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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 7, 2021 2:00am-2:31am BST

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welcome to bbc news. my name's mike embley. our top stories: delicate diplomacy in vienna — american officials describe the first day of talks on reviving the iran nuclear deal as constructive. brazil registers more than 4,000 coronavirus deaths in 2a hours, a new record for the country. at the trial of derek chauvin, a police trainer tells the court the force used by the former officer on george floyd was excessive. the new voluntary, one—child policy — why so many chinese parents are limiting themselves to a single infant. translation: for me, it's i already hard to raise this one. it feels better to put all your energy into one child, or we might feel guilty that we can't properly take care of many.
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welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. the united states has described the first day of indirect talks with iran as constructive. iran and the united states are holding the talks in vienna, in a bid to revive the landmark iran nuclear deal. european officials are acting as an intermediary, hoping to solve what's seemed like an impasse, ever since former president donald trump announced the us�*s exit from the deal nearly three years ago. mark lobel reports. tentative steps in vienna as european diplomats shuttle between iranians and americans in the same city, but different buildings, looking for a way in between the smoke to rein in iran's nuclear activities. we do see this as a constructive and certainly welcome step.
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and in the end, we hope that we are able to leave vienna, return to the united states — our negotiating team, i should say — with a better understanding of a road map for how to get to that end state. at the heart of the dispute is uranium enrichment. the international community wants iran producing limited uranium, enriched up to 3.67% concentration. but iran has been enriching some uranium up to 20% concentration and stockpiling it. iran's chief nuclear negotiator says, so far, meetings have been constructive and on the right track, but gave this warning. i have come here to do business. but i doubt that there is the same seriousness in the other side. if the us is serious, they should be prepared to lift all sanctions that they have imposed or reimposed against iran, and after verification, we certainly go back to full complies.
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this global effort is an attempt to revive the 2015 nuclear deal that donald trump abandoned in 2018. but who will blink first? sanctions are hurting iran's economy and oil trade. with a presidential election injune to replace hassan rouhani, a more moderate figure, with hardliners tipped to do well — how could that sway things? and iran's ballistic missiles and regional ambitions. so there is an expectation this shuttling between the americans and iranians could take some time to resolve. mark lobel, bbc news. i asked karim sadjadpour of the carnegie endowment for international peace whether a breakthrough is likely to come of these talks. you know, i've always thought that there was always going to be a lot of back
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and forth about the logistics of reviving the nuclear deal, but at the end of the day iran really can't reverse its economic decline absent the removal of us economic sanctions, which requires either a full or partial return to the nuclear deal. the biden administration is very much committed to that as well. so i think at some point, however long it takes is unclear, it could take weeks, could take months, but i do think we are on a path to a revival, either a full or partial revival of the nuclear deal. it is clear, isn't it, that iran's economy has been suffering deeply from the sanctions, it needs sanctions relief. but then there are surely plenty of people in the various strands of the iranian leadership who benefit from a kid of cold war with the united states. how are these factors likely to play out, especially with an election coming up? well, iran's deep state, its supreme leader ayatollah khamenei, the revolutionary guards, these are forces that
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are — absolutely have thrived as a result of the country's isolation. they view hostility towards the united states as part of the identity of the iranian revolution and islamic republic. this is not about normalising ties with united states, this is simply going to be a negotiation about fully or partially lifting some of the economic sanctions which prohibit iran from selling its oil. brazil has registered a new daily record of covid—i9 deaths on tuesday. the health ministry said 4,195 people died with the virus in the past 2a hours. more than 300,000 brazilians have now died since the start of the pandemic — the second highest total in the world after the united states. with me now is eduardo leite, governor of rio grande do sul.
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thank you for your time. i know you are a busy man. can you describe the situation for us, as you see it, in brazil? mike, thank you _ as you see it, in brazil? mike, thank you for— as you see it, in brazil? mike, thank you for letting - as you see it, in brazil? mike, thank you for letting me - as you see it, in brazil? mike, thank you for letting me be i thank you for letting me be here with you. what we are facing here in brazil, what we have here, it is a sad situation that is the consequence of the lack of co—ordination on the federal level by the national government. we have here, president bolsonaro, confronting governors and mayors. and the main tool that we have, the main weapon we have do not allow the coronavirus to spread in an easy way, and the weapon is the social distancing. what we have, what we have seen all over the world, is other countries such as the united
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kingdom leading with coronavirus and covid with not only the vaccination because of vaccination starting to get expanded rate now, with social distancing. and the president making us enemies with the social distancing, the way we can stop coronavirus being spread about. but we are doing our best on the state level, so, we can with the restrictions of social distancing, two degrees the cases of coronavirus. and we have that right now in our state of rio grande do sul, the southernmost state of brazil, near uruguay. we had a difficult, very hard month of march, but we are seeing the decrease of occupation of icus'
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capacity in our state in the last 15 days here. governor, ou last 15 days here. governor, you talk _ last 15 days here. governor, you talk about _ last 15 days here. governor, you talk about a _ last 15 days here. governor, you talk about a lack - last 15 days here. governor, you talk about a lack of - you talk about a lack of co—ordination, it is actually a fundamentally different approach, isn't it? the president has made it very clear he thinks the risk to the economy from coronavirus is greater than the risk to human beings, orat greater than the risk to human beings, or at least that the pain of the pandemic is worth bearing, not to destroy the economy? what do you think of that approach? {iii economy? what do you think of that approach?— that approach? of course the president _ that approach? of course the president is _ that approach? of course the president is wrong. - that approach? of course the president is wrong. he - that approach? of course the president is wrong. he may l that approach? of course the i president is wrong. he may not be the only person in the world thatis be the only person in the world that is right in being against social distancing, the vaccination that is going to stop the virus in the organism of the people, until we have vaccination to stop the virus in the bodies of the people, we have to stop people from getting around in gatherings so
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that the coronavirus cannot be spread in an easy way. the world recognises that the best practice, the scientists and researchers are almost unanimous about that. but the president makes these situations, confronting economy and protecting the lives of the people. and what we have is that without feeling that they are protected, people will not be confident to keep running the economy, so, his behaviour is unfortunately killing brazilians and it is hurting our economy. so he's not saving the economy and unfortunately, what we are seeing is that it makes people confused about which way they have to go, what
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they have to do. so the president leads in the wrong way. president leads in the wrong wa , , ., ., president leads in the wrong wa . ., ., way. governor, forgive me, i want to ask _ way. governor, forgive me, i want to ask you _ way. governor, forgive me, i want to ask you one - way. governor, forgive me, ii want to ask you one question about your own state. when you talk about confusion, it seems potentially confusing, given all that you have said, you are in fact relaxing the quarantine in fact relaxing the quarantine in your own state? if you do not mind, why is that? well, we have a model — not mind, why is that? well, we have a model of _ not mind, why is that? well, we have a model of what _ not mind, why is that? well, we have a model of what we - not mind, why is that? well, we have a model of what we call. have a model of what we call controlled social distancing. where we have 11 indicators, numbers that we are controlling of the occupation of our icu beds, for example, the occupation of what we call clinical beds that are not icus in. and we have seen since the middle of the month of march, a
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decreasing number of demand in our icu units here. we have seen the number of diagnostic cases to get lower in our state since the half part of the month of march. so we are in a better situation. and the problem that we have, mike, is that it problem that we have, mike, is thatitis problem that we have, mike, is that it is the federal government who has the money to subsidise economic activities so people can stay at home. and the federal government is not doing that right now. so, we have two allows some situations of businesses, but we are allowing it only in business hours, not at night, for
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example, restaurants have to remain closed during the night, during the weekends, so we are getting lower restrictions as we see a reduction of the occupation of our icu units that have reached a point of more than 100% occupation. we have less than 90% of occupation of our public icu units. ,., ., ., occupation of our public icu units. u, ., ., ., units. governor, forgive me for interrupting- — units. governor, forgive me for interrupting- i— units. governor, forgive me for interrupting. i think _ units. governor, forgive me for interrupting. i think you - units. governor, forgive me for interrupting. i think you have i interrupting. i think you have painted a very clear picture indeed. thank you for talking to us. ., ~ indeed. thank you for talking to us. . ~ ,, day seven of the trial of derek chauvin and the jury has been told that the neck restraint employed was against policy and training. prosecutors say mr chauvin made no attempt to calm george floyd down and spent more than nine minutes kneeling on his neck, which, they argue, led to his death. day seven of the trial of derek chauvin and the jury larry madowo has been following
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the case in minneapolis. we have heard from ten witnesses who are from the police, the minneapolis police department, all testifying that derek chauvin violated department policy, his use of force in the arrest of george floyd was excessive and this is not how they're trained. it is highly unusual to hear that many members of police organisation testify against a member of their own force. there is an unofficial rule called the thin blue line of silence, where police officers often protect their own, which is why it's often so hard to convict a police officer in a case of police brutality or police misconduct as a whole. in this case, they have all come out against 0fficer derek chauvin, who was fired just a day after the death of george floyd. we also heard the first outside witness brought on by the prosecution. he is sergeant from the los angeles police department. he did testify also from the outside looking in that his use of force was excessive. this is that exchange from the court today. based upon your review of these
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materials and in light of the ground factors, what is your opinion as to the degree of force used by the defendant on mr floyd on the date in question? my opinion was that the force was excessive. - the reason why this is important is the prosecution is trying to build the case that, as they said in their opening statement, that derek chauvin betrayed his badge, this is not consistent with police training. that is the narrative they've tried to build again and again. and the defence's case is to try to poke holes into that and discredit all the witnesses and to say that these are decisions that officers make that are split—second decisions, and they are situational, they take into account what's happening. in eric nelson's view — he is the lead attorney of derek chauvin — because there were a mob, there were people yelling and screaming at the officers there, they distracted them, they impaired theirjudgement,
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and that is why he made those decisions and that is why when he should have turned george floyd on his side so that he could recover, regain breathing. when he should have administered cpr, he didn't do that because of all the other factors around the arrest of george floyd. larry madowo for is there in minneapolis. stay with us on bbc news. still to come: joe biden's son, hunter, has spoken about his controversial work in ukraine. 25 years of hatred and rage as theyjump upon the statue. this funeral became a massive demonstration of black power, the power to influence. today is about the promise of a bright future, a day
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when we hope a line can be drawn under the bloody past. i think that picasso's i works were beautiful, they were intelligent and it's a sad loss to everybody - who loves art. welcome back. very good to have you with us on bbc news. the latest headlines: in vienna, after a day of delicate diplomacy the united states says the first session of talks on reviving the iran nuclear deal were constructive. brazil registers more than 4,000 coronavirus deaths in 2a hours. a new record for the country.
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president biden's son hunter biden has been speaking to the bbc. he was a target for donald trump in last year's presidential election. he was criticised for his drug and alcohol addictions, and his lucrative appointment to a ukrainian energy company. speaking to mishal husain, hunter biden spoke openly about his addiction problems — and that he failed to appreciate how his involvement in that company would be perceived. can you see why people look at the fact that the ukrainian gas company burisma took you onto their board for a reported $50,000 a month and think, well, they were obviously doing that because of your surname was yellow when someone comes to you with work, it's myjob to you with work, it's myjob to do the due diligence. to you with work, it's my “0b to do the due diligence. which idea. and. _ to do the due diligence. which idea. and, you _ to do the due diligence. which idea. and, you know, - to do the due diligence. which idea. and, you know, what- to do the due diligence. which idea. and, you know, what i l idea. and, you know, whati missed though is the perception
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what it would create. what i missed in that period of time. i don't know it is hard to believe with 2020 hindsight how i could possibly have missed that stop at the point you are working for burisma, it was a lot of money to be paid for relatively meetings a year and at a point where, by your own admission, you are an alcoholic through a loss of that period. how much work we were actually doing for them? um? how much work we were actually doing for them?— doing for them? why did the work that — doing for them? why did the work that was _ doing for them? why did the work that was required - doing for them? why did the work that was required of. doing for them? why did the i work that was required of every board member. and what you have to remember is what i was paid is the equivalent of what people are paid to serve on corporate boards. but i get it, michelle, i really do. they understand the thing. but here is the bottom line. not one investigative body, not one legitimate journalist or group of journalists or legitimate journalist or group ofjournalists or newspaper of journalists or newspaper have ofjournalists or newspaper have come to the conclusion other than this, my dad did nothing wrong and that i did
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nothing illegal or wrong in doing so. but you are right, i've created a perception, and a perception that was wielded against us in an incredibly wild and conspiratorial way. hunter biden speaking to mishal husain. well, hunter biden's interview is getting a lot of attention in the us — good and bad — from both the political right and left. let's get more on this from tyler page, a white house reporter at the washington post. thank you for your time. good to talk to. one question arises straightaway, why he is doing this. he says elsewhere in the interview that his father and is family have been wonderful to him, but do they need this right now?— to him, but do they need this right now? yeah, thank you so much for _ right now? yeah, thank you so much for having _ right now? yeah, thank you so much for having me _ right now? yeah, thank you so much for having me in. - right now? yeah, thank you so much for having me in. i - right now? yeah, thank you so much for having me in. i think| much for having me in. i think this story that hunter biden is trying to tell and one that is the genesis of this book is one of addiction. and when the book was announced a few months ago jill and joe biden, the president and first lady put out a statement saying they were supportive of their son and hoped that his story of addiction would help others overcome it. and i think that's
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really what he's trying to get out here is his side of the story, obviously, he has been in the news and the tabloids were much of the last few years and this is his effort to try to fill in the gaps of where he felt his story wasn't being told. ., , _ felt his story wasn't being told. ., , ., told. he does say it also in the interview, _ told. he does say it also in the interview, but - told. he does say it also in the interview, but to - told. he does say it also in the interview, but to a - told. he does say it also in the interview, but to a lot| told. he does say it also in i the interview, but to a lot of americans, given the opioid epidemic and all sorts of other drug issues, it is something that will win some sympathy from some americans. yeah, i think reported _ from some americans. yeah, i think reported he _ from some americans. yeah, i think reported he paints - from some americans. yeah, i think reported he paints in - think reported he paints in this memoir is one of tragedy and loss and something that, you know, further explains some of the tabloid stories that we read without his context. and it will surely win some sympathy. and it already has, as the book comes out and starts to get attention, i think people will look at the story and see somebody who has suffered unimaginable loss with
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both his mother and his close brother, and gives a fuller picture of the life he has lived. , , ., , . ., lived. yes, you very much get a sense of somebody destroyed by the early death of his mother, rebuild himself to an extent, and then destroyed again by the death of his beloved brother but has been all along a walking political liability for his father.— walking political liability for his father. ., ~ his father. yeah, i think there is no question _ his father. yeah, i think there is no question he _ his father. yeah, i think there is no question he has - his father. yeah, i think there is no question he has been i his father. yeah, i think there | is no question he has been the subject of political attacks, particularly from president trump over the last years, and ratcheted up during the campaign. buti ratcheted up during the campaign. but i think ultimately what we saw is those attacks didn't stick. they were never about, you know, really joe biden, they were about his son, and one of the most powerful moments that biden himself had on the debate stage when trump said your son is a crack addict, joe biden turned it into a moment to talk about addiction, it one a lot of credit for honestly confronting the struggle his son had a giving a platform to the millions of people and families
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that struggle with addiction. tyler, does seem inconceivable that he did not see how difficult his involvement in ukraine might be.- difficult his involvement in ukraine might be. yeah, that's something. — ukraine might be. yeah, that's something, as _ ukraine might be. yeah, that's something, as you _ ukraine might be. yeah, that's something, as you played i ukraine might be. yeah, that's something, as you played it i ukraine might be. yeah, that's something, as you played it in| something, as you played it in that clip about him staying in hindsight i should have seen, i think what he writes about in the book is that he didn't see how politicised he would be as an individual. there has often been an unwritten rule in politics about not going after politicians' families and their children. 0bviously he is an aduu children. 0bviously he is an adult and his business dealings are something to look at, but i think he writes that he did not think that trump would be as aggressive in going up to him and that was his mistake stop i think a lot of democrats and even biden allies think that he should never have engaged in foreign were given the role his father played in the 0bama administration as key around the world two allies.-
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the world two allies. tyler pa . e the world two allies. tyler pace of the world two allies. tyler page of the _ the world two allies. tyler page of the washington . the world two allies. tyler- page of the washington post, thank you very much.- page of the washington post, thank you very much. thank you so much for— thank you very much. thank you so much for having _ thank you very much. thank you so much for having it. _ —— having me. for decades, china used a one—child policy to rein in what the government feared was an ever—growing population which the country couldn't manage. then in recent years the rules were eased, allowing couples to have two children. there'sjust one problem: most young people don't seem to want to have big families anymore. 0ur correspondent stephen mcdonell met some of them in northeast china. chinese kids are sometimes called little emperors because parents, limited to one child only, gave their offspring everything. then came the two—child policy, but for many, one has remained well and truly enough. you just have to ask parents with a single child if they want more. translation: i haven't even considered it. i neither emotionally nor financially could i afford it. in china's once prosperous northeast, dwindling populations in many towns have
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led to a suggestion that this could be the first region to scrap birth limits altogether. but this may not produce more children. translation: for me, it's i already hard to raise this one. it feels better to put all your energy into one child, or we might feel guilty that we can't properly take care of many. there's been a huge shift in attitude from generation to generation here in china. older generations, they come from big families, and it was a really crucial thing in terms of their lives. but for younger people, it's not the same. they really don't want to have as many kids. it's not as important for them. the one—child policy came into force in the early �*80s
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to stop an already massive population exploding. later, people in rural areas and those from ethnic minorities were allowed multiple kids. yet for the vast majority over three decades, having more than one child meant being fined. china in 2021 is a completely different place. young couples want different things. when you look at birth rates throughout history, poverty tends to produce people. that's because every new human being is an extra pair of hands to go to work. then along comes prosperity, and it's not as important to have kids for this reason. another factor is that this huge country has now produced generations of people simply accustomed to small family life. it might be hard to get them to change. stephen mcdonell, bbc news.
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there is more on that and more on all the news at any time on the bbc website and on our twitter feeds. the bbc website and on our twitterfeeds. thank the bbc website and on our twitter feeds. thank you very much for watching. well, it's certainly been cold in the last couple of days. we've snow, particularly across northern parts of the uk. but here's the good news if you don't like the cold. it is going to feel a lot better on wednesday. we won't have that cold northerly wind. we won't have that windchill, which we've been experiencing for a couple of days now. but the arctic air has spread right across the continent into northern parts of the mediterranean as well, so it's quite a widespread outbreak of cold arctic air. now, through the early hours you can see clear skies across much of the country. still a few wintry showers there across parts of scotland. but lighter winds, clear skies, a frost as well. temperatures in some cities down to around —2 or —3 celsius early on wednesday morning. so wednesday's looking something like this, lots of bright, sparkling sunshine first thing in the morning. but the clouds will build through the morning and into the afternoon.
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so actually the second half of the day is looking a little overcast for some of us. and in the north—west of the country, later on in the afternoon, and towards the evening, the clouds will thicken further and we are expecting some outbreaks of rain in places like belfast, glasgow, much of the western isles. and that's because a weather front is approaching, the winds turning direction, actually milder air is reaching us. and by very early on thursday morning you can see that generally across the country it is frost free — almost. now, that change is brought by area of low pressure which will be tracking into the north of the uk. you can see that slightly milder air brought in by these south—westerly winds. so i think on thursday temperatures, at least for a while, will recover to double figures, onlyjust. perhaps ii or 12 across parts of england and wales. but with that also comes a weather front and outbreaks of rain parts of the north—west of the uk. i think the best of the weather will be further south and also south—east. now, as we head into thursday night and friday, that weather front will move across, in fact, it's a cold front
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and behind it we once again open up the gates to a cold air stream from the arctic, which could bring wintry showers to northern areas of the uk. so, yes, temporarily it is going to turn just a little bit milder through thursday, friday, maybe saturday, but the second half of the weekend it is turning colder again.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: american officials have described the start of talks in vienna — intended to revive the international deal on iran's nuclear programme — as a welcome step, and constructive. a state department spokesman said the discussions are expected to be difficult, and an early breakthrough is not anticipated. brazil has registered more than 4,000 coronavirus deaths in 24 hours — a new record for the country. the public health system has been largely overwhelmed by the surge in cases. president bolsonaro has been widely blamed for the crisis — he has consistently played down the severity of the virus. the jury in the trial of derek chauvin — accused of murdering george floyd — has been told the neck restraint he used was against police policy and training. prosecutors say he made no attempt to calm mr floyd down before kneeling on his neck, for more than nine minutes.

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