaccine for which we have the most evidence. yes. i mean it's always very difficult when you have a condition which is measured in a few cases per million to get data. and so to be absolutely sure there is an association permit will take a bit more time and a lot more analysis of what's going on, but there is what we call a signal, an association
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that seems to be there, so the cautious approaches to avoid using the vaccine in those where the risk of covid infection being severe is very, very low indeed. and of covid infection being severe is very, very low indeed.— of covid infection being severe is very, very low indeed. and that is a crucial of this. _ crucial of this. the _ crucial of this. the head - crucial of this. the head of. crucial of this. | the head of the crucial of this. - the head of the m hra, crucial of this. _ the head of the m hra, the watchdog, was saying that this is about very finely balanced risks. so it is not so much so that young people are more prone to this blood clot, it's that they are much less prone to serious illness from covid. that is the meaning _ serious illness from covid. that is the meaning -- — serious illness from covid. that is the meaning -- main _ serious illness from covid. that is the meaning -- main defining - serious illness from covid. that is . the meaning -- main defining factor. the meaning —— main defining factor. and if you are over 40, the balances in favourable vaccine. it will better protect you, so it is this sort of age—related severity situation with the covid infection where the chance of getting the disease amplifies it very much as you get older. it makes it clear
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that the vaccine is a safer option. it only in very young people where the risk is very low that the risk balance is in favour of using a different vaccine. so balance is in favour of using a different vaccine.— balance is in favour of using a different vaccine. so how do you enforce the _ different vaccine. so how do you enforce the message _ different vaccine. so how do you enforce the message that - different vaccine. so how do you enforce the message that the i different vaccine. so how do you - enforce the message that the vaccine is safe? ~ ., enforce the message that the vaccine is safe? ~ _, ., , ., , is safe? well, i coming on shows like this, rita — is safe? well, i coming on shows like this, rita and _ is safe? well, i coming on shows like this, rita and explaining - like this, rita and explaining things. and as clearly as we can. it is as a master of communication, that the public understand the situation. all medicines do have a degree of, well, even aspirin, for example, has a incredibly rare condition which is fatal in children. so these things, they are not unusual. the risk balance is something that we have to communicate because it is a little difficult to get that concept across accurately. difficult to get that concept across accuratel . �* ., ., , accurately. and the government has made it clear _ accurately. and the government has made it clear that _ accurately. and the government has made it clear that it _ accurately. and the government has made it clear that it doesn't - accurately. and the government has made it clear that it doesn't expectl made it clear that it doesn't expect today's decision to make any
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difference to the timetable for the roll—out. do you think that they are right to be confident? i roll-out. do you think that they are right to be confident?— right to be confident? i thinki don't really — right to be confident? i thinki don't really know— right to be confident? i thinki don't really know how - right to be confident? i thinki don't really know how it - right to be confident? i think i j don't really know how it might affect the timetable. i think it makes delivery more complicated because you suddenly have to, and at the moment we are agnostic about what vaccine some he receives, but now if you are under 30, you half to ensure there is a supply of non—astrazeneca vaccine available for those who are healthy and under 30. �* , ., ., ., 30. and the uk is in a fortunate osition 30. and the uk is in a fortunate position that — 30. and the uk is in a fortunate position that it _ 30. and the uk is in a fortunate position that it is _ 30. and the uk is in a fortunate position that it is not _ 30. and the uk is in a fortunate position that it is not solely - position that it is not solely reliant on astrazeneca, although it is the main vaccine. have there been no alternative, with the astrazeneca vaccine, the roll—out would have to continue to all age groups, wouldn't it? , , . ., , continue to all age groups, wouldn't it? , , ., it? yes, but it comes back to communication _ it? yes, but it comes back to communication situation - it? yes, but it comes back to l communication situation where it? yes, but it comes back to - communication situation where if the astrazeneca vaccine was the only vaccine, and this is quite an important point, because in many countries, it will be the only vaccine that is available. so for
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developing countries which don't have the luxury to be able to afford the pfizer or maternal vaccine because astrazeneca are producing this vaccine profit free and not making money out of the vaccine so that it can be used in other countries. so in those countries, and it will be the only vaccine available. the risk—benefit analysis will need to be recalculated depending on how much and how dangerous covid is to these different age groups in those countries. different age groups in those countries-— different age groups in those countries. ., ., ~ ., countries. 0k, good to talk to. thank you _ countries. 0k, good to talk to. thank you so _ countries. 0k, good to talk to. thank you so much. _ countries. 0k, good to talk to. thank you so much. that - countries. 0k, good to talk to. thank you so much. that is - countries. 0k, good to talk to. - thank you so much. that is professor jeremy brown from the university couege jeremy brown from the university college london. thank you so much. thank you. people living in cities are urged to think twice before buying suvs. the motoring organisation says drivers should use vehicles that are less polluting one they don't need to plough through rivers or fields on
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their way to shops. research suggests that most sport—utility vehicles bought by people who live in urban areas, particularly london. roger harrabin reports. 4x4 wheel drive cars are officially called suvs, sports utility vehicles. to people who hate their bulk on city streets, there is a less respectful title — chelsea tractors. new research shows that most of them are indeed bought in kensington and chelsea, hammersmith and fulham and westminster, london boroughs where wealthy residents can afford the prices. it is a far cry from the origins of the chelsea tractor, the humble workhorse land rover, loved by farmers, country dwellers and the military. their appeal has spread into the towns. two thirds of these cars are being sold to people living in cities where there are no opportunities to drive off—road. so actually, our call is not so much to consumers to think twice. what we are asking for is for these vehicles to stop being
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advertised in the uk. it is part of a trend towards bigger cars that has kept carbon emissions from transport unacceptably high. the classic mini, for instance, was 3.05 metres long. the new version mini is 3.82 metres long. compare the huge mercedes gls. it is 5.21 metres. and beasts like this are too big for a conventional parking space. if suv drivers were a country, they would be seventh in the world for carbon emissions. people choose different cars for different reasons. it might be style. it might be safety. it might be seating position. indeed, it might be size. if people have got a big family, they want a bigger car. if they want to tow things, they might need a bigger car. but not all suvs are big and dirty. some of the cleanest cars are now coming in the style of suvs.
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that means electric suvs, although they are only part of the solution. they waste energy, dragging tonnes of steel with heavy batteries through city streets, like this electric hummer, based on an american army truck. it is a beast. banning advertising for suvs would help, campaigners say, just as adverts for smoking are banned. it won't work, motoring groups warn. they say people buy suvs for all of the space inside and because they are good to drive. roger harrabin, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... people under the age of 30 in the uk are to be offered an alternative to the astrazeneca covid vaccine, because of evidence linking it to extremely rare blood clots in a very small number of cases. the eu drug regulator also updated its guidance, concluding that unusual blood clots should be listed as a very rare side effect.
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the uk now has its third coronavirus vaccine. the first doses of the moderna vaccine have been given in wales and scotland — with a 24—year—old carer the first to receive it. a little girl for wiltshire has become an inspiration to help teach other children about down syndrome. little rosie hit the head —— headlines last summer when building a doll house and their back garden. the tray company behind the original house got in touch to say they would like to base a new doll on rosie to help educate others about the condition. meet rosie. ear; help educate others about the condition. meet rosie. say hello. hello. my doll! _ hello. my doll! is_ hello. my doll! is that your dog? yes! -- doll- _ is that your dog? yes! -- doll. this - is that your dog? yes! -- doll. this is - is that your dog? yes! -- doll. this is the - is that your dog? yes! | -- doll. this is the tree is that your dog? yes! - -- doll. this is the tree house is that your dog? yes! _ -- doll. this is the tree house that started it all. — -- doll. this is the tree house that started it all. a _ -- doll. this is the tree house that
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started it all. a life-size _ -- doll. this is the tree house that started it all. a life-size wreck -- l started it all. a life—size wreck —— replica of rosie's favourite toy bill last year. just messing around. i thought it would be fun, really for the screenshot of just would be fun, really for the screenshot ofjust having the screenshot ofjust having the screenshot to stick it on air b&b. i got this message suddenly from my phone from air b&b saying you've got a booking this weekend. so i was like, what?— a booking this weekend. so i was like, what? , ., , ., , like, what? news of the unusual stay ca tured like, what? news of the unusual stay captured the — like, what? news of the unusual stay captured the imagination _ like, what? news of the unusual stay captured the imagination of- like, what? news of the unusual stay captured the imagination of people i captured the imagination of people around the world, and the boss of the company that makes the dolls got in touch. i actually came across a tweet and i said to _ i actually came across a tweet and i said to jason, look, i would love to make _ said to jason, look, i would love to make a _ said to jason, look, i would love to make a one — said to jason, look, i would love to make a one off doll for rosie. i would — make a one off doll for rosie. i would like _ make a one off doll for rosie. i would like to get that to her for christmas. but would like to get that to her for christmas-— christmas. but this was to be a secial christmas. but this was to be a special doll- — christmas. but this was to be a special doll. rosie _ christmas. but this was to be a special doll. rosie has - christmas. but this was to be a special doll. rosie has down i special doll. rosie has down syndrome, so subtle details were included in the toy and the packaging to explain her condition. we don't tell people that this is a doll with— we don't tell people that this is a doll with down syndrome. we let them purchase _ doll with down syndrome. we let them purchase it _ doll with down syndrome. we let them
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purchase it and then discover on the inside _ purchase it and then discover on the inside there — purchase it and then discover on the inside there is a little leaflet explaining what it actually means to have down _ explaining what it actually means to have down syndrome. so _ have down syndrome. so we _ have down syndrome. so we have diagram to show the eyebrows, the nose, the face, and she has her boots you know, they have modelled her boots on rosie's boots that have really helped her be able to walk and have a normal life. i think it's going to be a really nice educational thing for kids to look at and read and, you know, play, just like they play with any other doll. ~ play, just like they play with any other doll-— other doll. when others saw the finished product, _ other doll. when others saw the finished product, they _ other doll. when others saw the finished product, they wanted i other doll. when others saw the l finished product, they wanted one other doll. when others saw the - finished product, they wanted one as well. now it's been made available in toy shops in 35 different countries. they have sold hundreds already and totally we will sell more. $1 for every purchase will go to our local charity who helps to support rosie and otherfamilies in the community. what i hope from this is that it lets children know that she is just like them. she's just different. i believe all kids should have a diverse — i believe all kids should have a diverse toy box, and that we can develop — diverse toy box, and that we can develop that empathy. so it's
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extremely important to us. services _ extremely important to us. services like a normal day. she loves going outside, she loves going in the tree house. she loves playing with the dolls. she just loves life. let's go back now to that news that the uk medicines regulator has altered its advice on the astrazeneca vaccine. it said that the benefits massively outweigh the risks, but has recommended that people under the age of 30 be given a different vaccine. the prime minister borisjohnson has been giving his reaction to the news. let's listen. giving his reaction to the news. let's listen-— let's listen. first of all, i am massively — let's listen. first of all, i am massively grateful _ let's listen. first of all, i am massively grateful to - let's listen. first of all, i am massively grateful to the - let's listen. first of all, i am - massively grateful to the nhra. they have done a fantasticjob for our country throughout the pandemic and they continue to do so. of course, we will be following the guidance completely. these vaccines are safe. they have saved many thousands of lives, and people should come forward to get theirjabs, and we will make sure that they get the
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right jabs, will make sure that they get the rightjabs, and of course, i don't see any reason at this stage at all to think that we need to deviate from the road map, and we are also very secure about our supply. thank you. very secure about our supply. thank ou. ~ , , ., you. the prime minister they are s-teakin you. the prime minister they are speaking on _ you. the prime minister they are speaking on a — you. the prime minister they are speaking on a visit _ you. the prime minister they are speaking on a visit to _ you. the prime minister they are speaking on a visit to the - you. the prime minister they are i speaking on a visit to the southwest of england. time now to revisit this morning your questions answered. you've been sending in your questions on vaccines. and to answer your queries, i'm joined now by dr samara afzal, a gp at netherton health centre in dudley, and danny altmann, professor of immunology at imperial college, london. good afternoon to you both. paulfrom 0xfordshire paul from 0xfordshire asks why people aren't tested for covid when they are about to get vaccinated. he
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says that this could explain clotting if there is a correlation between having had covid when being vaccinated and the risk of reactions such as clots. it is one of those theories that's been going around. we do ask them whether they have had covid in the last month, and if we do, it's the logistics of it. if they have symptoms, they shouldn't be coming in they should be having a test anyway, but sometimes what happens is you get vaccines, you know, a few days notice, and it's the logistics of trying to get all of those patients tested. i think that would hurt the vaccination programme. so i don't think that would be possible. as we know lateral flow testing is around, but it's not 100% sensitive. and it's difficult to say whether it is that some of these patients have got covid and have had the vaccine and whether they have been developed, these complications. so i don't think that will come in, i don't think that will come in, i don't think —— for logistical reasons we will be able to test her from before
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having the vaccine. but will be able to test her from before having the vaccine.— having the vaccine. but of some of the nose that _ having the vaccine. but of some of the nose that they _ having the vaccine. but of some of the nose that they have _ having the vaccine. but of some of the nose that they have already i having the vaccine. but of some of. the nose that they have already had covid, would there be a sense in screening people first? i suppose you are saying that you don't know if that link is correct. we don't know, but if they have had covid in the last 28 days, they would have the vaccine anyway. truth? would have the vaccine anyway. why not? because _ would have the vaccine anyway. why not? because we _ would have the vaccine anyway. why not? because we don't _ would have the vaccine anyway. why not? because we don't know. it i would have the vaccine anyway. why. not? because we don't know. it tends to be affecting — not? because we don't know. it tends to be affecting from _ not? because we don't know. it tends to be affecting from their _ not? because we don't know. it tends to be affecting from their own - to be affecting from their own antibodies. it's a cautionary measure come i don't think there is much research of people having had the vaccine after contracting covid apart from what will come in the near future because of incidents of having the vaccine and later discovering that they had covid. so for that reason commits oppression and play. for that reason commits oppression and -la . ., ~ for that reason commits oppression and -la. ., ,, ., and play. 0k, thank you. professor, sue from lincolnshire _ and play. 0k, thank you. professor, sue from lincolnshire asks - and play. 0k, thank you. professor, sue from lincolnshire asks how- and play. 0k, thank you. professor, j sue from lincolnshire asks how long after having the vaccine what a
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blood clot, if you are going to develop one, show. so how long after your vacation can you stop worrying about whether you will get a blood clot or not?— clot or not? like most people, i have been _ clot or not? like most people, i have been studying _ clot or not? like most people, i have been studying the - clot or not? like most people, i have been studying the papers. clot or not? like most people, i i have been studying the papers and the case _ have been studying the papers and the case reports, things like the k series— the case reports, things like the k series from — the case reports, things like the k series from germany and austria. it's series from germany and austria. it's a _ series from germany and austria. it's a very— series from germany and austria. it's a very small number of cases, it's a _ it's a very small number of cases, it's a small— it's a very small number of cases, it's a small pattern. ——of cases, but the typical pattern is that these are events that are popping up after the first of vaccine dose and spotted during the first seven to 14 days. so that is the kind of window are keeping an eye on things. so fairly early on. i have a question here from richard who is asking are all the cases are from the first dose? any from the second? in the case series i have seen are published, they are all first dose, but i do not know the details on every single one of the 79 or so we have over the whole
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of the continent of europe so far, so i could not tell you about all of those. all right, thank you. james from northumberland asks does this type of clot occur in people who have not had the vaccine and if so, how often? is this something you have seen? yes, this clot does happen, but it is thought the risks at the moment, they are saying four in1 million, is probably slightly higher than what you would see in a baseline population, so although it is there, the risk has been said that it is slightly higher with the astrazeneca vaccine. right, 0k, thank you. stephen asks if you have a low platelet count, is it safe to have the astrazeneca vaccine? so, i think we are entering a phase where there will be...
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i have seen already some quite detailed haematology guidelines going out that will look at all of this, but you have to have your individual discussion with your gp, but samara may correct me if i'm wrong, but at the i think that is not on the list of things that would make it be regarded as unsafe. samara? we haven't seen patients who have got other conditions when they have a low platelet and we have been giving them astrazeneca vaccine providing it is not at a critically low level, but of course, with the new guidance, and bleeding disorders, whether they will be told they cannot have the astrazeneca vaccine, or should not, than with low platelets, in theory that can be a bleeding issue, so i do not know whether that will come in, but there will be more detailed guidance in the coming days from the haematologist.
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and show you say from individual consent should talk to their gp? —— additional concerns. absolutely and if they do have specific issues they can ask for advice from haematologists that the patients are under. very good to talk to you both, thank you so much. thank you both. hello. a little less cold for the next few days. frosty nights again by then. sunshine and winter showers. rain across northern ireland pushing into scotland overnight. preceded by a little bit of snow into the hills. the sun and rain reaching into its prince of wales on western england. elsewhere, we will get to see a few
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breaks in the cloud. still cold enough or a touch of frost, not nearly although, as cold as it was last night. into tomorrow, plenty of cloud around. some patches of rain, still some sunshine towards northeast scotland for a time before the heavy rain in northwest scotland sinks across scotland southwards as the day goes on with a strengthening wind. that will get into northern ireland as we go into thursday evening. not much rain into southeast england. very limited sunny spells. the air is coming in from a less cold direction, but that will be turning breezy air. the air from west, ratherfrom will be turning breezy air. the air from west, rather from the north, some temperatures showing up into double figures here before again it gets colderfor the double figures here before again it gets colder for the begun.
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today at six — new guidance from the uk's medical regulator to address concerns about the oxford—astrazeneca jab and blood clots. people under the age of 30 will be offered an alternative vaccine — the health experts say they are acting out of utmost caution. this is a course change. it is based on a clinical preference, based on newly emerging data. it will be kept under very careful review. research shows nearly 80 people developed the blood clots — but that's out of 20 million doses of the astrazeneca jab. these vaccines are safe. they have saved many _ these vaccines are safe. they have saved many thousands _ these vaccines are safe. they have saved many thousands of - these vaccines are safe. they have saved many thousands of lives i these vaccines are safe. they have saved many thousands of lives and | saved many thousands of lives and people should come forward to get
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theirjabs and we will make

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