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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  April 7, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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the uk gets it third coronavirus vaccine, as the first moderna doses are given to people in west wales. it comes as trials of the astrazeneca vaccine on children are paused because of concerns about a possible link with rare blood clots in adults. scientists say people should still have the jab. for the people being offered the vaccine at the moment, the risk/benefit is very strongly in favour of receiving the vaccine. we'll talk live to our medical editor for the latest. also this lunchtime... brazil records more than 4,000 covid deaths in 2a hours — its worst day since the start of the pandemic. its health system is overwhelmed. a study in the us suggests people diagnosed with covid—19 appear to be
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at greater risk of developing conditions including depression and psychosis. loneliness during the pandemic was greater in areas with more young people, says new research — and also in places with higher crime and unemployment. and think twice about buying an suv if you live in a city — why drivers need to think about their carbon footprint in urban areas. and coming up on the bbc news channel... manchester city's star midfielder kevin de bruyne signs a new contract with the premier league leaders that will keep him at the etihad until 2025. good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one.
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the roll—out has begun of the third coronavirus vaccine in the uk. the first person to receive the moderna vaccine was a 24—year—old carer in carmarthen in west wales. it comes as british and european regulators are due to report theirfindings on a potential link between the astrazeneca jab and rare blood clots. there have been 30 cases of the clots in the uk — including seven deaths — among more than 18 million people who've had the inoculation. 0ur health correspondent anna collinson has this report. the anna collinson has this report. third coronavirus va officially the third coronavirus vaccine has officially arrived in the uk. first in line for the moderna jab was 24—year—old l taylor from the fed. are very excited, i'm an unpaid caring for my grandmother so it's very important for me that i can get
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it so i can cater her properly and we say. it so i can cater her properly and we sa . ., it so i can cater her properly and wesa. ., , it so i can cater her properly and wesa. ., we say. the moderna vaccine is also bein: we say. the moderna vaccine is also being rolled — we say. the moderna vaccine is also being rolled out _ we say. the moderna vaccine is also being rolled out in _ we say. the moderna vaccine is also being rolled out in scotland - we say. the moderna vaccine is also being rolled out in scotland today, | being rolled out in scotland today, with the rest of the uk set to follow. . ' ., , , follow. there are 17 million doses available extra _ follow. there are 17 million doses available extra so _ follow. there are 17 million doses available extra so that _ follow. there are 17 million doses available extra so that helps - follow. there are 17 million doses available extra so that helps with| available extra 50 that helps with surm— available extra so that helps with supply issues. it is also kept at a normal_ supply issues. it is also kept at a normal temperature so far more robust _ normal temperature so far more robust and — normal temperature so far more robust and able to be taken around mobile _ robust and able to be taken around mobile to— robust and able to be taken around mobile to rural areas and those kind of things— mobile to rural areas and those kind of things so— mobile to rural areas and those kind of things so that will help us along the way— of things so that will help us along the way to— of things so that will help us along the way to keep to the timetable. this further expansion of the roll—out comes as europe's regulator is preparing to report on a key vaccine. investigations are taking place to see if the oxford—astrazeneca jab may be linked with very red blood clots. scientists and unusual constellation of features have been picked up in cases detected so far. the interest is that these _ cases detected so far. the interest is that these cases _ cases detected so far. the interest is that these cases are _ cases detected so far. the interest is that these cases are associated l is that these cases are associated with low platelet count which we don't normally see in cases of thrombosis that makes them stand out and it matches cases we have heard from other european countries. for the people being offered the vaccine at the moment the risk/benefit is
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very strongly in favour of receiving the vaccine if it transpires there is a link between the astrazeneca vaccine and rare blood clots it is estimated it could cause one out of 2.5 million people estimated it could cause one out of 2.5 million peopl— estimated it could cause one out of 2.5 million people vaccinated in the uk. at this stage _ 2.5 million people vaccinated in the uk. at this stage with _ 2.5 million people vaccinated in the uk. at this stage with the - 2.5 million people vaccinated in the uk. at this stage with the groups . 2.5 million people vaccinated in the | uk. at this stage with the groups of eo - le we uk. at this stage with the groups of peeple we are _ uk. at this stage with the groups of people we are vaccinating _ uk. at this stage with the groups of people we are vaccinating the - people we are vaccinating the benefit — people we are vaccinating the benefit of having an astrazeneca vaccination far, far outweigh any risks_ vaccination far, far outweigh any risks so— vaccination far, far outweigh any risks so please attend for your vaccine — risks so please attend for your vaccine no _ risks so please attend for your vaccine no vaccination. these cases at the _ vaccine no vaccination. these cases at the moment are incredibly rare. last night — at the moment are incredibly rare. last night trial for the oxford on children and teenagers was temporarily halted while the team await further information from the uk's regulator. they say they have taken an extremely cautious approach, particularly as children are most unlikely to become seriously ill from coronavirus. with a target to offer the vaccine to all adults by the summer, labour and the government are united in wanting to tackle any hesitancy it is a safe vaccine, lots of adults have rights,
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including myself, and vaccine, lots of adults have rights, including myself,— including myself, and i think it is very important — including myself, and i think it is very important we _ including myself, and i think it is very important we ensure - including myself, and i think it is. very important we ensure maximum confidence in the roll—out of the vaccine and where it is safe we need to say it is safe. vaccine and where it is safe we need to say it is safe-— to say it is safe. cheap and effective. _ to say it is safe. cheap and effective, the _ to say it is safe. cheap and effective, the astrazeneca | to say it is safe. cheap and i effective, the astrazeneca jab to say it is safe. cheap and - effective, the astrazeneca jab has been rolled out at speed around the globe, including here in georgia. the manufacturer has also promised to make it available to the developing world on a nonprofit basis. if regulators in the uk or europe recommend any restrictions, the decision could have rippling effects across the world. anna collinson, bbc news 0ur bbc news medical editor, fergus walsh, is here. we will hear from regulators. what is the balancing act here for them? they have a difficultjob because they have to analyse whether or not these are very rare blood clots that have been identified some days after people have received the astrazeneca jab is a random association or if there is a very definite link. it is
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thought to be about one in 600,000 people immunised in the uk, higher incidence in the european union. but we don't really know what the background risk is for this particular type of clots associated with low platelet levels. we know that covid for example increases your risk so it is possible some of the people affected have actually got covid, as well. individual case reports need to be followed up. in germany most of the cases were among younger women and that is one of the reasons why several eu countries have restricted the astrazeneca jab to older adults. fiend have restricted the astrazeneca 'ab to older adults.�* have restricted the astrazeneca 'ab to older adults. and so what should eo - le to older adults. and so what should peeple do? — to older adults. and so what should peeple do? they — to older adults. and so what should people do? they will _ to older adults. and so what should people do? they will be _ to older adults. and so what should people do? they will be people - people do? they will be people watching for example who have had their first dose and i waited for their first dose and i waited for the second. stump still being called up the second. stump still being called up and given an appointment, it can be worrying. i up and given an appointment, it can be worrying-— be worrying. i have had in my first dose of astrazeneca _ be worrying. i have had in my first dose of astrazeneca and - be worrying. i have had in my first dose of astrazeneca and i - be worrying. i have had in my first dose of astrazeneca and i shall. dose of astrazeneca and i shall definitely be there on the day and time i am called to have my second.
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you have to look at the benefits against the risk. we now have three highly effective vaccines. the vaccine roll—out in the uk has been an enormous success. we have seen it has helped along with lockdown to really bring down the deaths and hospitalisations. we have to keep that front and centre. people are being called for theirjabs now, the benefits definitely outweigh the risks. if you are in your 40s and you get covid you have still got a one in 1000 chance of dying. when it comes down to people in their 20s and 30s, the risk — benefit ratio analysis is more complex and that is the sort of thing that may well be addressed this afternoon. {lila the sort of thing that may well be addressed this afternoon. 0k, fergus walsh, addressed this afternoon. 0k, fergus walsh. thank — addressed this afternoon. 0k, fergus walsh. thank you _ addressed this afternoon. 0k, fergus walsh, thank you very _ addressed this afternoon. 0k, fergus walsh, thank you very much. - addressed this afternoon. 0k, fergus walsh, thank you very much. much i walsh, thank you very much. much more detail we think will be released this afternoon. you can watch the briefing which is being led by deputy chief medical officer for england jonathan van tam at 3pm. we expect to hear from
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we expect to hearfrom him we expect to hear from him at 3pm this afternoon. you will be able to watch that briefing live on the bbc news channel. brazil has recorded more than 4,000 coronavirus deaths in 2a hours — a grim record for the country. the public health system has been overwhelmed by a surge in the number of cases since the beginning of the year — as paul paul adams reports. sobbing. 0vercrowded hospitals, a health system on the brink of collapse, and a population living in fear. covid's spotlight has ranged across the globe and now has brazil locked in its harsh glare. for the first time the country has recorded more than 4,000 covid—related deaths in just 24 hours. brazil's death toll now stands at around 337,000 — second only to the united states. still behind both the us and britain in terms of death per capita, but a contagious new variant is fuelling the latest surge —
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the death toll in march twice as high as the previous month. i think brazil now is not only the epicentre of the pandemic worldwide, it's a threat to the entire effort of the international community to control the pandemic on the planet. if brazil is not under control, the planet is not going to be under control — it's not going to be safe — because we are brewing variants, new variants every week. the country's defiant president, jair bolsonaro, continues to oppose a lockdown. damaging the economy, he says, would be worse than the virus itself. without citing evidence, he's linked quarantine measures with obesity and depression. he's even tried to reverse restrictions imposed by local authorities. what we are facing here in brazil, what we have here, it is a sad situation that is the consequence of the lack of coordination in the federal level by the national government.
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we have here, it is president bolsonaro confronting governors and mayors. the government is under pressure — it knows the world is watching with a critical eye. the country's new foreign minister says there's a balance to be struck. translation: this is urgent, and president bolsonaro has l instructed me to face this mission. i emphasise the urgency of health, the urgency of the economy, and the urgency of sustainable development. scenes like this are undermining confidence in the government. the president says 2021 will be the year of vaccinations, but fewer than 10% of brazilians have had their firstjab. some say much more drastic action is needed. paul adams, bbc news. president biden says the us is on track to exceed his goal of 200 million coronavirus vaccinations being administered in his first 100 days in office.
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the president also announced a reduction in the number of people declining the vaccine. but he warned that new variants of the virus were increasing — and the country was still in a life—or—death race against the disease. the virus is spreading because we have too many people who, seeing the end in sight, think we're at the finish line already. but let me be deadly earnest with you. we aren't at the finish line. we still have a lot of work to do. we are still in a life—and—death race against this virus. people diagnosed with covid—19 appear to be at greater risk of developing psychological and neurological conditions, including depression, psychosis and stroke. a study by oxford university examined the health records of more than half a million patients in the united states — and found almost all the main brain illnesses were more common in people who'd caught the virus.
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here's our health reporter rachel schraer. coronavirus breaks into our cells and multiplies wherever in the body it finds itself. that's why it causes such a wide range of symptoms from the lungs, to the gut, to the brain. the team at the university of oxford looked over half a million patient records in the us to see if conditions affecting the brain were more common in those who'd had covid. they looked at 14 conditions including anxiety, depression and psychosis, stroke, brain haemorrhage, and dementia. all of these conditions were seen more often in people who'd had a covid infection in the previous six months. but these conditions all have very different causes. it could be that in some people, the virus actually gets into the brain and causes some damage. it could be the way your body is reacting to the virus, produces a sort of immune or inflammatory response that, again, contributes to the problems. and for other people, it may simply be a psychological effect, if you like, of the stress that having covid and thinking what might happen
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to you next is the important factor. the study couldn't prove the virus itself was definitely causing the changes, but patients recovering from covid were more likely than similar people who'd had flu or another infection to develop a psychological or neurological condition. and the sicker coronavirus patients had been, the more likely they were to develop these complications. rachel schraer, bbc news. police looking for the missing student richard 0korogheye have been searching epping forest in essex following the discovery of a body in a lake there yesterday. the 19—year—old, who's from west london, has been missing for more than a fortnight. helen wilkinson reports. it remains a mystery as to what happened to richard 0korogheye. an intelligent, quiet, focused boy, his family say. a gentle giant, loved by everyone. his family last saw him more than two weeks ago on march the 22nd
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when he left home in west london. here he is that night in the area, captured on cctv, without a jacket and without medication. the 19—year—old has sickle cell disease. the oxford brookes business and technology student was then seen again — this time in loughton in essex in the early hours of the following day. police say he had taken a taxi to a residential street and was heading towards epping forest. it's what led officers here, to this ancient woodland. the metropolitan police, supported by colleagues from the essex force, have been carrying out extensive searches. on monday they found a body in this lake. it has yet to be formally identified. richard's mother says her son had been shielding since the start of the pandemic,
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which took its toll. imagine staying in for that length of time, without seeing friends. the only opportunity he had to go out was going to his appointments, really. and really, that's it. nothing else other than that. searches in the area where a body was found are continuing. what was it that drew this 19—year—old from his home in west london? why did he head towards the forest? what happened to him? his family desperately need to know. helena wilkinson, bbc news. the time is 1.15. our top story this lunchtime. a third coronavirus vaccine — by the american firm, moderna, is being rolled out in the uk. government scientists will give an update on their investigations into a possible link between astrazeneca's jab, and rare cases of bloodclots, at a press conference this afternoon.
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and coming up, how china's old �*one—child rule' has changed young people's perceptions of family. coming up on the bbc news channel... the crucible could have a capacity crowd at the final of the world snooker championship on the 3rd of may — it's one of the pilot events designed to find ways to get fans back safe to sport. loneliness reported during the pandemic was more prevalent in places with a high concentration of young people, according to the latest research. a study by the office for national statistics shows people living in areas with higher rates of unemployment or crime were also more likely to say they felt isolated — and that 7% of people in britain felt lonely �*often or always' over the autumn and winter. harry farley reports.
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hello. there you go. thank you. every week maria calls in on so. it is a brief exchange but a lifeline. it is my birthday today. happy birthday! _ it is my birthday today. happy birthda ! �* it is my birthday today. happy birthda ! ~ , ., , , , birthday! and i stayed at suggests in s-urin birthday! and i stayed at suggests in spring last _ birthday! and i stayed at suggests in spring last year _ birthday! and i stayed at suggests in spring last year an _ birthday! and i stayed at suggests in spring last year an extra - birthday! and i stayed at suggests in spring last year an extra 1.1- in spring last year an extra 1.1 million people say that they often always feel lonely.— million people say that they often always feel lonely. some people have not seen anyone _ always feel lonely. some people have not seen anyone for— always feel lonely. some people have not seen anyone for a _ always feel lonely. some people have not seen anyone for a year— always feel lonely. some people have not seen anyone for a year were - always feel lonely. some people have not seen anyone for a year were not l not seen anyone for a year were not properly, apart from people doing the shopping of they have to go to the shopping of they have to go to the doctor they have not really been out. and you know you just chat to them for as long as you can. but it is very isolating and i think some people have gone downhill as well.
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the physical health. because of that sort of lack of purpose.— sort of lack of purpose. these fi . ures sort of lack of purpose. these figures suggest _ sort of lack of purpose. these figures suggest it _ sort of lack of purpose. these figures suggest it is _ sort of lack of purpose. these figures suggest it is young - sort of lack of purpose. these - figures suggest it is young people and particularly those in urban areas who have most felt the effects of lockdown. with social events curtailed and travel limited, there not usually isolated have faced loneliness. mi; not usually isolated have faced loneliness.— not usually isolated have faced loneliness. g , , loneliness. my mood has been very low. loneliness _ loneliness. my mood has been very low. loneliness is _ loneliness. my mood has been very low. loneliness is a _ loneliness. my mood has been very low. loneliness is a very _ loneliness. my mood has been very low. loneliness is a very strange i low. loneliness is a very strange thing _ low. loneliness is a very strange thing i've — low. loneliness is a very strange thing. i've never priorto low. loneliness is a very strange thing. i've never prior to this encounter— thing. i've never prior to this encounter any loneliness, i've always — encounter any loneliness, i've always been surrounded by people and very busv _ always been surrounded by people and very busy. and then to spend 12 months — very busy. and then to spend 12 months without human contact has 'ust months without human contact has just been— months without human contact has just been very hard. i�*ve months without human contact has just been very hard.— just been very hard. i've been workin: just been very hard. i've been working from _ just been very hard. i've been working from home _ just been very hard. i've been working from home so - just been very hard. i've been working from home so that i just been very hard. i've been working from home so that in| working from home so that in particular has been harder because i've not had that day to day
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connection with my colleagues. so these last few months have been particularly hard. the these last few months have been particularly hard.— these last few months have been particularly hard. the ons also said areas with high _ particularly hard. the ons also said areas with high rates _ particularly hard. the ons also said areas with high rates of— areas with high rates of unemployment had greater levels of loneliness. the pandemic has affected all of us in different ways. but across the country there are communities prepared to reach out and help those in need. russian police have detained the doctor of the opposition activist alexei navalny, outside the prison where he's serving a two and a half year sentence. mr navalny announced last week that was going on a hunger strike in protest at what he said was the refusal of prison authorities to treat him properly for acute pain. let's speak to our moscow correspondent sarah rainsford: a number of people arrested. what has been happening? _ a number of people arrested. “twist has been happening? we a number of people arrested. “iii“isgt has been happening? we were a number of people arrested. iii“isgt has been happening? we were outside the prison a couple of hours drive
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from moscow when this happened yesterday. a number of doctors allied to alexi navalny and some supporters who had gathered there were detained and briefly held but then most of them released. but they had been trying to get through to the present to speak to the prison authorities to intercede for alexi navalny who has been sending increasingly worrying messages from inside prison about the state of his health. he started by talking about acute back pain and sharp pains shooting down his legs and talked about having numbness in his legs and problem sitting down in particular. then a the last couple of days he ended up in the medical unit of the prison because he has a temperature and also a bad cough. 0f temperature and also a bad cough. of course in a pandemic there are worrying signs although a first covid test has come back negative. but basically alexi navalny has been calling for an independent doctor,
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doctor he says he can trust to be allowed to come to the prison to examine and because of course this is the most fierce critic of vladimir putin and he was poisoned with a military grade nerve agent last august and spent months recovering that in a hospital in germany. he is concerned that some of the symptoms could be linked to what happened to him back in august and also concerned about who exactly he can trust and prison doctors would not be high on the list. so we want an independent doctor to come and see in but in meantime his lawyers are calling for help in the criminal at the moment are saying that he will be given no special treatment. he is nobody special and will be dealt with by the prison authorities. they say they are doing everything that is needed at the moment. . ., everything that is needed at the moment. ., ,, , ., for decades, china imposed a one child policy on families, to prevent what they feared would be an unmanageable population. in recent years, the rules have been relaxed, allowing couples to have two children. but it now seems most young couples in china don“t want to have big families.
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0ur correspondent, stephen mcdonell, has been speaking to young people about their plans. chinese kids are sometimes called little emperors because parents, limited to one child only, gave their offspring everything. then came the two child policy. but, for many, one has remained well and truly enough. you just have to ask parents with a single child if they want more. translation: i haven't even considered it. - neither emotionally nor financially could i afford it. in china's once prosperous north—east, dwindling populations in many towns have led to a suggestion that this could be the first region to scrap both limits altogether. but this may not produce more children. translation: for me, - it's already hard to raise this one. it feels better to put
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all your energy into one child or we might feel guilty that we can't properly take care of many. there's been a huge shift in attitude from generation to generation here in china. older generations, they come from big families and it was a really crucial thing, in terms of their lives. but for younger people, it's not the same, they really don't want to have as many kids, it's not as important for them. the one child policy came into force in the early “80s to stop an already massive population exploding. later, people in rural areas and those from ethnic minorities were allowed multiple kids. yet for the vast majority, over three decades, having more than one child meant being fined.
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china in 2021 is a completely different place. young couples want different things. when you look at birth rates throughout history, poverty tends to produce people. that's because every new human being is an extra pair of hands to go to work. then along comes prosperity and it's not as important to have kids for this reason. another factor is that this huge country has now produced generations of people simply accustomed to small family life. it might be hard to get them to change. stephen mcdonell, bbc news, changchun. the human rights group, amnesty international, says the coronavirus pandemic has deepened inequalities around the world. its annual report says the worst impact has been on the most vulnerable people, leaving women and migrants further marginalised in some parts of the world. aru na iyengar reports. the global pandemic has affected
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everyone, but the impact is far from evenly spread. amnesty international is scathing in its report. it says women and refugees, like these in congo, have suffered the most. it points to domestic violence figures, which have risen in many countries, fuelled by victims being isolated with their abusers. women were largely the primary victims, in gender terms, of covid—19. throughout the world, groups that were vulnerable, individuals that were vulnerable, because of years of neglect, because of austerity measures that had wilfully neglected investment in health care, these individuals were hit the hardest. they had the least and they received the least. the report also says governments have used covid—19 to repress dissent.
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the philippines, nigeria, brazil and india are accused of using the pandemic as an excuse for tougher policing. countries such as china are accused of suppressing information, and rich countries are criticised for not thinking globally and refusing to share knowledge on vaccine production. amnesty says necessary restrictions taken to deal with a health crisis should be short, focused and proportionate. it says, instead many countries have extended their extraordinary powers. it concludes that covid has been weaponised by leaders around the world. shares in the takeaway delivery service, deliveroo, have risen modestly on the first full day of trading since it floated on the london stock exchange. at the same time, a number of deliveroo riders have gone on strike, demanding better pay and conditions. the company said a recent survey suggested satisfaction amongst its 50 thousand staff
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was at an all time high. the leader of plaid cymru, adam price, has promised to implement the most radical programme since the 1945 labour government. he was speaking as he launched the party's manifesto for the senedd elections on may 6th. mr price announced plans to create 60,000 greenjobs and said plaid cymru will hold an independence referendum within 5 years, if it comes to power. this election is our historic opportunity to become the diverse of a brighterfuture opportunity to become the diverse of a brighter future for ourselves. opportunity to become the diverse of a brighterfuture for ourselves. for the first time the people of wales will be able to vote to take the future into their own hands. we believe independence to be the only sure and sustainable means for achieving social and economic progress and for tackling the
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climate emergency. so a plaid cymru government will power the people in wales to decide the future of our nation. in independence referendum. people living in cities have been urged to think twice before buying suvs which are meant for the countryside. the motoring organisation the rac says drivers should choose vehicles which are less polluting, when they don't need to plough across rivers or fields on their way to the shops. research suggests most sports utility vehicles are now bought by people who live in urban areas, particularly london. roger harrabin reports. 4x4 wheel drive cars are officially called suvs, sports utility vehicles. to people who hate their bulk on city streets, there is a less respectful title. chelsea tractors. new research shows that most of them are indeed bought in kensington and chelsea, hammersmith and fulham and westminster. london boroughs where wealthy
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residents can afford the prices. it is a far cry from the origins of the chelsea tractor, the humble workhorse land rover. loved by farmers, country dwellers and the military. their appeal has spread into the towns. two thirds of these cars are being sold to people living in cities where there are no opportunities to drive off—road. so actually our call is not so much to consumers to think twice, what we are asking for is for these vehicles to stop being advertised in the uk. it is part of a trend towards bigger cars that has kept carbon emissions from transport unacceptably high. the classic mini for instance was 3.05 metres long. the new version mini is 3.82 metres long. compare the huge mercedes gls, it is 5.21 metres. beasts like this are too big
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for a conventional parking space. if suv drivers were a country, they be seventh in the world for carbon emissions. people choose different cars for different reasons. it might be style. it might be safety, it might be seating position. indeed it might be size. if people have got a big family they want a bigger car. if they want to tow things, they might need a bigger car. but not all suv cars are bigger and dirty. some of the cleanest cars are now coming in the style of suvs. that means electric suvs. but they are only part of the solution. they waste energy dragging tonnes of steel with heavy batteries through city streets. like this electric hummer, based on an american army truck. it is a beast. banning advertising for suvs would help, campaigners say, just as adverts for smoking are banned. it won't work motoring groups warn.

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