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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 7, 2021 9:00am-10:01am BST

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this is bbc news. i'm annita mcveigh. the headlines: a trial of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine in children has been paused while an investigation takes place into whether the jab is linked to rare blood clots in adults. leading scientists urge the public to continue getting the jab, saying the benefits far outweigh the risks. the risks of getting sick or dying of covid for all the people currently being offered first and second doses are far and away greater than any small theoretical risk that may exist relating to these cases, which are extremely rare. the third covid vaccine approved for use in the uk will begin rolling out later today, with people in wales the first to get the moderna jab. please do get in touch with your thoughts on the uk vaccine roll—out —
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i'm on twitter @annita—mcveigh and you can use the hashtag #bbcyourquestions... we #bbcyourquestions... will try we #bbcyourquestions. .. will try to we #bbcyourquestions... will try to read out some of those we will try to read out some of those comments. the mental health impact of coronavirus — new research suggests covid—19 can increase the risk of conditions such as depression, dementia and strokes. and coming up.... what do a peaky blinders themed bar and a custom—built yoga studio have in common? they're both contenders to be named shed of the year. we'll be hearing from their owners... hello and welcome to bbc news. the roll—out of the
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oxford—astrazeneca vaccine should be paused for young people until regulators have issued guidance on its safety, according to a government advisor. dr maggie wearmouth, who sits on thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation said the issue was about safety and public confidence. speaking to the telegraph she said, "we don't want to cover anything up "that we feel the public should be knowing." it follows the suspension of a trial of the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine on children while the uk regulator investigates concerns the jab may be causing rare blood clots in a tiny number of adults. none of the 300 children involved in the trial has suffered a clot. meanwhile in wales, the third covid—19 vaccine from the us company moderna is being rolled out across the uk for the first time. patients in carmarthenshire will be the first to receive it. it comes as uk researchers found people diagnosed with covid—19 in the previous six months were more likely to develop depression, dementia, psychosis and stroke.
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more on that coming up very soon. more now on the pause in the trial of the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine on children in this report from our medical editor, fergus walsh. there you go — all done. nearly 300 children aged six to 17 are taking part in the astrazeneca vaccine trial in england, which began in february. oxford university said there'd been no blood clots in the volunteers but, out of an abundance of caution, it had stopped vaccinations, pending the outcome of the safety review in adults. more than 18 million people in the uk have received the astrazeneca vaccine. the mhra said last week there'd been 30 rare cases of blood clots, including seven deaths. so it's nice to be able to see that the area is sterile. the prime minister, visiting an astrazeneca plant in macclesfield, once again gave his firm support for the vaccine.
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the best thing people should do is look at what the mhra say, our independent regulator — that's why we have them, that's why they're independent. and their advice to people is to, you know, keep going out there, get yourjab, get your second jab. as a precautionary measure, the mhra updated its advice last month to say that anyone with a headache that lasted for more than four days after receiving the astrazeneca vaccine, or bruising beyond the site of the jab, should seek medical attention. both of the vaccines we're using are highly effective against covid and the risks of getting sick or dying of covid for all the people currently being offered first and second doses are far and away greater than any small theoretical risk that may exist relating to these cases — which are extremely rare. this could be very much compromised if people think that this isn't being taken seriously, that this isn't being examined in great detail.
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but i think individuals have difficulties in sort of understanding risks and perceptions, and seeing this in relation to other sorts of illnesses or diseases or outcomes. the astrazeneca vaccine is central to the huge success of the roll—out ofjabs in the uk, which is way ahead of the rest of europe. bonjour. france has restricted the astrazeneca vaccine to adults over 55 — germany, to those over 60 — because of concerns about blood clots in younger adults. the european medicines agency and the uk regulator are due to give updated recommendations in the next day or two. maintaining public confidence in this highly effective vaccine will be vital. fergus walsh, bbc news. we can speak now to paul hunter, professor in medicine at the university of east anglia. professor hunter, good to happy with
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us today. lots to discuss. and right at the outset, let's establish your position is on this possible link between developing blood clots and the astrazeneca vaccine, something which i think you've been changing your mind on slightly over the last week or so?— week or so? well, absolutely. i think one _ week or so? well, absolutely. i think one of — week or so? well, absolutely. i think one of the _ week or so? well, absolutely. i think one of the concerns, - week or so? well, absolutely. i. think one of the concerns, always come up with something like a mass roll—out of any medication or vaccine is that you will see clusters of cases following that intervention that could arise entirely by chance. the problem is that once you start seeing that in multiple geographical regions, with the same disease following the same intervention, then, ithink, the odds are more that it's going to be, actually, related rather than some sort of statistical glitch. and added to that the fact that we were only really seeing this condition in people following the oxford astrazeneca vaccine and not at all,
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really, seeing it in people following the pfizer vaccine. i think the evidence is leaning towards there being a real relationship between the vaccine and this outcome. but it is a, still, very rare outcome and far, far rarer than the risk of severe disease and death if you don't have the vaccine. in terms of the risk—benefit ratio, you are clearly saying to people have the vaccine and i think you had the astrazeneca vaccine yourself? yes, i had my first dose and nothing that i've read or seen in the literature and the data would, in any way, discourage me for going from my second dose next month. you are well aware — from my second dose next month. you are well aware that dr maggie wearmouth, from thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation has said it might be betterfor public confidence to halt the roll—out for younger people, although clearly in the uk, we are not at that point anyway... the uk, we are not at that point anyway- - -_
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the uk, we are not at that point anyway...- until- the uk, we are not at that point anyway. . .- until the - the uk, we are not at that point i anyway. . .- until the safety anyway... indeed. untilthe safety ofthe anyway... indeed. untilthe safety of the oxford _ anyway... indeed. untilthe safety of the oxford astrazeneca - anyway... indeed. untilthe safety of the oxford astrazeneca jab - anyway... indeed. untilthe safety of the oxford astrazeneca jab is l of the oxford astrazeneca jab is certain. do you think that is more about public confidence? bringing people with the science rather than concerns over the jab per se? weill. concerns over the 'ab per se? well, i think concerns over the 'ab per se? well, t think that _ concerns over the 'ab per se? well, i think that one _ concerns over the 'ab per se? well, i think that one of— concerns over the jab per se? well, i think that one of the _ concerns over the jab per se? well, i think that one of the things - concerns over the jab per se? -ii i think that one of the things we need to know is more details about the cases of this disease that have been occurring across europe. early indications are that it predominantly seems to be affecting younger people are people under a0 or 50, younger people are people under a0 or50, ratherthan younger people are people under a0 or 50, rather than older people. and that's not too surprising. because when you look at how the epidemiology of... even before covert, blood clots, it tended to affect younger people rather than younger people —— even before covid. that would not be a surprise. at the moment, we've got time because we're not rolling out this vaccine to younger... 0rany vaccine not rolling out this vaccine to younger... or any vaccine to younger people at the moment. so by the time we've been able to look at the data carefully, by the time the
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regulatory agencies have come to their opinions, we will have many other vaccines on the shelves that could be given to younger people. if that's the conclusion that the regulatory agencies come to. but there doesn't need to be any kind of pause in terms of its use in the vaccination programme, that's what you're saying, as well? hat vaccination programme, that's what you're saying, as well?— you're saying, as well? not at all and, in you're saying, as well? not at all and. in fact. _ you're saying, as well? not at all and. in fact. if— you're saying, as well? not at all and, in fact, if we _ you're saying, as well? not at all and, in fact, if we did _ you're saying, as well? not at all and, in fact, if we did pause - and, in fact, if we did pause vaccination now, they would be rather more severe disease and deaths than would be the case if we carry on as we are.— carry on as we are. because, of course, carry on as we are. because, of course. and _ carry on as we are. because, of course. and i _ carry on as we are. because, of course, and i think— carry on as we are. because, of course, and i think it's - carry on as we are. because, of course, and i think it's worth i course, and i think it's worth reminding everyone about this, covid itself can cause blood clots and a story we're going to be talking about a little later, this study into psychological and neurological conditions caused by covid raises that very point. so, you know, that's got to be factored in, as well. �* , ,., , that's got to be factored in, as well. �* , , �* that's got to be factored in, as well. �* , , ~ ., well. absolutely. and covid certainly — well. absolutely. and covid certainly does _ well. absolutely. and covid certainly does cause - well. absolutely. and covid certainly does cause clots, | well. absolutely. and covidl certainly does cause clots, it
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well. absolutely. and covid - certainly does cause clots, it does cause something similar to something called intravascular coagulation, where you get blood clots throughout the body and use up your platelets. it certainly can be associated. and one of the possibilities is that people who are going for their vaccines get covid early on after their vaccine and still suffer these consequences. although the fact that you're not seeing that in people receiving pfizer would tend to argue against that suggestion. bud receiving pfizer would tend to argue against that suggestion.— against that suggestion. and 'ust to cover this point i against that suggestion. and 'ust to cover this point as i against that suggestion. and 'ust to cover this point as well, h against that suggestion. and just to cover this point as well, would - against that suggestion. and just to cover this point as well, would i - against that suggestion. and just to cover this point as well, would i be | cover this point as well, would i be right in saying that the pause in the trial involving children, that is because children have, one of your colleagues has described, as a vanishingly rare risk of becoming seriously ill or dying from covid. therefore, if they are involved in a vaccine trial, everyone involved wants to be absolutely certain that there is no risk to children? absolutely. and, you know, to a large extent, the pressure on vaccinating younger people, younger adults and children, is... is
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primarily to reduce transmission in the community generally rather than necessarily benefiting them. although some children do go on to develop severe conditions, like multisystem inflammatory syndrome. so, there are... there are serious consequences in children, but they are not seen anywhere near as commonly as in older adults. and so anything that we do for children has to be more safe than it is... has to be... we have to know for certain that it's safe in that age group. and i think, at the moment, with this question, it was entirely appropriate that we stopped the oxford astrazeneca trial in 0xford astrazeneca trial in children. oxford astrazeneca trial in children. ., oxford astrazeneca trial in children-— oxford astrazeneca trial in children. ., ., ., _ children. you mentioned that by the time we get — children. you mentioned that by the time we get around _ children. you mentioned that by the time we get around to _ children. you mentioned that by the time we get around to vaccinating i time we get around to vaccinating younger age groups there may be other vaccines in play, anyway. and let's talk about moderna being rolled out in the uk for the first time today in wales. what do we know about this particular vaccine, its efficacy and how it fits into the wider vaccination programme? yeah,
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well, it's actually _ wider vaccination programme? yeah, well, it's actually very, _ wider vaccination programme? yeah, well, it's actually very, very - well, it's actually very, very similar to the pfizer vaccine. it's produced in roughly the same way and it works in exactly the same way as the pfizer vaccine. and when you look at the results of the phase three trials, it's very difficult, until you see the title on the top of the paper, to work out which data comes from witch trials, the results are so very similar. so, yes it is... —— comes from witch trials. it is... —— comes from witch trials. it is great that we have another source of vaccine coming into the country. but it is very little difference to pfizer. so it will have a useful role to play, no doubt. 50. pfizer. so it will have a useful role to play, no doubt.- pfizer. so it will have a useful role to play, no doubt. so, is it tossible role to play, no doubt. so, is it possible that _ role to play, no doubt. so, is it possible that if _ role to play, no doubt. so, is it possible that if someone - role to play, no doubt. so, is it possible that if someone has . role to play, no doubt. so, is it. possible that if someone has had their first vaccination and that has been pfizer or astrazeneca, obviously, that the second vaccination could be the moderna one? fist vaccination could be the moderna one? �* ., �* , ., one? at the moment, we're trying to avoid that- — one? at the moment, we're trying to avoid that- at — one? at the moment, we're trying to avoid that. at the _ one? at the moment, we're trying to avoid that. at the moment, - one? at the moment, we're trying to avoid that. at the moment, the - one? at the moment, we're trying to avoid that. at the moment, the view| avoid that. at the moment, the view is that whatever you had for your first injection, you should have for your second injection. and i think
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that's the right decision, at the moment, but trials are going on to see whether you can mix and match vaccines between the first and second doses. and these... mixing vaccines in that way is called heterologous prime boost. and there is evidence from vaccines before covid that this sort of mixing and matching of vaccines might give you better protection than using the same vaccine for both but we don't know that for certain for covid and we won't know that until the results of these trials are per published probably sometime during the summer or early autumn. {lilia probably sometime during the summer or early autumn-— or early autumn. ok, professor paul hunter, or early autumn. ok, professor paul hunter. thank— or early autumn. ok, professor paul hunter, thank you _ or early autumn. ok, professor paul hunter, thank you very _ or early autumn. ok, professor paul hunter, thank you very much - or early autumn. ok, professor paul hunter, thank you very much for- or early autumn. ok, professor paull hunter, thank you very much for your time, good to talk to you. mt; time, good to talk to you. my pleasure- _ as we've heard there could well be developments from the european regulator the european medicines agency today. 0r or perhaps tomorrow. and our correspondent, anna holligan, is at their headquarters in amsterdam. this focus on the astrazeneca jab,
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the head of the ema vaccines has suggested a link between the jab and a rare blood clots, when when we hear from them, a rare blood clots, when when we hearfrom them, any a rare blood clots, when when we hear from them, any updates? a rare blood clots, when when we hearfrom them, any updates? in a rare blood clots, when when we hear from them, any updates? in six hours' hear from them, any updates? in six hours' time- — hear from them, any updates? in six hours' time- -- _ hear from them, any updates? in six hours' time. -- when _ hear from them, any updates? in six hours' time. -- when will _ hear from them, any updates? in six hours' time. -- when will we - hear from them, any updates? in six hours' time. -- when will we hear i hours' time. -- when will we hear from them- _ hours' time. -- when will we hear from them. we _ hours' time. -- when will we hear from them. we have _ hours' time. -- when will we hear from them. we have just - hours' time. -- when will we hear from them. we have just been - from them. we have 'ust been s-teakin from them. we have 'ust been speaking to h from them. we have 'ust been speaking to the _ from them. we have just been speaking to the ema, - from them. we have just been speaking to the ema, the - from them. we have just been| speaking to the ema, the body from them. we have just been - speaking to the ema, the body that regulates the use of medicines across the eu and they are holding a press briefing at 1500 bst, 1600 local time. we are expecting to hear from the part of the agency that deals with side effects of medicines. they have been investigating these rare cases, extremely rare cases of blood clots among a few people who have had the astrazeneca vaccine. you'll remember at the end of last month, the ema had said there was a possible but not proven link between the two. they have continued to analyse and investigate the available data from right around the world and we are waiting to hear the latest conclusions today.-
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waiting to hear the latest conclusions today. waiting to hear the latest conclusions toda . . , ., conclusions today. that is quite a confusint conclusions today. that is quite a confusing picture _ conclusions today. that is quite a confusing picture across - conclusions today. that is quite a confusing picture across the - conclusions today. that is quite a confusing picture across the eu l conclusions today. that is quite a | confusing picture across the eu as conclusions today. that is quite a i confusing picture across the eu as a whole anna because different countries are taking different approaches in which age group they think should and shouldn't have this particular vaccination.— particular vaccination. vaccines are vital to getting _ particular vaccination. vaccines are vital to getting out _ particular vaccination. vaccines are vital to getting out of _ particular vaccination. vaccines are vital to getting out of the - particular vaccination. vaccines are | vital to getting out of the pandemic but only if people have enough faith to actually take them and you're absolutely right. this kind of chequered approach among european governments has not helped with the public confidence issue. because at the moment, the eu has two issues. one is the supply of these vaccines and second is the public confidence. here in the netherlands, they have paused the use of the astrazeneca jab for the in the 60s and it's the same in germany. in france, it's for the under 55s. and this is one of the under 55s. and this is one of theissues the under 55s. and this is one of the issues and this is why the announcement from the ema is seen as so critical because this is the organisation that guides the european approach. but it doesn't inform the individual governments, who can take these unilateral
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decisions on their use. and it could be that the ema, today, says that there is a possible link, and updates its side—effects connected to the oxford astrazeneca jab. but that's still to be confirmed. this meeting is still ongoing, they are still analysing the data. and the speed at which these vaccines were rolled out means that the information is being reviewed in the real world in real time. and that's why we have these kind of changes in the rules among the different governments. at the moment, there's a pause in ten european countries, but many have said, depending on what the ema says today, this afternoon, probably, they may update their guidance. and at the moment, their guidance. and at the moment, the advice from the ema remains the same, if you are offered a shot of the oxford jab, then take it. the oxford 'ab, then take it. anna, thank ou the oxford jab, then take it. anna, thank you very _ the oxford jab, then take it. anna, thank you very much _ the oxford jab, then take it. anna, thank you very much and _ the oxford jab, then take it. anna, thank you very much and we i the oxford jab, then take it. anna, thank you very much and we will i the oxford jab, then take it. anna, i thank you very much and we will hear the verdict of the european medicines agency as anna was saying,
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little later on today, 3pm bst. some of you have been getting in touch already with your thoughts on the vaccine roll—out programme. 0ne vaccine roll—out programme. one person says someone who experienced an adverse reaction with the first vaccine have another brand for their second vaccine? that's a good question, we had from professor paul hunter saying the plan at the moment was not to mix vaccines across two doses —— we heard from. that's an interesting point, if someone had an adverse reaction from the first one, could it be changed? perhaps we can put that to an expert for you. another person says i had my coronavirus vaccine first dose of astrazeneca and feeling fantastic and no problems at all, don't go with the rumours of blood clots, this is not only about us, this is about keeping our country safe. the blood clots are not rumours, there are proven cases but they are extremely rare given the millions of people who have already had the vaccination. of course, it's absolutely right that we discuss all aspects of the story. thank you for your comment on that. one more tweet
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from andy of norwich, who says it seems obvious to me that it is in some people's interest to constantly rubbish the vaccine offered to the world at no profit. the astrazeneca vaccine is a big part of the covax programme, bringing the vaccination programme, bringing the vaccination programme to middle and low income countries. keep your thoughts coming in and we will try to read out some more, you can do that on twitter. researchers say that people diagnosed with covid—19 are at greater risk of developing psychological and neurological conditions, such as depression, psychosis and stroke. the team from oxford university examined the health records of more than half a million patients in the united states. here's our health reporter, rachel schraer. coronavirus breaks into our cells and multiplies wherever in the body it finds itself. that's why it causes such a wide range of symptoms from the lungs, to the gut, to the brain.
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the team at the university of oxford looked over half a million patient records in the us to see if conditions affecting the brain were more common in those who'd had covid. they looked at 1a conditions including anxiety, depression and psychosis, stroke, brain haemorrhage, and dementia. all of these conditions were seen more often in people who'd had a covid infection in the previous six months. but these conditions all have very different causes. it could be that in some people the virus actually gets into the brain and causes some damage. it could be the way your body is reacting to the virus, produces a sort of immune inflammatory response that, again, contributes to the problems. and for other people, it may simply be a psychological effect, if you like, of the stress that having covid and thinking what might happen to you next is the important factor. the study couldn't prove the virus itself was definitely causing the changes, but patients recovering from covid were more likely than similar people who'd had flu or another infection to develop a psychological or neurological condition.
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and the sicker coronavirus patients had been, the more likely they were to develop these complications. rachel schraer, bbc news. professor paul harrison is lead author of the study. you saw him in rachel's report. thanks very much forjoining us on bbc news today. we know a lot of research is already under way into covid, long covid and the physical symptoms but we have heard much less so far on the impact of mental health, psychological and neurological conditions. yes, i think so- _ neurological conditions. yes, i think so- we _ neurological conditions. yes, i think so. we have _ neurological conditions. yes, i think so. we have published i neurological conditions. yes, i think so. we have published a| neurological conditions. yes, i i think so. we have published a much smaller study a few weeks ago, which indicated anxiety in particular and also depression were common after covert, more common than after other health conditions. we need more data of a longer time period to support that. fora of a longer time period to support that. for a significant minority, anxiety and depression may well affect people with covid. we don't know how severe the illnesses were and many hopefully were mild. it
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points to a burden of mental health after infection. that points to a burden of mental health after infection.— after infection. that is one of your bacon sense. _ after infection. that is one of your bacon sense, isn't _ after infection. that is one of your bacon sense, isn't it? _ after infection. that is one of your bacon sense, isn't it? although i after infection. that is one of yourl bacon sense, isn't it? although the individual risk for most conditions is small, you are saying it could be that effect across the whole population. just put into some context for us what sort of level of risk are we talking about if someone has covid, long covid, going on to develop one of these conditions? we develop one of these conditions? - haven't looked at along covid here, we have looked, if you like, and more traditional psychiatric diagnoses. 0verall, more traditional psychiatric diagnoses. overall, we found that one in three people after covid were getting one or other of these diagnoses after six months. that isn't trivial, that included people who had similar problems before. if we only looked at people who had not previously had a neurological psychological decision, one in eight people are getting a condition of that kind after covid for the first time. that is about a0% — 50%
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greater than people who recovered from influenza and other conditions that we looked at also occurring during the pandemic period. at, that we looked at also occurring during the pandemic period. a really marked difference _ during the pandemic period. a really marked difference comparing - during the pandemic period. a really marked difference comparing covid i during the pandemic period. a really. marked difference comparing covid to come as you say, flu, or other respiratory conditions, that's really interesting. —— two, as you say. in terms of anxiety and mood disorders, how can you say it is down to the actual virus as opposed to, say, the impact of lockdown? we to, say, the impact of lockdown? - absolutely wouldn't that. i think anything if anything, our data suggests anxiety and depression after covid are psychological reactions of the virus and the implications of that and the lockdown period in general. the severity of the person's acute covid didn't really affect your risk of getting mood and anxiety problems later whereas the risk of the brain complications like the strokes and dementia, that got much greater if your covid had made you severely ill at the time. it may be that the
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mental health problems are more, if you like, a psychological reaction to covid whereas the brain complications might be more to do with something more direct, a biological consequence of the illness. ., , . biological consequence of the illness. . , ., , . illness. have you seen a distinct difference. _ illness. have you seen a distinct difference, when _ illness. have you seen a distinct difference, when you _ illness. have you seen a distinct difference, when you look- illness. have you seen a distinct difference, when you look at i illness. have you seen a distincti difference, when you look at the illness. have you seen a distinct i difference, when you look at the age profile of the participants in your study? profile of the participants in your stud ? ., , profile of the participants in your stud ? . , ., study? certainly, the older the tatient, study? certainly, the older the patient. the — study? certainly, the older the patient, the greater _ study? certainly, the older the patient, the greater the - study? certainly, the older the patient, the greater the risks. | study? certainly, the older the l patient, the greater the risks. a number of these conditions, like stroke and dementia, that is a big risk factorfor those stroke and dementia, that is a big risk factor for those conditions. in our analyses, we tried to control for those sort of factor is to simply tease out what might be covid itself. so we found that even when you, for example, match the patients for their age and previous health, patients who had gone to itu for the covid were much more likely to get strokes and dementia afterwards than the other way similar patients who hadn't been to i see you.— hadn't been to i see you. that's interesting _ hadn't been to i see you. that's interesting because _ hadn't been to i see you. that's interesting because dementia l hadn't been to i see you. that's. interesting because dementia uk hadn't been to i see you. that's i interesting because dementia uk have been picking up on this, it is known that the opposite is true, that people with dementia are more likely to get covid. it is interesting that
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you are looking at this in reverse. so, what's next for this area of research, professor?— so, what's next for this area of research, professor? there are other implications — research, professor? there are other implications and _ research, professor? there are other implications and two _ research, professor? there are other implications and two immediately i implications and two immediately come to mind. firstly, the explanations, the mechanisms, if the data are correct, we need to expect a significant increase in the numbers of people presenting with these conditions either to their gps, no neurology or psychiatry. we need to be ready. in research, the pressing matter is what is the cause, the mechanisms at play because it is difficult to know about effective interventions to stop these complications or treat them. if we don't understand what them. if we don't understand what the origins of it is. is it, for example, the virus itself in the brain, is it blood clots on the brain? inflammation and so on. we need different kinds of studies that can explore the biology of the relationships.— relationships. professor paul harrison. — relationships. professor paul harrison, good _ relationships. professor paul harrison, good to _ relationships. professor paul harrison, good to talk- relationships. professor paul harrison, good to talk to i relationships. professor paul| harrison, good to talk to you, relationships. professor paul- harrison, good to talk to you, thank you for your time today, lead author
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of the study at the university of oxford. we were mentioning a few 0xford. we were mentioning a few minutes ago that the roll—out of the moderna vaccine was beginning in the uk today in wales. it is always a big moment when we hear about the first person to get one of these jabs. the first person to get the moderna jab in the elle taylor uk is, a 2a—year—old unpaid care from alan ford and she received the moderna vaccine at the west wales general hospital in carmarthen this morning. we will talk to our wales correspondent tomos morgan very shortly about the roll—out. later, we'll be answering your questions about this. so if you have concerns about blood clots and the oxford/astrazeneca vaccine, the risks to children and the rollout of the moderna vaccine, then send your questions using the hash tag bbc your questions or by emailing yourquestions@bbc. co. uk.
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brazil has registered a new daily record of covid—19 deaths on tuesday. the health ministry said a,195 people had died with the virus in the previous 2a hours. more than 300,000 brazilians have lost their lives from covid since the start of the pandemic, the second—highest total in the world after the united states. 0pposition politician eduardo leite, governor of rio grande do sul — says the situation in brazil has been influenced by the actions of the president. what we are facing here in brazil, what we have here, it is a sad situation that is the consequence of the lack of co—ordination in the federal level by the national government. the... we have here it is president bolsonaro confronting governors and mayors. and the main tool that we have, the main weapon we have, to not
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allow the coronavirus to spread in an easy way, and the weapon is the social distancing. of course the president is wrong... he may not be the only person in the world that is right, being against social distancing. the world recognises that the best practice, the scientists, the researchers, they are almost unanimous about that. but the president makes this situation of confronting economy and protecting the lives of its people. and what we have is that without feeling that they are protected, people will not be confident to keep running the economy. so, his behaviour is, unfortunately, killing brazilians and it is hurting our economy.
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0ur latin america correspondent, will grant, has more on how this shocking total is playing out in brazilian politics. there's tension between the state and the federal government and, of course, it has repercussions beyond the borders of brazil, too, with, you know, the rest of south america, the rest of latin america, the rest of the world is concerned, really, about what's happening in brazil. because, of course, it's not just that these numbers are so terribly bad for brazil, for brazilian families, who are losing all upwards of a third of a million people since the pandemic began. but also that the strains that have been identified in brazil are so virulent, are so transmissible. so this is really genuinely being considered by epidemiologists around the world as a global threat. we hear tales, as well, of doctors, nurses, at their absolute wits end of doing everything they can
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simply to get through to the end of a shift. you know, i've spoken to family members, i've spoken to doctors. they really do paint an almost, you know, near—apocalyptic picture of the situation. we should say jair bolsonaro believes there is a lot of media hype aboutjust how bad things are. but when you just look at the raw data, when you look at those numbers from today, the highest the country's experienced, one of the highest numbers in the world, then you know it is a very, very serious crisis unfolding in brazil. will grant reporting. a police briefing is due to take place later in northern ireland — after the violence that took place over the easter period. a1 police officers were hurt and ten people were arrested — as a result of trouble in loyalist areas. the northern ireland assembly will meet tomorrow to discuss the violence after it was recalled from its easter break. doctors have been told not to prescribe painkillers to people suffering from chronic pain that has no known cause. the national institute for health
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and care excellence says there's little to no evidence that treating people with paracetamol or opioids makes any difference. it says people should be offered a range of therapies, including exercise, acupuncture or anti—depressants instead. motorists who live in crowded cities have been urged to think twice before buying a large suv. the rac foundation questioned whether big sports utility vehicles, colloquially known as chelsea tractors, are needed just to nip to the shops. the motoring group was responding to research, which showed that most suvs are bought by urban drivers. we have been telling you so far this morning about the roll—out of the moderna vaccine in wales, the first part of the uk to be rolling out this third vaccine coming into play in the fight against covid—19. let's get more from our correspondent tomas morgan. we have heard a bit of detail about the first person to get the jab in
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wales. yes, in west wales, carmarthenshire, the hospital in carmarthenshire, the hospital in carmarthenshire, the hospital in carmarthenshire, the harold varner health board, 5000 doses delivered over the last few days, and they begin the this morning. they started around 8:30am. the plan is for it to be rolled out in england and scotland in due course and other areas of wales. the uk has bought around 17 million doses of the moderna vaccine which us trials in about 30,000 people suggest it is very effective, effective to about 95% against general coburn and in severe covid cases 100% effective. and also, the company that has made the vaccine also says it is also effective against the english variant and the south african variant and the south african variant at the moment. 5000 doses in west wales initially and from the
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there will be slowly more as they get dispersed across england, wales and northern ireland and scotland. this is the third of the seven vaccines that the uk has bought and of course they will be slowly rolled out in due course. 0verall, out in due course. overall, how does this fit into the picture of the vaccine roll—out in wales and how that's going? wells is doing incredibly well when it comes to the vaccine roll—out really. the welsh government saying that now everybody over 50 has had their first dose of the vaccine. that was somewhat disputed yesterday, some people claiming they haven't had a call from their gp or from the nhs to say they need to go in but almost everyone over 50 now, so now moving into the last block of 1.5 million or so of people between the 16-50 1.5 million or so of people between the 16—50 years old that will get their firstjab. the 16—50 years old that will get theirfirstjab. if you remember just before christmas the situation in wales was far worse than other areas of the uk, the other uk
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notions, higher rates of covid, hospitals and worst positions. now we are in a position where wales is leading the way on vaccinations and the rates are the lowest of the uk notions. so things are moving in the right direction, but as easing takes place there is a cautious approach while government and also knowing that rates could increase as societies locked —— unlocked slowly. thank you very much. merrick now it is time for the sport with katherine downes at the bbc sport centre. good morning. a very late goalfrom phil foden has give manchester city the edge in their champions league quarter—final with borussia dortmund — but the match wasn't without controversy. city were ahead within 20 minutes — a neat move finished off by kevin de bruyne — and moments later they had a penalty award overturned by var.
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dortmund then thought they were level — but england internationaljude bellingham's goal was disallowed — the referee ruled he had fouled ederson. replays suggested that was a harsh decision. marco reus did equalise for the german side in the 8ath minute. but that wasn't late enough — foden making it 2—1 in the 90th — and the city manager had no complaints. the referees were brilliant. the game was not a problem. so it wasn't a penalty, the ar told me it wasn't a penalty, the ar told me it wasn't a penalty, the ar told me it wasn't a penalty, and the bellingham action from the leg is higher—than—expected. —— var told me. the referee and the linesman was perfect. fit. me. the referee and the linesman was terfect. �* ., ., me. the referee and the linesman was terfect. �* ., , perfect. a good night for pep guardiola- — butjurgen klopp said liverpool made it "too easy" for real madrid in spain.
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they won 3—1 in the first match between the sides since madrid's win in the champions league final three years ago. 20—year—old brazilian viniciusjunior is fast becoming a big star — and he scored the opening goal, before they went 2—0 up. liverpool came out fighting after the break, and mo salah reduced the deficit. but they were stung when vinicius found the net again — and that leaves liverpool with a really tough task in the home leg next week. if you want to go to the semifinals and that is absolutely 0k and fair, you have to deserve it with the performance you put on the pitch. and tonight we were not good enough to win this game. but the only good news is, there's another game, where we saw there. but it's not like we have an advantage now. we are under pressure, of course, and we have to show that we can deal with that. away from the champions league. norwich look almost certain to go straight back up to the premier league. they thrashed huddersfield 7—0 at carrow road — teemu pukki scoring a hat—trick. and that takes them eight points clear of watford at the top of the championship. scotland forward molly wright will miss the rest
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of the women's six nations after receiving a three—match ban. she was sent off for a dangerous high tackle on england's vickii cornborough, in the scots' 52—10 defeat on saturday, minutes after coming on as a replacement. she was remorseful when she admitted the offence afterwards, so the usual six—game ban was reduced to three. there'll be one big name missing when the masters gets under way tomorrow, and that's tiger woods, who's still recovering after his car crash. he's been an inspiration to many players — none more so than his friend rory mcilroy, who recently learned a big lesson about how woods managed to win as much as he has. i went over to tiger's house a few weeks ago to see him. and in his family room he's got his trophy cabinet. and it is his 15 major trophies. and i said, "that's really cool, where are all the others?" he was like, "i don't know." "what?" he goes, "yeah, my mum has some, there's a few in the office, and a few wherever." so then i went, i was driving home and i was thinking,
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i mean, he thought that, right, that's all he cared about. so how easy must that have felt for him to win all the others? if all he cared about was four weeks of the year, the other stuff must have just been like practice. a bit of perspective for rory. will that be a help or hindrance to him ten years on from that famous final—round implosion when he blew that four shot lead? let's not remind ourselves of that! highlights of the masters over the next few days and coverage on radio 5 live. that's all the sport for now. the office for national statistics is due to publish data shortly on the levels of loneliness by in the uk. the data explores how loneliness is associated with individual characteristics, like household circumstances and aspects of the local authority where people live. the figures showjust how challenging and sometimes isolating the past year has been for many of us. let me bring you some detail. 0ne
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let me bring you some detail. one of the questions is whether people report feeling lonely often or always. 7% of the adult population in great britain report that they feel that way, feel lonely often or always. that other bit of detail they have released so far is in relation specifically to students, 29%, much higher numberfor students, report feeling lonely, often or always, remaining at a similar level to february 2021. so the number of students feeling that way much higher than the general aduu way much higher than the general adult population which is 7% reporting feeling lonely often or always. the figures show how challenging and sometimes isolating the past year has been for many of us. john maguire has been speaking to some people who have been struggling. hello. there you go. thank you. was it all right? yes, all right today. once a week, maria calls in on sue to deliver some shopping, to chat and to catch up.
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it's my birthday today. i know — happy birthday! thank you. isolation and loneliness have been some of the cruellest effects of the pandemic. it's been very hard. yeah _ and what's been the hardest aspect for you, would you say? not seeing my friends, not seeing anybody. and i've usually got quite a good social life — i belong to u3a, which is something all over the country where you can go to groups. and, of course, that had to stop. it's not right to be locked up in your house and not see anybody else, really, is it? what are you most looking forward to, over the next few months? well, when we... when businesses open, like cafes and pubs and different things, i'm looking forward to seeing friends. maria is one of the a00 volunteers from a group called love devizes who signed up to help vulnerable people in the town before the first lockdown. some people haven't seen anybody for a year — not properly.
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apart from the people doing the shopping or if they have to go to the doctor's or something, they haven't really been out. and... it's... you know, you just chat to them as long as you can, um... but it's very isolating. i think some people have gone downhill, as well. covid — and the restrictions on society designed to tackle it — have meant many people not usually isolated have faced loneliness. my mood has been low — very low. loneliness is a very strange thing — i've never, prior to this, _ encountered any loneliness. i've always been surrounded by people, very busy. - and then to spend 12 months i without human contact hasjust... yeah... — it's been hard — very hard. this lockdown in particular was the first time that i've been
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affected with the lockdown in terms of work. so, i've been working from home. so that in particular has been harder because i've not had that sort of day—to—day connection with people, with my colleagues. good morning, love devizes. how can we help? 0h, hello, there. i wonder if somebody could do some shopping for me, please. yeah, of course we can. back at the love devizes office, volunteers viv and michael are helping people who telephone in. people have started to come out of certain restrictions, _ we're starting to uncover where people haven't i got the infrastructure you and i would take for granted — you know, either friends - or neighbours — some lonely people. you peel back... you know, devizes is a brilliant town, it's a great community. . but if you peel back- the veneer of that town, there are people who are lonely. | so we just feel that we want to, | in a supportive, in a gentle way, give that support. some of the most vulnerable or frail in our society have been forced indoors by the pandemic. but in communities right
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across the uk, there are people prepared to open doors and to help those most in need. john maguire, bbc news, wiltshire. we arejoined by we are joined by dorothy allcock, dorothy is 80 and lives on her own in solihull and joins us to talk about her experience of loneliness. thank you so much for talking to us on bbc news today. can i first of all send you my sympathies for the loss of your husband peter who died in february, you had been married for more than 60 years, that must leave a terrible void in your life. yes, i can't say it has been easy but at the same time i do have peace of mind because he was in such a wonderful care home. 0bviously of mind because he was in such a wonderful care home. obviously i couldn't see him for quite a long time and when i last saw him he didn't actually recognise me. but i always try and look at things positively and that's how it is really. i kind of look on the time
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is rather like world war i, which i can remember when i was very small. so there you go. you can remember when i was very small. so there you go-_ so there you go. you sound like you are a cope. — so there you go. you sound like you are a cope, dorothy, _ so there you go. you sound like you are a cope, dorothy, you _ so there you go. you sound like you are a cope, dorothy, you try - so there you go. you sound like you are a cope, dorothy, you try and i so there you go. you sound like you| are a cope, dorothy, you try and get on with things and make the best of it. i on with things and make the best of it. ., y on with things and make the best of it. ., , ., on with things and make the best of it. i do, i try and look out for other people _ it. i do, i try and look out for other people and _ it. i do, i try and look out for other people and that - it. i do, i try and look out for other people and that helps. it. i do, i try and look out for| other people and that helps a it. i do, i try and look out for- other people and that helps a lot. i phone a lot of neighbours and friends and when it was my husband's funeral it was only a small funeral as you know, i sent the funeral to something like 170 people, some of them i hadn't seen for about 50 years, so that was quite an exciting thing to do. == years, so that was quite an exciting thing to do— thing to do. -- coper. peter was a vicar, i thing to do. -- coper. peter was a vicar. i know. _ thing to do. -- coper. peter was a vicar, i know, and _ thing to do. -- coper. peter was a vicar, i know, and i— thing to do. -- coper. peter was a vicar, i know, and i think- thing to do. -- coper. peter was a vicar, i know, and i thinkjust- vicar, i know, and i thinkjust after you were married he went off to singapore and then came back to the uk and his ministry was all around different parts of the uk through the years. as a vicar�*s wife you must have been very busy. it must have been a very sociable job.
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definitely, i am a people person, i must say. i'm still in contact with people from most of the parishes that we have been in. so that certainly helps with the loneliness. always someone to talk to, or e—mail. in always someone to talk to, or e-mail. , ., ., ,., always someone to talk to, or e-mail. , ., ., y., ., e-mail. in terms of how you have tried to cope _ e-mail. in terms of how you have tried to cope in _ e-mail. in terms of how you have tried to cope in the _ e-mail. in terms of how you have tried to cope in the pandemic i e-mail. in terms of how you have | tried to cope in the pandemic with that feeling of loneliness, you have obviouslyjust picked up the phone, got on your computer, sent e—mails, try to keep talking and keep in contact with people as much as possible. what other ways have you tried to do that? i do possible. what other ways have you tried to do that?— tried to do that? i do have my family close — tried to do that? i do have my family close by _ tried to do that? i do have my family close by which - tried to do that? i do have my family close by which is i tried to do that? i do have my family close by which is lovely tried to do that? i do have my i family close by which is lovely and my daughter lives here with her family. what other things have i done? i wanted to do a lot of things, i wanted to sort everything out in the house because i'm moving shortly but i couldn't get my head around doing that. but ijust tried to soldier on, really, the best i could. , ' , ., could. does it feel differently now that experience _ could. does it feel differently now that experience of _ could. does it feel differently now that experience of loneliness i could. does it feel differently now that experience of loneliness at i that experience of loneliness at this point in the pandemic compared to the start last year? h0.
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this point in the pandemic compared to the start last year?— to the start last year? no, i definitely — to the start last year? no, i definitely feel _ to the start last year? no, i definitely feel more - to the start last year? no, i | definitely feel more positive to the start last year? no, i i definitely feel more positive now because i feel we are moving towards the end, hopefully. so yes, i do feel well at the moment, looking forward to my move. fiifi feelwell at the moment, looking forward to my move.— feelwell at the moment, looking forward to my move. ok, so that's something — forward to my move. ok, so that's something to _ forward to my move. ok, so that's something to focus _ forward to my move. ok, so that's something to focus on _ forward to my move. ok, so that's something to focus on and - forward to my move. ok, so that's something to focus on and you i forward to my move. ok, so that's i something to focus on and you sound more positive?— more positive? yes, i would say so, definitel . more positive? yes, i would say so, definitely. probably _ more positive? yes, i would say so, definitely. probably all— more positive? yes, i would say so, definitely. probably all of— more positive? yes, i would say so, definitely. probably all of us - more positive? yes, i would say so, definitely. probably all of us have i definitely. probably all of us have found it difficult at times. fii found it difficult at times. of course. found it difficult at times. of course. and has there been any help beyond family and friends in terms of people reaching out to you that you have been able to access over the last year or so?— the last year or so? yes, definitely. _ the last year or so? yes, definitely, lots _ the last year or so? yes, definitely, lots of - the last year or so? yes, | definitely, lots of friends, the last year or so? yes, _ definitely, lots of friends, someone from the carers' centre phoned me this morning, carers uk are very helpful. yes, it's ok, it's been 0k. sorry, dorothy. i helpful. yes, it's ok, it's been ok. sorry. dorothy-_ helpful. yes, it's ok, it's been ok. sorry, dorothy. i always went to the coffee shop —
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sorry, dorothy. i always went to the coffee shop every — sorry, dorothy. i always went to the coffee shop every morning - sorry, dorothy. i always went to the coffee shop every morning and i sorry, dorothy. i always went to the | coffee shop every morning and made some friends at the coffee shop and some friends at the coffee shop and so i go now daily to get coffee to bring back and it helps me to wake up. bring back and it helps me to wake u ._ bring back and it helps me to wake u . _ ., ~' ., bring back and it helps me to wake u a . ., o’ ., . ., ' bring back and it helps me to wake up. the walk and the coffee and the fresh air, which _ up. the walk and the coffee and the fresh air, which is _ up. the walk and the coffee and the fresh air, which is very _ up. the walk and the coffee and the fresh air, which is very fresh - up. the walk and the coffee and the fresh air, which is very fresh at i fresh air, which is very fresh at the moment, it has to be said. you are a coper, as you say, you have tried your best to keep in contact with people. have there been moments in all of that despite all of that, that you have felt lonely?- that you have felt lonely? yes, definitely- _ that you have felt lonely? yes, definitely. yes, _ that you have felt lonely? yes, definitely. yes, i— that you have felt lonely? yes, definitely. yes, i have. - that you have felt lonely? yes, definitely. yes, i have. i- that you have felt lonely? yes, definitely. yes, i have. i can't. that you have felt lonely? yes, i definitely. yes, i have. i can't say no to that because, yes, i have. i think all of us have at times. even if we have — think all of us have at times. even if we have had _ think all of us have at times. even if we have had people _ think all of us have at times. even if we have had people around, or we have been in regular contact with people, it's notjust the same, is it? people, it's not 'ust the same, is it? ., ., ., ., �* it? no, no. no, not when you're... i think it is— it? no, no. no, not when you're... i think it is different _ it? no, no. no, not when you're... i think it is different when _ it? no, no. no, not when you're... i think it is different when you - it? no, no. no, not when you're... i think it is different when you are i think it is different when you are living alone, it is harder when you are living alone, obviously. what are living alone, obviously. what sort of level _ are living alone, obviously. what sort of level of _ are living alone, obviously. what sort of level of appreciation i are living alone, obviously. what sort of level of appreciation has it
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brought to you of the point at which you will be able to get back out and do things which are more like normal? ~ ., ., ~' do things which are more like normal? ~ ., ., ., normal? well, i look forward to that. normal? well, i look forward to that- don't _ normal? well, i look forward to that. don't we _ normal? well, i look forward to that. don't we all?! _ normal? well, i look forward to that. don't we all?! yes, i that. don't we all?! yes, definitely. _ that. don't we all?! yes, definitely, yes. - that. don't we all?! yes, definitely, yes. meetingl that. don't we all?! yes, i definitely, yes. meeting up that. don't we all?! yes, - definitely, yes. meeting up with people. i was going to meet with someone in her garden but she has not been well so we will not be meeting in the garden in this weather but i've got that planned already. weather but i've got that planned alread . ~ ., ., . weather but i've got that planned alread . . . ., . ., already. what advice would you give to an bod already. what advice would you give to anybody else _ already. what advice would you give to anybody else who _ already. what advice would you give to anybody else who is _ already. what advice would you give to anybody else who is struggling i to anybody else who is struggling with these feelings from your own experience, dorothy? i with these feelings from your own experience, dorothy?— with these feelings from your own experience, dorothy? i would say try and reach out _ experience, dorothy? i would say try and reach out to _ experience, dorothy? i would say try and reach out to other _ experience, dorothy? i would say try and reach out to other people, i experience, dorothy? i would say try and reach out to other people, lift i and reach out to other people, lift up and reach out to other people, lift up the phone and call your friends, or people you don't know even, put a card through their door. that kind of thing, i think, really is a way of thing, i think, really is a way of reaching out to others, just so they know they are not forgotten and not totally alone. dorothy, thank you so much for talking to us, and keep enjoying those morning coffees
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and i hope you get back out and see lots of your friends and family face—to—face very soon. lots of your friends and family face-to-face very soon.- lots of your friends and family face-to-face very soon. take care. thank you — face-to-face very soon. take care. thank you very _ face-to-face very soon. take care. thank you very much. _ face-to-face very soon. take care. thank you very much. bye-bye. i face-to-face very soon. take care. i thank you very much. bye-bye. that's dorothy allcock _ thank you very much. bye-bye. that's dorothy allcock who _ thank you very much. bye-bye. that's dorothy allcock who is _ thank you very much. bye-bye. that's dorothy allcock who is 80 _ thank you very much. bye-bye. that's dorothy allcock who is 80 years i thank you very much. bye-bye. that's dorothy allcock who is 80 years old. i dorothy allcock who is 80 years old. a bit more detailfrom the 0ns dorothy allcock who is 80 years old. a bit more detail from the 0ns data on loneliness, 7.2%, 3.7 million adults, said they felt lonely often or always between october 2020 and february 2021, that's compared with 5% of adults between april and may 2020, so obviously as the pandemic has gone on those feelings of loneliness have grown. let's recap the headlines on bbc news this morning. a trial of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine in children has been paused while an investigation takes place into whether the jab is linked to rare blood clots in adults. the first doses of the moderna vaccine have been given out in wales, with a 2a—year—old unpaid carer the first to get the jab. the mental health impact of coronavirus —
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new research suggests covid—19 can increase the risk of conditions such as depression, dementia and strokes. a little girl from wiltshire has become the inspiration for a new doll to help teach children about down's syndrome. six—year—old rosie hit the headlines last summer when her family built a full—size replica of her favourite dolls' house in their back garden. the toy company behind the original house got in touch to say they'd like to base a new doll on rosie, to help educate others about the condition. matt treacy has the story. meet rosie. say hello. hello! pout — is that your doll? yeah! this is the tree house that started it all. a life—size replica of rosie's favourite toy built, last year. just messing around, i thought it would be fun, really,
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for the screenshot of just having the screenshot, to stick it on aianb. i got this message, suddenly, from my phone from aianb saying, "you've got a booking, this weekend." so i was like, "what? !" news of the unusual stay captured the imagination of people around the world and the boss of the company that makes the dolls got in touch. i actually came across a tweet and i said to jason, "look, i'd love to make a one—off doll for rosie. "and i'd like to gift it to her for christmas." but this was to be a special doll. rosie has down syndrome, so subtle details were included in the toy and the packaging to explain her condition. we don't tell people that this is a doll with down syndrome. we let them purchase it and then they discover on the inside, there's a little leaflet explaining what it actually means to have down syndrome. so we've got a diagram to show,
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the eyebrows and the nose and the face and she's got her boots, you know, they've modelled her boots on rosie's boots, that really helped her be able to walk and have a normal life. i think it's going to be a really nice educational thing for kids to look at and read and, you know, play, just like they play with any other doll. when others saw the finished product, they wanted one, too. now it's been made available in toy shops in 35 different countries. they've sold hundreds already and hopefully we're going to sell more. and $1 for every purchase will go to our local charity, which helps to support rosie and other families in the community. and what i hope from this is that it lets children know that she is just like them. she's just different. i believe all kids should have a diverse toy box, so that they can develop that empathy, so it is, it's extremely important to us. to her, this is like a normal day, she just loves going outside, loves going in the tree house, loves playing with her dolls,
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just loves life. matt treacy, bbc news. what a brilliant idea. here is a question for you. what do a peaky blinders themed bar and a custom—built yoga studio have in common? they're both contenders to be named shed of the year. graham satchell has been to meet the people whose humble shed is their pride and joy. we don't like to call it a shed. it's wooden built, but it is a yoga and pilates studio, which is where i teach and work. i'd have said probably for 15 years, over and over, "i would love to have my own studio, i would love to have my own studio," and, ta—dah! my husband goes, hmm, 0k. so began a mammoth lockdown project. geraint has spent most of the last year building a yoga studio for his wife, mel, in the back garden.
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it's been incredibly enjoyable, hugely satisfying to be able to stand in the kitchen window and look down and see something that i've created myself is just fantastic. the finished studio has underfloor heating, wi—fi, sound and vision. it's allowed mel to do her classes online. mel started doing yoga to help her cope with postnatal depression. it's been a huge saviour for me. and if i can help transfer that to others, then fantastic. what would it mean to you if you were to win shed of the year? it would be crazy. to have created this and thenjoin the shed pantheon would be fantastic. it really would. to see it on a computer and develop it into 3d and show me what could be... amazing. it's absolutely incredible.
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i couldn't be more proud. and eternally grateful. it's really quite tremendous, yeah. we always knew that the first name for the bar had to be something to do with peaky blinders, and that's why we called it mick and sue's peaky blinders. the fact that sue is actually in love with cillian murphy. he's a good—looking lad, isn't he? got to say that. cheers! mick and sue's peaky blinders shed pub has been a lockdown labour of love. it helped the whole family get through the last year. having the kids here with us all through the lockdown meant that we could all support each other and we could all love each other. and we knew we were all safe. and we knew, you know,
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most of all that we were playing by the rules, which was very, very important to us. it's been an escape away from the house, to come into here just to chill and relax and feel as though you're in a different world, basically. and when the bars do open up again, we don't want to go out. we're happy here. we're happy staying in our own bubble here and socialise in this way. seeing patients go through covid has been very challenging. it affects you every day you come home from work. and you absorb that. so it's about how do i manage myself, and prepare to go in the next day and do it all again? so, hence, the shed. diane's shed has become a haven from the outside world. she is a frailty nurse caring
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for patients in care homes. it sort of puts things in place, and you canjust sigh a relief and say, right, i can do this again tomorrow, i can go back into work with that smile on my face and nurse my patients. it's a bit of a joke with my son, my teenage son, who says, "where's mum?" to dad, and dad says, "oh, she's away with the fairies". it'sjust, yeah, it's a comfy, cosy place to be. i call it scribbles, i do scribbles in my shed. i'm not an artist, you know, i'm nowhere near, but it'sjust that mindfulness if you like ofjust doing something that i enjoy that i can just distract from everyday, what's going on in the world. how do you feel about being on the shortlist for shed of the year? it's a bit mad! i'm quite honoured, actually, because it'sjust a humble ten by eight shed.
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yeah, it's a really weird feeling, actually, shed of the year. but it's just my cosy space. those are some fine —looking sheds. hard to choose between those, i would say. a lovely little insight. time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. hello, again. today will feel more like a winter's day than a spring one. having said that, the wind isn't going to be as strong as it was yesterday for most, so we will lose that wind chill. it's going to be a dry day for many parts of the country today, but cloud will build replacing the early brightness that we have seen. we are still under the influence of this arctic air represented by the blues across the chart but look at what's coming in from the atlantic. later in the day something a wee bit milder. we have a lot of cloud across northern ireland, wales and the south—west, the same too across parts of northern and eastern scotland and england. but some of that will thin
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and break, we'll see some sunshine, and most of the wintry showers fading except for the north—west of scotland where we also have gusty winds. so sunny spells, or bright spells, through the afternoon, the clouds thickening across northern ireland bringing in some patchy rain by the end of the afternoon. maximum temperatures, one in lerwick to eight as we push further south. usually at this stage in april we would be looking at roughly between 10—13 , so below par. now, there will be some early frost in the west to start the night. but as the cloud and also the rain pushes steadily eastwards preceded by some snow on the hills, well, temperatures will actually go up. where the cloud remains broken, for example in the south—east, it will be a frosty start to the day tomorrow. tomorrow where we have got the clear skies we will see some sunshine, a bit more cloud around. 0ur rain pushing east and moving southwards through the day, the wind, though, having changed direction to more of a westerly, that's a milder direction for us represented in the temperatures, widely into double figures.
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but behind this weather front which is a cold front, cold air will start to return and we will see some snow once again on the mountains. by friday, the weather front sinking southwards with this band of cloud and patchy rain in southern areas. behind it, clear skies, some showers and some of those will be wintry again, in the north down to lower levels, and you can see the difference in the temperatures both sides of that front, still mild in the south, much colder in the north. that's showing up quite nicely on saturday as well. but on saturday an area of low pressure close by could bring a weather front across the channel islands and the south—east. that will bring some higher temperatures but also the risk of some rain. but generally as we go into the weekend it is going to feel colder.
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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world: a uk trial of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine in children has been paused while an investigation takes place into whether the jab is linked to rare blood clots in adults. leading scientists urge the public to continue getting the jab, saying the benefits far outweigh the risks. the risks of getting sick or dying of covid for all the people currently being offered first and second doses are far and away greater than any small theoretical risk that may exist relating to these cases, which are extremely rare. the first doses of the moderna vaccine for the uk have been given out in wales, with a 2a—year—old unpaid carer the first to get the jab. please do get in touch with your thoughts
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on the vaccine rollout — i'm on twitter @annita—mcveigh

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