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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 6, 2021 11:00pm-11:31pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the experts are weighing in, on day seven of the derek chauvin trial, saying the force used by the ex—officer on george floyd was excessive. i'm at the courthouse in minneapolis with all the latest developments from the trial. a trial of the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine on children is suspended in the uk, while the country's regulator investigates possible links to rare blood clots in adults. russian police detain supporters ofjailed kremlin critic, alexei navalny, amid reports he is suffering from a respiratory illness. one is fun — why so many of china's parents are limiting themselves to a single child, despite now being allowed to have more.
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translation: for me, - it's already hard to raise this one. it feels better to put all your energy into one child, or we might feel guilty that we can't properly take care of many. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. it's day seven in the trial of former police officer derek chauvin in minneapolis, the man accused of killing george floyd by kneeling on his neck in a case that triggered worldwide protests over racial injustice. today, we've been hearing more evidence from former colleagues of derek chauvin in the police department, with a particular focus on the training that officers receive. our correspondent larry madowo has been following the day's hearings and joins us live from minneapolis.
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larry. we have heard from ten witnesses who are from the police, the minneapolis police department, all testifying that derek chauvin violated department policy, and this is not how they are trained. it is highly unusual to hear that many members of police organisations testifying against a member of their own force. there is an unofficial rule called the thin blue line of silence, while officers protect their own, which is why it's often so hard to convict a police officer as a whole. in this case, they have all come out against officer derek chauvin after the death of george floyd. we also heard the first outside witness. he did
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testify also that his use of force was excessive. that was the exchange from the court today. if was excessive. that was the exchange from the court today.— from the court today. if your review of these materials, _ from the court today. if your review of these materials, what _ from the court today. if your review of these materials, what is - from the court today. if your review of these materials, what is your - of these materials, what is your opinion— of these materials, what is your opinion as — of these materials, what is your opinion as to the degree of force used _ opinion as to the degree of force used by— opinion as to the degree of force used by the defendant on mr floyd on the date _ used by the defendant on mr floyd on the date in _ used by the defendant on mr floyd on the date in question? my used by the defendant on mr floyd on the date in question?— the date in question? my opinion was the date in question? my opinion was the force was — the date in question? my opinion was the force was excessive. _ the date in question? my opinion was the force was excessive. the - the date in question? my opinion was the force was excessive. the reason i the force was excessive. the reason wh this the force was excessive. the reason why this is — the force was excessive. the reason why this is important _ the force was excessive. the reason why this is important is _ the force was excessive. the reason why this is important is that - why this is important is that prosecution is trying to build a case that, as they sat in the opening statement, that derek chauvin betrayed his badge. this is not consistent with police training. that is the narrative they try to build again again again, and in the defence's case, it's to say these are decision that officers make that are decision that officers make that are second decisions, and their situation take into account what's happening. in chauvin�*s attorney boz
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my view, because there was a mob yelling at the officers, they impaired theirjudgment —— impaired their judgment —— attorney's impaired theirjudgment —— attorney's view. that is why he turned george floyd on his side. he didn't apply cpr because of all the other factors around the arrest of george floyd. you other factors around the arrest of george floyd-— other factors around the arrest of george floyd. you talked about the thin blue line. _ george floyd. you talked about the thin blue line. have _ george floyd. you talked about the thin blue line. have there _ george floyd. you talked about the thin blue line. have there been - george floyd. you talked about the thin blue line. have there been any| thin blue line. have there been any other trials like this where we have seen police incriminate in terms of their testimony fellow officers? it their testimony fellow officers? it is highly unusual. it really happens. the fact that yesterday, the minneapolis police department chief took to the stand was cover naturally, it was leading the newspapers across the nation because of how unlikely it is to see something like that and trials of police misconduct in america. it is... it might lead to future
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prosecutors to call more officers to justify. prosecutors to call more officers to 'usti . . , ., , prosecutors to call more officers to 'usti . ., , . here in the uk, a trial of the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine on children has been paused while scientists investigate a possible link with rare blood clots in adults. the university of oxford has told the bbc that there are no safety concerns with the trial itself, but its scientists were waiting for further information. the prime minister borisjohnson has urged people to get their vaccination when invited. our medical editor fergus walsh reports. nearly 300 children aged 6—17 are taking part in the astrazeneca vaccine trial in england which began in february. oxford university said there had been no blood clots in the volunteers, but out of an abundance of caution, it had stopped vaccinations, pending the outcome of the safety review in adults. more than 18 million people in the uk have received
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the astrazeneca vaccine. the mhra said last week, there had been 30 rare cases of blood clots, including seven deaths. the prime minister, visiting an astrazeneca plant in macclesfield, once again gave his firm support for the vaccine. the best thing people should do is look at what the mhra say, our independent regulator, that's why we have them, that's why they're independent. and their advice to people is to, you know, keep going out there, get yourjab, get your second jab. as a precautionary measure, the mhra updated its advice last month to say that anyone with a headache that lasted for more than four days after receiving the astrazeneca vaccine or bruising beyond the site of the jab should seek medical attention. both of the vaccines we're using are highly effective against covid, and the risks of getting
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sick or dying of covid, for all the people currently being offered first and second doses, are far and away greater than any small theoretical risk that may exist relating to these cases, which are extremely rare. as for the future course of the epidemic here, three academic groups modelling the outbreak all have multiple scenarios showing a third covid wave after a final lifting restrictions in england in latejune. this model from warwick university looks at the number of patients in hospital with covid, which have been falling fast since a peak injanuary. looking ahead, the assumption is the reopening of shops and outdoor hospitality won't cause major problems for the nhs, but once all restrictions are lifted, a third wave follows, though likely much smaller than previous peaks. but it could be more or less severe depending on how effective vaccines are at preventing covid
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and stopping transmission. a seasonal drop in coronavirus could push that third wave well into the autumn. as we start to unlock, i suspect we may see the r number increasing, and we may see another wave. my hope is it will be a somewhat different wave, and we can keep hospital admissions and deaths relatively low. and i think that's the really crucial thing, that if we can do that, then hopefully we are still on track with the road map to release restrictions towards the end ofjune. the astrazeneca vaccine is central to the huge success of the roll—out ofjabs in the uk which is way ahead of the rest of europe. france has restricted the astrazeneca vaccine to adults over 55, germany to those over 60, because of concerns about blood clots in young adults. the european medicines agency in the uk regulator are due to give updated recommendations in the next day or two.
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maintaining public confidence in this highly effective vaccine will be vital. fergus walsh. brazil has registered a new daily record of covid—i9 deaths on tuesday. the health ministry said a,i95 people died with the virus in the past 2a hours. more than 300 thousand brazilians have now died since the start of the pandemic — the second highest total in the world after the united states. the jailed russian opposition activist, alexei navalny, is reported to be suffering symptoms of respiratory illness and fever in the penal colony where he's being imprisoned. he started a hunger strike last week and his health is now worsening. supporters of mr navalny gathered outside the jail earlier today, but several were arrested. our correspondent sarah rainsford has been outside the prison and sent this report.
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this is the prison outside moscow where alexi my navalny is being held behind these walls, it's from here where he's been giving messages out talking about how his health is deteriorating. he talked about having a bad temperature and cough, but before that, he talked about severe pain in his back and also that radiating down his legs. his legs becoming numb. there are extra police here today because doctors from alexei navalny�*s team have been trying to get to the prison to visit the administration and demand that mr navalny gets the help they say he needs. he's been calling for a specialist civilian doctor to see him and also for medicine that he needs to be let through. but the doctors that have made it here have not managed to get anywhere near him. ~ �* , ., ., ., not managed to get anywhere near him.�* ., ., , ., him. we're very afraid of his health and his condition, _ him. we're very afraid of his health and his condition, because - him. we're very afraid of his health and his condition, because i- him. we're very afraid of his health and his condition, because i don't l and his condition, because i don't want to let his health be worse. and
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i just... want to let his health be worse. and ijust... this is why i'm here now. do you trust the prison doctor? ihla. do you trust the prison doctor? no. state television _ do you trust the prison doctor? firm state television has been showing pictures within the prison, showing mr navalny walking around apparently uninjured, and they are using that to suggest all these health concerns are very much exaggerated. alexei navalny called a hunger strike last week. he said he would refuse all food until a specialist doctor was allowed into him. don't forget, this is the man who back in august was poison was a nerve agent. i think one thing is clear— if the criminal in hopes that alexei navalnymy it would take him out of the prison —— imprisonment... pro—democracy protesters in myanmar have sprayed red paint on roads and bus stops in the biggest city, yangon. they say it's to symbolise
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blood on the hands of myanmar�*s military rulers. more than 570 people, including at least 43 children, have been killed since the coup on february 1st. but that number is thought to be much higher. protestors say today is their red revolution day — giving them a sense of strength and unity in the ongoing battle for democracy. well, let's get more on the situation in myanmar with someone who knows the region very well. scot marciel was the united states ambassador to myanmar until last year. he now works on southeast asia at stanford university's asia pacific research centre. when you look at what antony bullington, the us secretary of state had to say after m versus day, he said he was horrified by the blood shed —— antony blinken. don't really cut much ice when it comes to leaders? i really cut much ice when it comes to leaders? ~ , ., ,
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leaders? i think it is really important _ leaders? i think it is really important to _ leaders? i think it is really important to call- leaders? i think it is really important to call out - leaders? i think it is really i important to call out military. leaders? i think it is really - important to call out military. it's also really important to remember that the military tried to seize power through this coup on february the 1st after it had been defeated in national elections. and the whole nation has rejected it, has rejected this coup, military rule. i think it's really important that the international community first call out the appalling human rights violations by the military, but also not do anything to convey legitimacy or acceptance of this military regime. or acceptance of this military reaime. ~ , ., or acceptance of this military reaime. ~ regime. when you were in post, it must have — regime. when you were in post, it must have been _ regime. when you were in post, it must have been clear _ regime. when you were in post, it must have been clear that - regime. when you were in post, it must have been clear that the - must have been clear that the military was involved in all sorts of corruption, extortion. they were effectively running the de facto leader. but the world is it unified.
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even the sanctions, even the threats from the security council are blocked by russia and china. true, it is really hard _ blocked by russia and china. true, it is really hard to _ blocked by russia and china. true, it is really hard to unify _ blocked by russia and china. true, it is really hard to unify the - it is really hard to unify the world. you mention russian and china impose trucker language in the un security council last week. seems also to be divided although king not asking members are concerned because they recognise not only the human rights problem, but the fact that continued rules by this military raises serious risk of significant instability that can spill over into the region. but important as the international response is, chances are that it's going to be what happens inside myanmar and it's going to determine what happened dominant —— where the country go. {iii dominant —— where the country go. of the world sit back and watch more thousands of people get killed because of a repressive state by the
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military, or does the world actually concentrate on the $30 billion plus of jade sold most years, concentrate on the $30 billion plus ofjade sold most years, a lot concentrate on the $30 billion plus of jade sold most years, a lot of which most goes to the military? a lot of the other fisheries and other industries that the military take billions of dollars in kickbacks from? ~ . ., , ., , from? well, certainly, it would be aood if from? well, certainly, it would be good if the _ from? well, certainly, it would be good if the world _ from? well, certainly, it would be good if the world focused - from? well, certainly, it would be good if the world focused on - from? well, certainly, it would be l good if the world focused on putting maximum pressure on the military, including vice breathing the sources... that's what the united states in the uk and some others are doing, but not everybody is willing to go that route yet. again, i think part of the problem is that some of these governments may think this is a sort of an ordinary coup and they'll have to accept it. i think they'll have to accept it. i think they don't understand how serious things are getting and what a threat it is to the region. if the world doesn't act to put more pressure on military. doesn't act to put more pressure on milita . �* , ., ., ~
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doesn't act to put more pressure on milita . . ., . ~ , military. ambassador, thank you very much indeed- — military. ambassador, thank you very much indeed. i'm _ military. ambassador, thank you very much indeed. i'm afraid _ military. ambassador, thank you very much indeed. i'm afraid we're - military. ambassador, thank you very much indeed. i'm afraid we're out - military. ambassador, thank you very much indeed. i'm afraid we're out of. much indeed. i'm afraid we're out of time. stay with us on bbc news. still to come... it's a country with only 40,000 voters, so why is the whole world closely watching the election in greenland? ..years of hatred and rage as they jump upon the statue... this funeral became a massive demonstration of black power, the power to influence. today is about the promise of a bright future, a day when we hope a line can be drawn under a bloody past.
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i think that picasso's i works were beautiful, they were intelligent and it's a sad loss to everybody who loves art. . this is bbc news. iranian and american officials are holding talks in vienna, trying to revive the 2015 nuclear deal. the two sides are not meeting face—to—face. instead, they're speaking through european diplomats, who go back and forth between the two parties, hoping to move the conversation forward. the iran deal was meant to ensure that tehran never acquires an atomic weapon. but some world powers don't trust iran, and believe its work on nuclear energy is actually a step towards building a nuclear bomb.
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iran denies this. so, in 2015, a deal was struck between iran and six other countries. iran would stop nuclear work in return for an end to sanctions. but in 2018, president trump abandoned the deal and re—imposed sanctions on iran, going against advice from european allies, which brings us to today. president biden wants to rejoin the deal, but both washington and tehran insists that the other side must make the first move. our correspondent bethany bell has this update from vienna. what they decided today, we understand, is that they've set up two working groups. one looking at the question of sanctions relief, which is of course he ran's big concern, and the second looking at the what question of what the nuclear question, because i ran in
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response to the us written drawing from the deal has been overstepping the limits on his nuclear work —— iran. they're going to keep talking about this and see whether they can come to some sort of agreement, but everyone says it's going to be very difficult. polls have just closed in greenland, in an election that could have major implications for the strategic and economic balance between china and the west. the inuit majority region will elect a fresh group of legislators with a raft of domestic issues on their mind, including fishing, housing, economic pressures and the demand for greater autonomy. many of these issues are linked. the arctic territory is an autonomous region of denmark, and gets around a third of its budget directly from copenhagen one route to financial independence. and a divisive electoral issue is the kvanefjeld mining project, site of one of the world's
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largest untapped deposits of rare earth elements, or rees. at present, the west relies on china for these minerals, which are crucial for the production of electronics. i'm joined now by powl krarup, editor of the inuit language newspaper sermitsiaq. this rare earth deposit has many pros and cons, doesn't it? in terms of the environmental damage it could cause in greenland, but it would also lead to many benefits for technology and environmental projects, potentially globally. yes. pro'ects, potentially globally. yes, of projects, potentially globally. yes, of course. projects, potentially globally. yes, of course- it _ projects, potentially globally. yes, of course. it depends _ projects, potentially globally. yes, of course. it depends on _ projects, potentially globally. yes of course. it depends on the result of course. it depends on the result of the election here because two main parties, the one party is
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supporting it, the other party is against it. we don't know who's winning. against it. we don't know who's winnina. �* ., . ., winning. and how close i have the olls winning. and how close i have the polls been? _ winning. and how close i have the polls been? you _ winning. and how close i have the polls been? you only _ winning. and how close i have the polls been? you only have - winning. and how close i have the l polls been? you only have 40,000 voters. has there been an exit poll? we don't have exit polls we have one pole that is a couple of weeks old. and the difference between the two main parties is 37% and 23%. but about 30% of the voters have not decided yet, so... we expect... those who haven't decided yet, they will win. �* will win. and in the... the undecided _ will win. and in the... the undecided might - will win. and in the... the undecided might decide i will win. and in the... the l undecided might decide who will win. and in the... the - undecided might decide who wins, will win. and in the... the _ undecided might decide who wins, but the value of these rare earths, not
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only for the world but for you as a country as well and what it would mean for independence and what it would mean to fill the coffers of greenland to pay for all the things it needs, how convincing an argument has not been for people? is it needs, how convincing an argument has not been for people?— has not been for people? is not very convincing — has not been for people? is not very convincing i— has not been for people? is not very convincing. i mean, _ has not been for people? is not very convincing. i mean, those _ has not been for people? is not very convincing. i mean, those who - has not been for people? is not very convincing. i mean, those who are l convincing. i mean, those who are against the majority of the people are against the mine product. and we have another rare earth elements project, which doesn't have... in the mountains. so, they hope that project will be the solution of the greenland economy. it’iii
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project will be the solution of the greenland economy.— greenland economy. it'll be fascinating _ greenland economy. it'll be fascinating to _ greenland economy. it'll be fascinating to see _ greenland economy. it'll be fascinating to see what - greenland economy. it'll be| fascinating to see what does greenland economy. it'll be - fascinating to see what does happen. thank you very much indeed. i'm afraid we're out of time. it makes you realise why donald trump offered to buy greenland a couple of years ago perhaps. for decades, china used a one—child—policy to rein in what the government feared was an ever—growing population which the country couldn't manage. then, in recent years, the rules were eased allowing couples to have two children. there'sjust one problem — most young people don't seem to want to have big families any more. chinese kids are sometimes called little emperors because parents, limited to one child only, gave their offspring everything. then came the two—child policy, but for many, one has remained well and truly enough. you just have to ask parents with a single child if they want more. translation: i haven't even considered it. - neither emotionally nor financially could i afford it.
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in china's once prosperous northeast, dwindling populations in many towns have led to a suggestion that this could be the first region to scrap birth limits altogether. but this may not produce more children. translation: for me, - it's already hard to raise this one. it feels better to put all your energy into one child, or we might feel guilty that we can't properly take care of many. there's been a huge shift in attitude from generation to generation here in china. older generations, they come from big families, and it was a really crucial thing in terms of their lives. but for younger people, it's not the same. they really don't want to have as many kids. it's not as important for them. the one—child policy came
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into force in the early '80s to stop an already massive population exploding. later, people in rural areas and those from ethnic minorities were allowed multiple kids. yet for the vast majority over three decades, having more than one child meant being fined. china in 2021 is a completely different place. young couples want different things. when you look at birth rates throughout history, poverty tends to produce people. that's because every new human being is an extra pair of hands to go to work. then along comes prosperity, and it's not as important to have kids for this reason. another factor is that this huge country has now produced generations of people simply accustomed to small family life. it might be hard to get them to change. stephen mcdonell, bbc news.
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and that is it. bye—bye. well, the last couple of days have been pretty cold. here's the good news if you don't like the cold — wednesday is going to feel a little milder. we're going lose that cold, biting northerly wind, lose the wind—chill, so with a little bit of sunshine, its houldn't feel too bad at all. here's the arctic outbreak. you can see it's quite a large outbreak of cold air, spreading right across the continent and even reaching the continent and even reached the northern mediterranean. this is what it looks like through the early hours. notice the strong northerly winds at the northerly winds are out in the north sea.
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—4, —5 in rural parts of yorkshire and scotland. the morning starts off cold and crisp and by lunch, it should feel pretty nice because the winds will be light. just a few flurries of snow there in scotland. but come the afternoon, it will cloud over. a beautiful start to the day but a cloudy afternoon for many of us. temperatures around five or six celsius. if anything, towards the end of the afternoon into the evening, the class will be thick enough to bring some rain to places like belfast, glasgow, generally the western isles and even at some snow across the western hills. that is because the winds are tending direction. this is the early hours of thursday. by this stage you can see the country is generally frost free. and this change in the wind direction is brought by this area of low pressure and you can see the cold air to the north and the mild is in the south but this in between zone, the temperatures are still below par
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for the time of the year but it's not quite as cold, and this is thursday. you can see south—westerly winds. we haven't got the arctic outbreak here but outbreaks of rain in the northwest of the uk i think, for the most part. in the northwest of the uk however, this is a cold front in the north. look what happens thursday and eventually in a friday. the cold front moved across the uk and again a return of wintry showers to some northern areas. we are going to see a resurgence of that cold air towards the end of the week and into the weekend. we can see that to the temperatures, so another fairly coolish day on wednesday, bumping of those temperatures thursday and friday and going back to single figures by the weekend.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. this is bbc world news, the headlines on day 7 of the trial over the killing of george floyd, more evidence was presented on police training. one witness said former officer derek chauvin should not have placed his knee on the neck of george floyd. russian police have detained the personal doctor of the opposition activist alexei navalny outside the penal colony where he's serving a jail sentence. mr navalny started a hunger strike last week to demand proper medical attention. the oxford—astrazeneca coronavirus vaccine trial on children and teenagers has been paused while the uk regulator investigates whether there's a possible link with rare blood clots in adults. experts say there are no safety concerns. the us has hailed the start of talks in vienna which aim to revive the iran nuclear deal as a welcome and constructive step. the two sides are not meeting directly, but talking

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