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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 7, 2021 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today. a trial of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine in children has been paused while an investigation takes place into whether the jab is linked to rare blood clots in adults. leading scientists urge the public to continue getting the jab, saying the benefits far outweigh the risk. there are risks of getting sick or dying of disease for all people currently being offered first and second doses are far and away greater than any small theoretical risk that may exist relating to these cases, which are extremely
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rare. lifting the shutters on the new shopping experience. good morning. big—name retailers are set to extend their opening hours from monday. but i look at why consumer retail therapy could cause a headache for smaller shops. liverpool lose in the champions league, but manchester city find a last—minute winner to take the advantage over borussia dortmund. from a palatial yoga studio to a pub in the back garden — we'll look at the runners and riders for shed of the year. good morning. it's a frosty start to the day to day but it won't be as windy as yesterday so it will not feel quite as cold, although there are still some wintry showers in the forecast and later some patchy rain coming into northern ireland. i will have all the details in ten minutes. it's wednesday the 7th of april. our top story. a trial of the oxford—astrazeneca covid vaccine on children has been temporarily paused — while the uk regulator investigates concerns that the jab may be causing rare blood clots in a tiny number of adults. the pause is voluntary —
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and none of the 300 children involved in the trial has suffered a clot, as our medical editor fergus walsh reports. there you go — all done. nearly 300 children aged six to 17 are taking part in the astrazeneca vaccine trial in england, which began in february. oxford university said there'd been no blood clots in the volunteers but — out of an abundance of caution — it had stopped vaccinations, pending the outcome of the safety review in adults. more than 18 million people in the uk have received the astrazeneca vaccine. the mhra said last week there'd been 30 rare cases of blood clots, including seven deaths. the prime minister visiting an astrazeneca plant in macclesfield once again gave his firm support for the vaccine. the best thing people should do is look at what the mhra say,
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our independent regulator — that's why we have them, that's why they're independent. and their advice to people is to, you know, keep going out there, get yourjab, get your second jab. as a precautionary measure, the mhra updated its advice last month to say that anyone with a headache that lasted for more than four days after receiving the astrazeneca vaccine, or bruising beyond the site of the jab, should seek medical attention. both of the vaccines we're using are highly effective against covid and the risks of getting sick or dying of covid for all the people currently being offered first and second doses are far and away greater than any small theoretical risk that may exist relating to these cases — which are extremely rare. this could be very much compromised if people think that this isn't being taken seriously, that this isn't being examined in great detail. but i think individuals have difficulties in sort
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of understanding risks and perceptions, and seeing this in relation to other sorts of illnesses or diseases or outcomes. the astrazeneca vaccine is central to the huge success of the roll—out ofjabs in the uk, which is way ahead of the rest of europe. france has restricted the astrazeneca vaccine to adults over 55 — germany, to those over 60 — because of concerns about blood clots in younger adults. the european medicines agency and the uk regulator are due to give updated recommendations in the next day or two. maintaining public confidence in this highly effective vaccine will be vital. fergus walsh, bbc news. the coronavirus vaccine made by the american company, moderna, will be administered in the uk for the first time today.
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the roll—out will begin in carmarthen in west wales. the uk has ordered 17 million doses of the vaccine, which has been shown in trials to prevent nearly all infections. it will be used alongside the pfizer and astrazeneca jabs. the welsh government has described its arrival as "another key milestone" in the fight against the virus. a comedy club has pulled out of a trial to test how venues can operate safely when lockdown ends — after receiving thousands of abusive messages. the hot water comedy club in liverpool says it was falsely linked to a scheme to test vaccine passports, leading to what it describes as a "hate campaign" on social media. a government spokesperson said they "strongly condemn" the online abuse the club received and clarified that participants in the trial would only need to provide a negative covid test — not proof of vaccination. researchers say that people diagnosed with covid—i9 are at greater risk of developing psychological and neurological conditions, such as depression, psychosis and stroke. the team from oxford university
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examined the health records of more than half a million patients in the united states. here's our health reporter rachel schraer. coronavirus breaks into our cells and multiplies wherever in the body it finds itself. that's why it causes such a wide range of symptoms from the lungs, to the gut, to the brain. the team at the university of oxford looked over half a million patient records in the us to see if conditions affecting the brain were more common in those who'd had covid. they looked at 14 conditions including anxiety, depression and psychosis, stroke, brain haemorrhage, and dementia. all of these conditions were seen more often in people who'd had a covid infection in the previous six months. but these conditions all have very different causes. it could be that in some people the virus actually gets into the brain and causes some damage. it could be the way your body is reacting to the virus, produces a sort of immune inflammatory response that, again, contributes to the problems. and for other people, it may simply be a psychological effect, if you like,
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of the stress that having covid and thinking what might happen to you next is the important factor. the study couldn't prove the virus itself was definitely causing the changes, but patients recovering from covid were more likely than similar people who'd had flu or another infection to develop a psychological or neurological condition. and the sicker coronavirus patients had been, the more likely they were to develop these complications. rachel schraer, bbc news. doctors have been told not to prescribe painkillers to people suffering from chronic pain that has no known cause. the national institute for health and care excellence says there's little to no evidence that treating people with paracetamol or opioids makes any difference. it says people should be offered a range of therapies including exercise, acupuncture or anti—depressants instead. britain's electricity system was the greenest it's ever been at lunchtime on easter monday, according to the national grid operator. sunny and windy weather,
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coupled with low demand, meant almost 80% of britain's power came from zero—carbon sources. no coal was in use and just 10% of power came from gas. the duke of cambridge has paid tribute to nhs workers during the pandemic — describing the institution as "probably the most admired organisation around". prince william and kate have taken part in a series of video conversations with medics across the uk in recent months and in the latest, the duke praised their "wonderful" efforts. good morning. hello, i'm will write? i want to sell— good morning. hello, i'm will write? i want to sell on _ good morning. hello, i'm will write? i want to sell on behalf— good morning. hello, i'm will write? i want to sell on behalf of— good morning. hello, i'm will write? i want to sell on behalf of everyone i i want to sell on behalf of everyone what a fantastic job you i want to sell on behalf of everyone what a fantasticjob you have done. he held it together. so many wonderful people. it's been a real team effort but we are all very proud of you.
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a seal that had a plastic ring stuck around its neck for two—and—a—half years has finally had it removed. the animal — named "mrs vicar" — was rescued from horsey beach, near great yarmouth. she's being cared for by the rspca, who say they're hopeful she will recover — but that she will need treatment for a "number of months". the united states is facing a shortage of tomato ketchup. heinz — which produces the most popular brand — says it's been unable to keep up with demand for sachets of the sauce. it's been driven by a surge in takeaway food during the pandemic. that is a tragedy! it is the little ackets that is a tragedy! it is the little packets because _ that is a tragedy! it is the little packets because they _ that is a tragedy! it is the little packets because they don't - that is a tragedy! it is the little l packets because they don't want that is a tragedy! it is the little - packets because they don't want to share tomato ketchup. do packets because they don't want to share tomato ketchup.— packets because they don't want to share tomato ketchup. do you have tomato ketchup _ share tomato ketchup. do you have tomato ketchup with _ share tomato ketchup. do you have
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tomato ketchup with chips? - share tomato ketchup. do you have tomato ketchup with chips? or - tomato ketchup with chips? (1) mayonnaise. tomato ketchup with chips? or mayonnaise. how _ tomato ketchup with chips? or mayonnaise. how very - tomato ketchup with chips? or| mayonnaise. how very belgian. controversial. _ mayonnaise. how very belgian. controversial. apparently - mayonnaise. how very belgian. controversial. apparently the i controversial. apparently the bel ians controversial. apparently the belgians started _ controversial. apparently the belgians started that. - controversial. apparently the - belgians started that. absolutely. i am lad we belgians started that. absolutely. i am glad we have — belgians started that. absolutely. i am glad we have cleared _ belgians started that. absolutely. i am glad we have cleared up. - belgians started that. absolutely. i am glad we have cleared up. it - belgians started that. absolutely. i am glad we have cleared up. it was better, i am glad we have cleared up. it was better. i think _ am glad we have cleared up. it was better, i think is _ am glad we have cleared up. it was better, i think is a _ am glad we have cleared up. it was better, i think is a good _ am glad we have cleared up. it was better, i think is a good way - am glad we have cleared up. it was better, i think is a good way of - better, i think is a good way of describing what was going on yesterday. good morning. goad yesterday. good morning. good mornint. yesterday. good morning. good morning. indeed, _ yesterday. good morning. good morning. indeed, and _ yesterday. good morning. good morning. indeed, and it - yesterday. good morning. good morning. indeed, and it is - yesterday. good morning. good morning. indeed, and it is a - yesterday. good morning. good morning. indeed, and it is a cold start— morning. indeed, and it is a cold start to — morning. indeed, and it is a cold start to the — morning. indeed, and it is a cold start to the day again today for mew — start to the day again today for many. these are the temperatures at the moment. belfast is three degrees because _ the moment. belfast is three degrees because in_ the moment. belfast is three degrees because in northern ireland, wales and the _ because in northern ireland, wales and the south—west there is more cloud _ and the south—west there is more cloud around at the moment but one thing _ cloud around at the moment but one thing you _ cloud around at the moment but one thing you will notice today, after a frosty _ thing you will notice today, after a frosty start, is it won't be as windy — frosty start, is it won't be as windy. temperatures are still low but it _ windy. temperatures are still low but it will— windy. temperatures are still low but it will feel more like winter than _ but it will feel more like winter than spring but we will not have that significant wind—chill. showers in the _ that significant wind—chill. showers in the south—west, they will push southwards. also some wintry showers across _ southwards. also some wintry showers across the _ southwards. also some wintry showers across the north, some coming going across— across the north, some coming going across the _
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across the north, some coming going across the west, and the east, most of which _ across the west, and the east, most of which were made through the day and after— of which were made through the day and after a _ of which were made through the day and after a sunny start and clear skies _ and after a sunny start and clear skies ctoud _ and after a sunny start and clear skies cloud will also build. having said that. — skies cloud will also build. having said that, there will be bright or sunny— said that, there will be bright or sunny intervals to look forward to. in sunny intervals to look forward to. in northern — sunny intervals to look forward to. in northern ireland, we have thicker ctoud _ in northern ireland, we have thicker cloud coming in for the afternoon ahead _ cloud coming in for the afternoon ahead of— cloud coming in for the afternoon ahead of a — cloud coming in for the afternoon ahead of a weather front which will introduce _ ahead of a weather front which will introduce some patchy rain. these are our— introduce some patchy rain. these are our maximum temperatures, one in lerwick— are our maximum temperatures, one in lerwick to— are our maximum temperatures, one in lerwick to eight in london, cardiff and plymouth. forthe lerwick to eight in london, cardiff and plymouth. for the evening and overnight. — and plymouth. for the evening and overnight, a weather front continuing to push from the west, moving _ continuing to push from the west, moving eastwards, preceded by snow, even at _ moving eastwards, preceded by snow, even at lower levels across some parts _ even at lower levels across some parts of — even at lower levels across some parts of scotland but then milder air comes — parts of scotland but then milder air comes in behind it. ahead of it, still some — air comes in behind it. ahead of it, still some cloud around, clear spetts. — still some cloud around, clear spells, but you can see quite nicely when _ spells, but you can see quite nicely when the _ spells, but you can see quite nicely when the cloud and rain is, reflected _ when the cloud and rain is, reflected in those temperatures. five and — reflected in those temperatures. five and six. not as cold by the end of the _ five and six. not as cold by the end of the night — five and six. not as cold by the end of the night. any snow will turn back— of the night. any snow will turn back to — of the night. any snow will turn back to ray for most. the head of it, back to ray for most. the head of it. we _ back to ray for most. the head of it. we wiit— back to ray for most. the head of it, we will still be in the cold air — it, we will still be in the cold air things— it, we will still be in the cold air. things get a bit milder tomorrow and i will tell you all
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about— tomorrow and i will tell you all about it — tomorrow and i will tell you all about it in _ tomorrow and i will tell you all about it in half an hour.- about it in half an hour. look forward to — about it in half an hour. look forward to that. _ about it in half an hour. look forward to that. thank- about it in half an hour. look forward to that. thank you. | about it in half an hour. look. forward to that. thank you. see about it in half an hour. errra; forward to that. thank you. see you through the morning. iam sure i am sure a lot of you will be thinking about this... it's the final countdown for hairdressers, pubs, restaurants and shops getting ready for reopening in england on monday. some of the big name retailers have been laying out how the shopping experience will be different from now on. lovely to see you both. you are a big fan of in shock shopping. band big fan of in shock shopping. and her putse- _ big fan of in shock shopping. and her me we — big fan of in shock shopping. and her pulse. we all— big fan of in shock shopping. and her pulse. we all need _ big fan of in shock shopping. and her pulse. we all need a - big fan of in shock shopping. and her pulse. we all need a haircut. | her pulse. we all need a haircut. can't have _ her pulse. we all need a haircut. can't have a _ her pulse. we all need a haircut. can't have a virtual _ her pulse. we all need a haircut. can't have a virtual haircut. - her pulse. we all need a haircut. can't have a virtual haircut. . - after a haircut and an alfresco pint, one of the things people are looking forward to is a bit of old—fashioned retail therapy. welcome back to bbc breakfast high street! still pretty empty but come monday across england those nonessential shutters will be rolling up. will it be different? well, we're used to facemasks, hand sanitiser, social distancing, and one—way systems. one small change from last time is that
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fitting rooms are reopening. but if you like to confer with a pal on a new purchase — i'm afraid that's only allowed if they're in your bubble. some good news if like me you've been wedging the kids' feet in to old shoes — john lewis are resuming kids feet measurements. this is important. to try and stagger visits, retailers are allowed to open until 10pm on monday to saturday. primark is one of the retailers who says it will be doing just that. that is fine for big names, but less easy for small independents. they'll have to be extremely careful how they allocate staff and resources. this is kate who runs a gift shop in kent. the shop is ready to go. there's a few more last—minute things to do, but everything is totally covid—secu re. i've got lovely hand sanitiser, i've got screens, i've got masks. i feel ready this time. it's a lot less scary than it was lastjune. i think there's going to be a little lift, i think things are going to be quite busy. i am really going to take this opportunity to extend my shop opening hours.
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i'm going to do the same day—to—day, but i will be opening on sundays. so, yeah, i'm just really looking forward to getting back into it and getting stuck in. good luck! a big part of the challenge is keeping staff safe and ensuring they're not overworked. we also know that abuse towards retail staff has increased over the pandemic — which is also a worry. these are the workers who kept the country going in what has been probably the worst period from the second world war, and it's shown these individuals — who are normally low—paid — the cinderella industry in some respects is now coming to the fore. and i would urge those now — those shops that are opening now — the non—essential stops, that customers treat these workers with respect. are you excited to get back to the shops? are you worried about safety? let us know. i'm going to be speaking to two independent shop bosses a bit later. this is one of the many areas where
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it is different depending on where you live. 0pen it is different depending on where you live. open from monday in england and wales, scotland some nonessential retail is only open but they have to wait till the 26th and like pub and restaurant we are still waiting on northern ireland so it is staggered across the uk.— waiting on northern ireland so it is staggered across the uk. thank you very much- — staggered across the uk. thank you very much- we _ staggered across the uk. thank you very much. we will _ staggered across the uk. thank you very much. we will be _ staggered across the uk. thank you very much. we will be talking - staggered across the uk. thank you very much. we will be talking about it throughout the programme. thank you. let's take a look at today's papers. the guardian leads with a plea from the prime minister, urging people to keep getting vaccines, after a trial of the jab for children is paused while regulators investigate concerns around blood clots. the daily telegraph's front page features a suggestion from a member of the government's immunisation advisory committee who says vaccines should be paused for under—sos to boost public confidence. the daily mail says affordable holidays could be on the horizon within weeks, as it reports that the prime minister has asked officials to look into using quick and cheap lateral flow tests, rather than costly pcr tests for travellers. trending online are tributes to the friday night dinner actor paul ritter — who died after a brain
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tumour at the age of 5a. comedian stephen mangan described him as a "wonderful person" while sue perkins tweeted it was an "immeasurable loss". have you got anything over there? i have got a few. i have you got anything over there? i have got a few-— have got a few. i have things i want to “on have got a few. i have things i want to jog about- _ have got a few. i have things i want to jog about. shall— have got a few. i have things i want to jog about. shall we _ have got a few. i have things i want to jog about. shall we talk - have got a few. i have things i want to jog about. shall we talk about i to jog about. shall we talk about discos, saturday nights discos at home? . .fl discos, saturday nights discos at home?_ that - discos, saturday nights discos at home?_ that has l discos, saturday nights discos at - home?_ that has become home? kitchen disco? that has become a bit of a theme — home? kitchen disco? that has become a bit of a theme for— home? kitchen disco? that has become a bit of a theme for quite _ home? kitchen disco? that has become a bit of a theme for quite a _ home? kitchen disco? that has become a bit of a theme for quite a few - a bit of a theme for quite a few people of the last few months. one of the papers is printing a survey, in the mirror, about the top ten christmas... christmas? sorry, where did that even come from? kitchen disco tunes. i did that even come from? kitchen disco tunes— did that even come from? kitchen disco tunes-— disco tunes. i love the fact that christmas _ disco tunes. i love the fact that christmas is _ disco tunes. i love the fact that christmas is just _ disco tunes. i love the fact that christmas is just floating - disco tunes. i love the fact that christmas isjust floating in - disco tunes. i love the fact that | christmas isjust floating in your christmas is just floating in your head. christmas is 'ust floating in your head. ,, ., ., christmas is 'ust floating in your head. ., ., ., . head. something to do with dancing. number one — head. something to do with dancing. number one is _ head. something to do with dancing. number one is dancing _ head. something to do with dancing. number one is dancing queen. - head. something to do with dancing. number one is dancing queen. i - head. something to do with dancing. | number one is dancing queen. i want to dance with somebody is number
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two. d0 to dance with somebody is number two. , ., ., to dance with somebody is number two. ., to dance with somebody is number two. y., ., .,, two. do you have erasure in there? not i can two. do you have erasure in there? not i can see- _ two. do you have erasure in there? not i can see. that _ two. do you have erasure in there? not i can see. that children - two. do you have erasure in there? not i can see. that children have i not i can see. that children have been teaching dance moves. they say that three in ten kids were embarrassed at how bad their parents were at dancing. i think that's not a bad result. i were at dancing. i think that's not a bad result-— were at dancing. i think that's not a bad result. i would take that. do ou a bad result. i would take that. do you recognise _ a bad result. i would take that. do you recognise this _ a bad result. i would take that. do you recognise this lady? _ a bad result. i would take that. do you recognise this lady? she - a bad result. i would take that. do you recognise this lady? she is - a bad result. i would take that. do you recognise this lady? she is on | you recognise this lady? she is on the front page of the times, she was on the forbes rich list. she is worth $1.3 billion. she used to work for it up tinder, her name is whitney wolfe herd. she wanted women to be able to make the first move on dating apps. she started up a new dating apps. she started up a new dating apps. she started up a new dating app called bumble. that dating apps. she started up a new dating app called bumble.- dating apps. she started up a new dating app called bumble. that is no future success. _ dating app called bumble. that is no future success. when _ dating app called bumble. that is no future success. when she _ dating app called bumble. that is no future success. when she has - dating app called bumble. that is no future success. when she has 31 - future success. when she has 31 million... wait a future success. when she has 31
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million... waita minute, hold future success. when she has 31 million... wait a minute, hold on a second. 35 million users, she has. i am scanning an entire article. i will be reading a paperfor the next five minutes to. i will be reading a paper for the next five minutes to.— five minutes to. i will show you this one you — five minutes to. i will show you this one you do _ five minutes to. i will show you this one you do that. _ five minutes to. i will show you this one you do that. i - five minutes to. i will show you this one you do that. i didn't i five minutes to. i will show you i this one you do that. i didn't know the story. it is a story of two women who tried, and one succeeded, to swim across the channel. this is backin to swim across the channel. this is back in 1927. mercedes, there she is. the first british woman to swim the channel and then four days later she was nearly run down by steamer. she was fed by rowboat accompanying her. four days later, the british woman claimed she had completed the swim in a time that was two hours faster and there was a picture of a sipping champagne. anyway, it all went on, there was knocked out more about it's but you haven't swim it, the second person, it was a false
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claim! they are making a film about it, which looks fantastic. thea;r claim! they are making a film about it, which looks fantastic.— it, which looks fantastic. they got to the bottom _ it, which looks fantastic. they got to the bottom of _ it, which looks fantastic. they got to the bottom of it _ it, which looks fantastic. they got to the bottom of it in _ it, which looks fantastic. they got to the bottom of it in the - it, which looks fantastic. they got to the bottom of it in the end. - it, which looks fantastic. they got to the bottom of it in the end. do| to the bottom of it in the end. do you ever —— did you ever that's what football stickers at home? what you ever -- did you ever that's what football stickers at home?_ football stickers at home? what do ou think? football stickers at home? what do you think? used _ football stickers at home? what do you think? used to _ football stickers at home? what do you think? used to spend - football stickers at home? what do you think? used to spend hours - football stickers at home? what do you think? used to spend hours at| you think? used to spend hours at lunchtime doing _ you think? used to spend hours at lunchtime doing that. _ you think? used to spend hours at lunchtime doing that. this - you think? used to spend hours at lunchtime doing that. this bloke l lunchtime doing that. this bloke here, his name is simon livermore. he is 45 and he has completed panini sticker albums all the way back to the 1974 world cup, the euros. he has euros and world cup albums all the way back to 1974. he got diego maradona, the most expensive one, £90. if anybody has got the argentina team badge from 1990... white you are missing out? i am missing out. honestly i spent years... not years, iam exaggerating, i spent so much of my time during that world cup cycling to a newsagent trying to find the
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argentina badge. nobody at the school had it on ebay wasn't around to. it school had it on ebay wasn't around to. . school had it on ebay wasn't around to. , ., ~ , school had it on ebay wasn't around to. . ., ~ , school had it on ebay wasn't around to. , ., . , , school had it on ebay wasn't around to. ,., . , , ., to. it is now. why did you bring a towel to the _ to. it is now. why did you bring a towel to the set? _ to. it is now. why did you bring a towel to the set? a _ to. it is now. why did you bring a towel to the set? a towel. - to. it is now. why did you bring a towel to the set? a towel. this l to. it is now. why did you bring a| towel to the set? a towel. this is because we _ towel to the set? a towel. this is because we have _ towel to the set? a towel. this is because we have been... - towel to the set? a towel. this is because we have been... can - towel to the set? a towel. this is because we have been... can you towel to the set? a towel. this is - because we have been... can you show this on camera — because we have been... can you show this on camera six, _ because we have been... can you show this on camera six, please? _ because we have been... can you show this on camera six, please? it - because we have been... can you show this on camera six, please? it is - because we have been... can you show this on camera six, please? it is a - this on camera six, please? it is a towel like this that i will use later. �* . towel like this that i will use tater-_ we - towel like this that i will use later._ we are - towel like this that i will use l later._ we are taking towel like this that i will use - later._ we are taking part later. because? we are taking part in the ice but _ later. because? we are taking part in the ice but 92 _ later. because? we are taking part in the ice but 92 challenge. - later. because? we are taking part in the ice but 92 challenge. len - in the ice but 92 challenge. len john rose, lachlan rose, swansea, he is suffering with motor neurone disease and he has come up with this challenge. you put yourfeet disease and he has come up with this challenge. you put your feet in a bucket of freezing water and do it for 92 seconds, one second for every club in the premier league and football league, trying to raise £92,000 but it won. brute football league, trying to raise £92,000 but it won.— football league, trying to raise £92,000 but it won. we have been volunteered? _ £92,000 but it won. we have been volunteered? we _ £92,000 but it won. we have been volunteered? we were _ £92,000 but it won. we have been volunteered? we were told - £92,000 but it won. we have been l volunteered? we were told yesterday that we would — volunteered? we were told yesterday that we would be _ volunteered? we were told yesterday that we would be doing _ volunteered? we were told yesterday that we would be doing this _ volunteered? we were told yesterday that we would be doing this today. i that we would be doing this today. that will be later. you are watching
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bbc breakfast, 6:20am. thank you for joining us. the past year has been a challenging and sometimes isolating time for many of us, as our usual ways of seeing family and friends have been put on pause. the latest figures by the office for national statistics — released later — are expected to show a rise in the number of people facing loneliness as a result of the pandemic. breakfast�*s john maguire reports. hello. there you go. thank you. was it all right? yes, all right today. once a week, maria calls in on sue to deliver some shopping, to chat and to catch up. my birthday today. i know — happy birthday! thank you. isolation and loneliness have been some of the cruellest effects of the pandemic. it's been very hard. yeah. and what's been the hardest aspect for you, would you say? not seeing my friends, not seeing anybody. and i've usually got quite a good social life — i belong to u3a, which is something all over the country where you can go to groups.
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and, of course, that had to stop. it's not right to be locked up in your house and not see anybody else, really, is it? what are you most looking forward to over the next few months? well, when we... when businesses open, like cafes and pubs and different things, i'm looking forward to seeing friends. maria is one of the 400 volunteers from a group called love devizes who signed up to help vulnerable people in the town before the first lockdown. some people haven't seen anybody for a year — not properly. apart from the people doing their shopping or if they have to go to the doctors or something, they haven't really been out. and... it's... you know, you just chat to them as long as you can, um... but it's very isolating. i think some people have gone downhill, as well, you know — their physical health — because of that sort of lack of purpose. covid — and the restrictions
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on society designed to tackle it — have meant many people not usually isolated have faced loneliness. my mood has been low — very low. loneliness is a very strange thing — i've never, prior to this, _ encountered any loneliness. i've always been surrounded by people, very busy. - and then to spend 12 months i without human contact isjust... yeah... it's been hard — very hard. this lockdown in particular was the first time that i've been affected by the lockdown in terms of work. i've been working from home. so that in particular has been harder because i've not had that day—to—day connection with people, with my colleagues. so these last few months have been particularly hard. i mean, i've got good support from work and things like that, but the last few weeks have been and have been
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particularly difficult. good morning, love devizes. how can we help? 0h, hello, there. i wonder if somebody could do some shopping for me, please. yeah, of course we can. back at the love devizes office, volunteers viv and michael are helping people who telephone in. so how are you doing at the moment, peter? 0h, not so bad, you know? bit fed up of all this shielding, i've got to be honest. been doing it over seven months now. have you really? people have started to come out of certain restrictions, _ we start to uncover where people haven't got the infrastructure i you and i would take for granted — you know, either friends - or neighbours — some lonely people. you peel back, you know, | devizes is a brilliant town, it's a great community. but if you peel back- the veneer of that town, there are people who are lonely. so we just feel that we want to, in a supportive, in a gentle i way, give that support. some of the most vulnerable or frail in our society have been forced indoors by the pandemic. but in communities right across the uk, there are people
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prepared to open doors and to help those most in need. john maguire, bbc news, wiltshire. we are talking about loneliness later in the programme. any thoughts on that, please get in touch. still to come on breakfast... is that your doll? yeah! we'll meet the little girl who inspired a doll designed to help children learn about down's syndrome. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. the coronavirus pandemic is leading to delayed grief with restrictions prolonging the process. that's according to one counselling provider in east london which says it's been helping more people than ever before. the muslim bereavement support service says restrictions mean people haven't been able to say goodbye properly.
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we are so busy now. we have women coming to us that have lost a few members of their family within a short space of time. there is a family that, you know, we are aware of that came to us and they buried their father, and their brother at the same time. so these are unusual circumstances, you wouldn't normally see that. drivers in large cities are being urged to think twice before buying a large suv. new research shows most are bought by urban drivers with three london boroughs, kensington and chelsea, hammersmith and fulham, and westminster, topping the list. the rac foundation has questioned whether the big sports utility vehicles, also known as chelsea tractors, are needed as a run around in cities. a musician from croydon is running workshops teaching young people how to rap. bhishma asare, known as proph, hopes the project will encourage youngsters to see rap as a way of expressing themselves when facing challenges.
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let's take a look at the travel situation now... 0n the tubes there are minor delays on the district and metropolitan lines. the piccadily line is part suspended bewteen rayners lane and uxbridge. tfl rail is part closed between liverpool street and stratford. over 40 bus routes across west, south west and south london operated by london united have been disrupted because of industrial action. so do double check your route. it's busy on the a11 between stepney and mile end, that's due to temporary traffic lights for gas works, in hornsey, turnpike lane is closed between the tube station and st marys school for repairs to a burst water main. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's another cold, frosty start to the day. temperatures in some of our rural spots down as low as minus three celsius. it should stay dry all day, it won't feel quite as cold
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as it did yesterday, that's because the wind is coming in from the north and north—westerly direction, not quite so much added wind chill through today. the wind isn't as brisk. some sunshine around through the morning and then into the afternoon there will be a bit more cloud developing and top temperatures of around eight or nine celsius. so a slight improvement there. as we head through the evening and overnight, it will be cold and frosty at first, with some clear skies around. then we will drag in some slightly milder air on a westerly wind as we head into the start of the day tomorrow. so it is a milder start to the morning than we are seeing at the moment. tomorrow with that westerly wind, temperatures could get into double figures, maybe. there will be some spells of brightness and sunshine but a bit more cloud around than today. a short spell of rain on friday will lead to a cold northerly wind and temperatures dropping again. i'm back with the latest from bbc london in half an hour. now though it's back to dan and louise. bye for now.
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hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. coming up on breakfast this morning. from peaky blinders themed bars to custom—built yoga studios. we'll meet the people hoping to take home the prize for shed of the year. we'll say hello to jason isaacs, who's hosting a harry potter themed quiz to raise money for the british red cross. and we'll both take our socks off for the challenge that involves dunking your feet in ice cold water for 92 seconds. all in aid of the mnd association. i don't know what's worse, doing the challenge of having to take our socks off! it's outside, going to be cold! . socks off! it's outside, going to be cold! , ., ., , cold! the first thing that was said to me this morning _ cold! the first thing that was said to me this morning when - cold! the first thing that was said to me this morning when i - cold! the first thing that was said | to me this morning when i walked cold! the first thing that was said i to me this morning when i walked in was, have you clean your feet? to me this morning when i walked in was, have you clean yourfeet? i have, thankfully. i was, have you clean your feet? i have, thankfully.— was, have you clean your feet? i have, thankfully. i always keep my feet! it wasn't _
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have, thankfully. i always keep my feet! it wasn't me _ have, thankfully. i always keep my feet! it wasn't me that _ have, thankfully. i always keep my feet! it wasn't me that asked. i we've been hearing a lot this morning about the oxford astrazeneca vaccine, and how a trial which is researching its effectiveness on children has been paused. let's talk more about this and other issues with one of our regular gps, doctor william bird. good morning, great to speak to you as ever. let's start with that pausing of the trial. what is your take on that? i will be aware a lot of people are watching this morning waiting to see what you and other experts have to say about this and there is probably understandably an element of concern about it. yes. element of concern about it. yes, there is an _ element of concern about it. yes, there is an element _ element of concern about it. yes, there is an element of _ element of concern about it. yes, there is an element of concern, i there is an element of concern, people are seeing these figures coming out that these clots, cerebral venous thrombosis, the one they are worried about, it is very, very rare, between ten and 15 per million people normally. we arejust seeing a little bit more of it with the oxford astrazeneca at one compared to the pfizer one. so there is that debate, it is caused by the
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vaccine or is itjust the fact is that debate, it is caused by the vaccine or is it just the fact that it is in the background? we know it is also much, much higher in people who have got covid, we must not forget that. even people who have asymptomatic covid, it will be a much higher rate of this, and that has been published in the last six months, well before this worry came up. at the moment we would go with the agency saying, it is absolutely fine to have the vaccine. we know the risks of covid, everyone says this, it's much, much worse. let's look at that. if you got a clot in your lung or a clot in your leg, one is called a dvt, the other is called a pulmonary embolus, each of those are 7% to 11% in covid. if you don't have a macro, it is not .1%. so those —— if you don't have covid, it is a 0.1%. so those clots are hugely
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elevated if you have covid. if you get the vaccine, there are no increases in dvt if you have the vaccine so we are talking about a very very small risk, very small, and we don't even know if it is to do with the vaccine. if you get covid, a massive risk. so i think thatis covid, a massive risk. so i think that is the best way to look at it. when you talk to your patients about risk management, that's a good way of putting it, are you getting more patients saying, is there a chance that i could have this vaccine instead of the oxford vaccine? there is a conversation, _ instead of the oxford vaccine? there is a conversation, and _ instead of the oxford vaccine? there is a conversation, and i _ instead of the oxford vaccine? there is a conversation, and i have - instead of the oxford vaccine? there is a conversation, and i have to i is a conversation, and i have to say, some people have said, can i have this one all that one? some people say, the messenger rna one from the pfizer one, we haven't had that child —— that in trial over ten years, the oxford astrazeneca one is much more familiar as a type. now we
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are going to get the moderna one which is coming out in the next few weeks which is almost identical to the pfizer one. unfortunately we have no say in it, what we are given is what we are given and as far as we know, and what the evidence is, they are the same in every way of effectiveness but also in the side effects. the agency will come back in the next couple of days to say why they stopped that roll—out for children. the children, it is very different. we are talking about much younger people here. people over 50, which i am part of, that doesn't seem to be an extra risk to them at all. ~ , ,., ~' seem to be an extra risk to them at all. . , ., seem to be an extra risk to them at all. ~ ., all. we spoke to the vaccine minister nadhim _ all. we spoke to the vaccine minister nadhim zahawi i all. we spoke to the vaccine - minister nadhim zahawi yesterday, he said that the moderna is arriving from the third week of april, ten days' time, in england. do you think where we might get to a situation whereby, when we are vaccinating down into the lower, younger age
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groups, that there are certain vaccines that are assigned to those ages? could that happen? it vaccines that are assigned to those ages? could that happen?- ages? could that happen? it might ha en but ages? could that happen? it might happen but as _ ages? could that happen? it might happen but as the _ ages? could that happen? it might happen but as the evidence - ages? could that happen? it might i happen but as the evidence connects, some vaccines are better for certain age groups, we might know that at the moment it will be dished out as they get it, i can't remember how many millions it is coming through, but they will be used to fill up some of the capacity where we need that, when it is beginning to slow down a bit. but i think it will be allocated to whoever. as we are moving down now into the low 50s, the moderna vaccine is probably going to be high up on the list and the chance is you will get that. so far that one has not been use that much compared to the other ones but it should be similar to the pfizer. the roll—out of the moderna vaccine starts in wales today. ijust the roll—out of the moderna vaccine starts in wales today. i just want to know about the way the vaccine
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roll—out is going from your perspective. the vaccines minister saying that's top nine priority groups would be hopefully sorted out by the end of next week, all getting the first jab. by the end of next week, all getting the firstjab. is that on track form what you are seeing? it the first jab. is that on track form what you are seeing?— what you are seeing? it is, it has been brilliant, _ what you are seeing? it is, it has been brilliant, really. _ what you are seeing? it is, it has been brilliant, really. so - what you are seeing? it is, it has been brilliant, really. so much i what you are seeing? it is, it has i been brilliant, really. so much hard work and we forget actually that when you go down into the nitty—gritty of who is... the delivery person, the people in the practice, the receptionist filling in the forms to get people in, phoning people up, chasing people when there have been extra vaccines, making sure that not a single one is wasted, the whole paraphernalia, not just the nurse who gives you the vaccine who is right at the end of the line, but all the people who have been working beforehand. it's been brilliant, it really has. i don't think i have had a single complaint of people saying, i went to... for us it is the majority stadium in reading or the
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racecourse, i went in there, got the jab, rested for a little bit, had my appointment for the next one and off i went and everyone has said it has been really well done. it has been a fantastic success, on track, and it looks like we will get every adult by the end ofjuly which is great. great to talk to you. is that a bit of snow on the roof behind you or that frost? it’s of snow on the roof behind you or that frost?— that frost? it's really cold, -4 outside. _ that frost? it's really cold, -4 outside, it's _ that frost? it's really cold, -4 outside, it's actually - that frost? it's really cold, -4 outside, it's actually frost i outside, its actually frost outside. i'm about to go out on a run, of course, iwas outside. i'm about to go out on a run, of course, i was hearing about the cold feet and i really thought, this is not the morning for cold feet! . ~' , ., this is not the morning for cold feet! . ,, , ., ., ., this is not the morning for cold feet! . ,, ., ., . ., this is not the morning for cold feet! . ~ ., ., . ., feet! thank you for that! we are so lookin: feet! thank you for that! we are so looking forward _ feet! thank you for that! we are so looking forward to _ feet! thank you for that! we are so looking forward to it! _ feet! thank you for that! we are so looking forward to it! it _ feet! thank you for that! we are so looking forward to it! it can - feet! thank you for that! we are so looking forward to it! it can be i feet! thank you for that! we are so looking forward to it! it can be a i looking forward to it! it can be a doctor's letter now, an excuse, we don't need to do it! apparently no chance. thank you very much, doctor bird, enjoy your run and take care. carol will have a weather update. i managed to time i i got home three
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minutes before a blizzard yesterday. —— | minutes before a blizzard yesterday. —— i managed to time my runner. i totally forgot to mention the champions league yesterday, because it was such a busy time yesterday, the masters, it passed me by! it was a mixed night for the two english teams in the champions league. the six time winners liverpool were beaten 3—1 at real madrid in the first leg of their quarter final but there was drama at the etihad stadium where manchester city scored a last minute winner against borussia dortmund asjoe wilson reports. liverpool versus real madrid, history versus dynasty. 19 times between them, they've been european champions. 13—6 to the spaniards, if you're keeping that score. real madrid are rebuilding theirstadium, playing in their training complex right now. a pass with architect's perfection to viniciuer. stand by for another. kroos looped over a similar pass and liverpool could not deal with it. they really could not deal with it. 2—0 before half—time.
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would liverpool wilt or resist? what they needed was this, mo salah onside. just one behind. but turn your back for an instant... now, first leg 3—1 isn't the tie won, but they look like the genuine madrid. erling haaland was playing against manchester city. next season, he might be playing for them, or anyone with money. well, he's borussia dortmund's for now. and anyway, do manchester city really need someone else? here was the kind of slick team attack which has swept by all opponents recently, to give them the lead against dortmund. now, haaland showed his strengths. not quite with the shot, but it was his pass which seemed to turn things. a late equaliser. not quite late enough. still time for city, for foden, for 2—1, and for that feeling. joe wilson, bbc news. there's one more side still in the champions league.
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chelsea play porto tonight, having lost for the first time under manager thomas tuchel at the weekend. they were thrashed 5—2 by west brom and tuchel revealed that there was a serious clash between team—mates kepa arrizabalaga and antonio rudiger in training the next day. they are all competitors and want to win training matches. so things got a little too heated up and the reaction was not ok. but the reaction to it, how the guys handled the situation — especially toni and especially kepa — was amazing and showed, like, how much respect they have for me and for each other because they sorted it out directly. there was no... they cleared the air immediately and this was the most important, so there was nothing left one day after. norwich look almost certain to go straight back up to the premier league. they thrashed huddersfield 7—0 at carrow road, teemu pukki scoring a hat—trick. and that takes them eight points clear of watford at the top
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of the championship. today is the deadline for the 12 host cities for this summer's european championship to let uefa know how many fans will be able to attend games safely. scotland take on the czech republic in their group opener, one of four matches that will be played at hampden park, and scotland's first minster nicola sturgeon is optimistic about the return of supporters. you know, we're still in a global pandemic. i can't stand here in early april and give absolute 100% guarantees forjune on anything, really — that's not the nature of what we're dealing with. but i am very, very hopeful — hopeful that i might be at hampden to cheer on scotland in the european championships and we'll continue to work as hard as we can to make that happen. there'll be one big name missing when the masters gets under way tomorrow, and that's tiger woods, who's still recovering after his car crash. he's been an inspiration to many players, none more so than his friend rory mcilroy, who recently learned a big lesson about how woods managed
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to win as much as he has. i went over to tiger's house a few weeks ago to see him. and in his family room he's got his trophy cabinet. and it is his 15 major trophies. and i said, "that's really cool, where are all the others?" he was like, "i don't know." "what?" he goes, "yeah, my mum has some, there's a few in the office, and a few wherever." so then i went, i was driving home and i was thinking, i mean, he thought that, right, that's all he cared about. all he cared about. so how easy must that have felt for him to win all the others? if all he cared about was four weeks of the year, the other stuff must have just been practice. 0nly have just been practice. only four weeks of the year matter to tiger woods, take what you will for that! and finally, it's the start of cricket's county championship tomorrow. but the conditions in durham yesterday wouldn't really have put anyone in the mood for a summer of leather on willow. 20 degrees last week, then this! most of us have experienced some changeable weather recently.
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here's hoping things have settled down by the time we're allowed to go to matches again. warning, slippery wicket! that was just unbelievable. gosh. and you guys are going to go out there and put your feet insome icy water on a day like today, rather you than me. water on a day like today, rather you than me— water on a day like today, rather ou than me. . ~ ., , you than me. talking about the gulf, the champions _ you than me. talking about the gulf, the champions dinner— you than me. talking about the gulf, the champions dinner was _ you than me. talking about the gulf, the champions dinner was last i you than me. talking about the gulf, the champions dinner was last night, they left a seat for tiger woods, an empty seat. bud they left a seat for tiger woods, an empty seat-— empty seat. and the sign at the entrance says, _ empty seat. and the sign at the entrance says, champions i empty seat. and the sign at the entrance says, champions only. j empty seat. and the sign at the l entrance says, champions only. it must feel amazing to go in there. you can only go in if you have a green jacket. you can only go in if you have a greenjacket. the person who you can only go in if you have a green jacket. the person who won the year before gets to choose the menu and dustinjohnson, you can literally have whatever you like, so he had pigs in blankets and lobster and corn fritters, house salad or caesar salad, and then the side, mashed potato and spring vegetables, main course, filet mignon with
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marinated sea bass and the desert was peach cobbler and apple pie and vanilla ice cream served in honour of dustin justin vanilla ice cream served in honour of dustinjustinjohnson vanilla ice cream served in honour of dustin justin johnson who vanilla ice cream served in honour of dustinjustinjohnson who —— dustinjohnson who was champion last year. dustin johnson who was champion last ear. , ., ., dustin johnson who was champion last ear. , . ., ~ , dustin johnson who was champion last ear. , . . ~ , ,. year. they have all kinds, barbecue, roasts, whatever _ year. they have all kinds, barbecue, roasts, whatever you _ year. they have all kinds, barbecue, roasts, whatever you like. _ year. they have all kinds, barbecue, roasts, whatever you like. one i year. they have all kinds, barbecue, roasts, whatever you like. one of. roasts, whatever you like. one of those lovely _ roasts, whatever you like. one of those lovely traditions _ roasts, whatever you like. one of those lovely traditions at - roasts, whatever you like. one of those lovely traditions at the i those lovely traditions at the masters. . ~ those lovely traditions at the masters. ., ,, , ., , those lovely traditions at the masters. ., ,, , ., masters. thank you, see you later. talkin: masters. thank you, see you later. talking about _ masters. thank you, see you later. talking about the _ masters. thank you, see you later. talking about the weather - masters. thank you, see you later. talking about the weather this i talking about the weather this morning, bitter yesterday and not too great today, either, hi, carol. good morning. yes, tablatures fell to below minus six degrees —— temperatures fell to below minus six degrees in some areas last night. but today it will be less windy so we will not have the wind chill that we will not have the wind chill that we had yesterday, which made it feel so bitter, but it will feel still like winter rather than spring. arctic air has moved across the uk but look at what is trying to come
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in from the atlantic late on, something a little bit milder. a cold and frosty start but a fair bit of sunshine around. showers in the south—west pushing away, wintry showers across scotland, coming down the east coast, a few in the west, many will fade. cloud building through the day as well so cloudier than yesterday. having said that, some brighter breaks as well and some brighter breaks as well and some sunshine. later on in the day, the weatherfront coming some sunshine. later on in the day, the weather front coming in from the west introduces some patchy rain to northern ireland and we will start to see some other coming our way. so tonight, some clear spells, there will be some early frost in the west, before all this cloud moves in, bringing its rain across parts of wales, northern england and scotland, preceded by snow in scotland, preceded by snow in scotland to lower levels, we could see some in the pennines as well. ahead of it, there will be some frost by the end of the night, more likely to be in the south and east. as the cloud comes in, temperatures will rise. where we have the cloud
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and rain, we will have five and six, not quite as for you. as we head through tomorrow, low pressure dominating the weather across the north of the country, starting to take the wind from more of a south—westerly direction, milder than the north—westerly then we have had. a weather front sinks southwards taking its rain with it. again tomorrow, a tevita cloud around, blustery wind in the north, and behind this some snow showers —— and behind this some snow showers —— a fair bit of cloud around. temperatures back into double figures for most. but it will not last, that weather front sinking southis last, that weather front sinking south is a cold front so you can see its passage heading southwards. still mild in the south, but back into that wintry northerly in the north during the course of a friday. so here is the weather front bringing patchy rain with it and the cloud as it sinks sales but hanging on to milder conditions. behind it,
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a fair bit of dry weather and sunshine but you can see that wintry showers and in the north of scotland some of those will be getting down to lower levels. six in aberdeen by friday, 11 as we move down towards the south—east. as for saturday, still a lot of dry weather around. a weather front just getting still a lot of dry weather around. a weather frontjust getting across the south—east. the positioning of the south—east. the positioning of the rain could change, it could be a bit further south, a bit further north, so if you have outdoor plans on saturday, keep checking the weather forecast. on saturday, keep checking the weatherforecast. it on saturday, keep checking the weather forecast. it will be a cold start, some frost around and still wintry showers around as well. but in between we will see some sunshine. the weather very changeable in the next few days, especially so the temperatures. could you change it by 8:30am when we have to go outside? filth. could you change it by 8:30am when we have to go outside?— we have to go outside? oh, louise! or 'ust we have to go outside? oh, louise! 0rjust bring _ we have to go outside? oh, louise! 0rjust bring a _ we have to go outside? oh, louise! orjust bring a heater— we have to go outside? oh, louise! orjust bring a heater or _ we have to go outside? oh, louise! orjust bring a heater or a - we have to go outside? oh, louise! orjust bring a heater or a kettle. i 0rjust bring a heater or a kettle. at the moment it is about —2. i5 orjust bring a heater or a kettle.
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at the moment it is about -2. is it? oh, at the moment it is about -2. is it? oh. gosh- — at the moment it is about -2. is it? oh. gosh- a — at the moment it is about -2. is it? oh, gosh. a magnificent _ at the moment it is about -2. is it? oh, gosh. a magnificent morning i at the moment it is about —2. is it? oh, gosh. a magnificent morning for shoving _ oh, gosh. a magnificent morning for shoving your — oh, gosh. a magnificent morning for shoving your feet in ice water. there — shoving your feet in ice water. there was _ shoving your feet in ice water. there was a massive laugh in our ears and therefore our boss. it was for a good — ears and therefore our boss. it was for a good cause! _ ears and therefore our boss. it was for a good cause! stay _ ears and therefore our boss. it was for a good cause! stay strong! i what do a peaky blinders themed bar and a custom—built yoga studio have in common? they're both contenders to be named "shed of the year". and it's a surprisingly packed field! breakfast�*s graham satchell has been to meet the people whose humble shed is their pride and joy. we don't like to call it a shed. it's wooden built, but it is a yoga and pilates studio, which is where i teach and work. i'd have said probably for 15 years, over and over, "i would love to have my own studio, i would love to have my own studio," and, ta—dah! my husband goes, hmm, 0k. so began a mammoth lockdown project. geraint has spent most of the last
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year building a yoga studio for his wife, mel, in the back garden. it's been incredibly enjoyable, hugely satisfying to be able to stand in the kitchen window and look down and see something that i've created myself is just fantastic. the finished studio has underfloor heating, wi—fi, sound and vision. it's allowed mel to do her classes online. mel started doing yoga to help her cope with postnatal depression. it's been a huge saviour for me. and if i can help transfer that to others, then fantastic. what would it mean to you if you were to win shed of the year? it would be crazy. to have created this and thenjoin the shed pantheon would be fantastic. it really would. to see it on a computer and develop it into 3d and show me what could be...
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amazing. it's absolutely incredible. i couldn't be more proud. and eternally grateful. it's really quite tremendous, yeah. we always knew that the first name for the bar had to be something to do with peaky blinders, and that's why we called it mick and sue's peaky blinders. the fact that sue is actually in love with cillian murphy. he's a good—looking lad, isn't he? got to say that. cheers! mick and sue's peaky blinders shed pub has been a lockdown labour of love. it helped the whole family get through the last year. having the kids here with us all through the lockdown meant that we could all support each other
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and we could all love each other. and we knew we were all safe. and we knew, you know, most of all that we were playing by the rules, which was very, very important to us. it's been an escape away from the house, to come into here just to chill and relax and feel as though you're in a different world, basically. and when the bars do open up again, we don't want to go out. we're happy here. we're happy staying in our own bubble here and socialise in this way. seeing patients go through covid has been very challenging. it affects you every day you come home from work. and you absorb that. so it's about how do i manage myself, and prepare to go in the next day and do it all again? so, hence, the shed.
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diane's shed has become a haven from the outside world. she is a frailty nurse caring for patients in care home. it sort of puts things in place, and you can just say a relief and say, right, i can do this again tomorrow, i can go back into work with that smile on my face and nurse my patients. it's a bit of a joke with my son, my teenage son, who says, "where's mum?" to dad, and dad says, "oh, she's away with the fairies". it'sjust, yeah, it's a comfy, cosy place to be. i call it scribbles, i do scribbles in my shed. i'm not an artist, you know, i'm nowhere near, but it'sjust that mindfulness if you like ofjust doing something that i enjoy that i can just distract from everyday, what's going on in the world. how do you feel about being on the shortlist for shed of the year? it's a bit mad!
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i'm quite honoured, actually, because it'sjust a humble ten by eight shed. yeah, it's a really weird feeling, actually, shed of the year. but it's just my cosy space. lots of questions about that. when is a shared not shared? i lots of questions about that. when is a shared not shared?— is a shared not shared? i think the rules need — is a shared not shared? i think the rules need to _ is a shared not shared? i think the rules need to be _ is a shared not shared? i think the rules need to be stricter. - is a shared not shared? i think the rules need to be stricter. i - is a shared not shared? i think the rules need to be stricter. i think, i rules need to be stricter. i think, wi—fi, not a shed, heating, rules need to be stricter. i think, wi—fi, nota shed, heating, not rules need to be stricter. i think, wi—fi, not a shed, heating, not a shed. abs. wi-fi, not a shed, heating, not a shed. �* . . . if shed. a little electric heater? if ou have shed. a little electric heater? if you have electricity, _ shed. a little electric heater? if you have electricity, lighting, i shed. a little electric heater? if. you have electricity, lighting, but once you start putting tvs in there, it is not a shed. she once you start putting tvs in there, it is not a shed.— it is not a shed. she said hers was ten by eight. _ it is not a shed. she said hers was ten by eight. i— it is not a shed. she said hers was ten by eight, i think— it is not a shed. she said hers was ten by eight, i think maybe i it is not a shed. she said hers was ten by eight, i think maybe there| ten by eight, i think maybe there needs to be a limit. i ten by eight, i think maybe there needs to be a limit.— needs to be a limit. i think they needs to be a limit. i think they need to look — needs to be a limit. i think they need to look at _ needs to be a limit. i think they need to look at the _ needs to be a limit. i think they need to look at the rules. i needs to be a limit. i think they need to look at the rules. they | needs to be a limit. i think they i need to look at the rules. they have just extended shed into any building
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in the gardens. some of them were houses! ., ., . houses! feel free to get in touch, when is a shed _ houses! feel free to get in touch, when is a shed not _ houses! feel free to get in touch, when is a shed not a _ houses! feel free to get in touch, when is a shed not a shed? i a little girl from wiltshire has become the inspiration for a new doll to help teach children about down syndrome. six—year—old rosie hit the headlines last summer when her family built a full—size replica of her favourite doll�*s house in their back garden. the toy company behind the original house got in touch to say they'd like to base a new doll on rosie, to help educate others about the condition. matt treacy has the story. say hello. hello! doll! is that your doll? yeah! this is the tree house that started it all. a life—size replica of rosie's favourite toy built last year. just messing around, i thought it would be fun, really, for the screenshot ofjust having a screenshot, to stick it on aianb. i got this message suddenly from my phone from aianb saying,
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you've got a booking this weekend. so i was like, what? news of the unusual stay captured the imagination of people around the world and the boss of the company that makes the dolls got in touch. i actually came across a tweet and i said to jason, look, i'd love to make a one—off doll for rosie. and i'd like to gift it to her for christmas. but this was to be a special doll. rosie has down syndrome so subtle details were included in the toy and the packaging to explain her condition. we don't tell people that this is a doll with down syndrome. we let them purchase it and then they discover on the inside there's a little leaflet explaining what it actually means to have down syndrome. so we've got a diagram to show, the eyebrows and the nose and the face and she's got her boots, you know, they've modelled her boots on rosie's boots that really
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helped her be able to walk and have a normal life. i think it's going to be a really nice educational thing for kids to look at and read and, you know, play, just like they play with any other doll. when others saw the finished product, they wanted one as well. now it's been made available in toy shops in 35 different countries. they've sold hundreds already and hopefully we can to sell more. and $1 for every purchase will go to our local charity who helps to support rosie and other families in the community. and what i hope from this is that it lets children know that she is just like them. she's just different. i believe all kids should have a diverse toy box so that they can develop that empathy, so it is, it's extremely important to us. to her, this is like a normal day, she just loves going outside, loves going in the tree house, loves playing with her dolls, just loves life. matt treacey, bbc news.
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that is brilliant, isn't it? i love that story. _ that is brilliant, isn't it? i love that story. so _ that is brilliant, isn't it? i love that story, so much, - that is brilliant, isn't it? i love that story, so much, well- that is brilliant, isn't it? i love| that story, so much, well done that is brilliant, isn't it? i love i that story, so much, well done to rosie. do you remember the ice bucket challenge that took over the internet a few years ago? now there's a new fundraising sensation in town. it's called the "ice foot challenge", and it involves dunking your feet in a bucket of ice cold water for 92 seconds. it's been set up by former footballer lenjohnrose to raise money for motor neurone disease and later this morning both of us are going to give it a go. which is great news. and we aren't allowed to do it in the studio, where doing it outside where it is currently —2. where doing it outside where it is currently -2-_ where doing it outside where it is currentl -2. ~ , . ., ., ., currently -2. why are we not allowed to do it, currently -2. why are we not allowed to do it. is — currently -2. why are we not allowed to do it. is it — currently -2. why are we not allowed to do it, is it because _ currently -2. why are we not allowed to do it, is it because of _ currently -2. why are we not allowed to do it, is it because of all _ currently -2. why are we not allowed to do it, is it because of all the i to do it, is it because of all the electrics?— to do it, is it because of all the electrics? , . ., . . electrics? yes, water and electric doesnt electrics? yes, water and electric doesn't go _ electrics? yes, water and electric doesn't go down _ electrics? yes, water and electric doesn't go down well. _ electrics? yes, water and electric doesn't go down well. i _ electrics? yes, water and electric doesn't go down well. i think i electrics? yes, water and electric| doesn't go down well. i think they are basically trying to make it as uncomfortable as possible for us. doing it outside. we will be speaking to len as well who will be... ., , , , speaking to len as well who will be... ., . , , ., be... hopefully guiding us through it. ithink
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be... hopefully guiding us through it- i think he _ be. .. hopefully guiding us through it. i think he will— be... hopefully guiding us through it. i think he will do _ be... hopefully guiding us through it. i think he will do it _ be. .. hopefully guiding us through it. i think he will do it himself- be... hopefully guiding us through it. i think he will do it himself as i it. i think he will do it himself as well. we will— it. i think he will do it himself as well. we will be _ it. i think he will do it himself as well. we will be outside - it. i think he will do it himself as well. we will be outside freezing our bits off! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. the pandemic is leading to "delayed grief" — with restrictions prolonging the process. that's according to one councelling service in east london which says it's been helping more people than ever before. the muslim bereavement support service says restrictions mean people haven't been able to say goodbye properly. we are so busy now. we have women coming to us that have lost a few members of their family within a short space of time. there is a family that, you know, we are aware of that came to us and they buried their father, and their brother at the same time. so these are unusual circumstances, you wouldn't normally see that. drivers are being urged to think twice before buying a large suv.
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new research shows most are bought by urban drivers with three london boroughs — kensington and chelsea, hammersmith and fulham, and westminster — topping the list. the rac foundation has questioned whether the big sports utility vehicles — also known as chelsea tractors — are needed as a run—around in cities. a musician from croydon is running workshops teaching young people how to rap. # my name is bhishma, ifounded rap therapy. # becoming more creative by pushing all your energy onto paper with pen. # helping the younger generation be creative again. bhishma asare — known as proph — hopes the project will encourage youngsters to see rap as a way of expressing themselves when facing challenges. let's take a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tubes there are a few issues. severe delays on the hammersmith & city line — minor delays on the metropolitan line. the piccadily line is part suspended and tfl rail is part closed. over 40 bus routes across south and west london operated by london united have been disrupted
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by industrial action, so do double check your route. temporary traffic lights for gas works on the a11 between stepney and mile end may cause some issues today. in hornsey, turnpike lane is closed between the tube station and st marys school for repairs to a burst water main. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's another cold, frosty start to the day. temperatures in some of our rural spots down as low as minus three celsius. it should stay dry all day, it won't feel quite as cold as it did yesterday, that's because the wind is coming in from the north and north—westerly direction, not quite so much added wind chill through today. the wind isn't as brisk. some sunshine around through the morning and then into the afternoon there will be a bit more cloud developing and top temperatures of around eight or nine celsius. so a slight improvement there. as we head through the evening and overnight, it will be cold and frosty at first, with some clear skies around. then we will drag in some slightly milder air on a westerly wind as we head into the start
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of the day tomorrow. so it is a milder start to the morning than we are seeing at the moment. tomorrow with that westerly wind, temperatures could get into double figures, maybe. there will be some spells of brightness and sunshine but a bit more cloud around than today. a short spell of rain on friday will lead to a cold northerly wind and temperatures dropping again. i'm back with the latest from bbc london in half an hour. now, though, it's back to dan and louise. bye for now.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. 0ur headlines today. a trial of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine in children has been paused while an investigation takes place into whether the jab is linked to rare blood clots in adults. but leading scientists urge the public to continue getting the jab, saying the benefits far outweigh the risks. the risks of getting sick or dying of covid for all the people currently being offered first and second doses are far and away greater than any small theoretical risk that may exist relating to these cases — which are extremely rare. liverpool lose in the champions league, but manchester city find a last—minute winner to take the advantage over borussia dortmund. a moment of celebration and a instant of calm — we'll speak to the winners
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of photographer of the year. good morning. cold and frosty start today. many of us starting with some sunshine, a few wintry showers here and there but the cloud will bill through the day and northern ireland we will see some patchy at main arrived. all the details in about nine minutes. it's wednesday the 7th of april. a trial of the oxford—astrazeneca covid vaccine on children has been temporarily paused — while the uk regulator investigates concerns that the jab may be causing rare blood clots in a tiny number of adults. the pause is voluntary — and none of the 300 children involved in the trial has suffered a clot, as our medical editor fergus walsh reports. there you go — all done. nearly 300 children aged six to 17 are taking part in the astrazeneca vaccine trial in england, which began in february. oxford university said there'd been no blood clots in the volunteers but — out of an abundance of caution — it had stopped vaccinations,
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pending the outcome of the safety review in adults. more than 18 million people in the uk have received the astrazeneca vaccine. the mhra said last week there'd been 30 rare cases of blood clots, including seven deaths. so it's nice to be able to see that the area is sterile. the prime minister, visiting an astrazeneca plant in macclesfield, once again gave his firm support for the vaccine. the best thing people should do is look at what the mhra say, our independent regulator — that's why we have them, that's why they're independent. and their advice to people is to, you know, keep going out there, get yourjab, get your second jab. as a precautionary measure, the mhra updated its advice last month to say that anyone with a headache that lasted for more than four days after receiving the astrazeneca vaccine, or bruising beyond the site of the jab, should seek
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medical attention. both of the vaccines we're using are highly effective against covid and the risks of getting sick or dying of covid for all the people currently being offered first and second doses are far and away greater than any small theoretical risk that may exist relating to these cases — which are extremely rare. this could be very much compromised if people think that this isn't being taken seriously, that this isn't being examined in great detail. but i think individuals have difficulties in sort of understanding risks and perceptions, and seeing this in relation to other sorts of illnesses or diseases or outcomes. the astrazeneca vaccine is central to the huge success of the roll—out ofjabs in the uk, which is way ahead of the rest of europe. france has restricted the astrazeneca vaccine to adults over 55 —
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germany, to those over 60 — because of concerns about blood clots in younger adults. the european medicines agency and the uk regulator are due to give updated recommendations in the next day or two. maintaining public confidence in this highly effective vaccine will be vital. fergus walsh, bbc news. let's speak now to our correspondent anna holligan, who's outside the european medicines agency headquarters in amsterdam. good morning. when are we expecting a decision from them? well. good morning. when are we expecting a decision from them?— a decision from them? well, you know, vaccines _ a decision from them? well, you know, vaccines are _ a decision from them? well, you know, vaccines are a _ a decision from them? well, you know, vaccines are a vital- a decision from them? well, you know, vaccines are a vital way i a decision from them? well, you | know, vaccines are a vital way out of the pandemic but they only work if people actually have the faith to take them, soak today or tomorrow we are expecting an update from the ema plasma protein that specialise in adverse reactions, and just to remind you of what we have heard from the ema so far. a few weeks ago
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they said the benefits of the oxford jab far outweigh the risk of side—effects. they said they still investigating this link between these extremely rare blood clots and these extremely rare blood clots and the oxford jab. the link, the possible link, was not proven but possible. and then at the end of last month they said there was no evidence that would support restricting the use of the oxford vaccine. since then they have continued to investigate and there is a chance these experts could add blood clots as a possible side effect. for now people are being urged, if they are offered the shot of the oxford jab, then take it. thank you. the coronavirus vaccine made by the american company moderna will be administered in the uk for the first time today. the roll—out will begin in carmarthen in west wales. the uk has ordered 17 million doses of the vaccine, which has been shown in trials to prevent nearly all infections. it will be used alongside the pfizer and astrazeneca jabs. the welsh government has
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described its arrival as "another key milestone" in the fight against the virus. a comedy club has pulled out of a trial to test how venues can operate safely when lockdown ends — after receiving thousands of abusive messages. the hot water comedy club in liverpool says it was falsely linked to a scheme to test vaccine passports, leading to what it describes as a "hate campaign" on social media. a government spokesperson said they "strongly condemn" the online abuse the club received and clarified that participants in the trial would only need to provide a negative covid test — not proof of vaccination. doctors have been told not to prescribe painkillers to people suffering from chronic pain that has no known cause. the national institute for health and care excellence says there's little to no evidence that treating people with paracetamol or opioids makes any difference. it says people should be offered a range of therapies including exercise, acupuncture or anti—depressants instead.
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motorists who live in crowded cities have been urged to think twice before buying a large suv. the rac foundation questioned whether big sports utility vehicles — also known as chelsea tractors — are needed just to nip to the shops. the motoring group was responding to research which showed that most suvs are bought by urban drivers. the duke of cambridge has paid tribute to nhs workers during the pandemic — describing the institution as "probably the most admired organisation around". prince william and kate have taken part in a series of video conversations with medics across the uk in recent months and in the latest, the duke praised their "wonderful" efforts. good morning, thelma. hello, how are you, your royal highness? it's lovely to meet you. i just want to say on behalf of everyone what a fantasticjob you've done. you've all held it together and been absolutely wonderful people. it's been a real team effort but we're all very proud of you.
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cheering. the nhs has gone from already being much loved to probably the most admired organisation around. thank you so much for all your hard work. a seal that had a plastic ring stuck around its neck for two—and—a—half years has finally had it removed. the animal — named mrs vicar — was rescued from horsey beach, near great yarmouth. she's being cared for by the rspca, who say they're hopeful she will recover — but that she will need treatment for a "number of months". some ketchup news! the united states is facing a shortage of tomato ketchup. heinz — which produces the most popular brand — says it's been unable to keep up with demand for sachets of the sauce. it's been driven by a surge in takeaway food during the pandemic. i suppose that is understandable. it
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is not a shortage of ketchup, but the sachets to put the catch in. . the earlier you said you look like that you like your chips. the other important question, sausage sandwich, red sauce or brown sauce? neither. marmalade. that's really messed with your head, hasn't it? what?! you are a maverick. my grandfather used to have marmalade with bacon. like, just... normal marmalade? with bacon. like, 'ust... normal marmalade?— with bacon. like, 'ust... normal marmalade? not marmalade? normal marmalade. not onl at m marmalade? normal marmalade. not only at my late? _ marmalade? normal marmalade. not only at my late? you _ marmalade? normal marmalade. not only at my late? you are _ marmalade? normal marmalade. not only at my late? you are breaking i only at my late? you are breaking culinary boundaries this morning! marmalade with sausages, carol? never tried it. i prefer mustard. just bog—standard ketchup! you come in here with your posh foodie ways, you lot. what is happening outside our studio? �* . you lot. what is happening outside our studio? 3 ., ., ~' you lot. what is happening outside our studio?_ it - you lot. what is happening outside our studio?_ it is - our studio? let's look. it is warming —
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our studio? let's look. it is warming op _ our studio? let's look. it is warming up there - our studio? let's look. it is warming up there for- our studio? let's look. it is warming up there for our. our studio? let's look. it is. warming up there for our ice our studio? let's look. it is i warming up there for our ice foot challenge. abs. warming up there for our ice foot challente. . warming up there for our ice foot challenge-— warming up there for our ice foot challente. ., challenge. a good day for a swim. what is happening _ challenge. a good day for a swim. what is happening out _ challenge. a good day for a swim. what is happening out there, i challenge. a good day for a swim. i what is happening out there, carol? 0h, what is happening out there, carol? oh, my goodness, you are brilliant doing _ oh, my goodness, you are brilliant doing that — oh, my goodness, you are brilliant doing that. a cold start, a frosty one for— doing that. a cold start, a frosty one for many, which is falling as low as— one for many, which is falling as low as -40 — one for many, which is falling as low as —40 —6 in some parts of the country _ low as —40 —6 in some parts of the country one — low as —40 —6 in some parts of the country. one thing you will notice as it _ country. one thing you will notice as it is _ country. one thing you will notice as it is not — country. one thing you will notice as it is not as windy for most yesterday _ as it is not as windy for most yesterday. we have lost that significant wind chill we had yesterday. still some wintry showers across _ yesterday. still some wintry showers across parts of scotland, in across northern — across parts of scotland, in across northern ireland and wales, a few in the north— northern ireland and wales, a few in the north sea coastline and a few showers — the north sea coastline and a few showers in — the north sea coastline and a few showers in the south—west. most of these _ showers in the south—west. most of these will— showers in the south—west. most of these will move away and through the day we _ these will move away and through the day we will— these will move away and through the day we will see more cloud developed. that certainly will be the case — developed. that certainly will be the case across southern areas, may the case across southern areas, may the show _ the case across southern areas, may the show in — the case across southern areas, may the show in the channel islands, but they will— the show in the channel islands, but they will be — the show in the channel islands, but they will be holes in the cloud in south—west england, midlands, wales, cheshire. _ south—west england, midlands, wales, cheshire, northern ireland before the cloud — cheshire, northern ireland before the cloud built for you, and also for scotland. across the north of scotland. — for scotland. across the north of scotland, the northern isles, it
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will be — scotland, the northern isles, it will be pretty windy. gusts of 40 to 50 mph _ will be pretty windy. gusts of 40 to 50 mph. temperatures, nothing to write _ 50 mph. temperatures, nothing to write home — 50 mph. temperatures, nothing to write home about. temperatures at this time _ write home about. temperatures at this time of— write home about. temperatures at this time of year should roughly be between _ this time of year should roughly be between ten and 13 degrees. we have between _ between ten and 13 degrees. we have between two and 9 degrees. feeling cold. between two and 9 degrees. feeling cold by— between two and 9 degrees. feeling cold. by the end of the afternoon, some _ cold. by the end of the afternoon, some patchy rain starting to show in northern— some patchy rain starting to show in northern ireland. for the evening and overnight, that will push across parts _ and overnight, that will push across parts of— and overnight, that will push across parts of scotland, the rest of northern _ parts of scotland, the rest of northern ireland, getting in through wales— northern ireland, getting in through wales and _ northern ireland, getting in through wales and also north west england. depositing some snow on the pennines and parts _ depositing some snow on the pennines and parts of— depositing some snow on the pennines and parts of the highlands and southern uplands. temperatures will io southern uplands. temperatures will go up _ southern uplands. temperatures will go up where we have that in the night. _ go up where we have that in the night. but — go up where we have that in the night, but remaining low elsewhere with some — night, but remaining low elsewhere with some patchy frost. but you should — with some patchy frost. but you should have held on until tomorrow to do— should have held on until tomorrow to do your— should have held on until tomorrow to do your ice foot challenge because _ to do your ice foot challenge because it won't be as cold tomorrow as it is _ because it won't be as cold tomorrow as it is today — because it won't be as cold tomorrow as it is today. we because it won't be as cold tomorrow as it is today-— as it is today. we will 'ust let charlie and i as it is today. we will 'ust let charlie and naga i as it is today. we will 'ust let charlie and naga do i as it is today. we willjust let charlie and naga do it. i as it is today. we willjust let charlie and naga do it. show| as it is today. we willjust let i charlie and naga do it. show we as it is today. we willjust let - charlie and naga do it. show we just charlie and naga do it. show wejust do that? carol, you can do it. i am gosh, look at the time, got things to do. you take care of yourself,
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enjoy your sausage and mustard. let's return now to the news that a trial of the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine on children has been temporarily paused — following fears that the jab could cause blood clots in a tiny fraction of people. none of the 300 children in the trial, who are aged between six and 17, has suffered a clot — and the official advice to adults is to take the vaccine if it is offered. professor adam finn sits on the government'sjoint committee on vaccination and immunisation — although he's talking to us in a personal capacity — and he's also head of the bristol children's vaccine centre. hejoins us, along with one of our regular breakfast gps, dr ellie cannon. good morning to you both. it is important to talk to you both at this morning. first of all, professor adam finn, tell us what you know so far about blood clots and the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine. well, clearly we all know from the announcement from mhra last thursday that the _ announcement from mhra last thursday that the number of cases being seen,
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and the _ that the number of cases being seen, and the interest is that these cases are associated with low platelet counts. — are associated with low platelet counts, which we don't normally see indicators _ counts, which we don't normally see indicators cases of thrombosis, so they stand — indicators cases of thrombosis, so they stand out. and it makes them much _ they stand out. and it makes them much cases— they stand out. and it makes them much cases we have heard from other european _ much cases we have heard from other european countries. this is being looked _ european countries. this is being looked at — european countries. this is being looked at very carefully by mhra and we are _ looked at very carefully by mhra and we are expecting them to give more information— we are expecting them to give more information on what has been going on since _ information on what has been going on since the 24th of march, when the last data _ on since the 24th of march, when the last data were presented either today— last data were presented either today or — last data were presented either today or tomorrow so that we can decide _ today or tomorrow so that we can decide what to do next about this problem — decide what to do next about this problem. us decide what to do next about this roblem. , ,. decide what to do next about this roblem. , ,, ,., problem. us your assessments of the numbers involved _ problem. us your assessments of the numbers involved here _ problem. us your assessments of the numbers involved here because i problem. us your assessments of the numbers involved here because it- problem. us your assessments of the numbers involved here because it is. numbers involved here because it is tiny fraction of people affected. yes, so the numbers announced last week_ yes, so the numbers announced last week were _ yes, so the numbers announced last week were up to the 24th of march and they— week were up to the 24th of march and they mentioned there is 22 of which _ and they mentioned there is 22 of which where thrombosis and starts doing _ which where thrombosis and starts doing a _ which where thrombosis and starts doing a per— which where thrombosis and starts doing a per site. time has gone by so we _ doing a per site. time has gone by
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so we would — doing a per site. time has gone by so we would strongly axe expect more cases— so we would strongly axe expect more cases to _ so we would strongly axe expect more cases to be _ so we would strongly axe expect more cases to be reported over that time, and i_ cases to be reported over that time, and i guess— cases to be reported over that time, and i guess we will know those numbers— and i guess we will know those numbers very shortly, possibly later on today _ numbers very shortly, possibly later on today. dr numbers very shortly, possibly later on toda . , ., ., ., ,, on today. dr ellie cannon, thank you for bein: on today. dr ellie cannon, thank you for being with _ on today. dr ellie cannon, thank you for being with us. _ on today. dr ellie cannon, thank you for being with us. there _ on today. dr ellie cannon, thank you for being with us. there are - for being with us. there are probably people tuning in, they may have heard this news yesterday, there may be understandable concerns. what is your message to those watching today it might be in line to have a back seat, might be thinking about having it down the road, what are your thoughts as a doctor and what conversations are you having with your patients with re—i'd like to reassure everybody at this stage, as an example my husband is due to have his second astrazeneca vaccination and i will certainly be making sure he has his. this is all certainly be making sure he has his. this is al . certainly be making sure he has his. thisisal , , this is all about the risk versus the benefits _ this is all about the risk versus the benefits of _ this is all about the risk versus the benefits of vaccination i this is all about the risk versus the benefits of vaccination and| this is all about the risk versus i the benefits of vaccination and we are looking — the benefits of vaccination and we are looking at _ the benefits of vaccination and we are looking at rates _ the benefits of vaccination and we are looking at rates at _ the benefits of vaccination and we are looking at rates at the - the benefits of vaccination and wel are looking at rates at the moment when _ are looking at rates at the moment when this— are looking at rates at the moment when this particular— are looking at rates at the moment when this particular type _ are looking at rates at the moment when this particular type of- are looking at rates at the moment when this particular type of blood i when this particular type of blood clot of— when this particular type of blood clot of around _ when this particular type of blood clot of around one _ when this particular type of blood clot of around one in _ when this particular type of blood clot of around one in 2.5- when this particular type of blood clot of around one in 2.5 million i clot of around one in 2.5 million people — clot of around one in 2.5 million people if— clot of around one in 2.5 million people. ifwe_ clot of around one in 2.5 million people. if we took— clot of around one in 2.5 million people. if we took 2.5— clot of around one in 2.5 million people. if we took 2.5 million i people. if we took 2.5 million people — people. if we took 2.5 million
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people and _ people. if we took 2.5 million people and instead _ people. if we took 2.5 million people and instead of- people. if we took 2.5 million people and instead of havingl people. if we took 2.5 million i people and instead of having the astrazeneca _ people and instead of having the astrazeneca vaccination, - people and instead of having the astrazeneca vaccination, if- people and instead of having the astrazeneca vaccination, if it i people and instead of having the astrazeneca vaccination, if it is i astrazeneca vaccination, if it is indeed — astrazeneca vaccination, if it is indeed the _ astrazeneca vaccination, if it is indeed the cause, _ astrazeneca vaccination, if it is indeed the cause, but- astrazeneca vaccination, if it is indeed the cause, but we - astrazeneca vaccination, if it is i indeed the cause, but we actually .ave indeed the cause, but we actually gave them — indeed the cause, but we actually gave them covid, _ indeed the cause, but we actually gave them covid, the _ indeed the cause, but we actually gave them covid, the infection, i indeed the cause, but we actually. gave them covid, the infection, we would _ gave them covid, the infection, we would expect— gave them covid, the infection, we would expect around _ gave them covid, the infection, we would expect around 2000 - gave them covid, the infection, wej would expect around 2000 deaths. that is— would expect around 2000 deaths. that is for— would expect around 2000 deaths. that is for a — would expect around 2000 deaths. that is for a 40—year—olds - would expect around 2000 deaths. that is for a 40—year—olds who i would expect around 2000 deaths. that is for a 40—year—olds who wei that is fora 40—year—olds who we consider_ that is for a 40—year—olds who we consider to— that is for a 40—year—olds who we consider to be _ that is for a 40—year—olds who we consider to be low— that is for a 40—year—olds who we consider to be low risk. _ that is for a 40—year—olds who we consider to be low risk. at- that is for a 40—year—olds who we consider to be low risk. at this - consider to be low risk. at this stage — consider to be low risk. at this stage the _ consider to be low risk. at this stage the groups _ consider to be low risk. at this stage the groups of _ consider to be low risk. at this stage the groups of people - consider to be low risk. at this stage the groups of people we| consider to be low risk. at this - stage the groups of people we are vaccinating, — stage the groups of people we are vaccinating, the _ stage the groups of people we are vaccinating, the benefits- stage the groups of people we are vaccinating, the benefits of- stage the groups of people we are i vaccinating, the benefits of having the astrazeneca _ vaccinating, the benefits of having the astrazeneca vaccination - vaccinating, the benefits of having the astrazeneca vaccination far, . vaccinating, the benefits of having l the astrazeneca vaccination far, far outweigh— the astrazeneca vaccination far, far outweigh any— the astrazeneca vaccination far, far outweigh any risks. _ the astrazeneca vaccination far, far outweigh any risks. so _ the astrazeneca vaccination far, far outweigh any risks. so please - the astrazeneca vaccination far, far. outweigh any risks. so please attend for your— outweigh any risks. so please attend for your vaccination. _ outweigh any risks. so please attend for your vaccination. these _ outweigh any risks. so please attend for your vaccination. these cases- outweigh any risks. so please attend for your vaccination. these cases at. for your vaccination. these cases at the moment— for your vaccination. these cases at the moment are _ for your vaccination. these cases at the moment are incredibly- for your vaccination. these cases at the moment are incredibly rare, - for your vaccination. these cases at| the moment are incredibly rare, but we are _ the moment are incredibly rare, but we are watching _ the moment are incredibly rare, but we are watching them _ the moment are incredibly rare, but we are watching them and - the moment are incredibly rare, but we are watching them and we - the moment are incredibly rare, but we are watching them and we are i we are watching them and we are listening — we are watching them and we are listening to — we are watching them and we are listening to the _ we are watching them and we are listening to the signals _ we are watching them and we are listening to the signals and - listening to the signals and everybody— listening to the signals and everybody is _ listening to the signals and everybody is being - listening to the signals and everybody is being very - listening to the signals and - everybody is being very cautious. there _ everybody is being very cautious. there are — everybody is being very cautious. there are lots _ everybody is being very cautious. there are lots of _ everybody is being very cautious. there are lots of us _ everybody is being very cautious. there are lots of us who - everybody is being very cautious. there are lots of us who are - there are lots of us who are accustomed to taking medicines, many of which do have side effects. that's absolutely right. i prescribed _ that's absolutely right. i prescribed the _ that's absolutely right. i- prescribed the contraceptive pill that's absolutely right. i— prescribed the contraceptive pill or hrt most— prescribed the contraceptive pill or hrt most days _ prescribed the contraceptive pill or hrt most days when _ prescribed the contraceptive pill or hrt most days when i _ prescribed the contraceptive pill or hrt most days when i am - prescribed the contraceptive pill or hrt most days when i am in - prescribed the contraceptive pill or hrt most days when i am in clinic| hrt most days when i am in clinic and i_ hrt most days when i am in clinic and i speak— hrt most days when i am in clinic and i speak to _ hrt most days when i am in clinic and i speak to women _ hrt most days when i am in clinic and i speak to women about - hrt most days when i am in clinic and i speak to women about the l
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hrt most days when i am in clinic. and i speak to women about the risk of blood _ and i speak to women about the risk of blood clots — and i speak to women about the risk of blood clots as _ and i speak to women about the risk of blood clots as well— and i speak to women about the risk of blood clots as well as _ and i speak to women about the risk of blood clots as well as the - and i speak to women about the risk of blood clots as well as the risk - of blood clots as well as the risk of blood clots as well as the risk of other— of blood clots as well as the risk of other things _ of blood clots as well as the risk of other things and _ of blood clots as well as the risk of other things and we - of blood clots as well as the risk of other things and we always i of blood clots as well as the risk - of other things and we always weigh up of other things and we always weigh up those _ of other things and we always weigh up those benefits _ of other things and we always weigh up those benefits of— of other things and we always weigh up those benefits of those _ up those benefits of those medications— up those benefits of those medications versus - up those benefits of those medications versus those i up those benefits of those - medications versus those risks. the difference _ medications versus those risks. the difference here _ medications versus those risks. the difference here is— medications versus those risks. the difference here is that _ medications versus those risks. the difference here is that we _ medications versus those risks. the difference here is that we are - difference here is that we are watching _ difference here is that we are watching science _ difference here is that we are watching science in _ difference here is that we are watching science in action, i difference here is that we arei watching science in action, we difference here is that we are - watching science in action, we are watching — watching science in action, we are watching these _ watching science in action, we are watching these trials _ watching science in action, we are watching these trials go _ watching science in action, we are watching these trials go ahead, i watching science in action, we arei watching these trials go ahead, we are watching — watching these trials go ahead, we are watching how— watching these trials go ahead, we are watching how cautious - watching these trials go ahead, we are watching how cautious they- watching these trials go ahead, we i are watching how cautious they are, where _ are watching how cautious they are, where is _ are watching how cautious they are, where is usually— are watching how cautious they are, where is usually when _ are watching how cautious they are, where is usually when drug - are watching how cautious they are, where is usually when drug trials . where is usually when drug trials are happening. _ where is usually when drug trials are happening, these— where is usually when drug trials are happening, these are - where is usually when drug trials are happening, these are a - where is usually when drug trialsi are happening, these are a caring atong _ are happening, these are a caring atong period _ are happening, these are a caring atong period of— are happening, these are a caring along period of time _ are happening, these are a caring along period of time and - are happening, these are a caring along period of time and they- are happening, these are a caring along period of time and they are i along period of time and they are not realty— along period of time and they are not really in — along period of time and they are not really in the _ along period of time and they are not really in the public _ along period of time and they are not really in the public eye - along period of time and they are not really in the public eye so - not really in the public eye so much — not really in the public eye so much i— not really in the public eye so much i am _ not really in the public eye so much. i am very— not really in the public eye so much. i am very reassured i not really in the public eye soi much. i am very reassured by not really in the public eye so - much. i am very reassured by how robust _ much. i am very reassured by how robust the — much. i am very reassured by how robust the surveillance _ much. i am very reassured by how robust the surveillance is - much. i am very reassured by how robust the surveillance is and - much. i am very reassured by how robust the surveillance is and i- robust the surveillance is and i think— robust the surveillance is and i think everybody— robust the surveillance is and i think everybody should - robust the surveillance is and i think everybody should be - robust the surveillance is and i- think everybody should be reassured by that _ think everybody should be reassured by that. they— think everybody should be reassured by that. they have _ think everybody should be reassured by that. they have seen _ think everybody should be reassured by that. they have seen the - think everybody should be reassured by that. they have seen the signals. by that. they have seen the signals of these _ by that. they have seen the signals of these btood _ by that. they have seen the signals of these blood clots _ by that. they have seen the signals of these blood clots and _ by that. they have seen the signals of these blood clots and they- by that. they have seen the signals of these blood clots and they are l of these blood clots and they are looking _ of these blood clots and they are looking into _ of these blood clots and they are looking into it— of these blood clots and they are looking into it and _ of these blood clots and they are looking into it and will— of these blood clots and they are looking into it and will halt - of these blood clots and they are looking into it and will halt the l looking into it and will halt the trial is— looking into it and will halt the trial is to — looking into it and will halt the trial is to be _ looking into it and will halt the trial is to be overcautious - looking into it and will halt the trial is to be overcautious if. trial is to be overcautious if necessary— trial is to be overcautious if necessary which _ trial is to be overcautious if necessary which really - trial is to be overcautious if. necessary which really should provide — necessary which really should provide reassurance - necessary which really should provide reassurance to - necessary which really should - provide reassurance to everybody. professor — provide reassurance to everybody. professor adam _ provide reassurance to everybody. professor adam finn, _ provide reassurance to everybody. professor adam finn, we - provide reassurance to everybody. professor adam finn, we will- provide reassurance to everybody. i professor adam finn, we will speak today about the moderna vaccine which has been rolled out in wales and the vaccines minister was seen yesterday it should start being used, arrive in england in mid
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april. do you think we will get to a point where certain vaccines like that one will be reserved for younger people? that one will be reserved for younger purple?— that one will be reserved for younger people? that is certainly ossible. younger people? that is certainly possible- we _ younger people? that is certainly possible. we are _ younger people? that is certainly possible. we are seeing, - younger people? that is certainly possible. we are seeing, as - younger people? that is certainly possible. we are seeing, as you i younger people? that is certainly . possible. we are seeing, as you say, another— possible. we are seeing, as you say, another vaccine coming in and further— another vaccine coming in and further vaccines are approaching ticensure — further vaccines are approaching licensure and i know the uk has made contracts— licensure and i know the uk has made contracts with quite a wide range of different— contracts with quite a wide range of different vaccines, so as time goes forward _ different vaccines, so as time goes forward we — different vaccines, so as time goes forward we will have much more flexibility— forward we will have much more flexibility as to who can be offered what~ _ flexibility as to who can be offered what~ 0n— flexibility as to who can be offered what. 0n the other hand, we do need to keep _ what. 0n the other hand, we do need to keep the _ what. 0n the other hand, we do need to keep the programme going if the plan to— to keep the programme going if the plan to open things up and allow things— plan to open things up and allow things to — plan to open things up and allow things to get back to normal is to proceed — things to get back to normal is to proceed without another wave of the pandemic— proceed without another wave of the pandemic coming through. it is quite a tricky— pandemic coming through. it is quite a tricky balancing act here, getting the balance right, getting vaccines coming _ the balance right, getting vaccines coming through, but as my colleague wasiust_ coming through, but as my colleague wasjust saying, getting the risk— benefit wasjust saying, getting the risk—benefitjudgment right wasjust saying, getting the risk—benefit judgment right for risk— benefit judgment right for people — risk—benefit judgment right for people coming forward. gn risk-benefit judgment right for people coming forward. on that oint, people coming forward. on that point. peeple — people coming forward. on that point, people have _ people coming forward. on that point, people have lots - people coming forward. on that point, people have lots of - people coming forward. on that - point, people have lots of questions when they are turning up for their vaccine, i'm sure, and one might be,
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dol vaccine, i'm sure, and one might be, do i have a choice? can people have a choice about which vaccine they get? a choice about which vaccine they net? ., a choice about which vaccine they .et? ., , ., , a choice about which vaccine they net? ., , . , ., . a choice about which vaccine they .et? ., , ., , ., ~ get? no. generally not. whether you are bein: get? no. generally not. whether you are being vaccinated _ get? no. generally not. whether you are being vaccinated gp _ get? no. generally not. whether you are being vaccinated gp surgery, - get? no. generally not. whether you are being vaccinated gp surgery, a i are being vaccinated gp surgery, a harbour— are being vaccinated gp surgery, a harbour or— are being vaccinated gp surgery, a harbour or a — are being vaccinated gp surgery, a harbour or a pharmacy, _ are being vaccinated gp surgery, a harbour or a pharmacy, they- are being vaccinated gp surgery, a harbour or a pharmacy, they tend i are being vaccinated gp surgery, a i harbour or a pharmacy, they tend to have one _ harbour or a pharmacy, they tend to have one supply— harbour or a pharmacy, they tend to have one supply they _ harbour or a pharmacy, they tend to have one supply they are _ harbour or a pharmacy, they tend to have one supply they are using - harbour or a pharmacy, they tend to have one supply they are using for. have one supply they are using for that day— have one supply they are using for that day -- — have one supply they are using for that day -- in— have one supply they are using for that day -- ina— have one supply they are using for that day —— in a vaccination - have one supply they are using for that day —— in a vaccination hub. . that day —— in a vaccination hub. they— that day —— in a vaccination hub. they witt— that day —— in a vaccination hub. they will use _ that day —— in a vaccination hub. they will use up _ that day —— in a vaccination hub. they will use up vaccination - that day —— in a vaccination hub. they will use up vaccination on i that day —— in a vaccination hub. i they will use up vaccination on that day. peopie — they will use up vaccination on that day. peopte don't— they will use up vaccination on that day. people don't usually— they will use up vaccination on that day. people don't usually have - they will use up vaccination on that day. people don't usually have a i day. people don't usually have a choice _ day. people don't usually have a choice and — day. people don't usually have a choice and i_ day. people don't usually have a choice and i would _ day. people don't usually have a choice and i would recommend i day. people don't usually have a i choice and i would recommend that the best— choice and i would recommend that the best vaccination _ choice and i would recommend that the best vaccination is _ choice and i would recommend that the best vaccination is the - choice and i would recommend that the best vaccination is the one - choice and i would recommend that the best vaccination is the one that| the best vaccination is the one that you can _ the best vaccination is the one that you can get — the best vaccination is the one that you can get as— the best vaccination is the one that you can get as soon _ the best vaccination is the one that you can get as soon as _ the best vaccination is the one that you can get as soon as possible. it| you can get as soon as possible. it may you can get as soon as possible. it nfay be _ you can get as soon as possible. it nfay be the — you can get as soon as possible. it may be the case _ you can get as soon as possible. it may be the case that _ you can get as soon as possible. it may be the case that we _ you can get as soon as possible. it may be the case that we start - you can get as soon as possible. it may be the case that we start to l may be the case that we start to operate — may be the case that we start to operate younger _ may be the case that we start to operate younger people - may be the case that we start toi operate younger people moderna vaccine, — operate younger people moderna vaccine, that— operate younger people moderna vaccine, that has— operate younger people moderna vaccine, that has come _ operate younger people moderna vaccine, that has come online - operate younger people moderna . vaccine, that has come online today in wales, _ vaccine, that has come online today in wales, but— vaccine, that has come online today in wales, but at— vaccine, that has come online today in wales, but at this _ vaccine, that has come online today in wales, but at this stage - vaccine, that has come online today in wales, but at this stage it - vaccine, that has come online today in wales, but at this stage it is - in wales, but at this stage it is vitatty— in wales, but at this stage it is vitally important— in wales, but at this stage it is vitally important people - in wales, but at this stage it is vitally important people showi in wales, but at this stage it is l vitally important people show up in wales, but at this stage it is - vitally important people show up for their appointment. _ vitally important people show up for their appointment. m— vitally important people show up for their appointment. it to _ vitally important people show up for their appointment.— their appointment. at to come back to ou, their appointment. at to come back to you. we — their appointment. at to come back to you. we asked — their appointment. at to come back to you, we asked ellie _ their appointment. at to come back to you, we asked ellie her - their appointment. at to come back to you, we asked ellie her advice i to you, we asked ellie her advice for people watching who are concerned. what would you say? there are people in situation turned on their tv this morning and have seen
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their tv this morning and have seen the news last night. i their tv this morning and have seen the news last night.— the news last night. i would echo what we have _ the news last night. i would echo what we have just _ the news last night. i would echo what we have just heard - the news last night. i would echo what we have just heard from - the news last night. i would echoj what we have just heard from my colleague, — what we have just heard from my colleague, that's for the people being _ colleague, that's for the people being offered the vaccine at the moment, — being offered the vaccine at the moment, the risk—benefit is very strongly— moment, the risk—benefit is very strongly in— moment, the risk—benefit is very strongly in favour of receiving the vaccine _ strongly in favour of receiving the vaccine i— strongly in favour of receiving the vaccine. i think we will hear more information— vaccine. i think we will hear more information within the next 24 hours mhra _ information within the next 24 hours mhra the — information within the next 24 hours mhra. the jcvi, the information within the next 24 hours mhra. the jcvi, the committee that i sit on. _ mhra. the jcvi, the committee that i sit on. witt— mhra. the jcvi, the committee that i sit on, will be responding to those data it _ sit on, will be responding to those data it with— sit on, will be responding to those data it with recommendations as appropriate. lots more to come in the next _ appropriate. lots more to come in the next hour or two on this issue. it is the next hour or two on this issue. it is being — the next hour or two on this issue. it is being taken very seriously and people _ it is being taken very seriously and people should listen out and we will provide _ people should listen out and we will provide that advice as fast as we can stop — provide that advice as fast as we can stop thank you, both, very much for your— can stop thank you, both, very much for your time — can stop thank you, both, very much for your time. thank you for answering _ for your time. thank you for answering some of those questions. 7:20am _ answering some of those questions. 7:20am now— answering some of those questions. 7:20am now and at 8:30am we will speak— 7:20am now and at 8:30am we will speak to _ 7:20am now and at 8:30am we will speak to fergus walsh. if you have questions. — speak to fergus walsh. if you have questions, and i'm sure there are lots, _ questions, and i'm sure there are tots, we — questions, and i'm sure there are tots, we will _ questions, and i'm sure there are lots, we will speak to him he can go through— lots, we will speak to him he can go through some of those with us. we have through some of those with us. have more through some of those with us. - have more academics with us just after 8am. professor callum semple,
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professor of child health and medicine at the university of liverpool and also the professor of medicine at the university of east anglia will both be here at 8:10am. plaid cymru is launching its manifesto today ahead of next month's senedd elections in wales — and the party says it would hold an independence referendum within five years if it came to power. let's speak now to the party leader adam price. good morning to you. thank you very much forjoining us. plaid cymru enters the campaign is the third largest party in wales. how would you try to deliver independence? well, the political weather is changing here. it was snowing in parts of wales last night but there is the sense of political spring in the air. we have seen a surge in support for independence over the last 12 months, up to as high as 40% now, but why? i think people are convinced, like us, that wales is a country with huge potential but we will not be able to realise that in
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full for all of our people unless we take our future into our own hands and that is why it is right to give the people of wales the right to decide whether they want to be an independent country. realistically, ou talk independent country. realistically, you talk about _ independent country. realistically, you talk about trying _ independent country. realistically, you talk about trying to _ independent country. realistically, you talk about trying to do - independent country. realistically, you talk about trying to do that - independent country. realistically, you talk about trying to do that in l you talk about trying to do that in five years. do you think that is a realistic possibility?— realistic possibility? well, certainly. _ realistic possibility? well, certainly, as _ realistic possibility? well, certainly, as i _ realistic possibility? well, certainly, as i said, - realistic possibility? well, l certainly, as i said, whether realistic possibility? well, - certainly, as i said, whether the rising level of support for independence, i think the wind is in the sales of the national movement here. why? there is a rising tide of self—confidence in this country, i think. we realise the solutions to it wales' problems will not come from westminster, they can only come from westminster, they can only come from wales itself. all the problems we have been so familiar with, the deep poverty that discard so many of our communities, the fact that our young people don't have the quality jobs and affordable housing to be able to stay in those problems, they can be solved. the starting point is having the self—confidence to believe in our own ability to find
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solutions. ., ., , , solutions. how would they be solved? where would — solutions. how would they be solved? where would you _ solutions. how would they be solved? where would you get _ solutions. how would they be solved? where would you get the _ solutions. how would they be solved? where would you get the money - solutions. how would they be solved? | where would you get the money from? well, i mean... they are solved by actually having a government which is dynamism and agility to be able to get to grips with the problems. let's look the problem of affordable housing. we need to be building the scale we were in the early 19705. we have 67,000 families in wales at the moment on housing waiting list. we can start to get to grips with that immediately by the election of plaid cymru government that sees ending homelessness and the housing crisis as a priority. similarly with child a5 a priority. similarly with child hunger, it is amazing that in this day and age, the 21st century, we are talking about child hunger. we can solve that problem by extending free school meals to all those children living in poverty in wales immediately and then extending it universally so that we can have a situation where no child goes to school hungry, we can ensure children are able to learn and
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achieve their potential because they are given the support they require. back to that question, with regard to both those points you make, why would you get the funding from? == would you get the funding from? -- where would you get the funding from? there policies are delivered by prioritising within the existing budget. we can also invest at the level of the scottish government has been doing successfully in terms of our infrastructure. one of the reasons we have an underperforming economy in wales at the moment is that we don't have the basic infrastructure, which is the platform for success of any country, and we can emulate the success that scotland has been able to show by taking advantage of historically low interest rates to borrow, to create a foundation for future welsh economic success. that starts with the election of a plaid cymru government which is ambitious for wales on may the main six and it builds a pathway forward to become an independent prosperous country that will deliver a decent life for all of our citizens —— on the 6th of may. all of our citizens -- on the 6th of ma . ~ .,
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all of our citizens -- on the 6th of ma . ~ . . may. what with the impact, if it were to be _ may. what with the impact, if it were to be an _ may. what with the impact, if it were to be an independent - may. what with the impact, if it - were to be an independent country, and the freedom to travel and work in other uk nations?— in other uk nations? well... as happened _ in other uk nations? well... as happened in — in other uk nations? well... as happened in the _ in other uk nations? well... as happened in the case _ in other uk nations? well. .. as happened in the case of- in other uk nations? well... as happened in the case of ireland in other uk nations? well... as - happened in the case of ireland when it became the irish free state of the 19205, we created a common travel area, didn't we? that has existed for the last 100 years or so of course they would be free movement. ourvision of course they would be free movement. our vision for of course they would be free movement. ourvision forwales of course they would be free movement. our vision for wales is an outward —looking vision, a forward—looking vision and it is one based on the ideal of partnership in the nations of this island, as well, but the partnership of equals and thatis but the partnership of equals and that is the difference and of course the central idea is the idea of wales taking its future into its own hands. it is a unique election in so many ways that one of the unique things in this election, we will take our own pens into the polling stations. what better metaphor for the future of wales, taking our future into our own hands and
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writing our own destiny? what future into our own hands and writing our own destiny? what would plaid do differently _ writing our own destiny? what would plaid do differently from _ writing our own destiny? what would plaid do differently from the - plaid do differently from the current welsh mince, for example in how it has tackled the pandemic? well, i think we need to shift our focus as we come out of the pandemic. we have supported the welsh government by and large in their slow and steady approach in terms of the protection of public health, but now the focus has to be shifting to rebuilding the economy and there we need a gear change, we need agility, dynamism, and we can only get that through different political leadership, new ideas, fresh thinking coming through a plaid cymru government to. adam plaid cymru government to. adam price, plaid cymru government to. adam price. leader— plaid cymru government to. adam price, leader of _ plaid cymru government to. adam price, leader of plaid _ plaid cymru government to. adam price, leader of plaid cymru, - plaid cymru government to. adam| price, leader of plaid cymru, thank you forjoining us. for more details on the welsh senedd election you can visit the bbc news website and click the link to wales. we are here until 9:15am. lowe is coming up on the programme. we are talking about face in secondary schools in the next ten minutes or so. lets us know your thoughts. time now to get the news,
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travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. the pandemic is leading to delayed grief with restrictions prolonging the process. that's according to one counselling service in east london which says it's been helping more people than ever before. the muslim bereavement support service says restrictions mean people haven't been able to say goodbye properly. we are so busy now. we have women coming to us that have lost a few members of their family within a short space of time. there is a family that, you know, we are aware of that came to us and they buried their father, and their brother at the same time. so these are unusual circumstances, you wouldn't normally see that. drivers are being urged to think twice before buying a large suv. new research shows most are bought by urban drivers with three london boroughs, kensington and chelsea,
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hammersmith and fulham, and westminster topping the list. the rac foundation has questioned whether the big sports utility vehicles, also known as chelsea tractors, are needed as a run—around in cities. a musician from croydon is running workshops teaching young people how to rap. # my name is bhishma, ifounded rap therapy. # becoming more creative by pushing all your energy onto paper with pen. # helping the younger generation be creative again. bhishma asare, known as 'proph', hopes the project will encourage youngsters to see rap as a way of expressing themselves when facing challenges. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tubes there are a few issues. severe delays on the hammersmith and city line, minor delays on the metropolitan line. the piccadily line is part suspended and tfl rail is part closed. over 40 bus routes across south and west london operated by london united have been disrupted by industrial action. so do double check your route.
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temporary traffic lights for gas works on the a11 between stepney and mile end may cause some issues today. in hornsey, turnpike lane is closed between the tube station and st marys school for repairs to a burst water main. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's another cold, frosty start to the day. temperatures in some of our rural spots down as low as minus three celsius. it should stay dry all day, it won't feel quite as cold as it did yesterday, that's because the wind is coming in from the north and north—westerly direction, not quite so much added wind chill through today. the wind isn't as brisk. some sunshine around through the morning and then into the afternoon there will be a bit more cloud developing and top temperatures of around eight or nine celsius. so a slight improvement there. as we head through the evening and overnight, it will be cold and frosty at first, with some clear skies around. then we will drag in some slightly milder air on a westerly wind as we head into the start of the day tomorrow. so it is a milder start to the morning than we are
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seeing at the moment. tomorrow with that westerly wind, temperatures could get into double figures, maybe. there will be some spells of brightness and sunshine but a bit more cloud around than today. a short spell of rain on friday will lead to a cold northerly wind and temperatures dropping again. i'm back with the latest from bbc london in an hour. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. the education secretary gavin williamson has confirmed that secondary school pupils in england will have to keep wearing facemasks in class after the easter holidays. so what are the rules on face coverings in schools across the uk? masks have been required in secondary schools in england, both in communal areas and in classrooms where social distancing cannot be maintained, since they reopened fully on 8th march. that decision will be reviewed by the 17th of may. the scottish government says all secondary school pupils should wear face coverings
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in corridors and communal areas, and senior pupils and their teachers must wear them in class. in wales facemasks have to be worn in secondary schools only if social distancing isn't possible. and in northern ireland post—primary pupils are required to wear face coverings in classrooms and communal areas. let's speak to ges smith, head teacher at the jo richardson community school in dagenham. good morning, very nice to speak to you on the programme today. can we start to get your reaction to the news that face coverings will be required after easter in secondary schools and colleges? it required after easter in secondary schools and colleges?— schools and colleges? it makes sense, doesn't _ schools and colleges? it makes sense, doesn't it, _ schools and colleges? it makes sense, doesn't it, really, - schools and colleges? it makes i sense, doesn't it, really, because it fits in line with the road map out of lockdown. what we mustn't forget is that it has been part of a package of precautions and intervention within schools, which has included both social distancing, the whole testing programme, masks
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in schools and corridors etc, and also limitations in other areas. there are a number of parts in this chick so and this has been an important part. it has been one of the most difficult parts —— it is a number of parts in this jigsaw. the most difficult parts —— it is a number of parts in thisjigsaw. it is a challenging situation to get 1600 kids to wear a mask at all 16oo kids to wear a mask at all times and understand their responsibility in wearing it but they have been incredible. across they have been incredible. across the country people have been incredible embracing their role and the role they have to play in preventing the spread of the virus. give us an idea of some of the practical challenges you have been facing as head teacher around this issue. is it a permanent thing of reminding and cajoling? it is issue. is it a permanent thing of reminding and cajoling?- reminding and ca'oling? it is an onauoin reminding and cajoling? it is an ongoing challenge, _ reminding and cajoling? it is an ongoing challenge, it _ reminding and cajoling? it is an ongoing challenge, it is - reminding and cajoling? it is an i ongoing challenge, it is reminding and controlling. the biggest challenge has been for a number of
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different subjects where communication in those lessons is important, things like drama and the more expressive arts where we are talking and communicating. and also, in every classroom, where you want interaction and questioning and discussion, you want the assessment, you don't want students just to sit there and not respond. it's incredibly difficult as we all know to read emotion and read response if somebody you are talking to is wearing a mask. the teaching staff that has become incredibly difficult, they are giving advice and not sure how it's being taken, you can't read the face in the same way you could before. [30 you can't read the face in the same way you could before.— way you could before. do children still have to _ way you could before. do children still have to wear _ way you could before. do children still have to wear it _ way you could before. do children still have to wear it for _ way you could before. do children still have to wear it for drama - way you could before. do children still have to wear it for drama or. still have to wear it for drama or do you allow them to take it out for performances on things like that? not necessarily, because within drama, you can do to me to spacing but they have to work in boxes of
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two metres —— you can do to metre spacing. pe is exempt and dance is exempt, you can subjects where it has a major impact and we have looked at them all. i will be honest, we can't wait till the 17th, and i think probably across the country, young people and staff. we can't forget one thing, there is also members of staff within schools, mask wearing has been to support them as well because they all returned to work, they aren't working from home. on a daily basis they are interacting face—to—face with their colleagues and with large numbers of students, and it has been in place to give them a sense of safety and protect their health and welfare as well. find safety and protect their health and welfare as well.— welfare as well. and i understand that ou welfare as well. and i understand that you are _ welfare as well. and i understand that you are planning _ welfare as well. and i understand that you are planning on - welfare as well. and i understand that you are planning on still- that you are planning on still having your end of year prom. i wonder whether the teenagers that will be coming along to that and hopefully looking forward to coming along to it, will they be wearing masks or how will you work at an event like that? taste masks or how will you work at an event like that?— masks or how will you work at an event like that? we were discussing
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it esterda event like that? we were discussing it yesterday and _ event like that? we were discussing it yesterday and i _ event like that? we were discussing it yesterday and i think _ event like that? we were discussing it yesterday and i think probably - event like that? we were discussing it yesterday and i think probably a i it yesterday and i think probably a venetian ball is more appropriate, romeo and juliet masks? in all seriousness, we have planned it for the end ofjuly, we have pushed it back as far as possible so there is the best chance possible and we hope that by that time afterjune 21 that we can have it as a normal prom. there can be food and dancing and it can be celebrating the end of what is the most bizarre of two years for our year 11 and 13 pupils who are looking forward to these events. taste looking forward to these events. we were both struck a few weeks ago when we spoke to some young lads, they were ten and 11, as parents and as teachers and as adults we have been talking about this for a year, and the repercussions on how we feel about it. we spoke to these two young lads and they say, just get on with it. it'sjust what young lads and they say, just get on with it. it's just what we do every day. and we don't really think to much about it, wear a facemasks,
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perspex shield is in some classrooms, but it is still school. do you think that is overriding the attitude for some children? yes. do you think that is overriding the attitude for some children? yes, i think the resilience _ attitude for some children? yes, i think the resilience they _ attitude for some children? yes, i think the resilience they have - attitude for some children? yes, i i think the resilience they have shown is incredible in the circumstances. we all knew we would deal with a lot of issues that had arisen over lockdown when we returned, but the vast majority of young people have embraced it and how it has become part of their lives. you have to remember, schools now, if you are a year seven student who only started last year, they know nothing about this, nothing but wearing facemasks and being tested twice a week, staggered entry and exits, sitting apart from friends, having all the lessons among one classroom and in bubbles. we didn't have this in our language 12 months ago. the young people have really accepted this as being here and now but hopefully we
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have an end to it inside. i being here and now but hopefully we have an end to it inside.— have an end to it inside. i hope the rom have an end to it inside. i hope the prom goes — have an end to it inside. i hope the prom goes well _ have an end to it inside. i hope the prom goes well at _ have an end to it inside. i hope the prom goes well at the _ have an end to it inside. i hope the prom goes well at the end - have an end to it inside. i hope the prom goes well at the end of - have an end to it inside. i hope the prom goes well at the end of the i prom goes well at the end of the year, thank you for talking to us. ges smith, head teacher at a community school in dagenham. i think those lads were a bit older, just started secondary school but they were brilliant.— just started secondary school but they were brilliant. they were 'ust like, it's annoying i they were brilliant. they were 'ust like, it's annoying but i they were brilliant. they were 'ust like, it's annoying but we �* they were brilliant. they were 'ust like, it's annoying but we get i they were brilliant. they were just like, it's annoying but we get on i like, it's annoying but we get on with it. let's get the sport. taste with it. let's get the sport. we could all do — with it. let's get the sport. we could all do with a bit of that perspective! all eyes were on the huge superstar from brucie dortmund yesterday, but we are now talking about phil foden. —— from marussia dortmund. a very late goal from phil foden has given manchster city the edge in their champions league quarterfinal with borussia dortmund but the match wasn't without controversy. kevin de bruyne put city ahead inside 20 minutes and moments later they had a penalty award overturned by var. dortmund then thought
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they were level but england internationaljude bellingham's goal was disallowed, the referee ruled he had fouled ederson. replays suggested that was a harsh decision. marco reus did equalise for the german side in the 84th minute. but that wasn't late enough, foden making it 2—1 in the 90th and the city manager had no complaints. the referees were brilliant. the game was not a problem, so it was a penalty, that is what the var, the people said it was a penalty, and the bellingham action from the leg was higher than expected so the referee was correct, it was perfect. jurgen klopp said liverpool made it "too easy" for real madrid in theirfirst leg in spain. they won 3—1 in the first match between the sides since madrid's win in the champions league final
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three years ago. twenty—year—old brazilian vinicius junior is fast becoming a big star and he scored the opening goal, before they went 2—0 up. liverpool came out fighting after the break, and mo salah reduced the defecit. but they were stung when vinicius found the net again and that leaves liverpool with a really tough task in the home leg next week. if you want to go to the semifinals and that is absolutely ok and fair, you have to deserve it with the performance you put on the pitch. and tonight we were not good enough to win this game. but the only good news is, there's another game, where we saw there. but it's not like we have an advantage now. we are under pressure, of course, and we have to show that we can deal with that. scotland forward molly wright will miss the rest of the women's six nations after receiving a three—match ban. she was sent off for a dangerous high tackle on england's vickii cornborough, in the scots' 52—10 defeat on saturday, minutes after coming on as a replacement. she was remorseful when she admitted
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the offence afterwards, so the usual six—game ban was reduced to three. the masters begins tomorrow, five months since the delayed 2020 tournament was played. since then, england's lee westwood has seen a brilliant return to form. he'll be playing in his 20th masters and if he wins, he'd breakjack nicklaus's record and become the oldest player to claim the green jacket. i'm 48 in a few days' time. and, you know, the secret is to tone the practice and the training down as thursday comes, so i'm fresh. my legs probably won't take as much as a 20—year—old's legs will take. and this is a physically demanding golf course. so i have to scale that back. i have got into trouble in the past for claiming at 48 that he is old, because as a golfer, you can play well into your 705 and 80s. but even
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lee they're saying, at 48, he is having to scale it back. whenjack last won the masters, he had his son on the back and lee has his son on the bag as well. he on the back and lee has his son on the bag as well.— on the back and lee has his son on the bag as well. he is in good form. i will the bag as well. he is in good form. i will follow — the bag as well. he is in good form. i will follow it _ the bag as well. he is in good form. i will follow it closely, _ the bag as well. he is in good form. i will follow it closely, well, - the bag as well. he is in good form. i will follow it closely, well, i- i will follow it closely, well, i will, you won't!— i will follow it closely, well, i will, you won't! well, you will tell me! let's have a look at the weather now, lovely but cold. absolutely right, good morning, a frosty start, temperatures below freezing for the most of the night, but it will not be as windy except for the far north of scotland where we have gusts of up to 50 miles an hour. we still have some wintry showers across scotland, a few skirting northern ireland, south—west wales, a few into east anglia. you may well wake up to a slight dusting of snow on the ground. as we go through the day, most of that will tend to clear away. we will hang onto a few snow
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showers in scotland. after a bright and sunny start, the cloud will build through the day. nonetheless there will be some bright and sunny spells. the exception to that will be northern ireland where the cloud will thicken to the west in the afternoon. by the end of the afternoon. by the end of the afternoon we will start to see a return to some patchy rain. temperature is nothing to write home about. the average for the time of year, ten to 13 degrees. today, 1 degrees is the maximum temperature in lerwick, couple that with a strong wind, it will not feel pretty. a5 strong wind, it will not feel pretty. as we come south, top temperature seven or eight. through the evening and overnight, clear skies and an early first in the west. that will be usurped by this weather front coming in from the west, introducing thick cloud, some rain, preceded by some snow across the highlands and the southern uplands and pennines. you can see quite clearly, the mark of demarcation where we have the cloud and rain. temperatures five or 6
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degrees, up through the course of the night. elsewhere, lower, and in the night. elsewhere, lower, and in the south—east, a frost first thing in the morning. talking of the morning, low—pressure driving and weather. the air coming around in an anticlockwise direction, a subtle change in the wind direction to more of a south—westerly or are westerly. a milder direction for us compared to the north or north westerly we have had. with the weather front sinking south, it will introduce rain across scotland, northern england and northern ireland with a few showers in wales. south of that, variable cloud, sunny skies, look at the temperatures. we are looking at ten quite widely, 11 or 12, but behind the weatherfront ten quite widely, 11 or 12, but behind the weather front which is a cold front, it will turn that bit colder once again. you can see it nicely in the air mass chart, as it slipped south, we are in colder air in the north. and snow showers come
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in the north. and snow showers come in once again on the return to the north—westerly wind. this weather front producing cloud and patchy rain in the south. behind that sunshine, showers, wintry in higher ground. but look at the temperatures, 4—8 in the north, but clinging on to 11 in the south. that will change as the weather front whips into france. thank you, see you in half an hour. it is still —1 outside in salford. we are doing the ice foot 92 challenge, inspired by a former footballer who is suffering with motor neurone disease, all about trying to raise money for the motor neurone disease foundation. i am at half past eight and you just before the of the programme? yes.
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half past eight and you 'ust before the of the programme?- half past eight and you 'ust before the of the programme? yes, by which time it will be — the of the programme? yes, by which time it will be 0 _ the of the programme? yes, by which time it will be 0 degrees! _ the joy of a wedding, a new—born baby and a fox on a london street, all captured in photographs that have been named amongst this year's best. around 10,000 images from all over the world were entered into the societies of photographers photo of the year contest and only 29 were picked. we'll speak to two of the winners in a moment, but first, let's take a look at some of those that made the grade. some absolutely lovely photographs there. let's speak to two of the winning photographers now.
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terry donnelly captured the joy of liverpool fans celebrating their premier league title win, and rachel burton, whose photo of a baby girl won top prize in the new—born category. good morning both of you, thank you forjoining us. rachel, iwant good morning both of you, thank you forjoining us. rachel, i want to talk to you first of all, we will be able to show everybody the photo in able to show everybody the photo in a second. tell us how you got involved in photographing really tiny babies?— involved in photographing really tin babies? ~ , ., ., tiny babies? well, photographing newborns was _ tiny babies? well, photographing newborns was the _ tiny babies? well, photographing newborns was the easiest - tiny babies? well, photographing newborns was the easiest to - tiny babies? well, photographing| newborns was the easiest to work around my kids, because i could photograph them in my home studio when my kids were at school and my husband was deployed. so i didn't have to travel for weddings and things like that. it was a kind of natural progression from photographing my own kids when they were small. i photographing my own kids when they were small. ~ to, photographing my own kids when they were small. ,, , ., were small. i think we can show everybody _ were small. i think we can show everybody the _ were small. i think we can show everybody the photo _ were small. i think we can show everybody the photo which - were small. i think we can show everybody the photo which is i were small. i think we can show. everybody the photo which is just absolutely, let's see if we can see it. it's really beautiful, tell us a little bit about this baby. babs;
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little bit about this baby. baby jasmine, little bit about this baby. baby jasmine. her _ little bit about this baby. baby jasmine, her mum _ little bit about this baby. baby jasmine, her mum was - little bit about this baby. e:3 jasmine, her mum was due little bit about this baby. e:31 jasmine, her mum was due to have her newborn shoot after she was born, but she was kind of, in and out of hospital during pregnancy, she had a hard pregnancy. so she was putting off booking it. and then my friend amy came to me and said, we have got a problem, her mum amanda, the baby's mother had gone into hospital and they were delivering baby jasmine early, five weeks. they found out when she was delivered that she had been poorly through her pregnancy because she had stage four bowel cancer. she they found that when they delivered her. i bowel cancer. she they found that when they delivered her.- when they delivered her. i mean, that photograph. _ when they delivered her. i mean, that photograph, it _ when they delivered her. i mean, that photograph, it is _ when they delivered her. i mean, that photograph, it isjust - that photograph, it is just absolutely, it's so tender and sweet, and so special. how do you capture something like that? jasmine was so calm —
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capture something like that? jasmine was so calm through _ capture something like that? jasmine was so calm through her— capture something like that? jasmine was so calm through her session, - was so calm through her session, they don't always go like that with newborns. she was so calm, she was barely awake, she woke up for a feed, that was it. and it was jasmine's nan and amy, my friend, that broughtjasmine and her sister so we could get those pictures for amanda. it’s so we could get those pictures for amanda. �* , , ., , so we could get those pictures for amanda. �*, , . , ~ amanda. it's beautifully calm, like ou sa , amanda. it's beautifully calm, like you say. a — amanda. it's beautifully calm, like you say. a perfect _ amanda. it's beautifully calm, like you say, a perfect picture. - amanda. it's beautifully calm, like you say, a perfect picture. from i you say, a perfect picture. from that, terry, we go to the noise of your picture. tell us a bit about your picture. tell us a bit about your photograph which, i'm sure is a liverpool fan yourself, you enjoyed quite a lot as well. a night of celebration when liverpool finally won the premier league. absolutely, cham - ions won the premier league. absolutely, champions of — won the premier league. absolutely, champions of england. _ won the premier league. absolutely, champions of england. this _ won the premier league. absolutely, champions of england. this picture i champions of england. this picture captures _ champions of england. this picture captures the salvation outside enfietd — captures the salvation outside enfield which is the home of liverpool football. it was the first league _ liverpool football. it was the first league title liverpool had one for 30 years — league title liverpool had one for 30 years. on the evening liverpool didn't— 30 years. on the evening liverpool didn't play. — 30 years. on the evening liverpool didn't play, manchester city were
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playing _ didn't play, manchester city were playing at — didn't play, manchester city were playing at stamford bridge against chelsea, _ playing at stamford bridge against chelsea, they lost the match so it made _ chelsea, they lost the match so it made it _ chelsea, they lost the match so it made it mathematically impossible for manchester city to capture liverpool. i was down at the ground covering _ liverpool. i was down at the ground covering the — liverpool. i was down at the ground covering the story and hundreds of people _ covering the story and hundreds of people started to turn up until about — people started to turn up until about. the picture itself was taken in quite _ about. the picture itself was taken in quite low— about. the picture itself was taken in quite low light conditions, and a red flare _ in quite low light conditions, and a red flare was gusting shadows from the supporters against the wall of the supporters against the wall of the cup _ the supporters against the wall of the cup stand. —— the kop stand. it wasiust_ the cup stand. —— the kop stand. it wasjust already a the cup stand. —— the kop stand. it was just already a brilliant atmosphere and that added something. it atmosphere and that added something. it looked _ atmosphere and that added something. it looked like a piece of art. did you know when you took the photograph that it was special? ianthem photograph that it was special? when i saw it photograph that it was special? when i saw it come — photograph that it was special? when i saw it come into _ photograph that it was special? when i saw it come into the _ photograph that it was special? when i saw it come into the camera, it did catch — i saw it come into the camera, it did catch my— i saw it come into the camera, it did catch my eye. it's almost, it is like the _ did catch my eye. it's almost, it is like the beatles in some ways. it reminds— like the beatles in some ways. it reminds me of the cover of the help
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atbum~ _ reminds me of the cover of the help album. ., , reminds me of the cover of the help album. . , ~ reminds me of the cover of the help album. . , ,, . , album. yeah, it is like the fab four! certain _ album. yeah, it is like the fab four! certain images _ album. yeah, it is like the fab four! certain images catch - album. yeah, it is like the fab| four! certain images catch your album. yeah, it is like the fab - four! certain images catch your eye when ou four! certain images catch your eye when you are _ four! certain images catch your eye when you are covering _ four! certain images catch your eye when you are covering news - four! certain images catch your eye when you are covering news stories like this— when you are covering news stories like this and — when you are covering news stories like this and this was one for me. whereabouts are you, you look like you are quite high up? were you on a vehicle or on a ladder or in summer's —— someone's vehicle? 1 summer's —— someone's vehicle? i think i was standing on top of a bt iunction _ think i was standing on top of a bt junction box that at the side of the road _ junction box that at the side of the road you — junction box that at the side of the road. you are quite right, dan, you need _ road. you are quite right, dan, you need advantage point to get over the top of— need advantage point to get over the top of the _ need advantage point to get over the top of the crowd to get that view. the thing — top of the crowd to get that view. the thing that strikes me about both of the photographs is that they capture emotion in a way that only photographs can do in some way. absolutely, and i think... 50. absolutely, and i think... go, rachel. absolutely, and i think... go, rachel- go — absolutely, and i think... go, rachel. go on! _ absolutely, and i think... go, rachel. go on! a _ absolutely, and i think... go, rachel. go on! a good - absolutely, and i think... go, - rachel. go on! a good composition will have impact, _ rachel. go on! a good composition will have impact, narrative - rachel. go on! a good composition will have impact, narrative and - rachel. go on! a good composition will have impact, narrative and a i will have impact, narrative and a good _ will have impact, narrative and a good story, _ will have impact, narrative and a good story, some creativity,
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composition and lighting, but that moment— composition and lighting, but that moment of capturing an emotion as you quite _ moment of capturing an emotion as you quite rightly say is so important to any picture. pick up the point. _ important to any picture. pick up the point, rachel? _ important to any picture. pick up the point, rachel? yeah, - important to any picture. pick up the point, rachel? yeah, and i. important to any picture. pick up - the point, rachel? yeah, and i think that needs to _ the point, rachel? yeah, and i think that needs to be _ the point, rachel? yeah, and i think that needs to be done _ the point, rachel? yeah, and i think that needs to be done without - the point, rachel? yeah, and i think| that needs to be done without words. they say a picture paints a thousand words. no one knew the story behind baby jasmine's picture words. no one knew the story behind babyjasmine's picture until i published it after, but they got something from the picture anyway. there is something about you taking a photograph, looking at it and thinking, that is a beautiful baby and looking at that picture and other people who you admire and look up other people who you admire and look up to saying, that's actually the photograph of the year. what was it like to hear that you had won the category? like to hear that you had won the cate . o ? ., like to hear that you had won the cateuo ? . . �* , like to hear that you had won the cateuo ? . .2_ ., like to hear that you had won the cateuo ? . j,j ., category? yeah, that's crazy for me, because i category? yeah, that's crazy for me, because i sit — category? yeah, that's crazy for me, because i sit there, _ category? yeah, that's crazy for me, because i sit there, i _ category? yeah, that's crazy for me, because i sit there, i have _ category? yeah, that's crazy for me, because i sit there, i have sat - because i sit there, i have sat there in past years and watched the awards, and ijust watch the pictures and i am in all of them. —— i pictures and i am in all of them. ——
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|__ pictures and i am in all of them. —— i—— i'mjust pictures and i am in all of them. —— i —— i'mjust in all. but then to see them and you have one, it is just crazy. them and you have one, it is 'ust cra . ., ~' them and you have one, it is 'ust cra . . ~ 1 ., y them and you have one, it is 'ust cra. . , . ., crazy. thank you very much both of ou, crazy. thank you very much both of you, congratulations. _ you, congratulations. those photographs were beautiful. wands at the ready! do you know your gryffindors from your slytherins, your hufflepuffs from your ravenclaws? tonight you'll have the chance to show off your harry potter knowledge, in the ultimate quiz hosted by none other than lucius malfoy all in aid of the british red cross. are you ignoring my question? do you know it? ~ ., are you ignoring my question? do you know it? ~ . , ., . ., are you ignoring my question? do you know it? ~ . . ., , , know it? what you want me to yes, i do! we'll speak to the man himself in a moment, but first let's take a look at the moment that lucius and harry first meet in harry potter and the chamber of secrets. now, now, draco, play nicely. mr potter. lucius malfoy.
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we meet at last. forgive me. your scar is legend. a5 of course is the wizard who gave it to you. voldemort killed my parents. he was nothing more than a murderer. and we can now say hello to jason isaacs, whojoins us now. we said the chris was tonight, it's actually sunday night. —— we said the quiz was tonight. than actually sunday night. -- we said the quiz was tonight.— the quiz was tonight. an amazing thin , the quiz was tonight. an amazing thin, i the quiz was tonight. an amazing thing, i haven't _ the quiz was tonight. an amazing thing, i haven't changed - the quiz was tonight. an amazing thing, i haven't changed one - the quiz was tonight. an amazing | thing, i haven't changed one cell, extraordinary! i thing, i haven't changed one cell, extraordinary!— thing, i haven't changed one cell, extraordinary! i like where you are, as well, magnificent _ extraordinary! i like where you are, as well, magnificent backdrop. - extraordinary! i like where you are, as well, magnificent backdrop. i. as well, magnificent backdrop. i know, they are having a hard as well, magnificent backdrop. i know, they are having a hard time keeping quiet but i have the sausages on the go.- keeping quiet but i have the sausages on the go. lovely to see ou. if sausages on the go. lovely to see you- if there _ sausages on the go. lovely to see you. if there is _ sausages on the go. lovely to see you. if there is a _ sausages on the go. lovely to see you. if there is a harry _ sausages on the go. lovely to see you. if there is a harry potter- you. if there is a harry potter guiz. — you. if there is a harry potter guiz. are _ you. if there is a harry potter quiz, are you going to be able to answer— quiz, are you going to be able to answer the — quiz, are you going to be able to answer the questions about all the harry— answer the questions about all the harry potter? not answer the questions about all the harry potter?— answer the questions about all the har potter? ., ., ., , harry potter? not one of them. first of all, if harry potter? not one of them. first of all. if you — harry potter? not one of them. first of all, if you know _ harry potter? not one of them. first of all, if you know a _ harry potter? not one of them. first
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of all, if you know a lot _ harry potter? not one of them. first of all, if you know a lot about - of all, if you know a lot about harry potter, it will be great, but it is also for people who do not know about harry potter, there will be some guesswork, there will be some things that only i know from behind the scenes, and then there will be something that ijust found. this is to raise money for the british red cross which is adds an extra ordinary —— is an extraordinary situation but it is also to break up the tedium ofjust going to your rooms or looking at your devices, something to do on the sunday night. d0 your devices, something to do on the sunday night-— sunday night. do you watch harry potter with _ sunday night. do you watch harry potter with your _ sunday night. do you watch harry potter with your family? - sunday night. do you watch harry potter with your family? god, - sunday night. do you watch harry| potter with your family? god, no, sunday night. do you watch harry - potter with your family? god, no, my kids to watch — potter with your family? god, no, my kids to watch anything _ potter with your family? god, no, my kids to watch anything i _ potter with your family? god, no, my kids to watch anything i am _ potter with your family? god, no, my kids to watch anything i am in, - potter with your family? god, no, my kids to watch anything i am in, they l kids to watch anything i am in, they would rather eat their own toes and watch anything that their dad is in! they love the books, though. that is such a shame- _ they love the books, though. that is such a shame. sometimes _ they love the books, though. that is such a shame. sometimes i - they love the books, though. that is such a shame. sometimes i take - they love the books, though. that is such a shame. sometimes i take a i they love the books, though. that is. such a shame. sometimes i take a job such a shame. sometimes i take a 'ob and i think, — such a shame. sometimes i take a 'ob and i think, the — such a shame. sometimes i take a 'ob and i think, the kids d such a shame. sometimes i take a 'ob and i think, the kids wind such a shame. sometimes i take a 'ob and i think, the kids will like i and i think, the kids will like this. but i realise there is no chance of watching it. how awful would it be to watch their dad in
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things? i would it be to watch their dad in thins? ., ., , . things? i thought it would be a secial things? i thought it would be a special moment, _ things? i thought it would be a special moment, they - things? i thought it would be a special moment, they have - things? i thought it would be a special moment, they have no| special moment, they have no interest at all?— special moment, they have no interest at all? let's park harry potter for _ interest at all? let's park harry potter for a _ interest at all? let's park harry potter for a second, _ interest at all? let's park harry potter for a second, if - interest at all? let's park harry potter for a second, if they - interest at all? let's park harry - potter for a second, if they watched anything else i have done, they would be watching their dad either have sex or murder people, sometimes at the same time. i think it would need to give them therapy. 1 at the same time. i think it would need to give them therapy. i think i understand — need to give them therapy. i think i understand now! _ need to give them therapy. i think i understand now! let's— need to give them therapy. i think i understand now! let's talk- need to give them therapy. i think i understand now! let's talk about i need to give them therapy. i think i l understand now! let's talk about the british red cross, how far does your association go with them? i{finite british red cross, how far does your association go with them?— association go with them? quite a lona time, association go with them? quite a long time. but _ association go with them? quite a long time, but what _ association go with them? quite a long time, but what is _ association go with them? quite a long time, but what is extra - long time, but what is extra ordinary, it is a lucky thing being an actor with a bit of a profile, you get invited into rims that you don't normally get to go through —— invited into rooms. and see this invisible fabric, the british red cross are everywhere in society. when the pandemic hit, they have always been, now multiple times more, they take people home from hospital, help the nhs out, they are on ambulances, they help people who are lonely, they administerjabs,
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take people to the jabs, feed people, close people, there is not one part of british society where they are not helping. there is a hardship fund the people who are starving, in a crisis, if your house burns down, the police won't help you find somewhere to stay and get you find somewhere to stay and get you some food, it is the red cross. they are there when you are in need. i have been privileged enough to see them do that. as well as the staff there is an army of volunteers, great goodness and the arguments that you might see if you watch news elsewhere, not you, that there are dark clouds looming and society is full of selfish people looking after themselves. actually the british are extraordinary and the people who volunteer and help give you faith in humanity and there are many of them in the red cross.— in the red cross. there are volunteers _ in the red cross. there are volunteers and _ in the red cross. there are volunteers and the - in the red cross. there are volunteers and the great i in the red cross. there are - volunteers and the great british public are incredibly generous as well. ,, , . ., �* . well. stunning, yeah. i don't want --eole to well. stunning, yeah. i don't want people to come — well. stunning, yeah. i don't want people to come on _ well. stunning, yeah. i don't want people to come on sunday - well. stunning, yeah. i don't want people to come on sunday and i well. stunning, yeah. i don't want i people to come on sunday and think it is going to be about, we will not
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be talking much about charity, it's a break from be talking much about charity, it's a breakfrom reminding you be talking much about charity, it's a break from reminding you that there is tremendous hardship and pain and suffering everywhere, and when we do talk about the red cross, it will be to inspire you and make you feel good. the fact is that the british are, what i meant to say is, sorry, i havejust woken up, i haven't had enough caffeine! you don't have to pay to come. we can make a donation to the red cross, it will not be a night banging you over the head telling you how much charity need your money. every charity need your money. every charity has suffered income wise. i hope i will provide an evening of good fun for this fantastic cause. the british are very generous, both in volunteering and making donations so let's face it if the pub was open or a restaurant was open, you would be spending a lot more than a few quid which would make a huge difference to us. i would like to do all of this again, lucky we are not live! ,, . ., , live! starting in two minutes, good rehearsal! you _
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live! starting in two minutes, good rehearsal! you mention _ live! starting in two minutes, good rehearsal! you mention to - live! starting in two minutes, good rehearsal! you mention to the i rehearsal! you mention to the british are generous and kind, but they also love moaning about a poorly run quiz. are you giving the answers out every round? every triple check the questions? 1 answers out every round? every triple check the questions? i would su: est triple check the questions? i would suggest first _ triple check the questions? i would suggest first of _ triple check the questions? i would suggest first of all, _ triple check the questions? i would suggest first of all, to _ triple check the questions? i would suggest first of all, to make i triple check the questions? i would suggest first of all, to make it i suggest first of all, to make it fun, to compete, split up in your household, or a line up with your friends so you can text each other how you are doing. there will be an honour system, we aren't monitoring of the body. i have done a few quizzes by now, i have said to the red cross and the people organising it, let's make it a laugh, better than a pub quiz. there will be challenges where you can have three options of things i would do, or i will call friends of mine from harry potter, and see if they answer the phone, i am potter, and see if they answer the phone, lam not potter, and see if they answer the phone, i am not going to tell them. we will have people sending pictures in, we will get it fully interactive, to try and break up the tedium of sunday night when there is blood on the dance floor trying to decide what to watch. i'm going to try and make it a great night because in the end of this is me in a hotel room in america on a laptop so i want to have a laugh. i like
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so i want to have a laugh. i like the idea of— so i want to have a laugh. i like the idea of you _ so i want to have a laugh. i like the idea of you ringing - so i want to have a laugh. i like i the idea of you ringing random... i am going to give them and you, if you sign up, i will give you lots of chances to enter entertain each other, i willjust be a conduit, harbour. is other, i will 'ust be a conduit, harbour. , ., other, i will 'ust be a conduit, harbour. , . . , ., harbour. is there a harry potter whatsa - harbour. is there a harry potter whatsapp group? _ harbour. is there a harry potter whatsapp group? there - harbour. is there a harry potter whatsapp group? there is i harbour. is there a harry potter whatsapp group? there is not. | harbour. is there a harry potter i whatsapp group? there is not. there are too many! _ whatsapp group? there is not. there are too many! there's _ whatsapp group? there is not. there are too many! there's like _ whatsapp group? there is not. there are too many! there's like 500 i whatsapp group? there is not. there are too many! there's like 500 cast l are too many! there's like 500 cast members. you are friendly with the people you are friendly with, i am the most childish of the adults so i am friends with the kids, but the older people will all be in bed, 7pm, they will be tucked up with egg cup of cocoa. 7pm, they will be tucked up with egg cop of cocoa-— cup of cocoa. thank you very much, i think ou cup of cocoa. thank you very much, i think you make _ cup of cocoa. thank you very much, i think you make a _ cup of cocoa. thank you very much, i think you make a great _ cup of cocoa. thank you very much, i think you make a great christmas. i cup of cocoa. thank you very much, i | think you make a great christmas. go to think you make a great christmas. (er: to the british red cross website you can find us, and you can find us. if you don't come, i might call you, live! i
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you don't come, i might call you, live! , . . . ., live! i might be watching around harry potter! — live! i might be watching around harry potter! we _ live! i might be watching around harry potter! we watch - live! i might be watching around harry potter! we watch them i live! i might be watching around harry potter! we watch them in | live! i might be watching around i harry potter! we watch them in any order in our house, we don't care about the order. [30 order in our house, we don't care about the order.— order in our house, we don't care about the order. do i get younger or older? they — about the order. do i get younger or older? they are _ about the order. do i get younger or older? they are spread _ about the order. do i get younger or older? they are spread over - about the order. do i get younger or older? they are spread over ten i older? they are spread over ten years and you can see the lines that being a parent has etched into my face as the films go on.— being a parent has etched into my face as the films go on. thank you so much, face as the films go on. thank you so much. great — face as the films go on. thank you so much, great to _ face as the films go on. thank you so much, great to speak _ face as the films go on. thank you so much, great to speak to i face as the films go on. thank you so much, great to speak to you. i so much, great to speak to you. that chris is 7pm on sunday night, just go to the british red cross and you can find it. so just go to the british red cross and you can find it-_ stay with us, headlines coming up.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today. a trial of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine in children has been paused while an investigation takes place into whether the jab is linked to rare blood clots in adults. but leading scientists urge the public to continue getting the jab, saying the benefits far outweigh the risks. the risks of getting sick or dying of covid for all the people currently being offered first and second doses are far and away greater than any small theoretical risk that may exist relating to these cases — which are extremely rare. lifting the shutters on the new shopping experience. good morning. big—name retailers are set to extend their opening hours from monday. but i look at why consumer retail therapy could cause a headache for smaller shops. and we are taking inspiration from former footballer lenjohnrose. we'll be putting our best foot
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forward in a new ice—bucket challenge to raise awareness for mnd. it looks ready for us out there, doesn't it? again and ifelt it looks ready for us out there, doesn't it? again and i felt a cold start to the day and also crusty. many start on a sunny note but the cloud will bill through the day with patchy rain arriving in the west later, wintry showers tending to fade. all the details coming up. it's wednesday the 7th of april. our top story. a trial of the oxford—astrazeneca covid vaccine on children has been temporarily paused — while the uk regulator investigates concerns that the jab may be causing rare blood clots in a tiny number of adults. the pause is voluntary — and none of the 300 children involved in the trial has suffered a clot, as our medical editor fergus walsh reports. there you go — all done. nearly 300 children aged six to 17 are taking part in the astrazeneca
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vaccine trial in england, which began in february. oxford university said there'd been no blood clots in the volunteers but — out of an abundance of caution — it had stopped vaccinations, pending the outcome of the safety review in adults. more than 18 million people in the uk have received the astrazeneca vaccine. the mhra said last week there'd been 30 rare cases of blood clots, including seven deaths. so it's nice to be able to see that the area is sterile. the prime minister, visiting an astrazeneca plant in macclesfield, once again gave his firm support for the vaccine. the best thing people should do is look at what the mhra say, our independent regulator — that's why we have them, that's why they're independent. and their advice to people is to, you know, keep going out there, get yourjab, get your second jab. as a precautionary measure,
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the mhra updated its advice last month to say that anyone with a headache that lasted for more than four days after receiving the astrazeneca vaccine, or bruising beyond the site of the jab, should seek medical attention. both of the vaccines we're using are highly effective against covid and the risks of getting sick or dying of covid for all the people currently being offered first and second doses are far and away greater than any small theoretical risk that may exist relating to these cases — which are extremely rare. this could be very much compromised if people think that this isn't being taken seriously, that this isn't being examined in great detail. but i think individuals have difficulties in sort of understanding risks and perceptions, and seeing this in relation to other sorts of illnesses or diseases or outcomes. the astrazeneca vaccine is central to the huge success of the roll—out ofjabs in the uk,
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which is way ahead of the rest of europe. france has restricted the astrazeneca vaccine to adults over 55 — germany, to those over 60 — because of concerns about blood clots in younger adults. the european medicines agency and the uk regulator are due to give updated recommendations in the next day or two. maintaining public confidence in this highly effective vaccine will be vital. fergus walsh, bbc news. let's discuss this with two specialists in the spread of infectious diseases — professor paul hunter is in norwich and professor calum semple is in liverpool. good morning to you and thank you very much forjoining us. it's really important to get the facts. calum semple, oxford has caused the vaccine trials for the moment. tell us about the assessment of why that has been done. i’m
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us about the assessment of why that has been done.— has been done. i'm not on jcvi or the mhra — has been done. i'm not on jcvi or the mhra so _ has been done. i'm not on jcvi or the mhra so we _ has been done. i'm not on jcvi or the mhra so we have _ has been done. i'm not on jcvi or the mhra so we have to - has been done. i'm not on jcvi or the mhra so we have to infer- has been done. i'm not on jcvi or. the mhra so we have to infer what has been done. i'm not on jcvi or i the mhra so we have to infer what is going _ the mhra so we have to infer what is going on— the mhra so we have to infer what is going on here — the mhra so we have to infer what is going on here. what— the mhra so we have to infer what is going on here. what happens- the mhra so we have to infer what is going on here. what happens here i the mhra so we have to infer what is going on here. what happens here is| going on here. what happens here is that clinical — going on here. what happens here is that clinical trials, _ going on here. what happens here is that clinical trials, including - that clinical trials, including vaccine _ that clinical trials, including vaccine studies _ that clinical trials, including vaccine studies and - that clinical trials, including vaccine studies and drug i that clinical trials, including i vaccine studies and drug studies, often _ vaccine studies and drug studies, often forced _ vaccine studies and drug studies, often forced to _ vaccine studies and drug studies, often forced to give _ vaccine studies and drug studies, often forced to give people - vaccine studies and drug studies, often forced to give people time i vaccine studies and drug studies, i often forced to give people time to analyse _ often forced to give people time to analyse the — often forced to give people time to analyse the data _ often forced to give people time to analyse the data in— often forced to give people time to analyse the data in great _ often forced to give people time to analyse the data in great detail i analyse the data in great detail when _ analyse the data in great detail when the — analyse the data in great detail when the concern _ analyse the data in great detail when the concern is _ analyse the data in great detail when the concern is raised, i analyse the data in great detail| when the concern is raised, and analyse the data in great detail i when the concern is raised, and very often _ when the concern is raised, and very often drug _ when the concern is raised, and very often drug trials _ when the concern is raised, and very often drug trials and _ when the concern is raised, and very often drug trials and vaccine - often drug trials and vaccine studies _ often drug trials and vaccine studies then— often drug trials and vaccine studies then restart - often drug trials and vaccine studies then restart again. i often drug trials and vaccine i studies then restart again. with children. — studies then restart again. with children. the _ studies then restart again. with children, the risk— studies then restart again. with children, the risk of— studies then restart again. with children, the risk of death i studies then restart again. with children, the risk of death from | children, the risk of death from covid _ children, the risk of death from covid is — children, the risk of death from covid is vanishingly— children, the risk of death from covid is vanishingly rare, - children, the risk of death from covid is vanishingly rare, roundj covid is vanishingly rare, round about— covid is vanishingly rare, round about one _ covid is vanishingly rare, round about one in _ covid is vanishingly rare, round about one ini— covid is vanishingly rare, round about one in! million— covid is vanishingly rare, round about one in 1 million children. covid is vanishingly rare, round i about one in 1 million children will die from _ about one in 1 million children will die from covid, _ about one in 1 million children will die from covid, and _ about one in 1 million children will die from covid, and these - about one in 1 million children will die from covid, and these are i die from covid, and these are children— die from covid, and these are children with _ die from covid, and these are children with severe - die from covid, and these are i children with severe underlying problems _ children with severe underlying problems the _ children with severe underlying problems. the risk— children with severe underlying problems. the risk of - children with severe underlying problems. the risk of the i children with severe underlying problems. the risk of the rarel children with severe underlying - problems. the risk of the rare brain clot that _ problems. the risk of the rare brain ctot that has — problems. the risk of the rare brain clot that has been _ problems. the risk of the rare brain clot that has been seen _ problems. the risk of the rare brain clot that has been seen in - problems. the risk of the rare brain clot that has been seen in youngeri clot that has been seen in younger adutts— clot that has been seen in younger adults is_ clot that has been seen in younger adults is again _ clot that has been seen in younger adults is again sitting _ clot that has been seen in younger adults is again sitting around - adults is again sitting around perhaps— adults is again sitting around perhaps one _ adults is again sitting around perhaps one to _ adults is again sitting around perhaps one to five - adults is again sitting around perhaps one to five in - adults is again sitting around perhaps one to five in 1 - adults is again sitting around i perhaps one to five in 1 million cases. — perhaps one to five in1 million cases. so— perhaps one to five in1 million cases, so incredibly— perhaps one to five in 1 million cases, so incredibly rare. - perhaps one to five in 1 million - cases, so incredibly rare. children, because _ cases, so incredibly rare. children, because of— cases, so incredibly rare. children, because of this _ cases, so incredibly rare. children, because of this need _ cases, so incredibly rare. children, because of this need to _ cases, so incredibly rare. children, because of this need to be - cases, so incredibly rare. children, because of this need to be so- cases, so incredibly rare. children, because of this need to be so sure| because of this need to be so sure and the _ because of this need to be so sure and the balance _ because of this need to be so sure and the balance of— because of this need to be so sure and the balance of risks _ because of this need to be so sure and the balance of risks and - and the balance of risks and benefits, _ and the balance of risks and benefits, it _ and the balance of risks and benefits, it is _ and the balance of risks and benefits, it is reasonable i and the balance of risks and benefits, it is reasonable to| and the balance of risks and - benefits, it is reasonable to stop and took — benefits, it is reasonable to stop and look carefully _ benefits, it is reasonable to stop and look carefully at _ benefits, it is reasonable to stop and look carefully at the - benefits, it is reasonable to stop and look carefully at the data. i and look carefully at the data. professor _ and look carefully at the data. professor paul— and look carefully at the data. professor paul hunter, -
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and look carefully at the data. i professor paul hunter, professor calum semple ran us through the important numbers when it comes to risk management. there will be people watching this morning wondering whether it is the right decision for them to have the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine. what is your message to? i oxford-astrazeneca vaccine. what is your message to?— your message to? i am in the position. _ your message to? i am in the position. i — your message to? i am in the position, i have _ your message to? i am in the position, i have had - your message to? i am in the position, i have had my- your message to? i am in the position, i have had my first. position, i have had my first oxford—astrazeneca vaccine a few weeks _ oxford—astrazeneca vaccine a few weeks ago. my next dose is next month— weeks ago. my next dose is next month and — weeks ago. my next dose is next month and i have seen nothing in the data to _ month and i have seen nothing in the data to suggest that i would have any anxiety about having my second dose and _ any anxiety about having my second dose and i_ any anxiety about having my second dose and i fully encourage other people _ dose and i fully encourage other peopte to — dose and i fully encourage other people to do so. not having an immunisation is more likely to mean you don't— immunisation is more likely to mean you don't survive until christmas because — you don't survive until christmas because of— you don't survive until christmas because of covid taking the vaccine. so the _ because of covid taking the vaccine. so the risk— because of covid taking the vaccine. so the risk benefit, particularly i think— so the risk benefit, particularly i think for— so the risk benefit, particularly i think for older people, where there is very— think for older people, where there is very little suggestion that this is very little suggestion that this is causing — is very little suggestion that this is causing problems in older people, the risk— is causing problems in older people, the risk benefit is very, very strongly— the risk benefit is very, very strongly in favour of having the vaccine — strongly in favour of having the vaccine and i encourage everybody, like myself— vaccine and i encourage everybody, like myself and my family, to go for
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their second or indeed their first astrazeneca vaccine when called. were _ astrazeneca vaccine when called. were both — astrazeneca vaccine when called. were both referring to age. professor paul hunter, tell us about the significance of age. we are not currently vaccinating people not at risk, for example, below 50. it is risk, for example, below 50. it is very difficult _ risk, for example, below 50. it is very difficult because we have not seen _ very difficult because we have not seen reports of the case series, the number— seen reports of the case series, the number of— seen reports of the case series, the number of people who have had service — number of people who have had service venous sinus thrombosis definitively but we are certainly hearing — definitively but we are certainly hearing that primarily is it something happening in younger people _ something happening in younger people not that surprising because before _ people not that surprising because before it _ people not that surprising because before it covid cvs t tended to affect — before it covid cvs t tended to affect people under 50. yes, there is an— affect people under 50. yes, there is an issue — affect people under 50. yes, there is an issue that needs to be addressed at the moment it doesn't seem _ addressed at the moment it doesn't seem to _ addressed at the moment it doesn't seem to be — addressed at the moment it doesn't seem to be an issue for people who are currently being offered the
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vaccine — are currently being offered the vaccine. we do have time to get this i’ilht vaccine. we do have time to get this right and _ vaccine. we do have time to get this right and work out exactly what the issue _ right and work out exactly what the issue is _ right and work out exactly what the issue is before we need to start worrying — issue is before we need to start worrying about the impact on the vaccine _ worrying about the impact on the vaccine roll—out. worrying about the impact on the vaccine roll-out.— worrying about the impact on the vaccine roll-out. professor semple, toda we vaccine roll-out. professor semple, today we start _ vaccine roll-out. professor semple, today we start to _ vaccine roll-out. professor semple, today we start to roll-out _ vaccine roll-out. professor semple, today we start to roll-out in - vaccine roll-out. professor semple, today we start to roll-out in wales | today we start to roll—out in wales of moderna vaccine, which will arrive in england in the third week of april, that is the plan. the vaccine programme is widening all the time. it vaccine programme is widening all the time. , ., , . the time. it is, something to bear in mind, the time. it is, something to bear in mind. really — the time. it is, something to bear in mind, really good _ the time. it is, something to bear in mind, really good way - the time. it is, something to bear in mind, really good way to - the time. it is, something to bear in mind, really good way to get i in mind, really good way to get brain— in mind, really good way to get braih clot — in mind, really good way to get brain clot portland _ in mind, really good way to get brain clot portland clot - in mind, really good way to get brain clot portland clot or- in mind, really good way to get brain clot portland clot or a - in mind, really good way to get i brain clot portland clot or a clock in your— brain clot portland clot or a clock in your gut — brain clot portland clot or a clock in your gut is— brain clot portland clot or a clock in your gut is to _ brain clot portland clot or a clock in your gut is to catch _ brain clot portland clot or a clock in your gut is to catch covid. - brain clot portland clot or a clock in your gut is to catch covid. one of the _ in your gut is to catch covid. one of the classic— in your gut is to catch covid. one of the classic ways _ in your gut is to catch covid. one of the classic ways that - in your gut is to catch covid. one of the classic ways that covid - in your gut is to catch covid. one of the classic ways that covid is i of the classic ways that covid is killing — of the classic ways that covid is killing people _ of the classic ways that covid is killing people is— of the classic ways that covid is killing people is to _ of the classic ways that covid is killing people is to give - of the classic ways that covid is killing people is to give them . of the classic ways that covid is - killing people is to give them blood clots _ killing people is to give them blood clots some — killing people is to give them blood clots. some people _ killing people is to give them blood clots. some people will— killing people is to give them blood clots. some people will catch - killing people is to give them blood clots. some people will catch covidi clots. some people will catch covid around _ clots. some people will catch covid around the — clots. some people will catch covid around the time _ clots. some people will catch covid around the time of— clots. some people will catch covid around the time of vaccination, - around the time of vaccination, before — around the time of vaccination, before the _ around the time of vaccination, before the vaccination - around the time of vaccination, before the vaccination time - around the time of vaccination, before the vaccination time to. before the vaccination time to generate _ before the vaccination time to generate immunity. _ before the vaccination time to generate immunity. that - before the vaccination time to generate immunity. that is i before the vaccination time to| generate immunity. that is the difference _ generate immunity. that is the difference between _ generate immunity. that is the difference between vaccination | generate immunity. that is the - difference between vaccination and immunisation, _ difference between vaccination and immunisation, about— difference between vaccination and immunisation, about three - difference between vaccination and immunisation, about three weeks. | difference between vaccination and i immunisation, about three weeks. we know that _ immunisation, about three weeks. we know that some — immunisation, about three weeks. we know that some of— immunisation, about three weeks. we know that some of these _ immunisation, about three weeks. we know that some of these people - immunisation, about three weeks. we know that some of these people go i immunisation, about three weeks. wei know that some of these people go on to get— know that some of these people go on to get blood _ know that some of these people go on to get blood clots, _ know that some of these people go on to get blood clots, as _ know that some of these people go on to get blood clots, as well. _ know that some of these people go on to get blood clots, as well. it- know that some of these people go on to get blood clots, as well. it is- to get blood clots, as well. it is incredibly—
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to get blood clots, as well. it is incredibly difficult _ to get blood clots, as well. it is incredibly difficult trying - to get blood clots, as well. it is incredibly difficult trying to - to get blood clots, as well. it is. incredibly difficult trying to tease apart _ incredibly difficult trying to tease apart what — incredibly difficult trying to tease apart what we _ incredibly difficult trying to tease apart what we call— incredibly difficult trying to tease apart what we call causation, - incredibly difficult trying to tease . apart what we call causation, which is when _ apart what we call causation, which is when a _ apart what we call causation, which is when a causes _ apart what we call causation, which is when a causes b, _ apart what we call causation, which is when a causes b, and _ apart what we call causation, which. is when a causes b, and association, which _ is when a causes b, and association, which is _ is when a causes b, and association, which is when — is when a causes b, and association, which is when you _ is when a causes b, and association, which is when you see _ is when a causes b, and association, which is when you see b _ is when a causes b, and association, which is when you see b which - is when a causes b, and association, which is when you see b which is - which is when you see b which is happening — which is when you see b which is happening at _ which is when you see b which is happening at the _ which is when you see b which is happening at the same - which is when you see b which is happening at the same time - which is when you see b which is happening at the same time as. which is when you see b which is| happening at the same time as a which is when you see b which is - happening at the same time as a but is not _ happening at the same time as a but is not being — happening at the same time as a but is not being caused _ happening at the same time as a but is not being caused by— happening at the same time as a but is not being caused by it. _ happening at the same time as a but is not being caused by it. please - is not being caused by it. please take _ is not being caused by it. please take a _ is not being caused by it. please take a back—seat. _ is not being caused by it. please take a back—seat. i— is not being caused by it. please take a back—seat. i have - is not being caused by it. please take a back—seat. i have had - is not being caused by it. please. take a back—seat. i have had both and| and i highly recommend it to my friends _ and i highly recommend it to my friends and _ and i highly recommend it to my friends and family. _ and i highly recommend it to my friends and family. you - and i highly recommend it to my friends and family.— and i highly recommend it to my friends and family. you are being absolutely clear. _ friends and family. you are being absolutely clear. professor - friends and family. you are being absolutely clear. professor paul i absolutely clear. professor paul hunter, there is so much being looked at this. we know that also across europe, as well. what is the scale of this and what is the science work going on behind this? i science work going on behind this? i think people will be looking exactly at what _ think people will be looking exactly at what risk factors other than the vaccine _ at what risk factors other than the vaccine that people will be having, whether— vaccine that people will be having, whether or — vaccine that people will be having, whether or not you can identify any subgroups — whether or not you can identify any subgroups within the population, particular— subgroups within the population, particular people who may or may not be at increased risk from this vaccine, _ be at increased risk from this vaccine, and if we can do that, if we can—
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vaccine, and if we can do that, if we can find — vaccine, and if we can do that, if we canfind a— vaccine, and if we can do that, if we can find a group that are particularly at risk we can find... there _ particularly at risk we can find... there are — particularly at risk we can find... there are plenty of other vaccines on the _ there are plenty of other vaccines on the shelf to fill the gap for those — on the shelf to fill the gap for those people, and that would provide reassurance that if you're not in that _ reassurance that if you're not in that group, _ reassurance that if you're not in that group, particularly, i am over 60, that group, particularly, i am over 60. then, — that group, particularly, i am over 60, then, you know, you don't need to worry— 60, then, you know, you don't need to worry and — 60, then, you know, you don't need to worry and you can go on with the vaccine _ to worry and you can go on with the vaccine i_ to worry and you can go on with the vaccine iwill— to worry and you can go on with the vaccine. i will stress that at the moment— vaccine. i will stress that at the moment this is work that is being done _ moment this is work that is being done both— moment this is work that is being done both on the continent and in the uk _ done both on the continent and in the uk and, as yet, that's data has not been _ the uk and, as yet, that's data has not been published for us to see exactly— not been published for us to see exactly what is going on here. all the exactly what is going on here. the gps we exactly what is going on here. fill the gps we speak to on this programme, we spoke into two today, they are having conversations with their patients, who were saying, what vaccine can i take, do i have a choice? le was telling us there is not a choice. are you concerned, do you think other professionals in the
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industry are concerned that even a tiny element of doubt or question marks about vaccines like the astrazeneca one at the moment, could not harm the vaccination programme? this is why it is so important to listen _ this is why it is so important to listen to— this is why it is so important to listen to your _ this is why it is so important to listen to your trusted _ this is why it is so important to listen to your trusted gp - this is why it is so important to listen to your trusted gp and i listen to your trusted gp and trusted — listen to your trusted gp and trusted health— listen to your trusted gp and trusted health professionals| listen to your trusted gp and - trusted health professionals because if you go— trusted health professionals because if you go to _ trusted health professionals because if you go to the — trusted health professionals because if you go to the internet _ trusted health professionals because if you go to the internet or _ trusted health professionals because if you go to the internet or social- if you go to the internet or social media _ if you go to the internet or social media you — if you go to the internet or social media you will _ if you go to the internet or social media you will get _ if you go to the internet or social media you will get taken - if you go to the internet or social media you will get taken down . if you go to the internet or social. media you will get taken down the rabbit— media you will get taken down the rabbit hole — media you will get taken down the rabbit hole of— media you will get taken down the rabbit hole of concern. _ media you will get taken down the rabbit hole of concern. it- media you will get taken down the rabbit hole of concern. it is- media you will get taken down the rabbit hole of concern. it is not- rabbit hole of concern. it is not practical— rabbit hole of concern. it is not practical to— rabbit hole of concern. it is not practical to have _ rabbit hole of concern. it is not practical to have different- rabbit hole of concern. it is not| practical to have different types rabbit hole of concern. it is not. practical to have different types of vaccines _ practical to have different types of vaccines kept— practical to have different types of vaccines kept in— practical to have different types of vaccines kept in different - practical to have different types of vaccines kept in different storage. vaccines kept in different storage conditions — vaccines kept in different storage conditions at _ vaccines kept in different storage conditions at each _ vaccines kept in different storage conditions at each and _ vaccines kept in different storage conditions at each and every - vaccines kept in different storage i conditions at each and every centre, so i conditions at each and every centre, so i don't _ conditions at each and every centre, so i don't think— conditions at each and every centre, so i don't think we _ conditions at each and every centre, so i don't think we will— conditions at each and every centre, so i don't think we will ever- conditions at each and every centre, so i don't think we will ever be - conditions at each and every centre, so i don't think we will ever be in i so i don't think we will ever be in a situation — so i don't think we will ever be in a situation where _ so i don't think we will ever be in a situation where there _ so i don't think we will ever be in a situation where there will- so i don't think we will ever be in a situation where there will be i a situation where there will be consumer— a situation where there will be consumer choice _ a situation where there will be consumer choice about - a situation where there will be consumer choice about which . a situation where there will be - consumer choice about which vaccine you get— consumer choice about which vaccine you get and — consumer choice about which vaccine you get and i— consumer choice about which vaccine you get and i certainly— consumer choice about which vaccine you get and i certainly would - consumer choice about which vaccine you get and i certainly would not- you get and i certainly would not encourage — you get and i certainly would not encourage that. _ you get and i certainly would not encourage that. if— you get and i certainly would not encourage that. if we _ you get and i certainly would not encourage that. if we come - you get and i certainly would not encourage that. if we come back you get and i certainly would not. encourage that. if we come back to the children. — encourage that. if we come back to the children, my— encourage that. if we come back to the children, my day _ encourage that. if we come back to the children, my dayjob _ encourage that. if we come back to the children, my dayjob is- encourage that. if we come back to the children, my dayjob is a - the children, my dayjob is a paediatrician. _ the children, my dayjob is a paediatrician. even - the children, my dayjob is a paediatrician. even the - the children, my dayjob is a| paediatrician. even the harm the children, my dayjob is a - paediatrician. even the harm that covid _ paediatrician. even the harm that covid causes _ paediatrician. even the harm that covid causes two _ paediatrician. even the harm that covid causes two children, - paediatrician. even the harm that covid causes two children, at - paediatrician. even the harm that covid causes two children, at the| covid causes two children, at the height— covid causes two children, at the height of— covid causes two children, at the height of the _ covid causes two children, at the height of the outbreak— covid causes two children, at the height of the outbreak we - covid causes two children, at the height of the outbreak we were i covid causes two children, at the - height of the outbreak we were seen between _ height of the outbreak we were seen between 15_ height of the outbreak we were seen between 15 and — height of the outbreak we were seen between 15 and 30 _ height of the outbreak we were seen between 15 and 30 children - height of the outbreak we were seen between 15 and 30 children per- height of the outbreak we were seeni between 15 and 30 children per week bein- between 15 and 30 children per week being admitted — between 15 and 30 children per week being admitted to _ between 15 and 30 children per week being admitted to intensive - between 15 and 30 children per week being admitted to intensive care - being admitted to intensive care with multisystem _
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being admitted to intensive care with multisystem inflammatory. with multisystem inflammatory systems — with multisystem inflammatory systems associated _ with multisystem inflammatory systems associated with - with multisystem inflammatory systems associated with covid.| with multisystem inflammatory- systems associated with covid. covid still causes _ systems associated with covid. covid still causes harm _ systems associated with covid. covid still causes harm to _ systems associated with covid. covid still causes harm to children. - systems associated with covid. covid still causes harm to children. it - still causes harm to children. it may— still causes harm to children. it may not— still causes harm to children. it may not kill— still causes harm to children. it may not kill them _ still causes harm to children. it may not kill them that - still causes harm to children. it may not kill them that makes l still causes harm to children. it - may not kill them that makes them very sick— may not kill them that makes them very sick they — may not kill them that makes them very sick they can _ may not kill them that makes them very sick they can then _ may not kill them that makes them very sick they can then transmit - may not kill them that makes them| very sick they can then transmit the virus _ very sick they can then transmit the virus and _ very sick they can then transmit the virus and take — very sick they can then transmit the virus and take it _ very sick they can then transmit the virus and take it home _ very sick they can then transmit the virus and take it home to _ very sick they can then transmit the virus and take it home to their- virus and take it home to their family — virus and take it home to their family. there _ virus and take it home to their family. there is— virus and take it home to their family. there is a _ virus and take it home to their family. there is a really- virus and take it home to their family. there is a really good. family. there is a really good public— family. there is a really good public health— family. there is a really good public health reason - family. there is a really good public health reason to - family. there is a really good public health reason to work| family. there is a really good - public health reason to work out, can we _ public health reason to work out, can we vaccinate _ public health reason to work out, can we vaccinate children - public health reason to work out, can we vaccinate children safely? public health reason to work out, . can we vaccinate children safely? it is can we vaccinate children safely? is really informative talk and can we vaccinate children safely?. is really informative talk and uber. thank you very much indeed for your time breakfast. professor calum semple and professor paul hunter. and thank you for the questions you have been sending it. we were speaking to play this role she will be speaking to louise just after 8:30am. she will be speaking to louise 'ust after mommfi she will be speaking to louise 'ust after 8:30am. when you are outside -auttin after 8:30am. when you are outside putting your — after 8:30am. when you are outside putting your feet _ after 8:30am. when you are outside putting your feet in _ after 8:30am. when you are outside putting your feet in an _ after 8:30am. when you are outside putting your feet in an ice _ after 8:30am. when you are outside putting your feet in an ice bucket. i putting your feet in an ice bucket. some great questions have come in already and i have been monitoring the temperature because we are doing this ice bucket challenge. i would beatin this ice bucket challenge. i would beat in ice water for 90 seconds. it was —2 earlier and it is now 0 degrees. was -2 earlier and it is now 0 degrees-— was -2 earlier and it is now 0 degrees. positively toast the! scorching! — degrees. positively toast the! scorching! good _ degrees. positively toast the! scorching! good morning. -
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degrees. positively toast the! | scorching! good morning. this morning — scorching! good morning. this morning it _ scorching! good morning. this morning it is a cold start to the day, joking aside, and a fair bit of frost around. one thing he will— fair bit of frost around. one thing he will notice if it would be as windy— he will notice if it would be as windy as _ he will notice if it would be as windy as it— he will notice if it would be as windy as it was yesterday so we will lose the _ windy as it was yesterday so we will lose the significant wind—chill. but it will— lose the significant wind—chill. but it will still— lose the significant wind—chill. but it will still feel more like winter and spring. a lot of sunshine to start— and spring. a lot of sunshine to start the — and spring. a lot of sunshine to start the day. some showers flirting with wales — start the day. some showers flirting with wales and the south—west of england. — with wales and the south—west of england, some are wintry. they will move _ england, some are wintry. they will move away — england, some are wintry. they will move away. wintry showers across northern _ move away. wintry showers across northern scotland, northern ireland, coming _ northern scotland, northern ireland, coming down the east coast into norfolk — coming down the east coast into norfolk. many will fade through the day but _ norfolk. many will fade through the day but what'll happen the cloud will build. there will be bright skies — will build. there will be bright skies with sunshine, south—west england. — skies with sunshine, south—west england, parts of wales, midlands, east anglia, cheshire, cumbria, northumberland. northern ireland, some _ northumberland. northern ireland, some bright spells on the east but in the _ some bright spells on the east but in the west the cloud will thicken ahead _ in the west the cloud will thicken ahead of— in the west the cloud will thicken ahead of ray. we hang onto wintry showers _ ahead of ray. we hang onto wintry showers across the final butland. the very— showers across the final butland. the very fine with other scotland will have — the very fine with other scotland will have gusty winds. these temperatures, three in aberdeen to nine in _ temperatures, three in aberdeen to nine in london. the average at this time _ nine in london. the average at this time of— nine in london. the average at this time of year— nine in london. the average at this time of year very roughly ten to 13
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north— time of year very roughly ten to 13 north to _ time of year very roughly ten to 13 north to south so we are still below part for— north to south so we are still below part for the — north to south so we are still below part for the time of year. through this evening and overnight, clear skies. _ this evening and overnight, clear skies. a — this evening and overnight, clear skies. a lot— this evening and overnight, clear skies, a lot of pad, early fast. in the west— skies, a lot of pad, early fast. in the west that will go because we have _ the west that will go because we have cloud coming in from the left, introducing — have cloud coming in from the left, introducing some rain preceded by some _ introducing some rain preceded by some snow in the highlands, southern uplands— some snow in the highlands, southern uplands and _ some snow in the highlands, southern uplands and also the pennines. these are overnight lows, where we have the cloud _ are overnight lows, where we have the cloud and rain temperatures will be held _ the cloud and rain temperatures will be held up — the cloud and rain temperatures will be held up. elsewhere it will be called _ be held up. elsewhere it will be called and some of us will see some frost~ _ called and some of us will see some frost~ it _ called and some of us will see some frost~ it will— called and some of us will see some frost. it will not stay like this and — frost. it will not stay like this and i— frost. it will not stay like this and i will— frost. it will not stay like this and i will tell you what will happen probably— and i will tell you what will happen probably in about half an hour. teases — probably in about half an hour. teases us _ probably in about half an hour. teases us with the weather! thank you very much for that, we will see you very much for that, we will see you at 8:45am. the past year has been a challenging and sometimes isolating time for many of us, as our usual ways of seeing family and friends have been put on pause. the latest figures by the office for national statistics — released later — are expected to show a rise in the number of people facing loneliness as a result of the pandemic. breakfast�*s john maguire reports. hello.
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there you go. thank you. was it all right? yes, all right today. once a week, maria calls in on sue to deliver some shopping, to chat and to catch up. my birthday today. i know — happy birthday! thank you. isolation and loneliness have been some of the cruellest effects of the pandemic. it's been very hard. yeah. and what's been the hardest aspect for you, would you say? not seeing my friends, not seeing anybody. and i've usually got quite a good social life — i belong to u3a, which is something all over the country where you can go to groups. and, of course, that had to stop. it's not right to be locked up in your house and not see anybody else, really, is it? what are you most looking forward to over the next few months? well, when we... when businesses open, like cafes and pubs and different things, i'm looking forward to seeing friends. maria is one of the 400 volunteers from a group called love devizes who signed up to help vulnerable people in the town before
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the first lockdown. some people haven't seen anybody for a year — not properly. apart from the people doing their shopping or if they have to go to the doctors or something, they haven't really been out. and... it's... you know, you just chat to them as long as you can, um... but it's very isolating. i think some people have gone downhill, as well. covid — and the restrictions on society designed to tackle it — have meant many people not usually isolated have faced loneliness. my mood has been low — very low. loneliness is a very strange thing — i've never, prior to this, _ encountered any loneliness. i've always been surrounded by people, very busy. - and then to spend 12 months i without human contact isjust...
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yeah... it's been hard — very hard. this lockdown in particular was the first time that i've been affected by the lockdown in terms of work. i've been working from home. so that in particular has been harder because i've not had that day—to—day connection with people, with my colleagues. good morning, love devizes. how can we help? oh, hello, there. i wonder if somebody could do some shopping for me, please. yeah, of course we can. back at the love devizes office, volunteers viv and michael are helping people who telephone in. people have started to come out of certain restrictions, _ we start to uncover where people haven't got the infrastructure - you and i would take for granted — you know, either friends - or neighbours — some lonely people. you peel back... you know, devizes is a brilliant town, it's a great community. i but if you peel back- the veneer of that town, there are people who are lonely. some of the most vulnerable or frail in our society have been forced indoors by the pandemic. but in communities right
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across the uk, there are people prepared to open doors and to help those most in need. john maguire, bbc news, wiltshire. we'll now speak to alex hoskyn, the founder of the chatty cafe scheme, designed to tackle loneliness, and the president general at the royal british legion industries, lord dannatt. shejoins us. joe she joins us. joe maguire's shejoins us. joe maguire's piece really highlights what has been an issue and continue to be an issue for so many people. give an idea of exactly how the chatty cafe scheme works and it is helping.— works and it is helping. before it the pandemic— works and it is helping. before it the pandemic our _ works and it is helping. before it the pandemic our aim _ works and it is helping. before it the pandemic our aim was - works and it is helping. before it the pandemic our aim was to - works and it is helping. before itj the pandemic our aim was to get catalase and other venues to designate chatter and not a table where customers can sit if they are happy to talk to other customers. when covid hit, we had to completely change what we were doing. now we are doing weekly calls to people who
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want to chat and we are doing three zoom sessions per week. it is want to chat and we are doing three zoom sessions per week.— zoom sessions per week. it is so different to _ zoom sessions per week. it is so different to sit _ zoom sessions per week. it is so different to sit in _ zoom sessions per week. it is so different to sit in a _ zoom sessions per week. it is so different to sit in a cafe - zoom sessions per week. it is so different to sit in a cafe talking l different to sit in a cafe talking and doing it on a zoom. it is different to sit in a cafe talking and doing it on a zoom. it is going reall , and doing it on a zoom. it is going really. really _ and doing it on a zoom. it is going really, really well. _ and doing it on a zoom. it is going really, really well. because - and doing it on a zoom. it is going really, really well. because we - and doing it on a zoom. it is going i really, really well. because we have been doing them for nearly a year now, people have performed quite good connections, we have people from all over the uk, different ages and they are going really, really well. the phone calls we are doing, well. the phone calls we are doing, we are making around 200 calls. well, 200 people a week at the moment. what people love is that it is just a chat about anything, there is just a chat about anything, there is no kind of agenda, we are not professional. and in your previous film people were saying about wanting to go out, but what we are finding is that people are really being able to volunteer from their own home and that many people actually wear very lonely and
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isolated pre—covid, as well, so there is definitely the meat that has been there for quite long time. we are speaking you from oldham and some of our regular viewers will remember terence, who we spoke to also from oldham, the previous christmas, who had been incredibly lonely, became a volunteer and he has always been adamant thatjust the simplest conversation, sometimes a couple of words, bits of interest, makes a huge difference. not only to him when he was lonely but to so many others, as well. that him when he was lonely but to so many others, as well.— him when he was lonely but to so many others, as well. that is why i started the — many others, as well. that is why i started the scheme _ many others, as well. that is why i started the scheme because - many others, as well. that is why i started the scheme because i - many others, as well. that is why i started the scheme because i was. many others, as well. that is why i | started the scheme because i was a new mum and i was going out in oldham, pushing the pram around and finding that even though i was out of the house i wasn't actually having much interaction with other people. it was amazing shopkeepers, people. it was amazing shopkeepers, people in cafe is, people thatjust say hello to you, when you are feeling invisible, that can kind of make you feel visible and human and i think that those connections and interactions are just so important
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and they really do make a difference to people. and they really do make a difference to --eole. , , ., to people. sometimes it can be two wa s. if to people. sometimes it can be two ways- if you — to people. sometimes it can be two ways. if you volunteer, _ to people. sometimes it can be two ways. if you volunteer, you - to people. sometimes it can be two ways. if you volunteer, you are - to people. sometimes it can be twoj ways. if you volunteer, you are also getting so much back from it, i tune? , , . , ., getting so much back from it, i tune? , , . i. ., tune? definitely. if anyone out there is feeling _ tune? definitely. if anyone out there is feeling lonely - tune? definitely. if anyone out there is feeling lonely and - tune? definitely. if anyone out - there is feeling lonely and isolated and they have an opportunity to do a bit of volunteering or give something back, it really kind of take your mind off what you are feeling for a moment and giving back to someone else, itjust cannot lift you and that other person. just put a bit of a spring in your step, which makes a big difference. what which makes a big difference. what would our which makes a big difference. what would your advice _ which makes a big difference. what would your advice be _ which makes a big difference. what would your advice be to somebody who may be watching this and has not had a conversation with somebody for a long time and, as you were, maybe feels a bit invisible at the moment and doesn't have that interaction? i and doesn't have that interaction? i think, if you can, just be brave. if you see a poster or you see something happening, just really try and give them a call or get in touch and give them a call or get in touch and see if you can get involved. but
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also, if you find something missing in your community, why not have a go at starting something yourself? if anybody wants any help and advice, they can get in touch with the chatty cafe scheme and we are happy to help. butjust be brave and give it a shot. to help. but 'ust be brave and give it a shot. ., , to help. but 'ust be brave and give it a shot. . , ., it a shot. that is thing to say -- make a nice _ it a shot. that is thing to say -- make a nice thing _ it a shot. that is thing to say -- make a nice thing to _ it a shot. that is thing to say -- make a nice thing to say. - it a shot. that is thing to say -- make a nice thing to say. thank it a shot. that is thing to say -- - make a nice thing to say. thank you, alex hoskyn, the chatty cafe scheme founder. the literature you. . do you remember the ice bucket challenge that took over the internet a few years ago? now there's a new fundraising sensation in town. we have been volunteered for this. we have been volunteered for this. we have been told we are doing it. voluntold! it's called the "ice foot challenge", and it involves dunking your feet in a bucket of ice cold water for 92 seconds. it's been set up by former footballer lenjohnrose to raise money for motor neurone disease
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and later this morning both of us are going to give it a go. i think ithink i'm i think i'm going out in a minute and louise is doing itjust before the end of the programme. we are really looking forward to it! i have brought a massive coach today, the world's biggest code. it is freezing outside! ., , world's biggest code. it is freezing outside! . , ., , outside! literally. you will see that soon- _ time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. the pandemic is leading to "delayed grief" — with restrictions prolonging the process. that's according to one counselling service in east london which says it's been helping more people than ever before. the muslim bereavement support service says restrictions mean people haven't been able to say goodbye properly. we are so busy now. we have women coming to us that have lost a few members of their family within a short space of time. there is a family that, you know, we are aware of that came to us and they buried their father, and their brother at the same time.
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so these are unusual circumstances, you wouldn't normally see that. drivers are being urged to think twice before buying a large suv. new research shows most are bought by urban drivers with three london boroughs — kensington and chelsea, hammersmith and fulham, and westminster — topping the list. the rac foundation has questioned whether the big sports utility vehicles — also known as chelsea tractors — are needed as a run around in cities. a musician from croydon is running workshops teaching young people how to rap. # my name is bhishma, ifounded rap therapy. # becoming more creative by pushing all your energy onto paper with pen. # helping the younger generation be creative again. bhishma asare — known as proph — hopes the project will encourage youngsters to see rap as a way of expressing themselves when facing challenges. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tubes there are a few issues.
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severe delays on the hammersmith and city line. the metropolitan and piccadily lines are part suspended and tfl rail is part closed. over a0 bus routes across south and west london operated by london united have been disrupted by industrial action, so do double check your route. temporary traffic lights for gas works on the ai! between stepney and mile end may cause some issues today. in hornsey, turnpike lane is closed between the tube station and st mary's school for repairs to a burst water main. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's another cold, frosty start to the day. temperatures in some of our rural spots down as low as minus three celsius. it should stay dry all day, it won't feel quite as cold as it did yesterday, that's because the wind is coming in from the north and north—westerly direction, not quite so much added wind chill through today. the wind isn't as brisk. some sunshine around through the morning and then into the afternoon there will be a bit more cloud developing and top temperatures of around eight or nine celsius. so a slight improvement there.
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as we head through the evening and overnight, it will be cold and frosty at first, with some clear skies around. then we will drag in some slightly milder air on a westerly wind as we head into the start of the day tomorrow. so it is a milder start to the morning than we are seeing at the moment. tomorrow with that westerly wind, temperatures could get into double figures, maybe. there will be some spells of brightness and sunshine but a bit more cloud around than today. a short spell of rain on friday will lead to a cold northerly wind and temperatures dropping again. i'm back with the latest from bbc london in an hour. now, though, it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. lam warm i am warm and toasty in the studio but dan is outside where he is going to take part in this ice challenge in a few minutes' time.
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"morning live" follows breakfast on bbc one. let's find out what's on today's show with kym and gethin. good morning. did he get this short straw? _ good morning. did he get this short straw? |_ good morning. did he get this short straw? ., good morning. did he get this short straw? . ., ., . , good morning. did he get this short straw?_ oh, i straw? i have to do it as well! oh, 0k! look forward _ straw? i have to do it as well! oh, 0k! look forward to _ straw? i have to do it as well! oh, 0k! look forward to both - straw? i have to do it as well! oh, 0k! look forward to both of- straw? i have to do it as well! oh, | 0k! look forward to both of those. coming up on morning live today... the prime minister, borisjohnson, has unveiled the trial covid passport scheme that could help get crowds back to large—scale live events — but is it enough to make you feel safe around thousands of people? we find out. and what about heading abroad — should we book a summer holiday now or not? travel expert simon calder has his tips on where to go and when, plus reveals the countries he thinks will be on the government's green list. and closer to home — gardens have been a safe haven to meet up with friends and family, but with over half a million being broken into, police forces have launched a new campaign to help keep your property secure. rav wilding is here with details of operation gnome that will help you protect yours. that is why he has his little friend with him! —
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that is why he has his little friend with him! i— that is why he has his little friend with him! i will call him rav the second — and dr rupy is back with us — he'll be telling us all about the new moderna vaccine that's being rolled out in the uk from today. also coming up, it's the lockdown hobby loved by celebs like david beckham and even movie star leonardo dicaprio! celebrity masterchef star riyad khalaf discovers how bee keeping is bringing communities together and improving people's mental health. and chef anna haugh is in the house today with a masterclass on olive oil — the kitchen staple known as liquid gold. she'll reveal why spending more isn't always worth it. liquid gold, she always has great idea _ and last time she was here, she had me and xand impersonating cats — join us at 9.15 to see what dancer nancy has planned for us in strictly fitness today! we'll see you then. good luck with your ice challenge, and more — good luck with your ice challenge, and more imminently, good luck to diana _ and more imminently, good luck to diana |_ and more imminently, good luck to diana. , ., and more imminently, good luck to diana. , . ,, ., and more imminently, good luck to diana. , ., ,, ., ,., and more imminently, good luck to diana. ,. ., diana. i shall pass on your message. i'm hoinr diana. i shall pass on your message. l'm hoping it — diana. i shall pass on your message. l'm hoping it helps — diana. i shall pass on your message. i'm hoping it helps with _ diana. i shall pass on your message. i'm hoping it helps with healing - diana. i shall pass on your message. i'm hoping it helps with healing my l i'm hoping it helps with healing my foot. it is a 0 degrees at the
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moment so it be great! —— it will be great! thank you! before that, let's go back to our main story. a trial of the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine on children has been paused while the uk regulator investigates concerns that the jab may be causing rare blood clots in a tiny number of adults. our medical editor fergus walsh can tell us more. good morning, thank you forjoining us. let's be really clear, why it has been paused, and all the reasons behind it. this has been paused, and all the reasons behind it. , , ., has been paused, and all the reasons behind it. , , . ., ., behind it. this is a trial involving 300 children _ behind it. this is a trial involving 300 children aged _ behind it. this is a trial involving 300 children aged six _ behind it. this is a trial involving 300 children aged six to - behind it. this is a trial involving 300 children aged six to 17. - behind it. this is a trial involving 300 children aged six to 17. it i 300 children aged six to 17. it started in february, i was there in oxford on day one, when the first teenagers got their doses. it's all been going very well. and they have decided informally, simply to stop doing any vaccinating while this investigation is being carried out by the medicine regulator the mhra
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into these rare blood clots in adults. there have been no clots in the children and they are all being asked to keep coming in for the follow—up blood tests and checks, so they anticipate hopefully that this will just they anticipate hopefully that this willjust be they anticipate hopefully that this will just be a they anticipate hopefully that this willjust be a short pause. if you actually pause a trial formally, thatis actually pause a trial formally, that is a much bigger deal, it involves regulators and independent teams deciding whether it can start up teams deciding whether it can start up again but there have been no safety concerns within this trial. and they have said it is an abundance of caution. i mean, so many questions around this. i suppose the key one is, this is important, that it doesn't damaged public confidence in a particular vaccine. ~ , , , , public confidence in a particular vaccine. ~ , , , . , vaccine. absolutely. this is a sign that the system _ vaccine. absolutely. this is a sign that the system is _ vaccine. absolutely. this is a sign that the system is working. - vaccine. absolutely. this is a sign that the system is working. the i vaccine. absolutely. this is a sign - that the system is working. the mhra has a very well ordered system for gathering data postvaccination of
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side effects. they publish that data. and last week they said that out of 18 million vaccinations with the astrazeneca jab, and there had been 30 cases of a rare blood clot in the brain with low platelet counts, so it is a very unusual condition, and seven deaths. and it looks like something like one in every 600,000 doses. the european medicines agency has also been investigating, and they're expected to announce their updated results today or tomorrow. they had found something like one in 100,000 cases of this rare blood clot. so a higher proportion. that's why countries like germany had restricted the use to older adults, because they have mostly found that these clots have beenin mostly found that these clots have been in younger people. so in
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germany, you can only have the astrazeneca jab if you are over 60. in france, if you are over 55. so that's the situation there. the trouble is, we don't really have a hard knowledge of how frequently these occurrences are in the background. and because it is such a rare event, and we also know that covid dramatically increases your chance of getting blood clots. briefly, a question from steve, the astrazeneca vaccine getting a lot of attention, but i have seen zero mention of any risk associated with pfizer or other vaccines?— pfizer or other vaccines? yeah, it is because _ pfizer or other vaccines? yeah, it is because of— pfizer or other vaccines? yeah, it is because of these _ pfizer or other vaccines? yeah, it is because of these particular - pfizer or other vaccines? yeah, it| is because of these particular rare blood clots in the brain with low platelets, there have been no reports of that with pfizer. there have been reports of other side—effects, they have been largely things like that you would expect, a
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sore arm, fever, sort of thing that many of us who have had their first jab have come across for a day or two and then have been resolved. it's these particular side—effects that seem largely reserved and connected with the astrazeneca doses. , . ., . ,, ., doses. fergus, excellent to talk to ou, doses. fergus, excellent to talk to you. thank — doses. fergus, excellent to talk to you. thank you _ doses. fergus, excellent to talk to you, thank you for _ doses. fergus, excellent to talk to you, thank you for being _ doses. fergus, excellent to talk to you, thank you for being so - doses. fergus, excellent to talk to you, thank you for being so clear l you, thank you for being so clear with us. it's the moment we have now all been waiting for! no—one can forget the success of the ice bucket challenge. this morning we have been talking about a new idea which former footballer lenjohnrose is hoping will become a new viral fundraising sensation. dan's hot—footed it out of the studio and can tell us more. he has his big coat on! i like the use of the phrase hotfooted it there with this in mind. ice water, a lovely block of ice in there. a slight issue with this ice bucket and the size of my feet, as you can see. i have to put
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them in rather daintily. i have my shoes and socks on at the moment, i will get ready in a few minutes' time to go in there for 90 seconds. it is 92 clubs in the premier and football league and you have to keep your feet submerged in the ice bucket a92 seconds. it is the idea of —— for 90 seconds. it is the idea of —— for 90 seconds. it is the idea of lenjohnrose. towards the far post, it's there! len johnrose towards the far post, it's there! lenjohnrose made his name as an uncompromising midfielder. he play to several clubs including blackburn rovers and swansea. he was diagnosed with motor neurone disease in 2017, and started speaking publicly about
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it a year later. and started speaking publicly about it a year later-— it a year later. early on in the diagnosis. — it a year later. early on in the diagnosis. it _ it a year later. early on in the diagnosis, it was _ it a year later. early on in the diagnosis, it was hard. - it a year later. early on in the diagnosis, it was hard. but i it a year later. early on in the i diagnosis, it was hard. but after it a year later. early on in the - diagnosis, it was hard. but after i sort of became public, you know i've been all right. find sort of became public, you know i've been all right-— been all right. and i do en'oy every sinale been all right. and i do en'oy every single day. — been all right. and i do en'oy every single day. since h been all right. and i do en'oy every single day. since then, _ been all right. and i do enjoy every single day. since then, len - been all right. and i do enjoy every single day. since then, len has - been all right. and i do enjoy every i single day. since then, len has been raising awareness of the competition which has also affected as fellow sportsmen rob burrow and doddy weir. this was him doing a parachutejump in 2018, an early fundraising effort. ~ , , in 2018, an early fundraising effort. ~ , . . effort. absolutely amazing. literally took _ effort. absolutely amazing. literally took my _ effort. absolutely amazing. literally took my breath - effort. absolutely amazing. i literally took my breath away. and now his latest _ literally took my breath away. and now his latest endeavour, the ice foot 92 challenge. submerging your feetin foot 92 challenge. submerging your feet in a freezing bucket of ice and water for 92 seconds. that is a second for every premier league and football league club. he hopes he will raise £92,000 for the mnd
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association. and he is inspiring others to dunk there's as well. this and he is inspiring others to dunk there's as well.— there's as well. this is the ice foot 92 challenge _ there's as well. this is the ice foot 92 challenge challeng. l there's as well. this is the ice i foot 92 challenge challeng. ten seconds to _ foot 92 challenge challeng. ten seconds to go. _ foot 92 challenge challeng. ten seconds to go, oh, my god. foot 92 challenge challeng. ten | seconds to go, oh, my god. oh, foot 92 challenge challeng. ten i seconds to go, oh, my god. oh, take it out! make — seconds to go, oh, my god. oh, take it out! make it— seconds to go, oh, my god. oh, take it out! make it longer! _ he isa he is a top man. we will be speaking to him live soon. joining me now is dean west, he and len were team—mates at bury fc and burnley fc. you have already done this, you will be the timekeeper. why are you doing the challenge and how special is it for you? he the challenge and how special is it for ou? , ., , the challenge and how special is it for ou? , . , ., for you? he is a very good friend of mine from — for you? he is a very good friend of mine from my _ for you? he is a very good friend of mine from my playing _ for you? he is a very good friend of mine from my playing days -
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for you? he is a very good friend of mine from my playing days and i for you? he is a very good friend of mine from my playing days and we | mine from my playing days and we stayed friends after we finished playing football. it is a challenge he has been thinking about for a long time to raise awareness and much needed funds for mnd. len has done a tremendousjob much needed funds for mnd. len has done a tremendous job raising awareness and more funds for the mnd association. ~ . ., ~ . association. when the cold kicks in, ou 'ust association. when the cold kicks in, you just dig — association. when the cold kicks in, you just dig in _ association. when the cold kicks in, you just dig in and _ association. when the cold kicks in, you just dig in and take _ association. when the cold kicks in, you just dig in and take of _ association. when the cold kicks in, you just dig in and take of len? i you just dig in and take of len? yes, once you get over the initial 30 seconds, your feet go yes, once you get over the initial 30 seconds, yourfeet go numb, and then you can't feel a thing. i will then you can't feel a thing. i will remember _ then you can't feel a thing. i will remember that! _ then you can't feel a thing. i will remember that! let's _ then you can't feel a thing. i will remember that! let's get i then you can't feel a thing. i will remember that! let's get ready for the ice foot 92 challenge challenge. len is there, and mairead is with him, how is it going? you len is there, and mairead is with him, how is it going?— len is there, and mairead is with him, how is it going? you sound like ou blame him, how is it going? you sound like you blame me _ him, how is it going? you sound like you blame me for— him, how is it going? you sound like you blame me for this! _ him, how is it going? you sound like you blame me for this! only - him, how is it going? you sound like you blame me for this! only one i him, how is it going? you sound like| you blame me for this! only one man to blame, _ you blame me for this! only one man to blame, len, it is wonderful to be here in— to blame, len, it is wonderful to be here in the — to blame, len, it is wonderful to be here in the sunshine in preston. what _ here in the sunshine in preston. what is — here in the sunshine in preston. what is with this matter challenge? i what is with this matter challenge? ithought— what is with this matter challenge?
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i thought it would be funny! i thought wrong!— i thought it would be funny! i thou:~htwron! ., ,,,._ ., thought wrong! you probably thought the weather would _ thought wrong! you probably thought the weather would be _ thought wrong! you probably thought the weather would be a _ thought wrong! you probably thought the weather would be a lot _ thought wrong! you probably thought the weather would be a lot kinder- thought wrong! you probably thought the weather would be a lot kinder to l the weather would be a lot kinder to us. the weather would be a lot kinder to us even— the weather would be a lot kinder to us. even though the sun is shining, it is freezing — us. even though the sun is shining, it is freezing here in preston, and freezing _ it is freezing here in preston, and freezing back at media city. it freezing back at media city. [it really freezing back at media city. really is, freezing back at media city. it really is, to be fair, you have chosen the coldest spot in the garden! it out of the sunshine! so it's even colder. but hopefully the april sun will be out soon, and hopefully everyone will get involved. this will be the search time for me, i'm not looking forward to it. so you have —— the third time for me, i'm not looking forward to it. ., . ., . ., for me, i'm not looking forward to it. you have done a few of them, you are determined _ it. you have done a few of them, you are determined to _ it. you have done a few of them, you are determined to do _ it. you have done a few of them, you are determined to do it _ it. you have done a few of them, you are determined to do it because i it. you have done a few of them, you are determined to do it because dan| are determined to do it because dan is doing _ are determined to do it because dan is doing it _ are determined to do it because dan is doing it back in the studio and it is all— is doing it back in the studio and it is all to — is doing it back in the studio and it is all to raise money for mnd. four— it is all to raise money for mnd. four years— it is all to raise money for mnd. four years since your diagnosis, how are now? _ four years since your diagnosis, how are now? .,, ., , , ., four years since your diagnosis, how arenow? ., _ are now? ok, obviously, as you can tell, m are now? ok, obviously, as you can tell. my voice _ are now? ok, obviously, as you can tell. my voice is _ are now? ok, obviously, as you can tell, my voice is not _
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are now? ok, obviously, as you can tell, my voice is not quite _ are now? ok, obviously, as you can tell, my voice is not quite as i are now? 0k, obviously, as you can tell, my voice is not quite as as - are now? 0k, obviously, as you can tell, my voice is not quite as as it i tell, my voice is not quite as as it was. which some would say is not a bad thing! but i am well, and looking forward to getting things done, and then moving on to something else. the done, and then moving on to something else.— done, and then moving on to something else. the ice bucket challen . e something else. the ice bucket challenge was _ something else. the ice bucket challenge was huge, _ something else. the ice bucket challenge was huge, raised - something else. the ice bucket challenge was huge, raised sol something else. the ice bucket - challenge was huge, raised so much money— challenge was huge, raised so much money for— challenge was huge, raised so much money for the charity. you are aiming — money for the charity. you are aiming for— money for the charity. you are aiming for 92,000, i think that is quite— aiming for 92,000, i think that is quite modest. | aiming for 92,000, i think that is quite modest-— aiming for 92,000, i think that is uuite modest. . ., ., �* quite modest. i am, i mean, we don't know how things _ quite modest. i am, i mean, we don't know how things will _ quite modest. i am, i mean, we don't know how things will pan _ quite modest. i am, i mean, we don't know how things will pan out. - quite modest. i am, i mean, we don't know how things will pan out. start i know how things will pan out. start with 92,000. if we get more than that, well, that's great. but obviously, the main thing is, get that awareness out there, and raise as much as we can. find that awareness out there, and raise as much as we can.— that awareness out there, and raise as much as we can. and the challenge is on to every — as much as we can. and the challenge is on to every club. _ as much as we can. and the challenge is on to every club. you _ as much as we can. and the challenge is on to every club. you say _ as much as we can. and the challenge is on to every club. you say every - is on to every club. you say every club _ is on to every club. you say every club. really, _ is on to every club. you say every club. really, you want as many players. — club. really, you want as many players. as— club. really, you want as many players, as many former players, so many _ players, as many former players, so
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many people, that love the sport that was— many people, that love the sport that was your life to get involved. absolutely. as i say, notjust football players, but everyone who enjoys football, and indeed, any other sport. so essentially, the whole of the uk.— other sport. so essentially, the whole of the uk. zoe, you are len's error, whole of the uk. zoe, you are len's error. you — whole of the uk. zoe, you are len's error. you have _ whole of the uk. zoe, you are len's error, you have been _ whole of the uk. zoe, you are len's error, you have been roped - whole of the uk. zoe, you are len's error, you have been roped into - error, you have been roped into this, _ error, you have been roped into this, you — error, you have been roped into this, you got the bucket ready for hint _ this, you got the bucket ready for hint -- _ this, you got the bucket ready for hint -- you — this, you got the bucket ready for him. —— you are len's carer. | this, you got the bucket ready for him. -- you are len's carer. i have any done — him. -- you are len's carer. i have any done it — him. -- you are len's carer. i have any done it once _ him. -- you are len's carer. i have any done it once but _ him. -- you are len's carer. i have any done it once but with - him. -- you are len's carer. i have| any done it once but with pleasure, iwiii— any done it once but with pleasure, iwiii have — any done it once but with pleasure, i will have this _ any done it once but with pleasure, i will have this one, _ any done it once but with pleasure, i will have this one, seeing - any done it once but with pleasure, i will have this one, seeing as - any done it once but with pleasure, i will have this one, seeing as you i i will have this one, seeing as you have _ i will have this one, seeing as you have me — i will have this one, seeing as you have me erupt— i will have this one, seeing as you have me erupt into _ i will have this one, seeing as you have me erupt into it— i will have this one, seeing as you have me erupt into it again. - i will have this one, seeing as you have me erupt into it again. it's. have me erupt into it again. it's all for— have me erupt into it again. it's all for a — have me erupt into it again. it's all for a good _ have me erupt into it again. it's all for a good cause. _ have me erupt into it again. it's all for a good cause. it's - have me erupt into it again. it's all for a good cause. it'sjust. have me erupt into it again. it's. all for a good cause. it'sjust how it is _ all for a good cause. it's 'ust how it is. . . . all for a good cause. it's 'ust how it is. , , . all for a good cause. it's 'ust how itis. , ,. ' it is. this is ice foot 92 challenge. _ it is. this is ice foot 92 challenge. your - it is. this is ice foot 92 challenge. your third i it is. this is ice foot 92 i challenge. your third dip it is. this is ice foot 92 - challenge. your third dip in the ice, you — challenge. your third dip in the ice, you are _ challenge. your third dip in the ice, you are doing it live on bbc breakfast — ice, you are doing it live on bbc breakfast this morning. along with danny— breakfast this morning. along with danny walker back at media city. do you think— danny walker back at media city. do you think he is fit for it? 0h,
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danny walker back at media city. do you think he is fit for it?— you think he is fit for it? oh, i saw him _ you think he is fit for it? oh, i saw him do — you think he is fit for it? oh, i saw him do something - you think he is fit for it? oh, i saw him do something a - you think he is fit for it? oh, i saw him do something a few i you think he is fit for it? oh, i - saw him do something a few years ago. i thought he would bottle it, to be fair. but we will see. he sa s, to be fair. but we will see. he says. we'll — to be fair. but we will see. he says, we'll see, are you up for it, dan? _ says, we'll see, are you up for it, dan? �* .,. says, we'll see, are you up for it, dan? �* . . says, we'll see, are you up for it, dan? �* .,, , . says, we'll see, are you up for it, dan? �* , ., ., ,, says, we'll see, are you up for it, dan? ,., ., dan? always up for it, thank you very much- _ dan? always up for it, thank you very much. len, _ dan? always up for it, thank you very much. len, we _ dan? always up for it, thank you very much. len, we are - dan? always up for it, thank you very much. len, we are ready. dan? always up for it, thank you very much. len, we are ready to| dan? always up for it, thank you i very much. len, we are ready to do this with you. sorry about getting my feet out live on the tv, don't look directly at them, you will get snow blindness. getting the socks off. we are going to try and work this out with len at the same time. so, 92 seconds. i have to put my feetin so, 92 seconds. i have to put my feet in rather daintily like a ballet dancer. if you are ready to give us a three, two, one. len and some members of his family getting involved. you can do this at home, the hashtag is #icefoot92 and you can donate some money to mnd as well. everyone ready? itrier? well. everyone ready? very technical. _ well. everyone ready? very technical, loads _ well. everyone ready? very technical, loads of- well. everyone ready? very technical, loads of rules, i well. everyone ready? very. technical, loads of rules, put well. everyone ready? very - technical, loads of rules, put your feetin technical, loads of rules, put your feet in the bucket. three, two, one,
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go! feet in the bucket. three, two, one, no! , feet in the bucket. three, two, one, .o! , , ., ., feet in the bucket. three, two, one, io! , ., , . ., �* go! oh, my god! that is cold! i'm aroin go! oh, my god! that is cold! i'm ioini to go! oh, my god! that is cold! i'm going to have _ go! oh, my god! that is cold! i'm going to have to _ go! oh, my god! that is cold! i'm going to have to talk _ go! oh, my god! that is cold! i'm going to have to talk the - go! oh, my god! that is cold! i'm going to have to talk the whole i going to have to talk the whole time. you told me earlier, yells as! i'm struggling to talk! you told me earlier it is important to brace yourself for the first 20 or 30 seconds and then they go numb. yeah, our feet seconds and then they go numb. yeah, your feet will — seconds and then they go numb. yeah, your feet will go _ seconds and then they go numb. yeah, your feet will go numb. _ seconds and then they go numb. yeah, your feet will go numb. and _ seconds and then they go numb. yeah, your feet will go numb. and then - yourfeet will go numb. and then somebody will come along and kick the bucket a little bit like that and make it better. just takes your mind off it little bit. you and make it better. just takes your mind off it little bit.— mind off it little bit. you have to think about _ mind off it little bit. you have to think about len _ mind off it little bit. you have to think about len and _ mind off it little bit. you have to think about len and mnd - mind off it little bit. you have to think about len and mnd and i mind off it little bit. you have to j think about len and mnd and all mind off it little bit. you have to - think about len and mnd and all that business and what you are raising money for. i am not doing myself any health issues here? if money for. i am not doing myself any health issues here?— health issues here? if you have any illness in your _ health issues here? if you have any illness in your ankles _ health issues here? if you have any illness in your ankles it _ health issues here? if you have any illness in your ankles it will - health issues here? if you have any illness in your ankles it will sort - illness in your ankles it will sort them out and you will feel much better afterwards. i’m them out and you will feel much better afterwards.— better afterwards. i'm trying my best! what's — better afterwards. i'm trying my best! what's the _ better afterwards. i'm trying my best! what's the time? - better afterwards. i'm trying my best! what's the time? you - better afterwards. i'm trying my| best! what's the time? you have better afterwards. i'm trying my - best! what's the time? you have just best! what's the time? you have 'ust over 30 seconds �* best! what's the time? you have 'ust over 30 seconds to i best! what's the time? you have 'ust over 30 seconds to go. i best! what's the time? you have 'ust over 30 seconds to go. i i best! what's the time? you have 'ust over 30 seconds to go. i will�* best! what's the time? you have just over 30 seconds to go. i will count i over 30 seconds to go. i will count the last ten seconds. you are doing
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a greatjob. i can see yourfeet shaking. it a great job. i can see your feet shakini. . a great job. i can see your feet shakini. , , a great job. i can see your feet shaking._ you're i shaking. it is minus... you're nearly there, _ shaking. it is minus... you're nearly there, 20 _ shaking. it is minus... you're nearly there, 20 seconds. - shaking. it is minus... you're| nearly there, 20 seconds. it's shaking. it is minus... you're i nearly there, 20 seconds. it's 0 deirees. nearly there, 20 seconds. it's 0 degrees- my — nearly there, 20 seconds. it's 0 degrees. my whole _ nearly there, 20 seconds. it's 0 degrees. my whole body - nearly there, 20 seconds. it's 0 degrees. my whole body is - nearly there, 20 seconds. it's 0 degrees. my whole body is shivering! i will count you down the last ten seconds, to take your mind off it. ten, nine, seven, six, five, four, three, two, one! out you go, well done! fantastic effort. i three, two, one! out you go, well done! fantastic effort.— done! fantastic effort. i hope len has done all— done! fantastic effort. i hope len has done all right _ done! fantastic effort. i hope len has done all right as _ done! fantastic effort. i hope len has done all right as well. - done! fantastic effort. i hope len has done all right as well. len - done! fantastic effort. i hope len| has done all right as well. len has done it a few times. that is a lot colder than i thought it would be. if you want to involved, you can. it is #icefoot92. louise, we have one lined up for you. dean will make sure you do it before the end of the programme as well. i think we did all right there. please, please get
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involved as well. let's have a word with len, mairead, how was that for you? with len, mairead, how was that for ou? ., ~ , with len, mairead, how was that for ou? . ~' , . with len, mairead, how was that for ou? . ~ , ., ., ., ., with len, mairead, how was that for ou? . ~' , . ., . ., ., you? thankfully i have not had to do it et! you? thankfully i have not had to do it yet! len. — you? thankfully i have not had to do it yet! len. how _ you? thankfully i have not had to do it yet! len, how was _ you? thankfully i have not had to do it yet! len, how was it? _ it yet! len, how was it? surprisingly cold! the coldest by far. it feels absolutely awful. you know what, i'll probably end up doing it again. but at the moment, i cannot view my feet! i doing it again. but at the moment, i cannot view my feet!— cannot view my feet! i think if you are asking — cannot view my feet! i think if you are asking people _ cannot view my feet! i think if you are asking people to _ cannot view my feet! i think if you are asking people to do _ cannot view my feet! i think if you are asking people to do it, - cannot view my feet! i think if you are asking people to do it, you - cannot view my feet! i think if you i are asking people to do it, you have to do— are asking people to do it, you have to do it! _ are asking people to do it, you have to do it! . are asking people to do it, you have todoit! , ., �*, are asking people to do it, you have todoit! . to do it! yes, that's it! never ask someone to _ to do it! yes, that's it! never ask someone to do _ to do it! yes, that's it! never ask someone to do something - to do it! yes, that's it! never ask someone to do something you i to do it! yes, that's it! never ask i someone to do something you can't do yourself. someone to do something you can't do ourself. . someone to do something you can't do ourself. , . ., someone to do something you can't do ourself. , _, ., ., yourself. this could get out of control, yourself. this could get out of control. it _ yourself. this could get out of control, it is _ yourself. this could get out of control, it is going _ yourself. this could get out of control, it is going viral, i control, it is going viral, semi—former players want to get involved — semi—former players want to get involved to help raise money for the hashtag. _ involved to help raise money for the hashtag, #icefoot92, the aim to
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raise _ hashtag, #icefoot92, the aim to raise £92,000, involving all of the football— raise £92,000, involving all of the football clubs across the country so .et football clubs across the country so get involved. football clubs across the country so get involved-— get involved. thank you! thank you _ get involved. thank you! thank you very - get involved. thank you! thank you very much, i get involved. thank you! - thank you very much, mairead, get involved. thank you! _ thank you very much, mairead, and a lender, thank you for taking part, i know he has done it a couple of times. i genuinely can't stop my feet shaking. i will tell down, get back up to the studio and louise, we have the bucket ready for you later. please get involved and raise money for a fantastic cause. dean, wait for a fantastic cause. dean, wait for louise and get your clock ready. don't try and make him make me do it for longer. i thought this is going to be easy, but it doesn't look easy at all! it looks horrible! it’s at all! it looks horrible! it's freezing! — at all! it looks horrible! it's freezing! well _ at all! it looks horrible! it's freezing! well done, i at all! it looks horrible! it's freezing! well done, well. at all! it looks horrible! it's i freezing! well done, well done. at all! it looks horrible! it's - freezing! well done, well done. well done to len — freezing! well done, well done. well done to len as _ freezing! well done, well done. well done to len as well. _ freezing! well done, well done. well done to len as well. absolutely i done to len as well. absolutely billions, i was laughing my head off in the studio and i know that will not be the case in half an hour when i have to do it! do feel free to join me. let's take a breather.
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what do a peaky blinders themed bar and a custom—built yoga studio have in common? they're both contenders to be named "shed of the year". and it's a surprisingly packed field! breakfast�*s graham satchell has been to meet the people whose humble shed is their pride and joy. we don't like to call it a shed. it's wooden built, but it is a yoga and pilates studio, which is where i teach and work. i'd have said probably for 15 years, over and over, "i would love to have my own studio, i would love to have my own studio," and, ta—dah! my husband goes, hmm, 0k. so began a mammoth lockdown project. geraint has spent most of the last year building a yoga studio for his wife, mel, in the back garden. it's been incredibly enjoyable, hugely satisfying to be able to stand in the kitchen window and look down and see something that i've created
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myself is just fantastic. the finished studio has underfloor heating, wi—fi, sound and vision. it's allowed mel to do her classes online. mel started doing yoga to help her cope with postnatal depression. it's been a huge saviour for me. and if i can help transfer that to others, then fantastic. what would it mean to you if you were to win shed of the year? it would be crazy. to have created this and thenjoin the shed pantheon would be fantastic. it really would. to see it on a computer and develop it into 3d and show me what could be... amazing. it's absolutely incredible. i couldn't be more proud. and eternally grateful. it's really quite tremendous, yeah.
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we always knew that the first name for the bar had to be something to do with peaky blinders, and that's why we called it mick and sue's peaky blinders. the fact that sue is actually in love with cillian murphy. he's a good—looking lad, isn't he? got to say that. cheers! mick and sue's peaky blinders shed pub has been a lockdown labour of love. it helped the whole family get through the last year. having the kids here with us all through the lockdown meant that we could all support each other and we could all love each other. and we knew we were all safe. and we knew, you know, most of all that we were playing by the rules, which was very, very important to us. it's been an escape away from the house, to come into here just to chill and relax
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and feel as though you're in a different world, basically. and when the bars do open up again, we don't want to go out. we're happy here. we're happy staying in our own bubble here and socialise in this way. seeing patients go through covid has been very challenging. it affects you every day you come home from work. and you absorb that. so it's about how do i manage myself, and prepare to go in the next day and do it all again? so, hence, the shed. diane's shed has become a haven from the outside world. she is a frailty nurse caring for patients in care homes. it sort of puts things in place, and you canjust sigh a relief and say, right, i can do this again tomorrow,
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i can go back into work with that smile on my face and nurse my patients. it's a bit of a joke with my son, my teenage son, who says, "where's mum?" to dad, and dad says, "oh, she's away with the fairies". it'sjust, yeah, it's a comfy, cosy place to be. i call it scribbles, i do scribbles in my shed. i'm not an artist, you know, i'm nowhere near, but it'sjust that mindfulness if you like ofjust doing something that i enjoy that i can just distract from everyday, what's going on in the world. how do you feel about being on the shortlist for shed of the year? it's a bit mad! i'm quite honoured, actually, because it'sjust a humble ten by eight shed. yeah, it's a really weird feeling, actually, shed of the year. but it's just my cosy space.
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he is back, he still doesn't have his socks on. he is back, he still doesn't have his socks on-_ he is back, he still doesn't have his socks on. sorry, everyone in. there is a _ his socks on. sorry, everyone in. there is a really _ his socks on. sorry, everyone in. there is a really bad _ his socks on. sorry, everyone in. there is a really bad news. i his socks on. sorry, everyone in. i there is a really bad news. stewards enquired if i stop up i'm not having that. you took your feet out! when they counted two, one. dean that. you took your feet out! when they counted two, one.— they counted two, one. dean had showed me _ they counted two, one. dean had showed me the _ they counted two, one. dean had showed me the clock, _ they counted two, one. dean had showed me the clock, it - they counted two, one. dean had showed me the clock, it had i they counted two, one. dean had i showed me the clock, it had counted down to zero, 92 seconds, none of this messing around, i am looking forward to you doing it later, my feet are boiling hot now. we forward to you doing it later, my feet are boiling hot now.- feet are boiling hot now. we will remind the _ feet are boiling hot now. we will remind the video _ feet are boiling hot now. we will remind the video and _ feet are boiling hot now. we will remind the video and play i feet are boiling hot now. we will remind the video and play it i feet are boiling hot now. we will i remind the video and play it again. i am not interested in anything you say! a film inspired by a young boy from essex and his battle with cancer is to feature at one of the world's best—known film festivals later this year. maximus, a fantasy film about wizards, beasts and angels, is based on ten—year—old max, and his treatment for leukaemia. it's told through the eyes of his younger sister. we'll speak to max, his family and those behind the film in a moment — but first let's take a look.
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my name is india. what's yours? you've got to be kidding me. it's mike. it says it on your top. yeah. well, mike, it all started a few years ago when my brother was conscripted into the zodiac army. assigned to the front line as a soldier, maximus was tasked with fighting a formidable enemy. it is formidable! we're joined by max who's alongside mum jodie and sister india. we can also speak to rachel prendergast who is the film's producer lovely to see you all. let's start with you. where shall i start? max, this story is based on you, so tell us a little bit about what happened to you when you were much younger. when i was two, i was diagnosed with
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leukaemia, i was in hospitalfor about three and a half years. and, yeah. about three and a half years. and, eah. ~ ., . about three and a half years. and, eah. ~ ., ~ . ., , about three and a half years. and, eah. ~ yeah. wow. and jodie, this story is told through _ yeah. wow. and jodie, this story is told through india's _ yeah. wow. and jodie, this story is told through india's eyes, - yeah. wow. and jodie, this story is told through india's eyes, i - yeah. wow. and jodie, this story is told through india's eyes, i will i told through india's eyes, i will come her in a minute. it's a wonderful, and such a good news story. wonderful, and such a good news sto . ., ., , story. 0h, we love it. it really brotht story. 0h, we love it. it really brought max's _ story. 0h, we love it. it really brought max's story _ story. 0h, we love it. it really brought max's story to - story. 0h, we love it. it really brought max's story to life, i story. 0h, we love it. it really. brought max's story to life, just made _ brought max's story to life, just made it— brought max's story to life, just made it magical, especially seeing as it was _ made it magical, especially seeing as it was told through india's eyes. lndia. _ as it was told through india's eyes. lndia. gives— as it was told through india's eyes. india, gives an idea, good morning, thank you for being with us this morning. what was it like to be involved in this and have somebody play you in the film? i felt involved in this and have somebody play you in the film?— play you in the film? i felt that i was very proud. _ play you in the film? i felt that i was very proud, and _ play you in the film? i felt that i was very proud, and i _ play you in the film? i felt that i was very proud, and i think i play you in the film? i felt that i was very proud, and i think that| play you in the film? i felt that i i was very proud, and i think that she represented — was very proud, and i think that she represented me _ was very proud, and i think that she represented me a _ was very proud, and i think that she represented me a lot. _ was very proud, and i think that she represented me a lot.— represented me a lot. she's absolutely _ represented me a lot. she's absolutely wonderful. i represented me a lot. she's absolutely wonderful. let's | represented me a lot. she's i absolutely wonderful. let's speak represented me a lot. she's - absolutely wonderful. let's speak to rachel. you are the producer of this. tell us how this idea came you, and also, it was obviously quite difficult filming during the time of covid? it
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quite difficult filming during the time of covid?— quite difficult filming during the time of covid? . , , , ., time of covid? it was, yes. the idea oriiinall time of covid? it was, yes. the idea originally came. _ time of covid? it was, yes. the idea originally came, the _ time of covid? it was, yes. the idea originally came, the head _ time of covid? it was, yes. the idea originally came, the head of - time of covid? it was, yes. the idea originally came, the head of the i originally came, the head of the film at west suffolk college approached my husband richard who is approached my husband richard who is a writer and director, he has always wanted to tell the story of max's jenny, he is good friends with the family. —— max'sjenny. in 2019, richard got a phone call and decided to write a script and to put it into a short film to make it more achievable as we were working with students, to get it made. that's how it started, really, and fast forward a year, a very interesting year, and we have managed to get it made. tell]! we have managed to get it made. tell us about the difficulties of getting it's made. with social distancing, it's made. with social distancing, it must have been pretty hard. it definitely had its challenges. when we first started talking with the couege we first started talking with the college about making a film with them, covid wasn't a thing. so we had a few crisis talks at the
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beginning of march, when everything exploded. wejust beginning of march, when everything exploded. we just decided to crack on. i think that we really wanted to get it made. it actually benefited us, a blessing in disguise, to put some extra time into the film, it is quite an ambitious film anyway. it did add extra time but also huge complications. having to socially distance people, masks having to be worn all the time, hand sanitiser was abundantly free everywhere. it did have challenges. but it was also injuly, things were not as serious as they became. but we were extremely safe and miraculously everyone remained safe, we didn't have any covid instances which is brilliant. ,., ., ., have any covid instances which is brilliant. ., ., have any covid instances which is brilliant. ., . �*, brilliant. good to hear. max, let's come back— brilliant. good to hear. max, let's come back to _ brilliant. good to hear. max, let's come back to you, _ brilliant. good to hear. max, let's come back to you, is _ brilliant. good to hear. max, let's come back to you, is it _ brilliant. good to hear. max, let's come back to you, is it right i brilliant. good to hear. max, let's come back to you, is it right you i come back to you, is it right you had the chance to see some of it made? what was that like? yeah, it was really cool, _ made? what was that like? yeah, it was really cool, we _ made? what was that like? yeah, it was really cool, we went _ made? what was that like? yeah, it was really cool, we went over i made? what was that like? yeah, it was really cool, we went over to i made? what was that like? yeah, it was really cool, we went over to the
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college _ was really cool, we went over to the college for _ was really cool, we went over to the college for a — was really cool, we went over to the college for a day. i watched one of the scenes — college for a day. i watched one of the scenes being filmed. it was very cool looking around the background. it's cool looking around the background. it's very— cool looking around the background. it's very much a message of gratitude to the people who looked after max? that gratitude to the people who looked after max? . ' :: :: , gratitude to the people who looked after max? �* 'ii :: , ~ gratitude to the people who looked aftermax?�* 'i: if . ., , ., after max? at 100%. we always wanted to sa after max? at 10096. we always wanted to sa thank after max? at 10096. we always wanted to say thank you — after max? at 10096. we always wanted to say thank you to _ after max? at 10096. we always wanted to say thank you to the _ after max? at 10096. we always wanted to say thank you to the team _ after max? at 10096. we always wanted to say thank you to the team at - to say thank you to the team at addenbrooke's hospital that saved max and made him healthy again. and this isjust the max and made him healthy again. and this is just the best thank you you could ever hope for. we're so excited that the online premiere, all of the ticket sales are going to be going to help otherjust like max. be going to help other 'ust like max. .. �* . be going to help other 'ust like max. �* , ., ., be going to help other 'ust like max. 2 ., ., , , ., max. rachel, it's going to be shown at the cannes _ max. rachel, it's going to be shown at the cannes film _ max. rachel, it's going to be shown at the cannes film festival - max. rachel, it's going to be shown at the cannes film festival in - max. rachel, it's going to be shown at the cannes film festival in july, i at the cannes film festival in july, which is at the cannes film festival injuly, which is a huge accolade? at the cannes film festival in july, which is a huge accolade?- at the cannes film festival in july, which is a huge accolade? yeah, it's brilliant. which is a huge accolade? yeah, it's brilliant- we — which is a huge accolade? yeah, it's brilliant. we went _ which is a huge accolade? yeah, it's brilliant. we went there _ which is a huge accolade? yeah, it's brilliant. we went there with - which is a huge accolade? yeah, it's brilliant. we went there with our i brilliant. we went there with our previous— brilliant. we went there with our previous short film, it is the american _ previous short film, it is the american pavilion which is a great showcase — american pavilion which is a great showcase in the cannes film festival _ showcase in the cannes film festival. it's brilliant, great for the students and all the people who have been—
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the students and all the people who have been involved in this and it worked — have been involved in this and it worked so — have been involved in this and it worked so hard, to have it screened in such— worked so hard, to have it screened in such a _ worked so hard, to have it screened in such a prestigious event is brilliant _ in such a prestigious event is brilliant. we are all very excited, we're _ brilliant. we are all very excited, we're just— brilliant. we are all very excited, we're just hoping we can go in person — we're just hoping we can go in ierson. a. . we're just hoping we can go in ierson. a, . ., we're just hoping we can go in ierson. . ., ., �* we're just hoping we can go in erson. ., ., 4' ., person. max and india, i don't know if ou person. max and india, i don't know if you have — person. max and india, i don't know if you have had _ person. max and india, i don't know if you have had a _ person. max and india, i don't know if you have had a chat _ person. max and india, i don't know if you have had a chat with - person. max and india, i don't know if you have had a chat with your- if you have had a chat with your school friends, what do your friends think about this film? the?r school friends, what do your friends think about this film?— think about this film? they think it's, like, really— think about this film? they think it's, like, really cool— think about this film? they think it's, like, really cool how - think about this film? they think it's, like, really cool how i i think about this film? they think it's, like, really cool howl have| it's, like, really cool how i have got a film about me, i think. just telling them about it, there are like, that's amazing, and stuff. yeah, they're really excited. the? yeah, they're really excited. they can't wait to _ yeah, they're really excited. they can't wait to see _ yeah, they're really excited. they can't wait to see it, _ yeah, they're really excited. they can't wait to see it, can _ yeah, they're really excited. they can't wait to see it, can they? before — can't wait to see it, can they? before we _ can't wait to see it, can they? before we go. _ can't wait to see it, can they? before we go, jodie, - can't wait to see it, can they? before we go, jodie, tell- can't wait to see it, can they? before we go, jodie, tell us . can't wait to see it, can they? - before we go, jodie, tell us about the consultant mike who stars in the film as well because he is a very important man in yourfamily, isn't he? important man in your family, isn't he? , ., important man in your family, isn't he? , . , , ., he? oh, yeah. he is everything to us. we he? oh, yeah. he is everything to us- we are _ he? oh, yeah. he is everything to us- we arejust— he? oh, yeah. he is everything to us. we are just so _ he? oh, yeah. he is everything to us. we are just so grateful- he? oh, yeah. he is everything to us. we are just so grateful to - he? oh, yeah. he is everything to| us. we are just so grateful to him, and i_ us. we are just so grateful to him, and i think— us. we are just so grateful to him, and i think that — us. we are just so grateful to him, and i think that is _ us. we are just so grateful to him, and i think that is encompassing. us. we are just so grateful to him, i and i think that is encompassing the whole _ and i think that is encompassing the whole point — and i think that is encompassing the whole point of— and i think that is encompassing the whole point of the _ and i think that is encompassing the whole point of the film, _ and i think that is encompassing the whole point of the film, our - whole point of the film, our gratitude _ whole point of the film, our gratitude to _ whole point of the film, our gratitude to mike, - whole point of the film, our gratitude to mike, to - whole point of the film, our gratitude to mike, to the i whole point of the film, our - gratitude to mike, to the whole team, — gratitude to mike, to the whole team, and _ gratitude to mike, to the whole team, and addenbrooke's, - gratitude to mike, to the whole team, and addenbrooke's, we| gratitude to mike, to the whole - team, and addenbrooke's, we cannot
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wait for— team, and addenbrooke's, we cannot wait for them — team, and addenbrooke's, we cannot wait for them personally _ team, and addenbrooke's, we cannot wait for them personally to _ team, and addenbrooke's, we cannot wait for them personally to see - team, and addenbrooke's, we cannot wait for them personally to see it. . wait for them personally to see it. because _ wait for them personally to see it. because it — wait for them personally to see it. because it will— wait for them personally to see it. because it will mean _ wait for them personally to see it. because it will mean a _ wait for them personally to see it. because it will mean a lot - wait for them personally to see it. because it will mean a lot to - wait for them personally to see it. because it will mean a lot to see i because it will mean a lot to see what _ because it will mean a lot to see what they— because it will mean a lot to see what they think _ because it will mean a lot to see what they think of _ because it will mean a lot to see what they think of it. _ because it will mean a lot to see what they think of it.— what they think of it. lovely to talk to you. — what they think of it. lovely to talk to you, max, _ what they think of it. lovely to talk to you, max, jodie, - what they think of it. lovely to talk to you, max, jodie, india | what they think of it. lovely to i talk to you, max, jodie, india and rachel, thank you for your time this morning. and the film is called maximus. wonderful if you have a chance to see it. , ' , t, , see it. only 15 minutes long, but brilliant.
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this is bbc news. i'm annita mcveigh. the headlines: a trial of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine in children has been paused while an investigation takes place into whether the jab is linked to rare blood clots in adults. leading scientists urge the public to continue getting the jab, saying the benefits far outweigh the risks. the risks of getting sick or dying of covid for all the people currently being offered first and second doses are far and away greater than any small theoretical risk that may exist relating to these cases, which are extremely rare. the third covid vaccine approved for use in the uk will begin rolling out later today, with people in wales the first to get the moderna jab. please do get in touch with your thoughts on the uk vaccine roll—out —
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i'm on twitter @annita—mcveigh and you can use the hashtag #bbcyourquestions...

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