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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 7, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world: a uk trial of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine in children has been paused while an investigation takes place into whether the jab is linked to rare blood clots in adults. leading scientists urge the public to continue getting the jab, saying the benefits far outweigh the risks. the risks of getting sick or dying of covid for all the people currently being offered first and second doses are far and away greater than any small theoretical risk that may exist relating to these cases, which are extremely rare. the first doses of the moderna vaccine for the uk have been given out in wales, with a 24—year—old unpaid carer the first to get the jab. please do get in touch with your thoughts
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on the vaccine rollout — i'm on twitter @annita—mcveigh and you can use the hashtag #bbcyourquestions. brazil's daily deaths from covid rise above 4,000 for the first time — it's a new, unwanted record, for the country. hungary is reopening shops and relaxing other restrictions, despite covid cases reaching a new peak. the mental health impact of coronavirus — new research suggests covid—19 can increase the risk of conditions such as depression, dementia and strokes. and coming up — what do a peaky blinders themed bar and a custom—built yoga studio have in common? they're both contenders to be named shed of the year. we'll be hearing from their owners.
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hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. the roll—out of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine should be paused for young people until regulators have issued guidance on it safety, according to a government advisor. dr maggie wearmouth, who sits on thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation said the issue was about safety and public confidence. speaking to the telegraph she said, "we don't want to cover anything up "that we feel the public should be knowing". it follows the suspension of a trial of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine on children while the uk regulator investigates concerns the jab may be causing rare blood clots in a tiny number of adults. none of the 300 children involved in the trial has suffered a clot. meanwhile in wales, the third covid—19 vaccine from the us company moderna is being rolled out across the uk for the first time.
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patients in carmarthenshire will be the first to receive it. it comes as uk researchers found people diagnosed with covid—19 in the previous six months were more likely to develop depression, dementia, psychosis and stroke. more now on the pause in the trial of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine on children in this report from our medical editor, fergus walsh. there you go — all done. nearly 300 children aged six to 17 are taking part in the astrazeneca vaccine trial in england, which began in february. oxford university said there'd been no blood clots in the volunteers but, out of an abundance of caution, it had stopped vaccinations, pending the outcome of the safety review in adults. more than 18 million people in the uk have received the astrazeneca vaccine. the mhra said last week there'd been 30 rare cases of blood clots,
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including seven deaths. so it's nice to be able to see that the area is sterile. including seven deaths. the prime minister, visiting an astrazeneca plant in macclesfield, once again gave his firm support for the vaccine. the best thing people should do is look at what the mhra say, our independent regulator — that's why we have them, that's why they're independent. and their advice to people is to, you know, keep going out there, get yourjab, get your second jab. as a precautionary measure, the mhra updated its advice last month to say that anyone with a headache that lasted for more than four days after receiving the astrazeneca vaccine, or bruising beyond the site of the jab, should seek medical attention. both of the vaccines we're using are highly effective against covid and the risks of getting sick or dying of covid for all the people currently being offered first and second doses are far and away greater than any small theoretical risk that may exist relating to these cases —
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which are extremely rare. this could be very much compromised if people think that this being taken seriously, that this isn't being examined in great detail. but i think individuals have difficulties in sort of understanding risks and perceptions, and seeing this in relation to other sorts of illnesses or diseases or outcomes. the astrazeneca vaccine is central to the huge success of the roll—out ofjabs in the uk, which is way ahead of the rest of europe. bonjour. france has restricted the astrazeneca vaccine to adults over 55 — germany, to those over 60 — because of concerns about blood clots in younger adults. the european medicines agency and the uk regulator are due to give updated recommendations in the next day or two. maintaining public confidence in this highly effective vaccine will be vital.
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fergus walsh, bbc news. joining me now is sir kent woods, a former chief executive of the uk's medicines and healthcare products regulatory agency. thank you very much forjoining us on bbc news today, sir kent woods. let me begin by asking where you sit in terms of the benefits and risks of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine. well, i haven't been sitting in the expert committee is reviewing these data, i am sitting in a personal capacity but it is clear from everything i have seen and read is that the risk of this thrombotic complication, blood clotting, if it is cause and effect linked to this vaccine is very much lower than the risks associated with coronavirus infection itself. we must bear in mind, too, that covid—i9 infection does carry with it a very considerable increased risk in clotting events.— considerable increased risk in clotting events. yes, let's talk about cause — clotting events. yes, let's talk about cause and _ clotting events. yes, let's talk about cause and effect. - clotting events. yes, let's talk about cause and effect. for i clotting events. yes, let's talk - about cause and effect. for example, as you say, covid itself can cause
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blood clots. if someone gets a particularjab and develops a blood clot, it could be because of the covid, not because of the jab, if the jab, for example, hasn't had time to build up and give that person any immunity yet. that's riuht. person any immunity yet. that's right- the _ person any immunity yet. that's right. the problem _ person any immunity yet. that's right. the problem with - person any immunity yet. that's i right. the problem with assessing these report is that they are so very, very rare, they are almost at the limit of what is detectable as a potential adverse reaction. the difficulty is that the scientists face on this include, firstly, as we have said, that coronavirus itself commonly causes thrombotic problems. secondly, we don't actually have good data on the natural occurrence is on these rare thrombotic events in the unvaccinated population. maw. in the unvaccinated population. now, what we've heard, _ in the unvaccinated population. now, what we've heard, and _ in the unvaccinated population. now, what we've heard, and we _ in the unvaccinated population. now, what we've heard, and we don't have a great deal of detail about the cases where people had developed these blood clots after the vaccination, is that the profile of
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these individuals. we are looking at probably younger people and probably more women, aren't we? yeah. probably younger people and probably more women, aren't we?— more women, aren't we? yeah. the initial report — more women, aren't we? yeah. the initial report that _ more women, aren't we? yeah. the initial report that came _ more women, aren't we? yeah. the initial report that came out - more women, aren't we? yeah. the initial report that came out of- initial report that came out of germany was striking in two respects. as you say, this appeared to be confined almost entirely to women. of the 30 or so cases, only two were men. at the age distribution was also strikingly young, that is to say 60 was the oldest patient. so, these are two characteristics which are not easy to explain. 0ne characteristics which are not easy to explain. one wonders about the possibility of an interaction with something else, like, the oral contraceptive pill. because that also has a low risk of clotting complications. there is something odd about the distribution of these events in relation to age and sex. and it is... there is a lot about this we don't understand. but none
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of the national data has shown anything other than an extremely rare event. anything other than an extremely rare event-— anything other than an extremely rare event. �* ., , , rare event. and, obviously, as you seument rare event. and, obviously, as you segment there _ rare event. and, obviously, as you segment there is _ rare event. and, obviously, as you segment there is something - rare event. and, obviously, as you segment there is something odd l rare event. and, obviously, as you - segment there is something odd about the distribution of age and gender, thatis the distribution of age and gender, that is something regulators will be looking at exceptionally closely —— as you say, there is. in the meantime, do you think it is the right move to have suspended or paused, i should say, the trials on children of the astrazeneca jab? well, clearly, it's important to have consistency in the scientific assessment. i think the mhra has got access to very good expert advice. it's important to emphasise, as your previous report did, that there were no events arising in this trial to cause the trial to be paused. but since we are expecting the mhra, and, i think also the ema, to come up and, i think also the ema, to come up with another review of the data, it is extremely cautious and prudent to pause a trial recruitment until we have that opinion. it is
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important to note that the ema and the mhra and the world health organization have been consistent in the view, up until now, that the benefits of this vaccine far outweigh the risks. benefits of this vaccine far outweirh the risks. �* . . outweigh the risks. bearing that in mind, dr outweigh the risks. bearing that in mind. dr maggie _ outweigh the risks. bearing that in mind, dr maggie wearmouth - outweigh the risks. bearing that in mind, dr maggie wearmouth from i outweigh the risks. bearing that in - mind, dr maggie wearmouth from the joint committee on vaccination and immunisation has said that it might be better to halt the roll—out for younger people until the safety of the oxford astrazeneca jab is certain. and she talks about public confidence. is there a case for doing that to ensure that the public�*s face, the public�*s confidence in this vaccine is... you know, keeps pace with what the science is telling them?- science is telling them? public confidence _ science is telling them? public confidence is _ science is telling them? public confidence is clearly _ science is telling them? public confidence is clearly critical. science is telling them? public confidence is clearly critical in | confidence is clearly critical in this, so i'm very pleased in the data that i've seen that public confidence in the vaccine in general seems to be holding up very well in this country in contrast to what has been happening in mainland europe. i
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think it's important to have a consistent are scientifically informed opinion on this. and the processes which are carried out by the mhra are and continuous, this isn't one off, this is a continuous monitoring of all reported events and establishing their significance. i think we should come as the prime minister was suggesting, we should go by the regulators' view on this. because it is the best informed we are going to get. and i think that in itself is the best thing we can do for public confidence. and in itself is the best thing we can do for public confidence. and do you believe that — do for public confidence. and do you believe that the _ do for public confidence. and do you believe that the roll-out _ do for public confidence. and do you believe that the roll-out of - do for public confidence. and do you believe that the roll-out of the - believe that the roll—out of the vaccine programme and both pfizer and astrazeneca is so well advanced in the uk already that there is a body of evidence there for the public to see, to keep that confidence going? public to see, to keep that confidence uroin? ~ , confidence going? absolutely. the success of the _ confidence going? absolutely. the success of the vaccination - confidence going? absolutely. the . success of the vaccination programme speaks for itself. it is still relatively early days, but there is pretty good evidence that the roll—out of the vaccine has made a
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serious impact on mortality from coronavirus. it's been a great success and we mustn'tjeopardise that by overreacting to these rather rare events. the main public health problem is to get this virus down as quickly as possible. and to prevent, for instance, the emergence of further mutants. it is a critical public health issue that the vaccination programme rolls through to its completion. that is the overriding safety concern. brute to its completion. that is the overriding safety concern. we are waitin: to overriding safety concern. we are waiting to hear _ overriding safety concern. we are waiting to hear more _ overriding safety concern. we are waiting to hear more from - overriding safety concern. we are waiting to hear more from the - overriding safety concern. we are waiting to hear more from the uk regulator and we are waiting to hear at three o'clock bst, four o'clock in local time from the european medicines agency on their latest examination of the oxford astrazeneca jab. but why do you think that is a difference of opinion at the moment between the uk regulator and individual governments in a number of eu countries who have decided to either pause the use of this jab or say it should be used
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for people of a certain age group? —— shouldn't be used. the for people of a certain age group? -- shouldn't be used.— -- shouldn't be used. the striking thing there _ -- shouldn't be used. the striking thing there is _ -- shouldn't be used. the striking thing there is not _ -- shouldn't be used. the striking thing there is not the _ -- shouldn't be used. the striking thing there is not the discordance | thing there is not the discordance between the mhra's position and the position in, for instance, in france and germany. it is the lack of liaison between the european medicines agency, which is supposed to be the coordinating voice for european drug safety, and the member states. and we've seen a number of member states, almost all member states, going their own way in the face of clear ema guidance. this has done nothing at all for public confidence in europe. we know that, from the outset, there were very high levels of vaccine scepticism in france and, to some extent, in germany. and that has been exacerbated by the contradictory and, sometimes, conflicting statements coming out of those countries, which may or may not be based on best science. but certainly are not following the line agreed by
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all member states when they sit round a table at the european medicines agency. 50 round a table at the european medicines agency.— round a table at the european medicines agency. so for anyone waitin: to medicines agency. so for anyone waiting to get — medicines agency. so for anyone waiting to get their _ medicines agency. so for anyone waiting to get their first - waiting to get their first vaccination, which may be the oxford astrazeneca or indeed, their second vaccination, which may be the oxford astrazeneca, and they are thinking there are other vaccines coming on stream all the time, should i hold out for one of those? these are the sorts of questions people should be asking. what is your advice to them today, sir kent? i asking. what is your advice to them today, sir kent?— today, sir kent? i can only say that friends and — today, sir kent? i can only say that friends and relations _ today, sir kent? i can only say that friends and relations of— today, sir kent? i can only say that friends and relations of mine - today, sir kent? i can only say that friends and relations of mine have l friends and relations of mine have been getting the vaccinations as they have been called. i had no concerns about them getting the astrazeneca vaccine. i am far more concerns of them not getting a vaccine and catching the infection itself, which is a totally different risk profile to anything that might emerge from the latest analysis of the astrazeneca vaccine. {lila emerge from the latest analysis of the astrazeneca vaccine.— the astrazeneca vaccine. 0k, sir kent woods. _ the astrazeneca vaccine. 0k, sir kent woods, very _ the astrazeneca vaccine. 0k, sir kent woods, very good - the astrazeneca vaccine. 0k, sir kent woods, very good to - the astrazeneca vaccine. 0k, sir kent woods, very good to talk. the astrazeneca vaccine. 0k, sir| kent woods, very good to talk to the astrazeneca vaccine. 0k, sir- kent woods, very good to talk to you today, former chief executive of the mhra. ., �* . ., there will be an update from the european regulator the european medical agencies
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later this afternoon. our correspondent, anna holligan, is at their headquarters in amsterdam. we've just been speaking to the ema, this is the body that regulates the use of medicines across the eu and they are holding a press briefing at 1500 bst, 1600 local time. we are expecting to hear from the part of the agency that deals with side effects of medicines. they have been investigating these rare cases, extremely rare cases, of blood clots among a few people who have had the astrazeneca vaccine. you'll remember at the end of last month, the ema had said there was a possible, but not proven, link between the two. they've continued to analyse and investigate the available data from right around the world and so we're waiting to hear their latest conclusions today. anna, there is quite
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a confusing picture across the eu as a whole because different countries are taking different approaches in which age group they think should and shouldn't have this particular vaccination. vaccines are vital to getting out of the pandemic, but only if people have enough faith to actually take them and you're absolutely right. this kind of chequered approach among european governments has not helped with the public confidence issue. because the eu, at the moment, has two issues. one is the supply of these vaccines and second is the public confidence. here in the netherlands, they have paused the use of the astrazeneca jab for the under 60s and it's the same in germany. in france, it's for the under 55s. and this is one of the issues and this is why the announcement from the ema is seen as so critical because this is the organisation that guides the european approach. but it doesn't inform the individual governments, who can take these kind of unilateral decisions on their use. and it could be that the ema, today,
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says that there is a possible link, and updates its side—effects connected to the oxford astrazeneca jab. but that's still to be confirmed. this meeting is still ongoing, they're still analysing the data. and the speed at which these vaccines were rolled out means that the information is being reviewed in the real world in real time. and that's why we have these kind of changes in the rules among the different governments. at the moment, there's a pause in ten european countries, but many have said, depending on what the ema says today, this afternoon, probably, they may update their guidance. and at the moment, the advice from the ema remains the same — if you're offered a shot of the oxford astrazenica jab, then take it. more of you have been getting in touch about the issue of the vaccine
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roll—out, the astrazeneca jab. one person says it should health care workers and those under 50 cancelled their astrazeneca appointments until more is known about these clocks and the risks are mitigated? virtually all the scientists say take your appointment —— these clots. because the risk of catching the virus is much greater. catherine bennett reflects a question coming in a lot at the moment saying how long after the receipt of the astrazeneca vaccine would be symptoms of blood clots appear? a similar question, as well, from gill, who says how long after having a vaccine with any symptoms of a blood clot appear or after how long would it be safe to say you are ok? during the trials, was there any evidence of blood clots? let me remind you, at 11:30am bst, your questions answered, we will try to make sure your questions go into that. if you want to get your questions in, do that in the usual ways, send them to me on
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twitter. we will try to read out some more of your comments. the coronavirus vaccine made by the american company, moderna, has been administered in the uk for the first time today — in carmarthen in west wales. the first recipient was 24—year—old elle taylor, who is an unpaid carer for her 82—year—old grandmother. the uk has ordered 17 million doses of the vaccine, which has been shown in trials to prevent nearly all infections. it will be used alongside the pfizer and astrazeneca jabs. she told the reporters she was pleased to get the vaccination. very excited, very happy. yeah, thrilled. yeah, really good. when did you find out you were going to get it? yesterday evening. yeah, so very last minute, but very happy. you're 24? 2a, yeah. so, obviously, young to be getting the vaccine. why were you so keen to get it? i'm an unpaid carerfor my grandmother, so it's very important
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to me that i can get it so that i can care for her properly and be safe. i presume your grandmother has been vaccinated? she has, yes. she has had herfirst vaccine. she's going for a second dose on saturday. elle taylor there. our wales correspondent, tomos morgan, gave me this update on the roll—out programme. west wales, carmarthenshire, glangwili hospital in carmarthenshire, that's the hywel dda health board in west wales, 5,000 doses delivered over the last few days, and they begin the this morning. as you mentioned. they started around 8:30am. the plan is for it to be slowly rolled out in england and scotland in due course and other areas of wales. the uk has bought around 17 million doses of the moderna vaccine which us trials in about 30,000 people suggest it is very effective, really, effective to about 95% against general covid and in severe covid cases 100% effective.
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and also, the company that has made the vaccine also says it is also effective against the english variant and the south african variant, at the moment. so 5,000 doses in west wales initially and from the there there will be slowly more as they get dispersed across england, wales and northern ireland and scotland. this is the third of the seven vaccines that the uk has bought and, of course, they will be slowly rolled out in due course. tomos, overall, how does this fit into the picture of the vaccine roll—out in wales and how that's going? wales is doing incredibly well when it comes to the vaccine roll—out, really. the welsh government saying that now everybody over 50 has had their first dose of the vaccine. that was somewhat disputed yesterday, some people claiming they haven't had a call from their gp or from the nhs to say they need to go in.
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but almost everyone over 50 now, so now moving into the last block of 1.5 million or so of people between the 16—50 years old that will get theirfirstjab. if you rememberjust before christmas, the situation in wales was far worse than other areas of the uk, the other uk nations, higher rates of covid, hospitals in worse positions. now we are in a position where wales is leading the way on vaccinations and the rates are now the lowest of the uk nations. so things are moving in the right direction, but as easing takes place, there is a cautious approach in welsh government and also knowing that rates could increase as society is unlocked slowly. brazil registered a new daily record of covid—19 deaths on tuesday. the health ministry said 11,195 people had died with the virus in the previous 2a hours. more than 300,000 brazilians have lost their lives from covid since the start of the pandemic — the second highest total in the world after the united states.
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opposition politician eduardo leite, governor of rio grande do sul — says the situation in brazil has been influenced by the actions of the president. what we are facing here in brazil, what we have here, it is a sad situation that is the consequence of the lack of co—ordination in the federal level by the national government. the... we have here it is president bolsonaro confronting governors and mayors. and the main tool that we have, the main weapon we have, to not allow the coronavirus to spread in an easy way, and the weapon is the social distancing. of course the president is wrong... he may not be the only person in the world that is right, being against social distancing.
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the world recognises that the best practice, the scientists, the researchers, they are almost unanimous about that. but the president makes this situation of confronting economy and protecting the lives of its people. and what we have is that without feeling that they are protected, people will not be confident to keep running the economy. so, his behaviour is, unfortunately, killing brazilians and it is hurting our economy. our latin america correspondent, will grant, has more on how this shocking total is playing out in brazilian politics. there's tension between the states and the federal government and, of course, it has repercussions beyond the borders of brazil, too,
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with, you know, the rest of south america, the rest of latin america, the rest of the world is concerned, really, about what's happening in brazil. because, of course, it's not just that these numbers are so terribly bad for brazil, for brazilian families, who are losing upwards of a third of a million people since the pandemic began. but also that the strains that have been identified in brazil are so virulent, are so transmissible. so it is really genuinely being considered now by epidemiologists around the world as a global threat. we hear tales, as well, of doctors, nurses, at their absolute wits end of doing everything they can simply to get through to the end of a shift. you know, i've spoken to family members, i've spoken to doctors. they really do paint an almost, you know, near—apocalyptic picture of the situation. we should say jair bolsonaro believes there is a lot of media hype aboutjust how bad things are. but when you just look at the raw data, when you look at those numbers from today,
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the highest the country's experienced, one of the highest numbers in the world, then you know it is a very, very serious crisis unfolding in brazil. will grant reporting. researchers say that people diagnosed with covid—19 are at greater risk of developing psychological and neurological conditions, such as depression, psychosis and stroke. the team from oxford university examined the health records of more than 500,000 patients in the united states. here's our health reporter, rachel schraer. coronavirus breaks into our cells and multiplies wherever in the body it finds itself. that's why it causes such a wide range of symptoms from the lungs, to the gut, to the brain. the team at the university of oxford looked over half a million patient records in the us to see if conditions affecting the brain were more common in those who'd had covid. they looked at 1a conditions including anxiety, depression and psychosis, stroke, brain haemorrhage, and dementia. all of these conditions were seen
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more often in people who'd had a covid infection in the previous six months. but these conditions all have very different causes. it could be that in some people the virus actually gets into the brain and causes some damage. it could be the way your body is reacting to the virus, produces a sort of immune or inflammatory response that, again, contributes to the problems. and for other people, it may simply be a psychological effect, if you like, of the stress that having covid and thinking what might happen to you next is the important factor. the study couldn't prove the virus itself was definitely causing the changes, but patients recovering from covid were more likely than similar people who'd had flu or another infection to develop a psychological or neurological condition. and the sicker coronavirus patients had been, the more likely they were to develop these complications. rachel schraer, bbc news. hungary is relaxing its covid restrictions today, with many shops and services allowed to reopen, despite the fact that hungary is in the grip of a third wave, with hospitals at full capacity.
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the prime minister, viktor orban, said he felt a "moral imperative" to start reopening the economy, but medical experts say the move is premature. the bbc�*s nick thorpe has more from budapest. big changes, really, for hungarians. shops, which have been closed for weeks or months will be allowed to reopen. there are some restrictions within the shops. no more than four people in a smallish shop at the same time. but it's a big change for hungarians who have really been locked down for a long time, many of them very heavily locked down since the middle of november. and, of course, some nonessential services like hairdressers, car mechanics, things like that, also reopening today. hungary is pretty much ahead within the european union. i think it's second only to malta. that's because the prime minister, viktor orban, took a gamble, basically by ordering the russian
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and chinese vaccines at a time when they were not, they're still not, approved by the european medicines agency. so that was a gamble which seems to have paid off. it meant that hungary had plenty of vaccines, including the astrazeneca. in hungary that's one of the five vaccines available. so, basically, the prime minister, viktor orban, here is taking another gamble. he said when hungary reaches 2.5 million vaccinations, which was some time yesterday, out of a population of 9.7 million, as you said, he said he had a moral imperative to reopen the country. there is a huge demand, huge frustration in the public, about not being able to go about their ordinary day's work. and i think the prime minister recognised that. but there are these doubts, these challenges to him from within the medical profession. a police briefing is due to take place later in northern ireland — after the violence that took place over the easter period. 41 police officers were hurt and ten people were arrested —
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as a result of trouble in loyalist areas. the northern ireland assembly will meet tomorrow to discuss the violence — after it was recalled from its easter break. doctors have been told not to prescribe painkillers to people suffering from chronic pain that has no known cause. the national institute for health and care excellence says there's little to no evidence that treating people with paracetamol or opioids makes any difference. it says people should be offered a range of therapies including exercise, acupuncture or anti—depressants instead. the main left—wing opposition party in greenland has won the general election — a result that could halt plans to mine rare earth metals on the world's largest island. the result casts doubts over the future of mining for rare earth metals on the arctic island — which is an autonomous territory of denmark. the winning community of the people — or ia party — campaigned against granting a licence to an international company to mine for
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uranium and other metals. it's unseated the governing siumut party, which had argued that the project could yield an economic windfall. now let's give you a recap of our main story so far today on bbc news. the eu medicines regulator is to outline its recommendations for the astrazeneca vaccine this afternoon — amid concerns about potential links to rare blood clots. leading scientists urge the public to continue getting the jab, saying the benefits far outweigh the risks. the first doses of the moderna vaccine for the uk have been given out in wales, with a 24—year—old carer the first to get the jab. brazil's daily deaths from covid rise above 4,000 for the first time — it's a new, unwanted, record for the country. hungary is reopening shops and relaxing other restrictions, despite covid cases reaching a new peak.
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let's get more on our top story on the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine. a government advisor has reccommended that the rollout of the vaccine be paused for young people until regulators have issued guidance on its safety, amid concerns over blood clots. dr maggie wearmouth, who sits on thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation said the issue was about safety and public confidence. earlier i spoke to paul hunter, professor in medicine at the university of east anglia, and i asked him why there are concerns about the safety of the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine. i think one of the concerns always with something like a mass roll—out of any medication or vaccine is that you will see clusters of cases following that intervention that could arise entirely by chance. the problem is that once you start seeing that in multiple geographical
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regions with the same disease following the same intervention, then i think that the odds are more that it's going to be actually related rather than some sort of statistical glitch. and added to that the fact that we were only really seeing this condition in people following the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine and not at all really seeing it in people following the pfizer vaccine. i think the evidence is leaning towards there being a real relationship between the vaccine and this but it is still a very rare outcome and far rarer than the risk of severe disease and death if you don't have the vaccine. hirer? of severe disease and death if you don't have the vaccine. very clearly in terms of — don't have the vaccine. very clearly in terms of the _ don't have the vaccine. very clearly in terms of the risk-benefit - don't have the vaccine. very clearly in terms of the risk-benefit ratio i in terms of the risk—benefit ratio you are saying to people to have the vaccine, and you had the astrazeneca vaccine, and you had the astrazeneca vaccine yourself? i vaccine, and you had the astrazeneca vaccine yourself?— vaccine yourself? i have had my first dose _ vaccine yourself? i have had my first dose and _ vaccine yourself? i have had my first dose and nothing _ vaccine yourself? i have had my first dose and nothing i - vaccine yourself? i have had my first dose and nothing i have - vaccine yourself? i have had my i first dose and nothing i have read orseen first dose and nothing i have read or seen in the literature or the data would in any way discourage me
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from going for my second dose next month. ., ., ., ., ., , month. you are well aware that dr mar aie month. you are well aware that dr maggie wearmouth _ month. you are well aware that dr maggie wearmouth from - month. you are well aware that dr maggie wearmouth from the - month. you are well aware that dr maggie wearmouth from the joint| maggie wearmouth from thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation has said it might be betterfor public immunisation has said it might be better for public confidence to halt the roll—out for younger people, although clearly in the uk we are not at that point yet anyway, until the safety of the oxford—astrazeneca jab is certain. do you think that's more about public confidence, about bringing people with the science rather than concerns over the jab per se? i rather than concerns over the 'ab er se? ~' ., rather than concerns over the 'ab er se? ~ ., ., rather than concerns over the 'ab er se? ~' ., ., , per se? i think one of the things we need to know _ per se? i think one of the things we need to know is _ per se? i think one of the things we need to know is more _ per se? i think one of the things we need to know is more details - per se? i think one of the things we need to know is more details about| need to know is more details about the cases of this disease that have been occurring across europe. early indications are that it predominantly seems to be affecting younger people, people under a0 or 50, ratherthan younger people, people under a0 or 50, rather than older people. that's not too surprising because when you look at how the epidemiology of this
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form of thrombosis before covid pretended to affect younger rather than older people, so that would not be a surprise. at the moment we have time because we are not rolling out this vaccine, or any vaccine to younger people at the moment, so by the time we have been able to look at the data more carefully, by the time the regulatory agencies have come to their opinions, we will have many other vaccines on the shelves that could be given to younger people, if that's the conclusion that the regulatory agencies come to. ., , ., ., , ., to. there does not need to be a -ause to. there does not need to be a ause in to. there does not need to be a pause in terms _ to. there does not need to be a pause in terms of _ to. there does not need to be a pause in terms of its _ to. there does not need to be a pause in terms of its use - to. there does not need to be a pause in terms of its use in - to. there does not need to be a pause in terms of its use in the | pause in terms of its use in the vaccination programme? idat pause in terms of its use in the vaccination programme? not at all, if we did pause _ vaccination programme? not at all, if we did pause vaccination - vaccination programme? not at all, if we did pause vaccination now - vaccination programme? not at all, | if we did pause vaccination now they would be rather more disease and deaths than would be the case if we carry on as we are.— carry on as we are. professor paul hunter there. _ when former glamour model jess davies started modelling at 18,
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she had no idea images of her would end up being used to con money out of men all over the world. over the years, jess has received hundreds, if not thousands, of messages from people telling her they've been speaking to someone using her pictures and until now she's never understood why. in a new bbc three documentary, when nudes are stolen, jess traces where her pictures are being used and explains the effect this has had on her life. just to warn you, this story includes some language viewers may may offensive. here is a clip from the documentary: here is a clip from the documentary. i can barely remember the first time it happened. someone was setting up fake profiles with pictures of me to con money out of men. i thought it would be a one off but i was wrong. there was another version of me, and another, and another one. the first message was almost ten years ago and it hasn't stopped since.
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my name isjess davies, but you might have met me as kim, mabel, jane, carol, jasmine. in my real life, i'm a model and influencer. but in my online life there's a problem. an army of fakejesses are using my pictures on dating apps and social media. i'm in an almost daily battle with them. i've just found five profiles that i didn't know existed. this seems to be happening more regularly. and even liking my pictures. like, the nerve! it's just never ending. i report them and it might get taken down, and then the next day there's a new one again. i'm not the only one whose photos are being leaked and misused in ways they never consented to. but fear and shame stop people from speaking up. and we can speak now tojess davies and also to dr lisa sugiura, senior lecturer in criminology
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and criminaljustice, university of portsmouth. jess and lisa, thank you for coming along. let me begin with you. since you started making the documentary, have you been able to find out any more but when your images were first used in this way? it more but when your images were first used in this way?— used in this way? it goes back to when i started _ used in this way? it goes back to when i started glamour - used in this way? it goes back to l when i started glamour modelling when i started glamour modelling when i started glamour modelling when i was 18, and when we started the documentary i thought we would look more at the traditional ways of catfish in, which seems to be romance scams, building up relationship over time, but when we went into the documentary we found this underground world where images of women are packed up and traded and sold, which seems to be what has happened to mine which is what we find out in the documentary. it was a lot to take on. dr find out in the documentary. it was a lot to take on.— a lot to take on. dr lisa sugiura, jess obviously — a lot to take on. dr lisa sugiura, jess obviously talks _ a lot to take on. dr lisa sugiura, jess obviously talks about - a lot to take on. dr lisa sugiura, jess obviously talks about cat. jess obviously talks about cat fishing and romance scams and that sort of thing, but this particular type of crime, tell us about it and how it happens, how is it carried out? so how it happens, how is it carried out? ., , ., out? so it involves fraudulent
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behaviour. — out? so it involves fraudulent behaviour, which _ out? so it involves fraudulent behaviour, which is _ out? so it involves fraudulent behaviour, which is not - out? so it involves fraudulent behaviour, which is not only | behaviour, which is not only criminal. _ behaviour, which is not only criminal, exploitative, usually through— criminal, exploitative, usually through the deceitful use of images, usually— through the deceitful use of images, usually of— through the deceitful use of images, usually of young women, images are stolen _ usually of young women, images are stolen from — usually of young women, images are stolen from various sources, including _ stolen from various sources, including social networks, pornographic sites and so—called revenge — pornographic sites and so—called revenge porn sites and the individuals have not consented to them _ individuals have not consented to them being used in this manner and photos— them being used in this manner and photos of— them being used in this manner and photos of individuals, are traded or sold to _ photos of individuals, are traded or sold to third parties, and ben the individual— sold to third parties, and ben the individual in the images is impersonated in chat encounters, form _ impersonated in chat encounters, form of _ impersonated in chat encounters, form of misrepresentation to the third _ form of misrepresentation to the third party who is paying for what they believe is a legitimate online sexual— they believe is a legitimate online sexual encounter where they think they are _ sexual encounter where they think they are interacting with a genuine online _ they are interacting with a genuine online sex— they are interacting with a genuine online sex worker, or somebody who is sexually _ online sex worker, or somebody who is sexually or— online sex worker, or somebody who is sexually or romantically interested in them, so this form of sexual— interested in them, so this form of sexual exploitation crosses over with other — sexual exploitation crosses over with other types of cybercrime and types _ with other types of cybercrime and types of _ with other types of cybercrime and types of online fraud, such as cat fishing. _ types of online fraud, such as cat fishing, romance scams, as well as blackmait — fishing, romance scams, as well as blackmail. , . . fishing, romance scams, as well as blackmail. . . . . fishing, romance scams, as well as blackmail. , , ., , , ., fishing, romance scams, as well as blackmail. ,, ., ., blackmail. jess, as you learned more about how your— blackmail. jess, as you learned more about how your images _ blackmail. jess, as you learned more about how your images were - blackmail. jess, as you learned more
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about how your images were being i about how your images were being used, how did that make you feel? it makes you feel really dirty and quite worthless. i think a lot of people just assume you took that image, so what did you expect? but on the basis of it, well i expect to be treated with respect like every other human and not to be treated as an object. and the basis of when you consent to uploading an image to a one site it isn't blanket consent for it to be used and traded in all these other websites and sold without your permission. so it is quite upsetting to see and when i found out that my images were being packed up, we were told we have started filming a documentary and it would be impossible to find out because it is such an underground and anonymous world, it is confirmed for mejust and anonymous world, it is confirmed for me just how far spread my images are on the internet. tell for me just how far spread my images are on the internet.— are on the internet. tell us more about individuals _ are on the internet. tell us more about individuals who _ are on the internet. tell us more about individuals who got - are on the internet. tell us more about individuals who got in - are on the internet. tell us morel about individuals who got in touch with you believing that prior to that they were actually communicating with you when clearly they weren't. communicating with you when clearly they weren't-— they weren't. over the years i have had hundreds. _ they weren't. over the years i have had hundreds, if— they weren't. over the years i have had hundreds, if not _ they weren't. over the years i have had hundreds, if not thousands - they weren't. over the years i have had hundreds, if not thousands of. had hundreds, if not thousands of men contact me saying that they have
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been talking to me on all these different social media sites, dating profiles, or sex chats as well, and in the documentary i speak to walter who was an individual living in arizona and he thought he was talking to me, or someone who was using my images, at least, on chat, and for him it went on over a month and for him it went on over a month and he was building up a relationship with this person. i think a lot of people think, how can these people be so naive to believe this, that would never happen to you, but the thing about cat fishing at these kind of online scans, they know exactly where to look and the kind of people to target because speaking to walter, i think possibly i had that thought to start with, how can people believe this? but online, especially with the lockdown, people are using online dating to find that.— dating to find that. lisa, what has been done — dating to find that. lisa, what has been done to _ dating to find that. lisa, what has been done to deal— dating to find that. lisa, what has been done to deal with _ dating to find that. lisa, what has been done to deal with this - dating to find that. lisa, what has been done to deal with this kind l dating to find that. lisa, what has| been done to deal with this kind of crime? what level of priority does it have for law enforcement? weill. it have for law enforcement? well, the issue is — it have for law enforcement? well, the issue is is _ it have for law enforcement? well, the issue is is that _ it have for law enforcement? well,
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the issue is is that existing - it have for law enforcement? well, the issue is is that existing laws, i the issue is is that existing laws, it is quite — the issue is is that existing laws, it is quite difficult to apply to this particular trade in nude images _ this particular trade in nude images. there are laws that apply to the different facets such as things like revenge pornography and image -based _ like revenge pornography and image —based sexual abuse and romance scams _ —based sexual abuse and romance scams and — —based sexual abuse and romance scams and the broader remit of fraud, — scams and the broader remit of fraud, but— scams and the broader remit of fraud, but in terms of this particular collection and packaging and re—purpose in of individuals into images, i'm not aware of any prosecutions or cases that have targeted — prosecutions or cases that have targeted that, in fact, there is generally— targeted that, in fact, there is generally a very limited amount of knowledge in academia as well. jess, i wonder knowledge in academia as well. jess, i wonder what — knowledge in academia as well. jess, i wonder what advice _ knowledge in academia as well. if" i wonder what advice from the benefit of your experience, bitter experience, i'm sure, in many cases, would you give to people about protecting images of themselves. being aware that your content can be distributed elsewhere, but alsojust changing the attitude towards women, and the way we treat women online
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needs to be changed because people should upload an image with consent and not give blanket consent for that to be used and traded and sold elsewhere. , . . that to be used and traded and sold elsewhere. , , , ., ~ that to be used and traded and sold elsewhere, ,, . ~' ,. that to be used and traded and sold elsewhere, ,, ., ,, y., ., elsewhere. jess, thank you for talkin: elsewhere. jess, thank you for talking to _ elsewhere. jess, thank you for talking to us. _ elsewhere. jess, thank you for talking to us, and _ elsewhere. jess, thank you for talking to us, and also - elsewhere. jess, thank you for talking to us, and also dr- elsewhere. jess, thank you for talking to us, and also dr lisa | talking to us, and also dr lisa sugiura from the university of portsmouth, thank you both for your time today. if you, or someone you know has been affected by the issues raised by what we've spoken about today, please contact the bbc action line via bbc.co.uk/actionline for details of organisations which offer advice and support. when nudes are stolen is available to watch on the bbc iplayer now. in the last hour, the office for national statistics has published data on the levels of loneliness across england, scotland and wales. the figures showjust how challenging and sometimes isolating the past year has been for many of us with. 3.7 million adults saying they feel lonely �*often or always'. some of the main characteristics which can impact someone's level of loneliness include age, marital status and employment status. and what some may consider
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a surprising line to come out of this report is that 29% of students in great britain said they feel lonely �*often or always' compared to 7% of the adult population. john maguire reports. hello. there you go. thank you. was it all right? yes, all right today. once a week, maria calls in on sue to deliver some shopping, to chat and to catch up. my birthday today. i know — happy birthday! thank you. isolation and loneliness have been some of the cruellest effects of the pandemic. it's been very hard. yeah _ and what's been the hardest aspect for you, would you say? not seeing my friends, not seeing anybody. and i've usually got quite a good social life — i belong to u3a, which is something
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all over the country where you can go to groups. and, of course, that had to stop. it's not right to be locked up in your house and not see anybody else, really, is it? what are you most looking forward to over the next few months? well, when we... when businesses open, like cafes and pubs and different things, i'm looking forward to seeing friends. maria is one of the a00 volunteers from a group called love devizes who signed up to help vulnerable people in the town before the first lockdown. some people haven't seen anybody for a year — not properly. apart from the people doing their shopping or if they have to go to the doctors or something, they haven't really been out. and, it's... you know, you just chat to them as long as you can, um... but it's very isolating. i think some people have gone downhill, as well. covid — and the restrictions on society designed to tackle it — have meant many people not usually isolated have faced loneliness. my mood has been low — very low.
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loneliness is a very strange thing — i've never, prior to this, _ encountered any loneliness. i've always been surrounded by people, very busy. - and then to spend 12 months without human contact has . just, yeah, it's been hard — very hard. i this lockdown in particular was the first time that i've been affected by the lockdown in terms of work. i've been working from home. so that in particular has been harder because i've not had that day—to—day connection with people, with my colleagues. good morning, love devizes. how can we help? oh, hello, there. i wonder if somebody could do some shopping for me, please. yeah, of course we can. back at the love devizes office, volunteers viv and michael are helping people who telephone in.
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people have started to come out of certain restrictions, _ we start to uncover where people haven't got the infrastructure - you and i would take for granted — you know, either friends - or neighbours — some lonely people. you peel back... you know, devizes is a brilliant town, it's a great community. i but if you peel back- the veneer of that town, there are people who are lonely. so we just feel that we want to, in a supportive, in a gentle - way, give that support. some of the most vulnerable or frail in our society have been forced indoors by the pandemic. but in communities right across the uk, there are people prepared to open doors and to help those most in need. john maguire, bbc news, wiltshire. for decades china used a one—child—policy to rein in what the government feared was an ever—growing population which the country couldn't manage. then, in recent years, the rules were eased allowing couples to have two children. there'sjust one problem — most young people don't seem to want to have
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big families anymore. our correspondent stephen mcdonell met some of them in north east china. chinese kids are sometimes called little emperors because parents, limited to one child only, gave their offspring everything. then came the two—child policy. but, for many, one has remained well and truly enough. you just have to ask parents with a single child if they want more. translation: i haven't even considered it. - neither emotionally nor financially could i afford it. in china's once prosperous north—east, dwindling populations in many towns have led to a suggestion that this could be the first region to scrap both limits altogether. birth limits altogether. but this may not produce more children. translation: for me, - it's already hard to raise this one. it feels better to put
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all your energy into one child or we might feel guilty that we can't properly take care of many. there's been a huge shift in attitude from generation to generation here in china. older generations, they come from big families and it was a really crucial thing, in terms of their lives. but for younger people, it's not the same, they really don't want to have as many kids, it's not as important for them. the one—child policy came into force in the early �*80s to stop an already massive population exploding. later, people in rural areas and those from ethnic minorities were allowed multiple kids. yet for the vast majority, over three decades, having more than one child meant being fined. china in 2021 is a completely
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different place. young couples want different things. when you look at birth rates throughout history, poverty tends to produce people. that's because every new human being is an extra pair of hands to go to work. then along comes prosperity and it's not as important to have kids for this reason. another factor is that this huge country has now produced generations of people simply accustomed to small family life. it might be hard to get them to change. stephen mcdonell, bbc news, changchun. now, a question for you. what do a peaky blinders themed bar and a custom—built yoga studio have in common? they're both contenders to be named the uk's shed of the year. graham satchell has been to meet the people whose humble shed is their pride and joy.
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we don't like to call it a shed. it's wooden—built, but it is a yoga and pilates studio, which is where i teach and work. i'd have said probably for 15 years, over and over, "i would love to have my own studio, i would love to have my own studio," and, ta—dah! my husband goes, "hmm, ok." so began a mammoth lockdown project. geraint has spent most of the last year building a yoga studio for his wife, mel, in the back garden. it's been incredibly enjoyable, hugely satisfying to be able to stand in the kitchen window and look down and see something that i've created myself is just fantastic. the finished studio has underfloor heating, wi—fi, sound and vision. it's allowed mel to do her classes online. mel started doing yoga to help her cope with postnatal depression. it's been a huge saviour for me.
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and if i can help transfer that to others, then fantastic. what would it mean to you if you were to win shed of the year? it would be crazy. to have created this and thenjoin the shed pantheon would be fantastic. it really would. to see it on a computer and develop it into 3d and show me what could be... amazing. it's absolutely incredible. i couldn't be more proud. and eternally grateful. it's really quite tremendous, yeah. we always knew that the first name for the bar had to be something to do with peaky blinders, and that's why we called it mick and sue's peaky blinders.
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the fact that sue is actually in love with cillian murphy. he's a good—looking lad, isn't he? got to say that. cheers! mick and sue's peaky blinders shed pub has been a lockdown labour of love. it helped the whole family get through the last year. having the kids here with us all through the lockdown meant that we could all support each other and we could all love each other. and we knew we were all safe. and we knew, you know, most of all that we were playing by the rules, which was very, very important to us. it's been an escape away from the house, to come into here just to chill and relax and feel as though you're in a different world, basically. and when the bars do open up again, we don't want to go out. we're happy here. we're happy staying in our own bubble here
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and socialising this way. seeing patients go through covid has been very challenging. it affects you every day you come home from work. and you absorb that. so it's about how do i manage myself, and prepare to go in the next day and do it all again? so, hence, the shed. diane's shed has become a haven from the outside world. she is a frailty nurse caring for patients in care homes. it sort of puts things in place, and you canjust sigh a relief and say, right, i can do this again tomorrow, i can go back into work with that smile on my face and nurse my patients. it's a bit of a joke with my son, my teenage son, who says, "where's mum?"
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to dad, and dad says, "oh, she's away with the fairies." it'sjust, yeah, it's a comfy, cosy place to be. i call it scribbles, i do scribbles in my shed. i'm not an artist, you know, i'm nowhere near, but it'sjust that mindfulness, if you like, ofjust doing something that i enjoy that i can just distract from everyday, what's going on in the world. how do you feel about being on the shortlist for shed of the year? it's a bit mad! i'm quite honoured, actually, because it'sjust a humble ten by eight shed. yeah, it's a really weird feeling, actually, shed of the year. but it's just my cosy space. i hope you feel suitably relaxed after that shed and that very relaxing music. and as for humble sheds, i'm not quite so sure, they
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are pretty grand, aren't they? they are pretty grand, aren't they? they are all competing to win the shed of the year title. we will say goodbye to viewers on bbc world, thanks for watching. you're watching bbc news. martine croxall will be here with you next to take you through to 1pm. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. hello, again. today will feel more like a winter's day than a spring one. having said that, the wind isn't going to be as strong as it was yesterday for most, so we will lose that wind chill. it's going to be a dry day for many parts of the country today, but cloud will build replacing the early brightness that we have seen. we are still under the influence of this arctic air represented by the blues across the chart but look at what's coming in from the atlantic. later in the day something a wee bit milder. we have a lot of cloud across northern ireland, wales and the south—west, the same too across parts of northern and eastern scotland and england. but some of that will thin and break, we'll see some sunshine, and most of the wintry showers
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fading except for the north of scotland where we also have gusty winds. so sunny spells, or bright spells, through the afternoon, the cloud thickening across northern ireland bringing in some patchy rain by the end of the afternoon. with our maximum temperatures one in lerwick to eight as we push further south. usually at this stage in april we would be looking at roughly between 10—13 , so we're below par. now, there will be some early frost in the west to start the night. but as the cloud and also the rain pushes steadily eastwards preceded by some snow on the hills, well, temperatures will actually go up. where the cloud remains broken, for example in the south—east, it will be a frosty start to the day tomorrow. tomorrow, where we have got the clear skies, we will see some sunshine, a bit more cloud around. our rain pushing east and moving southwards through the day, the wind, though, having changed direction to more of a westerly,
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that's a milder direction for us represented in the temperatures, widely into double figures. but behind this weather front which is a cold front, cold air will start to return and we will see some snow once again on the mountains. by friday, the weather front sinking southwards with this band of cloud and patchy rain in southern areas. behind it, clear skies, some showers and some of those will be wintry again, in the north down to lower levels, and you can see the difference in the temperatures both sides of that front, still mild in the south, much colder in the north. that's showing up quite nicely on saturday as well. but on saturday an area of low pressure close by could bring a weather front across the channel islands and the south—east. that will bring some higher temperatures but also the risk of some rain. but generally as we go into the weekend it is going to feel colder.
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this is bbc news. i'm martine croxall. the headlines at 11:00am... the eu medicines regulator will hold a briefing on the astrazeneca vaccine this afternoon — amid concerns about potential links to rare blood clots. leading scientists urge the public to continue getting the jab, saying the benefits far outweigh the risks. the risks of getting sick or dying of covid—19 for all of the people currently being offered first and second doses are far in a way greater than any small theoretical risk that may exist relating to these cases, which are extremely rare. given out in wales — with a 2a—year—old carer the first doses of the moderna vaccine for the uk have been given out in wales — with a 2a—year—old carer the first to get the jab. the mental health impact of coronavirus — new research
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suggests covid—19 can increase the risk of conditions such as depression, dementia and strokes. brazil records more than a,000 covid—related deaths in 2a hours for the first time — as a more contagious variant fuels a surge in cases. and coming up... we'll meet the little girl from wiltshire who has become the inspiration for a new doll to help teach children about down's syndrome. the european medicines regulator is to outline its recommendations for the oxford astrazeneca vaccine this afternoon, amid concerns about potential links to very rare blood clots. it comes as a government advisor calls for a pause in the roll—out for young people until regulators have issued guidance on its safety. dr maggie wearmouth, who sits on thejoint committee
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on vaccination and immunisation said the issue was about safety and public confidence. speaking to the telegraph she said, "we don't want to cover anything up that we feel the public should be knowing." it follows the suspension of a trial of the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine on children while the uk regulator investigates concerns the jab may be causing rare blood clots in a tiny number of adults. none of the 300 children involved in the trial has suffered a clot. meanwhile in wales a 2a—year—old carer has become the first person to receive the moderna vaccine, as becomes the third covid—19 vaccine to be rolled out across the uk. it comes as uk researchers found people diagnosed with covid—19 in the previous six months were more likely to develop depression, dementia, psychosis and stroke. more now on the pause in the trial of the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine on children in this report from our medical editor fergus walsh.
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there you go — all done. nearly 300 children aged six to 17 are taking part in the astrazeneca vaccine trial in england, which began in february. oxford university said there'd been no blood clots in the volunteers but, out of an abundance of caution, it had stopped vaccinations, pending the outcome of the safety review in adults. more than 18 million people in the uk have received the astrazeneca vaccine. the mhra said last week there'd been 30 rare cases of blood clots, including seven deaths. so it's nice to be able to see that the area is sterile. including seven deaths. the prime minister, visiting an astrazeneca plant in macclesfield, once again gave his firm support for the vaccine. the best thing people should do is look at what the mhra say, our independent regulator — that's why we have them, that's why they're independent. and their advice to people is to,
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you know, keep going out there, get yourjab, get your second jab. as a precautionary measure, the mhra updated its advice last month to say that anyone with a headache that lasted for more than four days after receiving the astrazeneca vaccine, or bruising beyond the site of the jab, should seek medical attention. both of the vaccines we're using are highly effective against covid and the risks of getting sick or dying of covid for all the people currently being offered first and second doses are far and are way greater than any small theoretical risk that may exist relating to these cases — which are extremely rare. this could be very much compromised if people think that this being taken seriously, that this isn't being examined in great detail. but i think individuals have difficulties in sort of understanding risks and perceptions, and seeing this in relation to other sorts of illnesses or diseases or outcomes.
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the astrazeneca vaccine is central to the huge success of the roll—out ofjabs in the uk, which is way ahead of the rest of europe. bonjour. france has restricted the astrazeneca vaccine to adults over 55 — germany, to those over 60 — because of concerns about blood clots in younger adults. the european medicines agency and the uk regulator are due to give updated recommendations in the next day or two. maintaining public confidence in this highly effective vaccine will be vital. fergus walsh, bbc news. the european medical agencies will give an update at 3pm this afternoon — our correspondent anna holligan is at their headquarters in amsterdam. so we are expecting updates from the ema's team that specialises in adverse reactions. these vaccines are seen as the way out of the pandemic, but only if people have enough
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confidence and faith to actually take them. so, you will remember last month the ema issued guidance which said the benefits of taking the oxford astrazeneca jab outweighed the potential risk of side—effects. they also said any causal link between these extremely rare blood clots and the vaccine were possible but not proven, and the evidence suggested that people should continue to take it. we've seen governments across the eu adopting different approaches though — some, including here in the netherlands and across the border in germany, have paused the use of the astrazeneca jab among the under—60s. in france, it's the under—55s. so what we are expecting from the ema today, they have continued to investigate the data as it emerges from around the world, and we are expecting an update on whether there is a possible link and whether they may update their guidance to list blood clots as among the side—effects,
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and then it will be up to the eu governments to decide what to do with that information. but it hasn't helped with the public confidence issue — that is one of the main obstacles here on the continent, along with the supply of these vaccines. so the ema guidance is expected this afternoon, eagerly anticipated by governments and people who are looking for reassurance and clarity too. at the moment, the advice from the european medicines agency remains, if you are heading into the surgery today and you are offered the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine, then take it. the coronavirus vaccine made by the american company, moderna, has been administered in the uk for the first time today — in carmarthen in west wales. the first recipient was 2a—year—old elle taylor, who is an unpaid carer for her 82—year—old grandmother. the uk has ordered 17 million doses of the vaccine, which has been shown in trials
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to prevent nearly all infections. it will be used alongside the pfizer and astrazeneca jabs. very excited, very happy. yeah, thrilled. yeah, really good. when did you find out you were going to get it? yesterday evening. yeah, so very last minute, but very happy. you're 2a? 2a, yeah. so, obviously, young to be getting the vaccine. why were you so keen to get it? i'm an unpaid carerfor my grandmother, so it's very important to me that i can get it so that i can care for her properly and be safe. i presume your grandmother has been vaccinated? she has, yes. she has had herfirst vaccine. she's going for a second dose on saturday. our wales correspondent tomos morgan gave me this update on the roll—out programme... west wales, carmarthenshire, glangwili hospital in carmarthenshire, that's the hywel dda health board in west wales, 5,000 doses delivered over the last few days, and they begin the this morning.
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—— as you mentioned, they begin the roll—out to bear this morning. they started around 8:30am. the plan is for it to be slowly rolled out in england and scotland in due course and other areas of wales. the uk has bought around 17 million doses of the moderna vaccine which us trials in about 30,000 people suggest it is very effective, really, effective to about 95% against general covid and in severe covid cases 100% effective. and also, the company that has made the vaccine also says it is also effective against the english variant and the south african variant, at the moment. so 5,000 doses in west wales initially and from the there there and then from there, they will be slowly dispersed as they get rolled
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out across england, wales and northern ireland and scotland. this is the third of the seven vaccines that the uk has bought and, of course, they will be slowly rolled out in due course. tomos, overall, how does this fit into the picture of the vaccine roll—out in wales and how that's going? researchers say that people diagnosed with covid—19 are at greater risk of developing psychological and neurological conditions, such as depresson, psychosis and stroke. the team from oxford university examined the health records of more than half a million patients in the united states. here's our health reporter rachel schraer. coronavirus breaks into our cells and multiplies wherever in the body it finds itself. that's why it causes such a wide range of symptoms from the lungs, to the gut, to the brain. the team at the university of oxford looked over half a million patient records in the us to see if conditions affecting the brain were more common in those who'd had covid. they looked at 1a conditions including anxiety, depression and psychosis, stroke, brain haemorrhage, and dementia. all of these conditions were seen more often in people who'd had a covid infection in the previous six months. but these conditions all have very different causes. it could be that in some people, the virus actually gets into
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the brain and causes some damage. it could be the way your body is reacting to the virus, produces a sort of immune or inflammatory response that, again, contributes to the problems. and for other people, it may simply be a psychological effect, if you like, of the stress that having covid and thinking what might happen to you next is the important factor. the study couldn't prove the virus itself was definitely causing the changes, but patients recovering from covid were more likely than similar people who'd had flu or another infection to develop a psychological or neurological condition. and the sicker coronavirus patients had been, the more likely they were to develop these complications. rachel schraer, bbc news. brazil registered a new daily record of covid—19 deaths on tuesday. the health ministry said a,195 people had died with the virus in the previous 2a hours. more than 300 thousand brazilians have lost their lives from covid since the start of the pandemic — the second highest total in the world after the united states.
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opposition politician eduardo leite, governor of rio grande do sul, says the situation in brazil has been influenced by the actions of the president. what we are facing here in brazil, what we have here, it is a sad situation that is the consequence of the lack of co—ordination in the federal level by the national government. the... we have here it is president bolsonaro confronting governors and mayors. and the main tool that we have, the main weapon we have, to not allow the coronavirus to spread in an easy way, and the weapon is the social distancing. of course the president is wrong... he may not be the only person in the world that is right, being against social distancing.
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the world recognises that the best practice, the scientists, the researchers, they are almost unanimous about that. but the president makes this situation of confronting economy and protecting the lives of its people... and what we have is that without feeling that they are protected, people will not be confident to keep running the economy. so, his behaviour is, unfortunately, killing brazilians and it is hurting our economy. our latin america correspondent will grant has more on how this shocking total is playing out in brazilian politics. there's tension between the states and the federal government and, of course, it has repercussions beyond the borders of brazil, too, with, you know,
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the rest of south america, the rest of latin america, the rest of the world concerned, really, about what's happening in brazil. because, of course, it's not just that these numbers are so terribly bad for brazil, for brazilian families, who are losing upwards of a third of a million people since the pandemic began. but also that the strains that have been identified in brazil are so virulent, are so transmissible. so it is really genuinely being considered now by epidemiologists around the world as a global threat. we hear tales, as well, of doctors, nurses, at their absolute wits end of doing everything they can simply to get through to the end of a shift. you know, i've spoken to family members, i've spoken to doctors. they really do paint an almost, you know, near—apocalyptic picture of the situation. we should say jair bolsonaro believes there is a lot of media hype aboutjust how bad things are. but when you just look
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at the raw data, when you look at those numbers from today, the highest the country's experienced, one of the highest numbers in the world, then you know it is a very, very serious crisis unfolding in brazil. the headlines on bbc news... the eu medicines regulator will hold a briefing on the astrazeneca vaccine this afternoon — amid concerns about potential links to rare blood clots. the first doses of the moderna vaccine for the uk have been given out in wales — with a 2a year old carer the first to get the jab. brazil records more than a,000 covid—related deaths in 2a hours for the first time — as a more contagious variant fuels a surge in cases. drivers living in cities are being asked to think twice about buying big suvs. the appeal has been made by the rac foundation — which was responding to a report by a green think—tank, the new weather institute. let's speak now to leo murray
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from the new weather institute think—tank — he's one of the co—authors of the report. thank you very much forjoining us. tell us, how often an suv is driven off—road in this country, which is what they are designed for? yes. off-road in this country, which is what they are designed for? yes, so it seems to — what they are designed for? yes, so it seems to be _ what they are designed for? yes, so it seems to be extremely _ what they are designed for? yes, so it seems to be extremely rare - it seems to be extremely rare indeed. suvs is a very broad category and because of their popularity, a lot of cars which don't really have all of those capabilities are made to look like suvs. about three quarters of all suvs. about three quarters of all suvs sold in the uk are sold to addresses that are registered in urban areas, so they are sold in cities. even when you look at the largest suvs, which do have four—wheel drive capabilities, it is still two thirds of these cars that are being sold to people who live in the cities, where there are no
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abilities to drive off—road. what we are asking for is for these vehicles to stop being advertised in the uk. the headliners, ban on suv ads but in fact, there is a bit more nuanced to it than that. the issue is that the trend towards these larger, more polluting vehicles is acting against national and international efforts to tackle climate crisis, so the trend towards buying suvs has overtaken the trend towards buying electric vehicles. so, for every electric vehicles. so, for every electric vehicles. so, for every electric vehicle sold in britain, there were 37 suvs sold in the uk. and because of that,... that is absolutely down to the rise in popularity of suvs. what is —— what our analysis today shows that most
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of the people that buy these vehicles evidently do not need to be driving to turn four—wheel drive cars. we actually put the blame not so much on consumers for making bad choices but on the car manufacturers and the advertisers that are pushing them towards those choices and the reason for that is that, you know, the work that we published last year showed that suvs are much more comfortable for manufacturers and they make far more money for each one being sold. they are more profitable product ranges, which also happen to be much larger and much more polluting. the also happen to be much larger and much more polluting.— much more polluting. the m says that the talk— much more polluting. the m says that the talk of _ much more polluting. the m says that the talk of banning _ much more polluting. the m says that the talk of banning suvs - much more polluting. the m says that the talk of banning suvs is i that the talk of banning suvs is naive. he said that some of the cleanest cars on the market come in the suv shape and they are actually
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electric. i'm guessing you are not talking about that variety?- talking about that variety? well, exactl . i talking about that variety? well, exactly. i think _ talking about that variety? well, exactly. i think it _ talking about that variety? well, exactly. i think it would - talking about that variety? well, exactly. i think it would have i talking about that variety? -ii exactly. i think it would have been helpful if edward king had actually looked at what is that we are calling on suv. although the headliners ban suv ads, what we are asking the government is a ban on ads for the dirtiest form of cars that are being sold in the uk. the cars that are —— the average emissions are far higher than the target that we need to get onto to reach our emissions goal. most of those cars in that group are suvs. the ten that the top ten most polluting cars that people are buying are all suvs. there are arguments to make against those but that's not what our demand is focused on. we focus on stopping
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advertisers and car—makers from pushing these much more polluting products at people who definitely don't need them. certainly not to meet any practical needs in their own lives. they want them. and the reason they want them is in part down to the fact that they have been aggressively marketed and advertised.— aggressively marketed and advertised. ., ., ., ,, ., advertised. thank you for talking to us. doctors have been told not to prescribe painkillers to people suffering from chronic pain that has no known cause. the national institute for health and care excellence says there's little to no evidence that treating people with paracetamol or opioids makes any difference. it says people should be offered a range of therapies including exercise, acupuncture or anti—depressants instead. a police briefing is due to take place later in northern ireland — after the violence that took place over the easter period. a1 police officers were hurt and 10 people were arrested, as a result of trouble in loyalist areas. the northern ireland assembly will meet tomorrow to discuss the violence,
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after it was recalled from its easter break. workers from the delivery firm deliveroo have gone on strike, in a dispute over pay and conditions. socially distanced protests were held in cities including london, york, sheffield, reading and wolverhampton. the independent workers' union of great britain said its members are calling for decent pay as well as improved employment rights and safety protections. let's speak to our business presenter, alice baxter. alice, tell us more about their complaints. alice, tell us more about their complaints-— alice, tell us more about their comlaints. ~ ,,., , complaints. absolutely right. the mood music _ complaints. absolutely right. the mood music around _ complaints. absolutely right. the mood music around this - complaints. absolutely right. the mood music around this initial. mood music around this initial public offering of deliveroo just comes from bad to worse. we will talk about what is happening on the stock market in just a minute but out on the street in the real world, around a00 deliveroo food drivers are taking to the streets across towns and cities to complain about their rights. that is exactly why so many of the big respected investors
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out there refused to take part in the ipo, the initial public offering of deliveroo last week. they said there was just too many itjust speaks to the volatility around the share offering. that is what is happening on the streets. what is happening on the streets. what is happening on the stock markets, that's a little bit better for the company. the shares are up ever so slightly, around 2% from where they were. they are currently trading at around 280 7p per share. that is still well below the 300 90p per share that they had last week. that is still way below the a60 p per share that they initially hoped to get. what was initially being built as the biggest stock market flotation to ever take place in
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london has now been dubbed the worst flotation to happen in the history of london. we saw shares initially slumber at around 31% last week. we saw the bank goldman sachs buy up a considerable amount of stock. it has been reported in the financial times today to assure of the flotation and the sub dock —— beat stock. today is the sub dock —— beat stock. today is the open day of trading, where the smaller retail investors get to sell their shares. smaller retail investors get to sell theirshares. it smaller retail investors get to sell their shares. it has been a fairly disastrous introduction for them. so, today, the first fully open day of trading for deliveroo shares. it has crept up a little bit, by 2%. but overall, the company is still reeling from this disastrous flirtation that happened last week, being dubbed as the worst ever in
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the history of the london stock market and alongside that, today as you said, we are seeing deliveroo riders hitting the streets in protest at their working conditions. alice, thank you very much. some breaking news to bring you now. we havejust breaking news to bring you now. we have just learnt that the european union's health ministers are going to hold a virtual meeting later today about the roll—out of the astrazeneca vaccine. after we have heard from the eu medicines regulator, the ema and they are decision on the safety of that vaccine and that is because of the concern that a small number of adults have suffered from a very rare blood clot after receiving that particular vaccine. rare blood clot after receiving that particularvaccine. so, rare blood clot after receiving that particular vaccine. so, the eu health ministers are going to meet after we hearfrom health ministers are going to meet after we hear from the health ministers are going to meet after we hearfrom the ema. a little girl from wiltshire has become the inspiration for a new doll to help teach children about down's syndrome.
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six—year—old rosie hit the headlines last summer when her family built a full—size replica of her favourite dolls house in their back garden. the toy company behind the original house got in touch to say they'd like to base a new doll on rosie, to help educate others about the condition. matt treacy has the story. meet rosie. say hello. hello! doll! is that your doll? yeah! this is the tree house that started it all. a life—size replica of rosie's favourite toy built last year. just messing around, i thought it would be fun, really, for the screenshot ofjust having a screenshot, to stick it on aianb. i got this message suddenly from my phone from aianb saying, you've got a booking this weekend. so i was like, what? news of the unusual stay captured the imagination of people around the world and the boss of the company that makes the dolls got in touch.
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i actually came across a tweet and i said to jason, look, i'd love to make a one—off doll for rosie. and i'd like to gift it to her for christmas. but this was to be a special doll. rosie has down syndrome so subtle details were included in the toy and the packaging to explain her condition. we don't tell people that this is a doll with down syndrome. we let them purchase it and then they discover on the inside there's a little leaflet explaining what it actually means to have down syndrome. so we've got a diagram to show, the eyebrows and the nose and the face and she's got her boots, you know, they've modelled her boots on rosie's boots that really helped her be able to walk and have a normal life. i think it's going to be a really nice educational thing for kids to look at and read and, you know, play, just like they play with any other doll. when others saw the finished product, they wanted one as well.
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now it's been made available in toy shops in 35 different countries. they've sold hundreds already and hopefully we can sell more. and $1 for every purchase will go to our local charity who helps to support rosie and other families in the community. and what i hope from this is that it lets children know that she is just like them. she's just different. i believe all kids should have a diverse toy box so that they can develop that empathy, so it is, it's extremely important to us. to her, this is like a normal day, she just loves going outside, loves going in the tree house, loves playing with her dolls, just loves life. matt treacy, bbc news. now at the start of the pandemic — it was toilet paper , now it's ketchup. the united states is facing a shortage of one of its most iconic condiments — due to the pandemic.
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heinz — which produces the most popular brand — says it has been unable to keep up with surging demand for sachets of ketchup, although it is now boosting production. demand has been driven by the surge in takeaway food, coupled with advice to avoid using communal bottles in restaurants. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. hello again. for many of us today it's going to feel cold — perhaps not quite as cold as yesterday, because it's not going to be as windy, except for in the north of scotland where we will hang onto wintry showers as we go through the day. but generally, after the bright start that we had, cloud will build leaving us with some sunny intervals, or bright spells and patchy rain coming in later in the afternoon to northern ireland. our maximum temperatures, 1 to 8 degrees, so below average for this stage in april. tonight there still will be some clear skies around, but the rain in the west will continue to move eastwards, preceded by some snow. and it's going to be a cold night more or less across the board, although where we've got the cloud and rain temperatures will rise. in the south—east we will end
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the night with a touch of frost. here, there will be some sunshine first thing, but generally tomorrow more cloud than today. rain in the northern half of the country. the wind having changed direction to more of a south—westerly — that's a milder direction for us, with many of us back into double—figure temperatures, but feeling cooler in the north.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: the eu medicines regulator will hold a briefing on the astrazeneca vaccine this afternoon, amid concerns about potential links to rare blood clots — eu health ministers will meet later as well. leading figures urge the public to continue getting the jab — saying the rollout of the vaccine program is the top priority. it isa it is a critical public health issue that the vaccination programme rolls through to its completion. that is the overriding safety concern.
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the first doses of the moderna vaccine for the uk have been given out in wales — with a 2a—year—old carer the first to get the jab. brazil records more than a,000 covid—related deaths in 2a hours for the first time — as a more contagious variant fuels a surge in cases. the mental health impact of coronavirus — new research suggests covid—19 can increase the risk of conditions such as depression, dementia and strokes. sport, and for a full roundup, from the bbc sport centre, sport centre, here's sarah. good morning. manchester city midfielder kevin de bruyne has signed a contract extension with the club, keeping him at the etihad until the summer of 2025 — something to make manager pep guardiola smile. and he was also happy with the match officials, after their 2—1 win over borussia dortmund in the first leg of their champions league quarter—final last night. shortly after de bruyne had put city ahead, they were awarded a penalty when rodri went down clutching his face
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following a challenge... but that was overturned after a var check. and a few minutes later dortmund thought they were level, but england international jude bellingham's goal was disallowed — the referee ruled he had fouled ederson. replays suggested that was a harsh decision. the german side did equalise very late on, but not late enough — phil foden with the winner in the 90th minute, and guardiola had no complaints. the referees were brilliant. the game was not a problem. so it wasn't a penalty, var told me it wasn't a penalty, and the bellingham action from the leg is higher than expected. the referee and the linesmen were perfect. jurgen klopp said liverpool made it "too easy" for real madrid in spain. they won 3—1 in the first match between the sides since real�*s win
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in the champions league final three years ago. liverpool were second—best for most of the game and much of the damage was done in the first half, vinicuisjunior opening the scoring, before real went 2—0 ahead. liverpool came out fighting after the break, and mo salah reduced the defecit. but they were stung when vinicius found the net again — and that leaves liverpool with a really tough task in the home leg next week. if you want to go to the semifinals and that is absolutely ok and fair, you have to deserve it with the performance you put on the pitch. and tonight we were not good enough to win this game. but the only good news is, there's another game, where we saw there. but it's not like we have an advantage now. we are under pressure, of course, and we have to show that we can deal with that. there could be a capacity crowd at the final of the world snookoer championship on the 3rd of may. it's one of the pilot events designed to find ways to get fans back safely, without social distancing. the crucible can hold 980
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spectators, and the plan is for the theatre to be a third full for the opening round, which starts on the 17th of april, increasing to half and then three quarters as the tournament progresses. the organisers say that by the final, they should be able to operate without any capacity restriction but there will still be some measures in place, including the wearing of face coverings inside. there'll be a major name missing when the masters gets underway tomorrow, and that's tiger woods, who's still recovering after his car crash. he's been an inspiration to many players — none more so than his friend rory mcilroy, who recently learned a big lesson about how woods managed to win as much as he has. i went over to tiger's house a few weeks ago to see him. and in his family room he's got his trophy cabinet. and it is his 15 major trophies. and i said, "that's really cool, where are all the others?" he was like, "i don't know." "what?" he goes, "yeah, my mum has some, there's a few in the office,
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and a few wherever." so then i went, i was driving home and i was thinking, i mean, he thought that, right, that's all he cared about. all he cared about. so how easy must that have felt for him to win all the others? if all he cared about was four weeks of the year, the other stuff must have just been practice. that's all the sport for now — i'll have more for you later — but now on bbc news, it's your questions answered. you've been getting in touch with questions and concerns about blood clots and the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine. let's talk to our health correspondent, jim reed. let's start by talking about the latest we know about the oxford astrazeneca vaccine, and the other one that has started to be rolled out in the uk, and the donor. brute
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one that has started to be rolled out in the uk, and the donor. we are exectin: out in the uk, and the donor. we are exoecting a — out in the uk, and the donor. we are exoecting a busy _ out in the uk, and the donor. we are expecting a busy afternoon _ out in the uk, and the donor. we are expecting a busy afternoon on i out in the uk, and the donor. we are expecting a busy afternoon on the i expecting a busy afternoon on the vaccine front. there is a news conference due from the ema at three o'clock this afternoon. we are expecting a separate news conference at some point from the mhra, that could be today or tomorrow. both groups have been looking into the possible link between the astrazeneca vaccine and a very rare blood clot, so we should get more information about that this information. —— this afternoon. important to point out, we're not talking about standard blood clots, it's very rare condition, normally found in the brain but sometimes of the parts of the body, that combine a blood clot with something called a low platelet count. platelets are the cells in your blood that are responsible for clotting. so it's very strange to see a low count of the road combined with clots in the blood. and that is what regulators, doctors have been looking into. the latest statistics, we should get an
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update at some point today or tomorrow, are from march 2a, we have seen 30 cases of this very rare clots in the uk, seven deaths after the astrazeneca vaccine was administered. it doesn't necessarily mean vaccine was to blame, itjust means people notice them after taking the vaccine. an 80 million doses, 30 cases out of 80 million is a very low number. we doses, 30 cases out of 80 million is a very low number.— doses, 30 cases out of 80 million is a very low number. we also have the third vaccine — a very low number. we also have the third vaccine being _ a very low number. we also have the third vaccine being rolled _ a very low number. we also have the third vaccine being rolled out - a very low number. we also have the third vaccine being rolled out now, . third vaccine being rolled out now, moderna. the third vaccine being rolled out now, moderna. ., , ' moderna. the uk has bought 17 million doses _ moderna. the uk has bought 17 million doses of— moderna. the uk has bought 17 million doses of this. _ moderna. the uk has bought 17 million doses of this. we i moderna. the uk has bought 17 million doses of this. we had . moderna. the uk has bought 17 i million doses of this. we had the first dose is given today in south—west wales and we've just found out in glasgow as well. it's being used widely in the us, part of president trump's big push on vaccine front last year. also being used in europe, it's manufactured, the european version, in switzerland, which is outside the eu. sent to spain for what is called fill and finish where they put it in
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the bottles, then sent to us. very much the beginning of the process, just a couple of thousand doses available at the moment. should have 17 million eventually. brute available at the moment. should have 17 million eventually.— 17 million eventually. we have quite a few questions _ 17 million eventually. we have quite a few questions from _ 17 million eventually. we have quite a few questions from people - 17 million eventually. we have quite a few questions from people who i 17 million eventually. we have quite i a few questions from people who have a few questions from people who have a lot of queries concerns about vaccines. celia kingsley: i'm not sure if the benefits about of a vaccine outweigh the risks. so this is one of the key questions that regulators have been looking at about the astrazeneca vaccine. at the moment, the who, the ema in europe and the mhra in the uk have said it is firmly the case that the benefits do outweigh any risks and people should get the vaccine if offered. to explain that, you need to get into the maths of all this. the latest data, the uk data, shows there is a one in 600,000 chance of having the astrazeneca vaccine and then getting one of these rare blood clots. that does not mean it is
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necessarily causing it, that is just a relationship. if you think of six wembley stadium is full of people who have received one dose of this vaccine, one person out of those six full stadiums will have developed a clot based on the latest data. then what the regulators are doing is comparing that with the chance of getting covid. so here it depends very much on how old you are. if you are in your80s very much on how old you are. if you are in your 80s or 90s, you get covid, you have an eight in 100 chance, an 8% chance of needing hospital treatment, and a 6% chance of dying. that is still quite small, thatis of dying. that is still quite small, that is a 9a% chance of not dying, but it is much higher than the risk of those clots. as you go down the age groups, that risk profile changes. for me, i am aa, if i get
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covid there is a two and 100 chance of me needing to go into hospital and a one in a thousand chance of me dying. again, very small, even smaller than if you are older, but thatis smaller than if you are older, but that is starting to compare with the chance of these blood clots. still much smaller, but still... as you go down into the 30s and 20s, that risk produces. so that is the risk balance the regulators are having to weigh up. if you give the vaccine to the younger age groups, does that risk start to equalise up? at the moment they are saying, no, it doesn't. it moment they are saying, no, it doesn't. . . . moment they are saying, no, it doesn't. , . , ., doesn't. it is always more complicated _ doesn't. it is always more complicated than - doesn't. it is always more complicated than we i doesn't. it is always more | complicated than we would doesn't. it is always more i complicated than we would like. heather lack: has the pfizer vaccine been studied to see if there are any instances of blood clots? it would be interesting to know. it has. at the moment the data we have on this is from the uk and it's from a while back. originally the mhra said there was five cases of astrazeneca and two of pfizer, but
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it switched on its latest assessment, and said over 30 cases it has seen so far of this very rare clot, all of those are after taking astrazeneca and zero after taking pfizer. however, there is a big but, and this is reporting bias. if you look for something, you are more likely to find something. in germany, doctors there have been sent a letter saying, if you notice symptoms in people who have taken the astrazeneca jab, get in touch immediately. in that situation, people are more likely to notice people are more likely to notice people who are having these symptoms after taking that particular vaccine. so that is something again the regulators are having to disentangle, are they genuinely seeing higher rates for the astrazeneca jab, or are they saying it because people are looking for it? the reality is we probably won't know until this afternoon when they explain it in more detail. julia from epping: is it possible to request a different vaccine for the second dose
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if you have concerns or have had side effects? at the moment the answer in the uk is no. interestingly, scientists think this is something that could be very useful and be scientifically plausible. there are trials going on at the moment to see if it might work better if you have one vaccine and then a different one, because your immune system is primed by the first vaccine and then you had a different one and it creates an even stronger response in your immune system afterwards. having said that, uk regulators are saying they will not do this until the trials are completed. in other countries, they are. in germany they have said in that younger age group, under 60s, if they have had the astrazeneca jab they can have a differentjab for their second dose. at the moment in their second dose. at the moment in the uk that is not what we are doing. anonymous: i would like to know if the data discloses whether those suffering these rare blood clots share certain characteristics, such as gender, underlying pre—existing low platelet counts, hrt, and so on.
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it's a really good question, and at the risk of sounding like a broken record, this is exactly what the regulators are looking into. there is some real confusion here. in germany, the latest figures we have, of the 31 cases of this rare blood clot, they have noticed, they say 29 were women between the ages of 20 and 63, andjust were women between the ages of 20 and 63, and just two men. we don't have comparable data for the uk, but if you look at the first five cases in the uk, they were all men. so there is a real difference there, and regulators will have to know what is going on. it's worth pointing out these rare blood clots are much more common anyway in women than in men. so before the vaccine that was the pattern that was noticed. and i think there could be a link to the use of the contraceptive pill, sojust because more women are potentially being noticed in that german sample, that
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could be explained by other factors, not necessarily something vaccine is doing. again, we will have to wait for the reports from the ema and the mhra later. bren lyddon: if all adults are vaccinated and children are little affected by covid—19, where is this talk of a third wave of the virus coming from? this i honestly think is a question i have been asked the most week. people have been told for months now that once we vaccinate the most vulnerable, that is the first step towards going back to normal life in this country. there are very different views on this at the moment, whether we will see this third wave. chris whitty, the deputy chief medical officer for england, has warned about this risk of a third wave, and his argument and other scientists support this, say, look, we can't think of vaccines as the silver bullet, that protects everyone all the time. the latest
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data we have is after a first dose of both vaccines in the uk, four weeks after in an elderly population, it is may be stopping 60% of infections, 80% of hospitalisations. so there is a group that will have this vaccine and not be fully protected. plus there are people who have not yet been vaccinated. so if you go to us all going to the beach, to pubs, eating and siding restaurants, the warriors that could cause a real surge that group. having said that, look what else is happening in the world. in israel they have lifted pretty much every restriction, they have vaccinated upwards of 60% of their population with two doses, they have noticed cases go through they have noticed cases go through the floor. they have not seen an uptick in places. so the honest answer is we don't know yet, some scientists think a third wave is a possibility but it is not certain. thank you very much for answering all those questions.
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now, the mauritanian is the latest film to depict the experiences of detainees at the guantanamo bay us naval base in cuba. the film tells the story of mohamedou ould slahi, an electrical engineer who was questioned on his suspected involvment in 9/11 by mauritanian authorities — before being transported to the notorious prison. he remained there for 1a years without charge — in which he says he was frequently tortured until his release in october 2016. it's been lined up to be a big contender for this year's award season and the film's director, kevin mcdonald, joins me now. delighted to have you here. thank you forjoining us. a lot of films have been made about the war on terror, what made this film so different in your view? simply, because it _ different in your view? simply, because it is _ different in your view? simply, because it is largely _ different in your view? simply, because it is largely from i different in your view? simply, because it is largely from the i different in your view? simply, i because it is largely from the point of view of one of the prisoners, of
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a muslim man who is accused of terrorism and who is caught in this terrible situation where there is no evidence against him but the more he argues and says he is innocent, the more they think he is a mastermind. what involvement did he have in telling the story? the what involvement did he have in telling the story?— what involvement did he have in telling the story? the film is based on his book. _ telling the story? the film is based on his book, guantanamo - telling the story? the film is based on his book, guantanamo diary, i telling the story? the film is based i on his book, guantanamo diary, that he wrote while he was still a prisoner there. he wrote while he was still a prisonerthere. it he wrote while he was still a prisoner there. it is the only book written by a prisoner while they were in the present. that forms the basis of it, that he was also a consultant, he tells us little sketches of the cell c was then, the corridors, told us the specific treatment he was receiving. tell us what the challenges _ treatment he was receiving. tell us what the challenges are _ treatment he was receiving. tell us what the challenges are for - treatment he was receiving. tell us what the challenges are for a i what the challenges are for a film—maker if you are trying to tell something that is based on a real story, how much latitude you feel you can give yourself? in story, how much latitude you feel you can give yourself?— you can give yourself? in this instance. _ you can give yourself? in this
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instance, we _ you can give yourself? in this instance, we felt _ you can give yourself? in this instance, we felt we - you can give yourself? in this instance, we felt we had i you can give yourself? in this instance, we felt we had a i you can give yourself? in this. instance, we felt we had a real responsibility to be as truthful as we could, pretty much documentary truthful when it came to his treatment in guantanamo. you suggested in your intro that he was tortured throughout his period of of being there for 1a and a half years, but that's not true, he was interrogated consistently but only tortured for 76 days. and that period and what happened to him in that period is one of the elements we deal with in the film, and we have tried to show that exactly what happened to him. but very much from his point of view. so unlike other films made from the american point of view, like zero da 30, a great film, that is americans saying torture works and we used it to capture bin laden. first of all,
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thatis capture bin laden. first of all, that is not true.— that is not true. you have an incredible — that is not true. you have an incredible cast, _ that is not true. you have an incredible cast, it's - that is not true. you have an incredible cast, it's a - that is not true. you have an incredible cast, it's a highlyl incredible cast, its a highly political film, incredible cast, its a highly politicalfilm, but how incredible cast, its a highly political film, but how keen were they to be part of this project? they were all really keen. this would not have happened if all these great stars, jodie foster who has not made a film for years, and pretty much came out of retirement to do this, benedict cumberbatch she was one of the producers, and the wonderful french algerian actor playing the lead, they'll felt so connected to the story, notjust because they felt it was politically important but because they felt it was an incredible true story of resilience and survival of the human spirit. it's a very positive film, when you get to the end of it is incredibly uplifting because this man not only survived but he survives with his humanity intact and his humour intact. it is survives with his humanity intact and his humour intact.— and his humour intact. it is easy with everything _ and his humour intact. it is easy with everything going _ and his humour intact. it is easy with everything going on - and his humour intact. it is easy with everything going on in i and his humour intact. it is easy with everything going on in the l with everything going on in the world in the last few years to
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forget there are still people waiting for release from guantanamo bay. how likely do you think this film will be in having an influence on the biden administration and the decisions they make about it? first and foremost _ decisions they make about it? first and foremost we _ decisions they make about it? f “st and foremost we hope a lot of people watch this movie around the world is a piece of entertainment, but as a piece of entertainment with a message. i hope it is very entertaining as a legal thriller, but it's true to say there are a0 something prisoners still in guantanamo, half of them are prisoners like our lead, who have not been charged with any crimes but have been there for a decade or longer, and those prisoners should be released. they are caught in this terrible legal limbo because a lot of them have been tortured and therefore they cannot have trials because the evidence obtained under torture cannot be used in a court of law. so there is this terrible
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catch—22 situation. biden has said he wants to close the camp finally, and he has announced a review of the whole situation. so we are hopeful our film can play whole situation. so we are hopeful ourfilm can play a small whole situation. so we are hopeful our film can play a small part whole situation. so we are hopeful ourfilm can play a small part in the public debate, particularly in america, that will lead to its closure. ., ., , , america, that will lead to its closure. ., ., , ., ., , closure. you have plenty of awards nominations. _ closure. you have plenty of awards nominations, how— closure. you have plenty of awards nominations, how important i closure. you have plenty of awards nominations, how important for i closure. you have plenty of awardsl nominations, how important for you is it that the film wins a few? it is it that the film wins a few? it is always the same with awards, it is always the same with awards, it is actually nice just to be nominated, to be made to feel you are a part of the group of the strongest films of the year. whether you win or not, ultimately, there is a bit of... there are always reasons where things when others don't. we have the baftas on sunday, we are nominated for five of those including best film, and i'm not expecting to win any, but it's nice to be there at least virtually. you already have _ to be there at least virtually. you
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already have an _ to be there at least virtually. you already have an oscar, how many do you need? this already have an oscar, how many do ou need? �* . . , already have an oscar, how many do ou need? a . ,.,, already have an oscar, how many do ouneed? a . , , already have an oscar, how many do i you need?_ well. you need? as many as possible! well, aood luck. you need? as many as possible! well, good luck. thank _ you need? as many as possible! well, good luck. thank you _ you need? as many as possible! well, good luck. thank you so _ you need? as many as possible! well, good luck. thank you so much - you need? as many as possible! well, good luck. thank you so much for- good luck. thank you so much for talking to us. plaid cymru has launched its manifesto for may's senedd election — pledging to hold an independence referendum within five years if it wins power. party leader adam price unveiled plans including creating 60,000 "green" jobs and extending free school meals. in this election, plaid cymru is presenting the most radically ambitious and transformational programme offered by any party in any welsh election since 19a5. the manifesto that we are launching today looks forward to the confident and successful country wales can become. an equal nation and a nation of equals. it sets out the practical, deliverable and, yes, fully costed policies that we can put to work to bring about that new nation. it speaks of and to a country
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that has come of age, whose next chapter will be fairer, greener and more prosperous than the decades of disappointment that came before. the manifesto sets out our ideas and our vision to create a brighter future together under the fresh leadership of a plaid cymru welsh government. now, is our opportunity to create that new future. we will deliver a plan for the whole country to prosper, creating thousands of qualityjobs in every part of wales. we will give every child in wales the best start in life. we will make household budgets go further for a fair dealforfamilies. we will end child hunger, fewer poverty and homelessness. we will learn the lessons
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of the pandemic by delivering a seamless national health and care service, and yes, we will face up to the climate and biodiversity crisis by taking the radical action that this moment demands. in this manifesto, we pledge ourselves to building a nation that delivers the opportunity of a decent life and brighter future for all. this election is our historic opportunity to become the drivers of that brighter future ourselves. for the first time in the senedd election, the people of wales will be able to vote to take their future into their own hands. we believe independence to be the only sure and sustainable means for achieving social and economic progress and for tackling
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the climate emergency. so, a plaid cymru government will empower the people in wales to decide the future of our nation in an independence referendum. we are not the country that we should be. that we can be. and we are not the country that we want to be. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. hello, again. today will feel more like a winter's day than a spring one. having said that, the wind isn't going to be as strong as it was yesterday for most, so we will lose that wind chill. it's going to be a dry day for many parts of the country today, but cloud will build replacing the early brightness that we have seen. we are still under the influence of this arctic air represented by the blues across the chart but look at what's coming in from the atlantic. later in the day something a wee bit milder. we have a lot of cloud across northern ireland, wales and the south—west,
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the same too across parts of northern and eastern scotland and england. but some of that will thin and break, we'll see some sunshine, and most of the wintry showers fading except for the north of scotland where we also have gusty winds. so sunny spells, or bright spells, through the afternoon, the cloud thickening across northern ireland bringing in some patchy rain by the end of the afternoon. with our maximum temperatures one in lerwick to eight as we push further south. usually at this stage in april we would be looking at roughly between 10—13 , so we're below par. now, there will be some early frost in the west to start the night. but as the cloud and also the rain pushes steadily eastwards preceded by some snow on the hills, well, temperatures will actually go up. where the cloud remains broken, for example in the south—east, it will be a frosty start to the day tomorrow. tomorrow, where we have got the clear skies, we will see some sunshine, a bit more cloud around. our rain pushing east and moving southwards through the day, the wind, though, having changed direction to more of a westerly,
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that's a milder direction for us represented in the temperatures, widely into double figures. but behind this weather front which is a cold front, cold air will start to return and we will see some snow once again on the mountains. by friday, the weather front sinking southwards with this band of cloud and patchy rain in southern areas. behind it, clear skies, some showers and some of those will be wintry again, in the north down to lower levels, and you can see the difference in the temperatures both sides of that front, still mild in the south, much colder in the north. that's showing up quite nicely on saturday as well. but on saturday an area of low pressure close by could bring a weather front across the channel islands and the south—east. that will bring some higher temperatures but also the risk of some rain. but generally as we go into the weekend it is going to feel colder.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... the eu medicines regulator will hold a briefing on the astrazeneca vaccine this afternoon — amid concerns about potential links to rare blood clots. leading figures urge the public to continue getting the jab — saying the roll—out of the vaccine programme is the top priority. it's a critical public health issue that the vaccination programme rolls through to its completion. that is the overriding safety concern. the first doses of the moderna vaccine for the uk have been given out in wales — with a 2a—year—old carer the first to get the jab. brazil records more than a,000 covid—related deaths in 2a hours for the first time — as a more contagious variant fuels a surge in cases. the mental health impact of coronavirus — new research suggests covid—19 can increase the risk of conditions such as depression, dementia and strokes.
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and coming up... we'll meet the little girl from wiltshire who has become the inspiration for a new doll to help teach children about down's syndrome. the european medicines regulator is to outline its recommendations for the oxford astrazeneca vaccine this afternoon, amid concerns about potential links to very rare blood clots. it follows the suspension of a trial of the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine on children while the uk regulator investigates concerns the jab may be causing rare blood clots in a tiny number of adults. none of the 300 children involved in the trial has suffered a clot. meanwhile in wales a 2a—year—old carer has become the first person to receive the moderna vaccine, as it becomes the third
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covid—19 vaccine to be rolled out across the uk. it comes as uk researchers found people diagnosed with covid—19 in the previous six months were more likely to develop depression, dementia, psychosis and stroke. more now on the pause in the trial of the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine on children in this report from our medical editor fergus walsh. there you go — all done. nearly 300 children aged six to 17 are taking part in the astrazeneca vaccine trial in england, which began in february. oxford university said there'd been no blood clots in the volunteers but, out of an abundance of caution, it had stopped vaccinations, pending the outcome of the safety review in adults. more than 18 million people in the uk have received the astrazeneca vaccine. the mhra said, last week, there'd been 30 rare cases of blood clots, including seven deaths.
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so it's nice to be able to see that the area is sterile. the prime minister, visiting an astrazeneca plant in macclesfield, once again gave his firm support for the vaccine. the best thing people should do is look at what the mhra say, our independent regulator — that's why we have them, that's why they're independent. and their advice to people is to, you know, keep going out there, get yourjab, get your second jab. as a precautionary measure, the mhra updated its advice last month to say that anyone with a headache that lasted for more than four days after receiving the astrazeneca vaccine, or bruising beyond the site of the jab, should seek medical attention. both of the vaccines we're using are highly effective against covid and the risks of getting sick or dying of covid for all the people currently being offered first and second doses are far and away greater than any
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small theoretical risk that may exist relating to these cases — which are extremely rare. this could be very much compromised if people think that this isn't being taken seriously, that this isn't being examined in great detail. but i think individuals have difficulties in sort of understanding risks and perceptions, and seeing this in relation to other sorts of illnesses or diseases or outcomes. the astrazeneca vaccine is central to the huge success of the roll—out ofjabs in the uk, which is way ahead of the rest of europe. bonjour. france has restricted the astrazeneca vaccine to adults over 55 — germany, to those over 60 — because of concerns about blood clots in younger adults. the european medicines agency and the uk regulator are due to give updated recommendations in the next day or two. maintaining public confidence in this highly effective vaccine will be vital.
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fergus walsh, bbc news. well, health ministers from the eu will be meeting following an update from the european medical agencies at 3pm this afternoon our correspondent anna holligan is at their headquarters in amsterdam. so we are expecting updates from the ema's team that specialises in adverse reactions. these vaccines are seen as the way out of the pandemic, but only if people have enough confidence and faith to actually take them. so, you will remember last month the ema issued guidance which said the benefits of taking the oxford astrazeneca jab outweighed the potential risk of side—effects. they also said any causal link between these extremely rare blood clots and the vaccine were possible but not proven, and the evidence suggested that people should continue to take it. we've seen governments across the eu adopting different approaches though —
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some, including here in the netherlands and across the border in germany, have paused the use of the astrazeneca jab among the under—60s. in france, it's the under—55s. so what we are expecting from the ema today, they have continued to investigate the data as it emerges from around the world, and we are expecting an update on whether there is a possible link and whether they may update their guidance to list blood clots as among the side—effects, and then it will be up to the eu governments to decide what to do with that information. but it hasn't helped with the public confidence issue — that is one of the main obstacles here on the continent, along with the supply of these vaccines. so the ema guidance is expected this afternoon, eagerly anticipated by governments and people who are looking for reassurance and clarity too. at the moment, the advice from the european medicines agency remains, if you are heading into the surgery today and you are offered the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine, then take it.
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the coronavirus vaccine made by the american company, moderna, has been administered in the uk for the first time today — in carmarthen in west wales. the first recipient was 2a—year—old elle taylor, who is an unpaid carer for her 82 —year—old grandmother. the uk has ordered 17 million doses of the vaccine, which has been shown in trials to prevent nearly all infections. it will be used alongside the pfizer and astrazeneca jabs. very excited, very happy. yeah, thrilled. yeah, really good. when did you find out you were going to get it? yesterday evening. yeah, so very last minute, but very happy. you're 2a? 2a, yeah. so, obviously, young to be getting the vaccine. why were you so keen to get it? i'm an unpaid carerfor my grandmother, so it's very important to me that i can get it so that i can care for her properly and be safe.
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i presume your grandmother has been vaccinated? she has, yes. she has had herfirst vaccine. she's going for a second dose on saturday. our wales correspondent tomos morgan gave me this update on the roll—out programme. west wales, carmarthenshire, glangwili hospital in carmarthenshire, that's the hywel dda health board in west wales, 5,000 doses delivered over the last few days, and as you mentioned, they begin the roll—out there this morning. they started at around 8:30am. the plan is then, for it to be slowly rolled out in england and scotland in due course and in other areas of wales. the uk has bought around 17 million doses of the moderna vaccine, which trials in the us suggest — trials of around 30,000 people— suggest that it is really effective. it is effective at about 95% against general covid and in severe covid cases, 100% effective. and also, the company that has made the vaccine, it also says that it's also
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effective against the english variant and the south african variant at the moment. so, 5000 doses in west wales initially and then from there, there will be slowly more as they get dispersed across england, wales, northern ireland and scotland. this is the third of the seven vaccines that the uk has bought and, of course, they will be slowly rolled out in due course. the labour leader sir keir starmer has said it's important people have confidence in the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine. the labour leader said he'd had a first dose of the astrazeneca vaccine himself without any side effects and encouraged people to come forward for a jab if they're offered one. he was also asked about the government's plans for covid passports as a way of opening the economy, and whether his party would support the idea. we do not support the government's plans on their current form. in
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fact, the plans seems to be changing on a daily basis. only a few weeks ago, the prime minister was saying that he was thinking of vaccine passports to go to the park and now he says he isn't. one day he was talking about tests and certificates. it's a complete mess. there isn't a real plan around this but what i fear is that it will be another example of a government with another example of a government with a plan that does not work, costing lots of taxpayer money, when i think that the focus should be on getting as many people vaccinated as possible. that is the light at the end of the trip love tunnel. and —— thatis end of the trip love tunnel. and —— that is the light at the end of the tunnel. let's fix the problems we have really got but we do not support the government's plans in their current form. researchers say that people diagnosed with covid—19 are at greater risk of developing psychological and neurological
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conditions, such as depresson, psychosis and stroke. the team from oxford university examined the health records of more than half a million patients in the united states. here's our health reporter rachel schraer. coronavirus breaks into our cells and multiplies wherever in the body it finds itself. that's why it causes such a wide range of symptoms from the lungs, to the gut, to the brain. the team at the university of oxford looked over half a million patient records in the us to see if conditions affecting the brain were more common in those who'd had covid. they looked at 1a conditions including anxiety, depression and psychosis, stroke, brain haemorrhage, and dementia. all of these conditions were seen more often in people who'd had a covid infection in the previous six months. but these conditions all have very different causes. it could be that in some people, the virus actually gets into the brain and causes some damage. it could be the way your body is reacting to the virus, produces a sort of immune or inflammatory response that, again, contributes to the problems. and for other people, it may simply
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be a psychological effect, if you like, of the stress that having covid and thinking what might happen to you next is the important factor. the study couldn't prove the virus itself was definitely causing the changes, but patients recovering from covid were more likely than similar people who'd had flu or another infection to develop a psychological or neurological condition. and the sicker coronavirus patients had been, the more likely they were to develop these complications. rachel schraer, bbc news. brazil registered a new daily record of covid—19 deaths on tuesday. the health ministry said a,195 people had died with the virus in the previous 2a hours. more than 300,000 brazilians have lost their lives from covid since the start of the pandemic — the second highest total in the world after the united states. opposition politician eduardo leite, governor of rio grande do sul — says the situation in brazil has been influenced by the actions of the president.
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what we are facing here in brazil, what we have here, it is a sad situation that is the consequence of the lack of co—ordination in the federal level by the national government. the... we have here it is president bolsonaro confronting governors and mayors. and the main tool that we have, the main weapon we have, to not allow the coronavirus to spread in an easy way, and the weapon is the social distancing. of course the president is wrong... he may not be the only person in the world that is right, being against social distancing. the world recognises that the best practice, the scientists, the researchers, they are almost unanimous about that. but the president makes this
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situation of confronting economy and protecting the lives of its people... and what we have is that without feeling that they are protected, people will not be confident to keep running the economy. so, his behaviour is, unfortunately, killing brazilians and it is hurting our economy. our latin america correspondent will grant has more on how this shocking total is playing out in brazilian politics. there's tension between the states and the federal government and, of course, it has repercussions beyond the borders of brazil, too, with, you know, the rest of south america, the rest of latin america, the rest of the world concerned, really, about what's happening in brazil. because, of course, it's not just that these numbers
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are so terribly bad for brazil, for brazilian families, who are losing upwards of a third of a million people since the pandemic began. but also that the strains that have been identified in brazil are so virulent, are so transmissible. so it is really genuinely being considered now by epidemiologists around the world as a global threat. we hear tales, as well, of doctors, nurses, at their absolute wits end of doing everything they can simply to get through to the end of a shift. you know, i've spoken to family members, i've spoken to doctors. they really do paint an almost, you know, near—apocalyptic picture of the situation. we should say jair bolsonaro believes there is a lot of media hype aboutjust how bad things are. but when you just look at the raw data, when you look at those numbers from today, the highest the country's experienced, one of the highest numbers in the world, then you know it is a very, very
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serious crisis unfolding in brazil. the headlines on bbc news... the eu medicines regulator will hold a briefing on the astrazeneca vaccine this afternoon — amid concerns about potential links to rare blood clots. the first doses of the moderna vaccine for the uk have been given out in wales — with a 2a—year—old carer the first to get the jab. brazil records more than a,000 covid—related deaths in 2a hours for the first time — as a more contagious variant fuels a surge in cases. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's sarah. good afternoon. manchester city midfielder kevin de bruyne has signed a two—year contract extension with the club, keeping him at the etihad until the summer of 2025. hejoined in 2015, and he's made over 250 apperances,
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winning seven major trophies — and they're in with a chance of taking four more this season. de bruyne is 30 now, and he said he couldn't be happier to be staying with city. i feel proud because ifeel proud because i have been here now for six years and, obviously, this feels like home. it has been the longest time that i have been at the club. to get the extension now, at my age, feels also like a very proud moments because, obviously, it means that they trust me until i get really old in football terms.— me until i get really old in football terms. �* ,.., football terms. and he did score in the champions _ football terms. and he did score in the champions league _ football terms. and he did score in the champions league last - football terms. and he did score in the champions league last night. i there's one more english side still to play in the champions league. chelsea take on porto tonight, having lost for the first time under manager thomas tuchel at the weekend. they were thrashed 5—2 by west brom but their champions league form has been exceptional, topping their group without losing a game and knocking out spanish league leaders atletico madrid in the last 16.
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the challenge is to be totally focused on our strengths and to play an intensive game and to narrow the focus down into a5 minutes and then another a5 minutes. focus down into as minutes and then another as minutes.— another as minutes. then, we will see what results _ another as minutes. then, we will see what results we _ another as minutes. then, we will see what results we get _ another as minutes. then, we will see what results we get and i another as minutes. then, we will see what results we get and how i another as minutes. then, we will i see what results we get and how we will deal with it in the second leg. there could be a capacity crowd at the final of the world snooker championship on the 3rd of may. it's one of the pilot events designed to find ways to get fans back safely, without social distancing. the crucible can hold 980 spectators, and the plan is for it to be a third full for the opening round, which starts on the 17th of april, increasing as the tournament progresses. the organisers say that by the final, they should be able to operate without any capacity restriction but there will still be some measures in place, including the wearing of face coverings inside. australia's women have extended their one—day international winning streak to 23 matches, after beating new zealand
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in tauranga to clinch their series with a game to spare. they posted 271—7 from their 50 overs, built on rachael haynes' 87 before bowling out their hosts for 200, spinnerjessjonassen taking three wickets as the white ferns lost seven for just 80 runs. australia haven't lost a one—day series since they were beaten by engand in 2013. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. let's return to the latest developments with the roll—out of the astrazeneca vaccine and go through what we know so far. the european medicines regulator is to outline its recommendations for the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine this afternoon, amid concerns about potential links to very rare blood clots. after that, eu health ministers will also meet to discuss what the ema have decided. and later the uk medicines regulator — the mhra — is also expected to give an update on its own investigation. we can speak now to
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professor stephen reicher, professor of psychology at the university of st andrews and member of the sage subcommittee advising on behavioural science. welcome. thanks very much for joining us again. what's the best message for scientists and politicians in the uk to give the public to keep the roll—out of the astrazeneca programme going despite these concerns that people might have? ~ . these concerns that people might have? ~ , ., ., ,, have? well, first of all, i think it shows the _ have? well, first of all, i think it shows the importance _ have? well, first of all, i think it shows the importance that i have? well, first of all, i think it i shows the importance that alongside the roll—out of the vaccine itself, we need a roll—out of information. i think it would have been far preferable if we had brought that information out in advance so that people were prepared for stories like this, which in many ways, are not surprising. no vaccine is perfect. every vaccine has risks. if you go into your medicine cabinet and you get out your leaflets with your aspirin, you will see a long
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list of things that can happen. they happen very rarely but if people are prepared for them, they are less concerned that they will happen. there is no point crying over spilt milk, so what should we do now? well, first of all, the first message about this is how remarkably careful we are being. we are not talking about large numbers of cases, we are talking about 30 cases amongst 18 million people, eight death. every death is a tragedy but it is less than one death per 2 million vaccines. this is an incredibly rare event. the other thing is, always everything in life is a risk. it is a balance of risks. the only way to stay safe is in a sense to stay in bed all day and that's probably the most dangerous thing you can do. so, let's look at the other risks. if you look at the other stories that we have had today, for instance, the story that one in three people, 33% of people, with severe covid—19, get mental
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health problems in the long term, that again gives us a balance of risks. and how clear the balance of risks. and how clear the balance of risks are. it is far safer to take the vaccine then to not take the vaccine. ., , , ., ., ,, vaccine. how wise is it to make vaccinations — vaccine. how wise is it to make vaccinations compulsory? i vaccine. how wise is it to make | vaccinations compulsory? well, hopefully. _ vaccinations compulsory? well, hopefully, vaccines _ vaccinations compulsory? well, hopefully, vaccines aren't i hopefully, vaccines aren't compulsory. they are certainly not compulsory. they are certainly not compulsory in the formal sense. i think there is a danger at the moment with talk of vaccine passports, which could include basic social participation, going to the pub, going to the shops, perhaps even going to work, that people begin to see them as compulsory. in effect, unless you are vaccinated, you can't take part in everyday social life. once that happens, it feeds into narrative, saying that the vaccine is something done to you to control you. i think that is counter—productive because it feeds into the very fears of those groups
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who are hesitant. i think we need to be extremely careful in our talk about vaccine passports about not talking in ways that sends a message that, in effect this is compulsory. that would undermine the vaccine. at exactly the point when we need to be engaging those in doubt and increasing uptake.— engaging those in doubt and increasing uptake. there has been cross-party _ increasing uptake. there has been cross-party resistance _ increasing uptake. there has been cross-party resistance to - increasing uptake. there has been cross-party resistance to the i increasing uptake. there has been cross-party resistance to the idea | cross—party resistance to the idea of domestic vaccine passports but are they not a legitimate idea if you want to be part of a mass gathering, say to go to a concert or a festival, if not have a drink in a pub garden? i a festival, if not have a drink in a pub garden?— pub garden? i think one of the problems _ pub garden? i think one of the problems about _ pub garden? i think one of the problems about this _ pub garden? i think one of the problems about this is - pub garden? i think one of the problems about this is that i pub garden? i think one of the problems about this is that we pub garden? i think one of the i problems about this is that we are flying so many kites, they have got tangled up leading to a incredibly confusing debate. it is not clear when people are talking about these things that they are talking about vaccines or whether they are talking about tests. whether they are talking about, if you like,
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privileges or everyday activities. whether we are talking about doing it now or at some point in the future. i think the danger is that some of the arguments on some things are used tojustify some of the arguments on some things are used to justify other things which could be far more dangerous. with some things, i think there is a widespread consensus over. for instance, to travel internationally, is mostly agreed on. that's not a problem. but once it comes to everyday social activities, so that if you don't get a vaccine, you can't really participate socially, then in practice, it becomes to be seen compulsory and once things are compulsory you are going to put things off, especially those who are hesitant and those who are most important to persuade. what we should be doing at the moment, is increasing vaccine roll—out by going to communities and by talking to them and putting their minds at rest. the worst things that you can do is to lead to alienation by
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fuelling theirfears. to do is to lead to alienation by fuelling their fears.- fuelling their fears. to what extent, fuelling their fears. to what extent. if — fuelling their fears. to what extent, if at _ fuelling their fears. to what extent, if at all, _ fuelling their fears. to what extent, if at all, did - fuelling their fears. to what i extent, if at all, did ministers continue at sage and ask about the impact on behaviours of the idea of a vaccine passports because it is already being trialled?— already being trialled? well, all sorts of considerations - already being trialled? well, all sorts of considerations going i already being trialled? well, all sorts of considerations going to | sorts of considerations going to vaccine passports. one of the problem is that we have at the moment as i say is that we don't know if this is a or ideas that are being floated or suggestions that are being hyped up by the media. we need clarity. i think we are getting incredibly mixed messaging and that is causing real fears of being counter—productive. but is causing real fears of being counter-productive. but have you been asked _ counter-productive. but have you been asked about _ counter-productive. but have you been asked about the _ counter-productive. but have you been asked about the wisdom i counter-productive. but have you been asked about the wisdom ofl been asked about the wisdom of passports? the been asked about the wisdom of passports?— been asked about the wisdom of --assorts? ,, ., , passports? the issue of passports, of course, passports? the issue of passports, of course. is _ passports? the issue of passports, of course, is one _ passports? the issue of passports, of course, is one of— passports? the issue of passports, of course, is one of the _ passports? the issue of passports, | of course, is one of the behavioural issues which is being considered. i'm sorry to ask you this question again but what is your —— what has your advice been to the government
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about these vaccine passports given that there is already a trial under way? that there is already a trial under wa ? ~ . �* ., that there is already a trial under wa? . way? well, what i can't do is give ou way? well, what i can't do is give you information _ way? well, what i can't do is give you information about _ way? well, what i can't do is give | you information about discussions which aren't yet in the public domain. in due course when the papers have been looked at and have been checked to make sure that they are fine, they will go into the public domain and that is quite right, there needs to be a transparency. speaking personally, and from the research that i have looked at and some of the research that i have been involved in, i think it is very clear that compulsion is counter—productive. there are some studies in germany that show that very clearly that when vaccines become compulsory, there is anger. in israel there was a sense of vaccinations becoming compulsory and that led to alienation. what worked in israel, as ever, was community engagement. having mobile vaccination centres outside bars and going to people and
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engaging, that is the solution. we have had this argument all the way through this pandemic, haven't we? the importance of having local engagement. we have had an elected mayor saying that they were sending people out onto the streets, using the extra funds that they have got for that local engagement but it seems on the whole that the government has persisted with this centralised approach. i was government has persisted with this centralised approach.— centralised approach. i was 'ust thismomrngi centralised approach. i was 'ust this morning looking i centralised approach. i was 'ust this morning looking at i centralised approach. i was 'ust this morning looking at a h centralised approach. i wasjust this morning looking at a list i centralised approach. i wasjust this morning looking at a list of| this morning looking at a list of examples from the royal college of physicians and there are shining examples in all sorts of cities up and down the country of doing things. it would be far better, of course, if that was supported nationally and if that was the nationally and if that was the national approach but we are learning simple messages that we have forgotten and that is that good public health is about community engagement. it is about working with
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people and respecting people. when people and respecting people. when people feel that the government isn't working with them but imposing upon them, you break that vital link. so, let's rememberthe upon them, you break that vital link. so, let's remember the good, basic lessons of good public health, engage people, respect people and don't treat people as the problem. how useful is social pressure in your own peer group or your own community, if you see people without a mask, sometimes somebody will ask them to put one on? washing hands... could be vaccine uptake be subject to a similar social pressure? absolutely. social laws are very important stopper has been a number of studies recently which that one of studies recently which that one of the key factors in which whether people adhere or not relies on what their social group too. so, certainly getting out a sense of social norms of what we do is really important. the danger is that when
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you make things compulsory, then you feed into the fears of those groups that historically have a sense of not being looked after by the authorities. you give traction to those arguments that the vaccination is about social control rather than public health. i think... there are many voices in all sorts of communities that say, let's get vaccinated. you need a government and the state that acts in ways that help them and magnifies their voice. compulsion, as i say precisely undermines those in communities which say, let's get vaccinated, is for our own good and it's for the good of the communities as a whole. good to talk to you as always. thank you very much. now it's time for a look at the weather. hello again. for many of us today it's going to feel cold —
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perhaps not quite as cold as yesterday, because it's not going to be as windy, except for in the north of scotland where we will hang onto wintry showers as we go through the day. but generally, after the bright start that we had, cloud will build leaving us with some sunny intervals, or bright spells and patchy rain coming in later in the afternoon to northern ireland. our maximum temperatures, ito 8 degrees, so below average for this stage in april. tonight there still will be some clear skies around, but the rain in the west will continue to move eastwards, preceded by some snow. and it's going to be a cold night more or less across the board, although where we've got the cloud and rain temperatures will rise. in the south—east we will end the night with a touch of frost. here, there will be some sunshine first thing, but generally tomorrow more cloud than today. rain in the northern half of the country. the wind having changed direction to more of a south—westerly — that's a milder direction for us, with many of us back into double—figure temperatures, but feeling cooler in the north.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: the eu medicines regulator will hold a briefing on the astrazeneca vaccine this afternoon, amid concerns about potential links to rare blood clots — eu health ministers will meet later as well. leading figures urge the public to continue getting the jab — saying the rollout of the vaccine program is the top priority. it's a critical public health issue that the vaccination programme rolls through to its completion. that is the overriding safety concern. the first doses of the moderna vaccine for the uk have been given out in wales — with a 24—year—old carer the first to get the jab. brazil records more than 4,000 covid—related deaths in 2a hours for the first time — as a more contagious variant fuels a surge in cases. the mental health impact of coronavirus — new research suggests covid—i9 can increase the risk of conditions such as depression, dementia and strokes. and coming up.... what do a peaky blinders themed bar
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and a custom—built yoga studio have in common? they're both contenders to be named "shed of the year". we'll be hearing from their owners. a little girl from wiltshire has become the inspiration for a new doll to help teach children about down�*s syndrome. six—year—old rosie hit the headlines last summer when her family built a full—size replica of her favourite dolls house in their back garden. the toy company behind the original house got in touch to say they'd like to base a new doll on rosie, to help educate others about the condition. matt treacy has the story. meet rosie. say hello. hello! doll! is that your doll? yeah! this is the tree house that started it all. a life—size replica of rosie's favourite toy, built last year. just messing around,
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i thought it would be fun, really, for the screenshot ofjust having a screenshot, to stick it on aianb. i got this message suddenly from my phone from aianb saying, you've got a booking this weekend. so i was like, what? news of the unusual stay captured the imagination of people around the world and the boss of the company that makes the dolls got in touch. i actually came across a tweet and i said to jason, look, i'd love to make a one—off doll for rosie. and i'd like to gift it to her for christmas. but this was to be a special doll. rosie has down syndrome so subtle details were included in the toy and the packaging to explain her condition. we don't tell people that this is a doll with down syndrome. we let them purchase it and then they discover on the inside there's a little leaflet explaining what it actually means to have down syndrome. so we've got a diagram to show,
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the eyebrows and the nose and the face and she's got her boots, you know, they've modelled her boots on rosie's boots that really helped her be able to walk and have a normal life. i think it's going to be a really nice educational thing for kids to look at and read and, you know, play, just like they play with any other doll. when others saw the finished product, they wanted one as well. now it's been made available in toy shops in 35 different countries. they've sold hundreds already and hopefully we can sell more. and $1 for every purchase will go to our local charity who helps to support rosie and other families in the community. and what i hope from this is that it lets children know that she is just like them. she's just different. i believe all kids should have a diverse toy box so that they can develop that empathy, so it is, it's extremely important to us. to her, this is like a normal day, she just loves going outside, loves going in the tree house,
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loves playing with her dolls, just loves life. matt treacy, bbc news. the human rights group amnesty international says the coronavirus pandemic has exposed and deepened inequalities around the world. its annual report says the worst impact has been on the most vulnerable people. aru na iyengar reports. the global pandemic has affected everyone, but the impact is far from evenly spread. amnesty international is scathing in its report. it says women and refugees, like these in congo, have suffered the most. it points to domestic violence figures, which have risen in many countries, fuelled by victims being isolated with their abusers. women were largely the primary victims, in gender terms, of covid—i9. throughout the world, groups that were vulnerable, individuals that were vulnerable,
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because of years of neglect, because of austerity measures that had wilfully neglected investment in health care, these individuals were hit the hardest. they had the least and they received the least. the report also says governments have used covid—i9 to repress dissent. the philippines, nigeria, brazil and india are accused of using the pandemic as an excuse for tougher policing. countries such as china are accused of suppressing information, and rich countries are criticised for not thinking globally and refusing to share knowledge on vaccine production. amnesty says necessary restrictions taken to deal with a health crisis should be short, focused and proportionate. it says, instead many countries have extended their extraordinary powers. it concludes that covid has been weaponised by leaders around the world.
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drivers living in cities are being asked to think twice about buying big suvs. the appeal has been made by the rac foundation — which was responding to a report by a green think—tank, the new weather institute. its co—author leo murray, told me earlier that advertisers should be taking more responsibilty. suvs is a very broad category and because of their popularity, a lot of cars which don't really have all of those capabilities are made to look like suvs. about three quarters of all suvs sold in the uk are sold to addresses that are registered in urban areas, so they are sold in cities. even when you look at the largest suvs, which do have four—wheel drive capabilities, it is still two thirds of these cars that are being sold to people who live in the cities, where there are no abilities to drive off—road.
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what we are asking for is for these vehicles to stop being advertised in the uk. the headline is, ban on suv ads but in fact, there is a bit more nuanced to it than that. the issue is that the trend towards these larger, more polluting vehicles is acting against national and international efforts to tackle climate crisis, so the trend towards buying suvs has overtaken the trend towards buying electric vehicles. so, for every electric vehicle sold in britain, there were 37 suvs sold in the uk. and because of that... the average amount of pollution coming from a new care cells in the uk has been going up in the last few years. that is absolutely down to the rise
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in popularity of suvs. what our analysis today shows that most of the people that buy these vehicles evidently do not need to be driving to turn four—wheel drive cars. we actually put the blame not so much on consumers for making bad choices but on the car manufacturers and the advertisers that are pushing them towards those choices and the reason for that is that, you know, the work that we published last year showed that suvs are much more profitable for manufacturers and they make far more money for each one being sold. so they have been using more own more of their advertising spend on pushing these. they are more profitable product ranges, which also happen to be much larger and much more polluting. now at the start of the pandemic
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it was toilet paper — now it's ketchup. the united states is facing a shortage of one of its most iconic condiments — due to the pandemic. heinz — which produces the most popular brand — says it has been unable to keep up with surging demand for sachets of ketchup, although it is now boosting production. demand has been driven by the surge in takeaway food, coupled with advice to avoid using communal bottles in restaurants. someone has just told someone hasjust told me someone has just told me as long with hand sanitiser they carry their own bottle of ketchup wherever they go! don't mix up the two! now, what's in your shed? a lawn mower...old bikes..broken furniture...what ever is in there — i bet they don't look these we're going to show in a moment. from a peaky blinders themed bar, a custom—built yoga studio — they are just two of the contenders vying to be named 'shed of the year.�* and it's a packed field! graham satchell has been to meet the people whose humble shed is their pride and joy. we don't like to call it a shed.
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it's wooden—built, but it is a yoga and pilates studio, which is where i teach and work. i'd have said probably for 15 years, over and over, "i would love to have my own studio, i would love to have my own studio," and, ta—da! my husband goes, "hmm, 0k." so began a mammoth lockdown project. geraint has spent most of the last year building a yoga studio for his wife, mel, in the back garden. it's been incredibly enjoyable, hugely satisfying to be able to stand in the kitchen window and look down and see something that i've created myself is just fantastic. the finished studio has underfloor heating, wi—fi, sound and vision. it's allowed mel to do her classes online. mel started doing yoga to help her cope with postnatal depression.
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it's been a huge saviour for me. and if i can help transfer that to others, then fantastic. what would it mean to you if you were to win shed of the year? it would be crazy. to have created this and thenjoin the shed pantheon would be fantastic. it really would. to see it on a computer and develop it into sd and show me what could be... amazing. it's absolutely incredible. i couldn't be more proud. and eternally grateful. it's really quite tremendous, yeah. we always knew that the first name for the bar had to be something to do with peaky blinders,
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and that's why we called it mick and sue's peaky blinders. the fact that sue is actually in love with cillian murphy. he's a good—looking lad, isn't he? got to say that. cheers! mick and sue's peaky blinders shed pub has been a lockdown labour of love. it helped the whole family get through the last year. having the kids here with us all through the lockdown meant that we could all support each other and we could all love each other. and we knew we were all safe. and we knew, you know, most of all that we were playing by the rules, which was very, very important to us. it's been an escape away from the house, to come into here just to chill and relax and feel as though you're in a different world, basically. and when the bars do open up again, we don't want to go out. we're happy here. we're happy staying in our own bubble here and socialising this way.
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seeing patients go through covid has been very challenging. it affects you every day you come home from work. and you absorb that. so it's about how do i manage myself, and prepare to go in the next day and do it all again? so, hence, the shed. diane's shed has become a haven from the outside world. she is a frailty nurse caring for patients in care homes. it sort of puts things in place, and you canjust sigh a relief and say, right, i can do this again tomorrow, i can go back into work with that smile on my face and nurse my patients. it's a bit of a joke with my son, my teenage son, who says, "where's mum?" to dad, and dad says, "oh, she's away with the fairies." it'sjust, yeah, it's
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a comfy, cosy place to be. i call it scribbles, i do scribbles in my shed. i'm not an artist, you know, i'm nowhere near, but it's just that mindfulness, if you like, ofjust doing something that i enjoy that i can just distract from everyday, what's going on in the world. how do you feel about being on the shortlist for shed of the year? it's a bit mad! i'm quite honoured, actually, because it'sjust a humble ten by eight shed. yeah, it's a really weird feeling, actually, shed of the year. but it's just my cosy space. some breaking news. we'vejust heard the mhra and thejoint some breaking news. we'vejust heard the mhra and the joint council for vaccinations and immunisations are
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going to hold a joint press briefing this afternoon at three, the same time the european medicines regulator holds its briefing. both are expected to give an updated analysis on any link between the astrazeneca vaccine and rare blood clots. now on bbc news, another chance to see your questions answered. viewers have been getting in touch. let's start by talking about the latest we know about the oxford astrazeneca vaccine, and the other one that has started to be rolled out in the uk, the moderna. we are expecting a busy afternoon on the vaccine front. there is a news conference due from the ema at three o'clock this afternoon. we are expecting a separate news conference at some
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point from the mhra, that could be today or tomorrow. both groups have been looking into the possible link between the astrazeneca vaccine and a very rare blood clot, so we should get more information about that this afternoon. important to point out, we're not talking about standard blood clots, it's very rare condition, normally found in the brain but sometimes in other parts of the body, that combine a blood clot with something called a low platelet count. platelets are the cells in your blood that are responsible for clotting. so it's very strange to see a low count of those combined with clots in the blood. and that is what regulators, doctors have been looking into. the latest statistics, we should get an update at some point today or tomorrow, are from march 2a, we have seen 30 cases of these very rare clots in the uk,
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seven deaths after the astrazeneca vaccine was administered. it doesn't necessarily mean vaccine was to blame, itjust means people noticed them after taking the vaccine. in 18 million doses, 30 cases out of 80 million is a very low number. we also have the third vaccine being rolled out now, moderna. the uk has bought 17 million doses of this. we had the first doses given today in south—west wales and we've just found out in glasgow as well. it's being used widely in the us, part of president trump's big push on the vaccine front last year. also being used in europe. it's manufactured, the european version, in switzerland, which is outside the eu. sent to spain for what is called fill and finish where they put it in the bottles, then sent to us. very much the beginning of the process, just a couple of thousand doses available at the moment. should have 17 million eventually. we have quite a few questions from people who have a lot of queries concerns.
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celia kingsley: i'm not sure if the benefits about vaccines. of a vaccine outweigh the risks. so this is one of the key questions that regulators have been looking at about the astrazeneca vaccine. at the moment, the who, the ema in europe and the mhra in the uk have said it is firmly the case that the benefits do outweigh any risks and people should get the vaccine if offered. to explain that, you need to get into the maths of all this. the latest data, the uk data, shows there is a one in 600,000 chance of having the astrazeneca vaccine and then getting one of these rare blood clots. that does not mean it is necessarily causing it, that is just the relationship. if you think of six wembley stadiums full of people who have received
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one dose of this vaccine, one person out of those six full stadiums will have developed a clot based on the latest data. then what the regulators are doing is comparing that with the chance of getting covid. so here it depends very much on how old you are. if you are in your 80s or 90s, and you get covid, you have an eight in 100 chance, an 8% chance of needing hospital treatment, and a 6% chance of dying. that is still quite small, that is a 94% chance of not dying, but it is much higher than the risk of those clots. as you go down the age groups, that risk profile changes. for me, i am 44, if i get covid there is a two in 100 chance of me needing to go into hospital and a one in a thousand chance of me dying. again, very small, even smaller than if you are older, but that is starting to compare with the chance
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of these blood clots. still much smaller, but still... as you go down into the 30s and 20s, that risk produces. —— that risk reduces. so that is the risk balance the regulators are having to weigh up. if you give the vaccine to the younger age groups, does that risk start to equalise up? at the moment they are saying, no, it doesn't. it is always more complicated than we would like. heather lack: has the pfizer vaccine been studied to see if there are any instances of blood clots? it would be interesting to know. it has. at the moment the best data we have on this is from the uk and it's from a while back. originally the mhra said there was five cases of astrazeneca and two of pfizer, but it switched on its latest assessment, and said over 30 cases it has seen so far of this very rare clot, all of those are after taking astrazeneca and zero after taking pfizer. however, there is a big but,
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and this is reporting bias. if you look for something, you are more likely to find something. in germany, doctors there have been sent a letter saying, if you notice symptoms in people who have taken the astrazeneca jab, get in touch immediately. in that situation, people are more likely to notice people who are having these symptoms after taking that particular vaccine. so that is something again the regulators are having to disentangle, are they genuinely seeing higher rates for the astrazeneca jab, or are they seeing it because people are looking for it? the reality is we probably won't know until this afternoon when they explain it in more detail. julia from epping: is it possible to request a different vaccine for the second dose if you have concerns or have had side effects? at the moment, the answer in the uk is no. interestingly, scientists think this is something that could be very useful and be scientifically plausible.
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there are trials going on at the moment to see if it might work better if you have one vaccine and then a different one, because your immune system is primed by the first vaccine and then you get a different one and it creates an even stronger response in your immune system afterwards. having said that, uk regulators are saying they will not do this until the trials are completed. in other countries, they are. in germany they have said in that younger age group, under 60s, if they have had the astrazeneca jab they can have a differentjab for their second dose. at the moment in the uk that is not what we are doing. anonymous: i would like to know if the data discloses whether those suffering these rare blood clots share certain characteristics, such as sex, underlying pre—existing low platelet counts, being on hrt, and so on. it's a really good question, and at the risk of sounding like a broken record, this is exactly what the regulators are looking into.
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there is some real confusion here. in germany, the latest figures we have, of the 31 cases of this rare blood clot they have noticed, they say 29 were women between the ages of 20 and 63, and just two men. we don't have comparable data for the uk, but if you look at the first five cases in the uk, they were all men. so there is a real difference there, and regulators will have to know what is going on. it's worth pointing out these rare blood clots are much more common anyway in women than in men. so before the vaccine, that was the pattern that was noticed. and i think there could be a link to the use of the contraceptive pill, sojust because more women are potentially being noticed in that german sample, that could be explained by other factors, not necessarily something the vaccine is doing. again, we will have to wait for the reports from the ema and the mhra later. bren lyddon: if all adults are vaccinated and children
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are little affected by covid—i9, where is this talk of a third wave of the virus coming from? this i honestly think is a question i have been asked the most week. —— the most in the last week. people have been told for months now that once we vaccinate the most vulnerable, that is the first step towards going back to normal life in this country. there are very different views on this at the moment, whether we will see this third wave. chris whitty, the deputy chief medical officer for england, has warned about this risk of a third wave, and his argument — and other scientists support this — say, look, we can't think of vaccines as the silver bullet that protects everyone all the time. the latest data we have is after a first dose of both vaccines in the uk, four weeks after in an elderly population, it is maybe stopping 60% of infections, 80% of hospitalisations. so there is a group that will have this vaccine
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and not be fully protected. plus there are people who have not yet been vaccinated. so if you go back to us all going to the beach, to pubs, eating in restaurants, the worry is that could cause a real surge that group. having said that, look what else is happening in the world. in israel they have lifted pretty much every restriction, they have vaccinated upwards of 60% of their population with two doses, they have noticed cases go through the floor. they have not seen an uptick in cases. so the honest answer is we don't know yet, some scientists think a third wave is a possibility but it is not certain. thank you very much for answering all those questions. hello, again. today will feel more like a winter's day than a spring one. having said that, the wind isn't going to be as strong as it was yesterday for most,
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so we will lose that wind chill. it's going to be a dry day for many parts of the country today, but cloud will build replacing the early brightness that we have seen. we are still under the influence of this arctic air represented by the blues across the chart but look at what's coming in from the atlantic. later in the day something a wee bit milder. we have a lot of cloud across northern ireland, wales and the south—west, the same too across parts of northern and eastern scotland and england. but some of that will thin and break, we'll see some sunshine, and most of the wintry showers fading except for the north of scotland where we also have gusty winds. so sunny spells, or bright spells, through the afternoon, the cloud thickening across northern ireland bringing in some patchy rain by the end of the afternoon. with our maximum temperatures one in lerwick to eight as we push further south. usually at this stage in april we would be looking at roughly between 10—13 , so we're below par. now, there will be some early frost in the west to start the night. but as the cloud and also the rain pushes steadily eastwards preceded
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by some snow on the hills, well, temperatures will actually go up. where the cloud remains broken, for example in the south—east, it will be a frosty start to the day tomorrow. tomorrow, where we have got the clear skies, we will see some sunshine, a bit more cloud around. our rain pushing east and moving southwards through the day, the wind, though, having changed direction to more of a westerly, that's a milder direction for us represented in the temperatures, widely into double figures. but behind this weather front which is a cold front, cold air will start to return and we will see some snow once again on the mountains. by friday, the weather front sinking southwards with this band of cloud and patchy rain in southern areas. behind it, clear skies, some showers and some of those will be wintry again, in the north down to lower levels, and you can see the difference in the temperatures both sides of that front, still mild in the south, much colder in the north. that's showing up quite nicely on saturday as well. but on saturday an area of low pressure close by could bring a weather front
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across the channel islands and the south—east. that will bring some higher temperatures but also the risk of some rain. but generally as we go into the weekend it is going to feel colder.
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the uk gets it third coronavirus vaccine, as the first moderna doses are given to people in west wales. it comes as trials of the astrazeneca vaccine on children are paused because of concerns about a possible link with rare blood clots in adults. scientists say people should still have the jab. for the people being offered the vaccine at the moment, the risk/benefit is very strongly in favour of receiving the vaccine. we'll talk live to our medical editor for the latest. also this lunchtime... brazil records more than 4,000 covid deaths in 2a hours — its worst day since the start of the pandemic. its health system is overwhelmed. a study in the us suggests people diagnosed with covid—i9 appear to be
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at greater risk of developing conditions including

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