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tv   BBC World News  BBC News  April 7, 2021 5:00am-5:31am BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. i'm ben boulos. a trial of the astrazeneca vaccine on children is paused in the uk while the country's regulator investigates possible links to rare blood clots in adults. brazil's daily covid deaths top 4,000 for the first time — a new, unwanted record, for the country. ndirect talks between washington and tehran are taking place in vienna as both side try to salvage the iran nuclear deal. a self—imposed one child policy — the chinese parents limiting themselves to a single infant. translation: for me, it's i already hard to raise this one. it feels better to put all your energy into one child.
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greenland goes to the polls, with the country divided over a mining project that would make them a major, global source of rare earth metals. will there be new advice regarding the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine? the uk's medicines regulator and the european medicines agency are currently investigating a possible link with rare blood clots in younger adults. they are due to updated advice later today or on thursday. in the uk, trial of the vaccine on children in the uk has temporarily been halted. the university of oxford has told the bbc that there are no safety concerns with the trial itself. 0ur medical editor,
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fergus walsh, reports. nearly 300 children, aged 6—17 are taking part in the astrazeneca vaccine trial in england which began in february. 0xford england which began in february. oxford university said there had been no blood clots and volunteers but out of an abundance of caution it had stopped vaccinations pending the outcome of the safety review in adults. more than 18 million people in the uk have received the astrazeneca vaccine. the mhra said last week the happy 30 rare cases of blood clots including seven deaths. —— there had been 30 rare cases. the prime minister, visiting an astrazeneca plant in macclesfield gave his firm support for the vaccine. the best thing people _ support for the vaccine. tie best thing people should support for the vaccine. tte best thing people should do support for the vaccine. ttj: best thing people should do is look at what the mhra say, our independent regulator, that is why we have them, that is why
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they are there, they are independent, their advice is to keep going out there and get yourjab, get your second keep going out there and get yourjab, get yoursecond jab your jab, get your second jab upright yourjab, get yoursecond jab upright as a precautionary measure, the mhra updated its advice last month to say that anyone with a headache that lasted more than four days after receiving the astrazeneca vaccine or bruising beyond the sight of the jab should seek medical attention. sight of the jab should seek medicalattention. both sight of the jab should seek medical attention. both of the vaccines we are using a highly effective against covid and the risks of getting sick of dying of covid are all the people being offered first and second doses are far greater than any theoretical risk related to these cases which are rare. this could be compromised if people — this could be compromised if people think this is not being taken seriously and examined the great detail but i think individuals have difficulties individuals have difficulties in understanding risks and perceptions and seeing this in relation — perceptions and seeing this in relation to other sorts of
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illnesses and diseases and outcomes. illnesses and diseases and outcome— illnesses and diseases and outcomes. the astrazeneca vaccine is — outcomes. the astrazeneca vaccine is central _ outcomes. the astrazeneca vaccine is central to - outcomes. the astrazeneca vaccine is central to the - outcomes. the astrazeneca. vaccine is central to the huge success of the rollout ofjabs in the uk, which is way ahead of the rest of europe. france has restricted the astrazeneca vaccine to adults over 65, germany to over 60, because of concerns over blood clots in younger adults. the european medicines agency in the uk regulator due to give updated recommendations in the next day or two, recommendations in the next day ortwo, maintaining public or two, maintaining public confidence ortwo, maintaining public confidence in this highly effective vaccine will be vital. fergus walsh, bbc news. brazil registered a new daily record of covid—19 deaths on tuesday. the health ministry said 11,195 people died with the virus in the past 2a hours. more than 300,000 brazilians have now died since the start of the pandemic, the second—highest total in the world after
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the united states. eduardo leite, governor of rio grande do sul, told us the situation in brazil has been influenced by the actions of the president. what we are facing here in brazil, what we have here, it is a sad situation that is the consequence of the lack of co—ordination in the federal level by the national government. what we have here is president bolsonaro confronting governors and mayors. and the main tool that we have, the main weapon we have to not allow the coronavirus to spread in an easy way, and the weapon is the social distancing. of course the president is wrong. he may not be the only person in the world that is right being against social
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distancing. the world recognises that the best practice, the scientists, the researchers are almost unanimous about that. but the president makes this situation of confronting economy and protecting the lives of the people. and what we have is that without feeling that they are protected, people will not be confident to keep running the economy, so, his behaviour is unfortunately killing brazilians and it is hurting our economy. amnesty international has said that covid has impacted across
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the world. we will come back to this report later. we will soon find out if greenland will become a major global source of rare earth metals. all eyes are on their snap election result. the autonomous territory, which is subsidised by denmark to the tune of 600 million dollars a year, was once on donald trump's wish list — to buy. here's mark lobel with more. who would take power over the largest island in the world? a decision is imminent that will cause ripples far wider than greenland's coastline, floating voters rule the waves and have clear choices to make. it is true, there are a blizzard of domestic issues on the minds of the inuit majority here, including fishing and housing
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and economic pressures and the demand for greater autonomy but one controversial topic stands out and affects global citizens as well, the kvanefjeld mining project, one of the worlds largest untapped deposits of rare earth elements, minerals the west currently relies on chinese or to manufacture electronics, but could that change? the ruling social democratic siumut (forward) party party there is the giant earth any remaining mining project would unearth an economic windfall and would help greenland to financial independence as it gets one third of its budget directly from copenhagen. translation: ~ ., , translation: when it really counts and — translation: when it really counts and when _ translation: when it really counts and when reality - translation: when it really counts and when reality sets | counts and when reality sets in, there are many who support our politics so we're very confident about that and hope for a great election. but some have reservations. . _ have reservations. . translation: i have reservations. . tuna/mom- have reservations. .
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translation: ., ., ., translation: i am voting for the -a translation: i am voting for the party that _ translation: i am voting for the party that says _ translation: i am voting for the party that says no - translation: i am voting for the party that says no to - the party that says no to uranium and there are two parties that say no to uranium. the reason is that where they will mine for uranium is too close to the town.— close to the town. so, the battle lines _ close to the town. so, the battle lines are _ close to the town. so, the battle lines are drawn. - close to the town. so, the | battle lines are drawn. will this area be used to my minerals to produce windmills, laptops, cellphones and electric vehicles? 0r laptops, cellphones and electric vehicles? or will sheepish voters ran the project and its associated radioactive? ——ram. talks to try to revive the iran nuclear deal have started constructively according to both the us and iran. their negotiators are in vienna for discussions. they are not speaking directly but with european officials acting as intermediaries between them. the deal was intitially struck
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in 2015, lifting sanctions on iran in return for curbs to its nuclear programme until former president trump pulled the us out nearly tanya dendrinos reports. tentative steps in vienna as european diplomats shuttle between iranians and americans in the same city but different buildings. looking for a way in between the smoke to rain in iran's nuclear activities. indie iran's nuclear activities. we do see this _ iran's nuclear activities. we do see this as _ iran's nuclear activities. we do see this as a _ iran's nuclear activities. : do see this as a constructive and certainly welcome step and in the end we hope that we are able to leave vienna, return to the united states, all the negotiating team i should say, with a better understanding of a roadmap of how we get to that upright at the heart of the dispute is uranium enrichment. the international community wants iran producing limited iranian in rich, up to 3.67% concentration but iran has been enriching some iranian up to
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20% concentration and stockpiling at.- 20% concentration and stockpiling at. the chief nuclear— stockpiling at. the chief nuclear negotiator - stockpiling at. the chief nuclear negotiator for l stockpiling at. the chief i nuclear negotiator for iran stockpiling at. the chief - nuclear negotiator for iran so so far meetings have been constructive and on the right track but gave this warning. i track but gave this warning. i have come here to do business. but i _ have come here to do business. but i doubt _ have come here to do business. but i doubt that there is the same — but i doubt that there is the same seriousness on the other side _ same seriousness on the other side if— same seriousness on the other side. if the us is serious, they— side. if the us is serious, they should be prepared to lift all functions that they have imposed or reimposed against iren _ imposed or reimposed against iran. ., , ., imposed or reimposed against iran. ., a, , ., iran. the global effort is an attem -t iran. the global effort is an attempt to _ iran. the global effort is an attempt to revive _ iran. the global effort is an attempt to revive the - iran. the global effort is an attempt to revive the 2015 | attempt to revive the 2015 nuclear deal donald trump abandoned in 2018. but who will blink first? sanctions are hurting the economy of iran and oil trade but the presidential election injune to replace the moderate with hardliners tipped to do well, how could that sway things? and in the us, some
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want a new deal to go further and cover iran's ballistic missiles and regional ambitions so there is an expectation the shuffling between americans and iranians could take some time to resolve. joining me now from tehran is prof. seyed mohammad marandi, who was there in vienna with the iranian delegations for the original talks in 2015. good to have you with us. as someone who has been at the frontline of the talks, what do you make of the noises we are hearing from these initial stages the last 21: hours? stages the last 24 hours? biden is _ stages the last 24 hours? biden is continuing _ stages the last 24 hours? biden is continuing withjump off maximum pressure campaign targeting women and children. the international community considers this to be illegal,
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even the eu does not accept it even the eu does not accept it even though it abides by the sanctions. they are strangling women and children alongside the americans, even though they say openly that they are against it. the iranians are saying that clear what has to be done. the nuclear deal was negotiated by barack 0bama and joe biden was his vice president and they are saying the americans have to abide by all of their obligations and that has to be verified because under 0bama what happened was the united states said one thing but behind the scenes they did something else. this time around, the iranians say they have to verify. just like we are verified by the international atomic agency, your actions have to be verified as well. if the us lifts all sanctions and it is verified in accordance with the nuclear deal, then iranians will abide by the commitments. the round has a history of
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abiding by commitments as the iaea has repeated and the united states didn't and donald trump told the deal up altogether.— trump told the deal up altoaether. ., . .., trump told the deal up altoaether. ., . , altogether. how much can be achieved in _ altogether. how much can be achieved in talks _ altogether. how much can be achieved in talks where - altogether. how much can be achieved in talks where each | achieved in talks where each side has effectively taking the approach that you have to go first, no you have to go first? the issue for iran is not who have to go first. that is what the americans are saying and thatis the americans are saying and that is because they are an imperial power, they have to show themselves to be the stronger side. show themselves to be the strongerside. for show themselves to be the stronger side. for iran, the issueis stronger side. for iran, the issue is that the united states left the deal. the united states created great damage to the iranian economy and kill people. 0rdinary people. people who needed medicine and so on. and iranians after the americans left continue to abide by the dealfor a year and then after a year, they
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gradually decreased their implementation of the deal to put pressure on the europeans because they were promising iran behind—the—scenes that they would do something about it, and they didn't. in addition to that, the iranians are saying that we have to make sure that the americans do not say something and do something else. because as i said, under 0bama, american said, it was agreed that iran could use the global financial sector for transaction, for business, but it never did. that was never possible because the united states did not abide by the deal. the iranians are saying you have to verify that what you have to verify that what you write on paper is actually carried out, just like the iaea, verifies the actions of iran. ~ , . iran. we must leave it there. thank you very much. - professor seyed mohammad marandi.
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stay with us on bbc news. still to come: the man who used memories, sculptures and mosaics to turn his home into a living work of art. 25 years of hatred and rage as theyjump upon the statue. this funeral became a massive demonstration of black power, the power to influence. today is about the promise of a bright future, a day when we hope a line can be drawn under the bloody past. i think that picasso's i works were beautiful, they were intelligent and it's a sad loss to everybody - who loves art.
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this is bbc news. the latest headlines: the european medicines agency prepares to issue new advice about the astrazeneca vaccine — and possible links to rare blood clots in adults. brazil's daily covid deaths top 4,000 for the first time — a new, unwanted record for the country. for decades, china used a one—child policy to rein in what the government feared was an ever—growing population which the country couldn't manage. then, in recent years, the rules were eased, allowing couples to have two children. there'sjust one problem — most young people don't seem to want to have big families anymore. 0ur correspondent, stephen mcdonell, met some
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of them in north—east china. chinese kids are sometimes called little emperors because parents, limited to one child only, gave their offspring everything. then came the two—child policy, but for many, one has remained well and truly enough. you just have to ask parents with a single child if they want more. translation: i haven't even considered it. - neither emotionally nor financially could i afford it. in china's once prosperous northeast, dwindling populations in many towns have led to a suggestion that this could be the first region to scrap birth limits altogether. but this may not produce more children. translation: for me, it's i already hard to raise this one. it feels better to put all your energy into one child, or we might feel guilty that we can't properly take care of many.
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there's been a huge shift in attitude from generation to generation here in china. older generations, they come from big families, and it was a really crucial thing in terms of their lives. but for younger people, it's not the same. they really don't want to have as many kids. it's not as important for them. the one—child policy came into force in the early �*80s to stop an already massive population exploding. later, people in rural areas and those from ethnic minorities were allowed multiple kids. yet for the vast majority over three decades, having more than one child meant being fined. china in 2021 is a completely different place. young couples want different things. when you look at birth rates throughout history, poverty tends
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to produce people. that's because every new human being is an extra pair of hands to go to work. then along comes prosperity, and it's not as important to have kids for this reason. another factor is that this huge country has now produced generations of people simply accustomed to small family life. it might be hard to get them to change. stephen mcdonell, bbc news. now it's time for the latest sport from the bbc sports centre. hello, i'm chetan pathak with your latest sports news. the 13—time winners real madrid have shown their class in the champions league again after beating liverpool 3—1 in the first leg of their quarterfinal in the spanish capital. vinciusjunior opened the scoring just before the half—hour mark with
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a well—taken goal and real doubled their lead nine minutes later after some poor defending allowed marco asensio to score. liverpool were better in the second half, mo salah scoring what they hope will prove to be a crucial away goal but real re—established their two—goal cushion with vinicius' second of the night, leaving liverpool with a tough job to turn things around in the second leg at an empty anfield next week. if you want to go to the semifinals, that's absolutely ok semifinals, that's absolutely 0k and fair but you have to deserve it with the performance on the beach. we are under pressure now, of course, and we have to show that we can meet that. it was a night of contrasting fortunes for the two english teams, because in the other quarterfinal first leg manchester city — looking to win the champions league for the first time in their history — beat borussia dortmund 2—1. city made the perfect start at the etihad with kevin de bruyne scoring inside 20 minutes,
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but they couldn't extend that lead — and with six minutes to go, erling haaland passed to marco reus who got the equaliser which swung the tie dortmund's way. but there was to be one more twist, it wasn't haaland but city's 20—year—old striker who got the winner — phil foden in the last minute — giving pep guardiola's side the edge going into next week's second leg. i asked of the players, just win, i don't want anything else. we did it, we did it, and now we're going to dortmund to absolutely not defend, we are going to build up, we are going to control the runners and we're going to try to play 90 minutes to try to the semifinal. the champions league continues on wednesday as chelsea take on porto away in seville in the first leg of their quarterfinal. whilst in the other tie, bayern munich will be without forward serge gnabry for their first leg against paris saint—germain. he's tested positive for covid—19 and is said to be
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fine, but isolating at home. and we're getting closer — the masters gets underway on thursday at augusta national. the world number two, justin thomas, has revealed that tiger woods is frustrated to be missing out this year. woods is currently recovering after a car crash in february. he is bound to his note here playing shots with us. ——he is upset he is not here playing with us. i've been lucky to play with tiger over the last four years or whatever it is, fooling around like puppy dogs, wherever they go, we hit chips from there. it's no coincidence that things have been so successful here. and there's more build—up to the masters, including thursday's tee times, over on the bbc sport website. but from me, and the team, that is all your sport for now. you've heard the saying "some things need to be seen to be believed".
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that's certainly true when talking about the home improvements one artist in south london has done. actually, it's more like a labour of love for more than 20 years — turning his terraced house into a unique work of art. my name is stephen wright. i'm the creator of the house of dreams museum in south london. welcome to my house in the house of dreams. i began the project in 1998, all those years ago. the house is about legacy, it's about wanting to leave something behind. during lockdown, i certainly have had a lot of time in my hands to make more work, which is what i have done, really. so, this one was the first piece that i produced under lockdown, and i think he's fab. i like his false teeth. under normal circumstances we have one open day a month. people often ask me
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when they come to the house of dreams, what's my favourite object. it's very hard to answer. but i suppose one of my favourites is the doll with the squashed face over here, which i bought at the market for £1. we have these big columns of toys and colour. i love colour. but everything is here for a reason, it isn't to fill a space. so, you know, i could tell you virtually where everything is from. because that is why it's here. i want to recall the memories i had when i bought them. it's not an easy project, but if i wanted an easier life, i wouldn't do this. when you think it will be finished? the house of dreams will never be finished. i will be finished before the house of dreams is finished. i put iput up i put up one set of coat hooks
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in lockdown and i was quite pleased until i saw his efforts. you can reach me on twitter — i'm @benmboulos. well, it's certainly been cold in the last couple of days. we've snow, particularly across northern parts of the uk. but here's the good news if you don't like the cold. it is going to feel a lot better on wednesday. we won't have that cold northerly wind. we won't have that windchill, which we've been experiencing for a couple of days now. but the arctic air has spread right across the continent into northern parts of the mediterranean as well, so it's quite a widespread outbreak of cold arctic air. now, through the early hours
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you can see clear skies across much of the country. still a few wintry showers there across parts of scotland. but lighter winds, clear skies, a frost as well. temperatures in some cities down to around —2 or —3 celsius early on wednesday morning. so wednesday's looking something like this, lots of bright, sparkling sunshine first thing in the morning. but the clouds will build through the morning and into the afternoon. so actually the second half of the day is looking a little overcast for some of us. and in the north—west of the country, later on in the afternoon, and towards the evening, the clouds will thicken further and we are expecting some outbreaks of rain in places like belfast, glasgow, much of the western isles. and that's because a weather front is approaching, the winds turning direction, actually milder air is reaching us. and by very early on thursday morning you can see that generally across the country it is frost free — almost. now, that change is brought by area of low pressure which will be tracking into the north of the uk. you can see that slightly milder air brought in by these south—westerly winds. so i think on thursday temperatures, at least
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for a while, will recover to double figures, onlyjust. perhaps 11 or 12 across parts of england and wales. but with that also comes a weather front and outbreaks of rain parts of the north—west of the uk. i think the best of the weather will be further south and also south—east. now, as we head into thursday night and friday, that weather front will move across, in fact, it's a cold front and behind it we once again open up the gates to a cold air stream from the arctic, which could bring wintry showers to northern areas of the uk. so, yes, temporarily it is going to turn just a little bit milder through thursday, friday, maybe saturday, but the second half of the weekend it is turning colder again.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. deliveroo shares start trading fully in the next few hours, but will there be enough appetite for investing in the food delivery firm? major cruise ship operator royal caribbean starts taking bookings from today for cruises around the british isles. and luxury watch enthusiasts prepare for the world's most important watch fair. a virtual affair, it'll showcase all the new models from top watchmakers. we'll speak to one of them.

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