Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 6, 2021 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

8:00 pm
this is bbc news, i'm tim willcox. the headlines at 8pm. the oxford—astrazeneca coronavirus vaccine trial on children and teenagers is temporarily paused tonight — as the uk regulator investigates whether there is a possible link with rare blood clots in adults. oxford university say they won't carry out more jabs on younger people "out of an abundance of caution". more data is due to be published in the coming days — the world health organization says the vaccine�*s benefit largely outweighs the risk. forthe time being, there is no evidence that the benefit risk assessment for the vaccine needs to be changed. the argument continues over so—called covid passports — and what they might be needed for. the disappearance of 19 —year—old richard okorogheye — a body is about to be
8:01 pm
formally identified. fresh calls to deport members of a notorious rochdale grooming gang after one of the men was spotted in the town where he abused young girls more than a decade ago. also coming up... tributes to the actor paul ritter — best known for his role in �*friday night dinner�* — who's died of a brain tumour at the age of 5a. a trial of the oxford—astrazeneca coronavirus vaccine on children and teenagers has tonight been paused as the medical regulator investigates possible links to rare blood clots in adults. oxford university say it's not an formal pausing of the trial — but they have decided not to carry
8:02 pm
out any more vaccinations until the mhra complete their review the possible link between the astrazeneca vaccine and blood clots in younger people. he added that there were no safety concerns on the trial and no risk to the children involved. the british regulator has said the jab�*s benefits far outweigh its risks. our health correspondent, anna collison is here to take us through developments and the pausing of that trial on young people — she's been speaking to the team at oxford university. we'll discuss the latest with her injust a moment — but first let's get some background — because government there is considerable uncertainty about the future path of the epidemic here. but three academic groups modelling the outbreak all have multiple scenarios showing a third covid wave after a final lifting of restrictions in
8:03 pm
england in latejune. this model from warwick university looks at the number of patients in hospital with covid, which have been falling fast since a peak injanuary. looking ahead, the assumption is that the reopening of shops and outdoor hospitality won't cause major problems for the nhs, but once all restrictions are lifted, a third wave follows, though likely much smaller than previous peaks. but it could be more or less severe depending on how effective vaccines are at preventing covid and stopping transmission. a seasonal drop in coronavirus could push that third wave well into the autumn. as we start to unlock, i suspect we may see the r number increasing, and we may see another wave. my hope is it will be a somewhat different wave, and we can keep hospital admissions and deaths relatively low. and i think that's the really crucial thing, that if we can do that, then hopefully we are still on track with
8:04 pm
the road map to release restrictions towards the end ofjune. european and uk drug regulators are continuing to examine whether there's any connection between the astrazeneca vaccine and extremely rare cases of blood clots. germany and france are among several countries which have restricted use of the jab to those over 60. and france the over 55s. so it's not just. .. yes. the prime minister visiting and astrazeneca plant in macclesfield, once again gave his firm support to the vaccine. the best thing people should do is look at what the mhra say, our independent regulator, that's why we have them, that's why they're independent. and their advice to people is to, you know, keep going out there, get yourjab, get your second jab. last week, the mhra said there had been 30 rare cases of blood clots, including seven deaths after 18 million doses of the astrazeneca vaccine.
8:05 pm
and its benefits far outweighed any risks. both of the vaccines we're using are highly effective against covid, and the risks of getting sick or dying of covid, for all the people currently being offered first and second doses, are far and away greater than any small theoretical risk that may exist relating to these cases, which are extremely rare. despite a fall in supply, the government says the uk remains on track to offer all adults a first dose of one of the three approved covid vaccines by the end ofjuly. our health correspondent, anna collinson is here. more generally can you put these numbers about blood
8:06 pm
this evening is been confirmed the trial has stopped immunising. while the uk regulator investigates these rare type of blood clots that may be linked with the ashes jab. mane rare type of blood clots that may be linked with the ashes jab.— linked with the ashes “ab. none of the children h linked with the ashes “ab. none of the children involved _ linked with the ashes jab. none of the children involved in _ linked with the ashes jab. none of the children involved in the - linked with the ashes jab. none of the children involved in the trial. the children involved in the trial had been affected?— the children involved in the trial had been affected? absolutely. the hrase the had been affected? absolutely. the phrase they are _ had been affected? absolutely. the phrase they are using _ had been affected? absolutely. the phrase they are using is _ had been affected? absolutely. the phrase they are using is this - had been affected? absolutely. the phrase they are using is this is - had been affected? absolutely. the phrase they are using is this is a - phrase they are using is this is a decision taking with an abundance of caution in the air came to stress there are no safety concerns with there are no safety concerns with the trial itself, no children have been put at risk or endangered, but they are taking really cautiously
8:07 pm
because, children are so not a risk of covid—19 they don't need to take any risk whatsoever. {eek of covid-19 they don't need to take any risk whatsoever.— of covid-19 they don't need to take any risk whatsoever. ok the british government _ any risk whatsoever. ok the british government and _ any risk whatsoever. ok the british government and a _ any risk whatsoever. ok the british government and a lot _ any risk whatsoever. ok the british government and a lot of _ any risk whatsoever. ok the british government and a lot of scientistsl government and a lot of scientists are saying when you look at this in the hole, the oxford astrazeneca jab committee of the benefits far outweigh the risks, and if you have the stats, if you have coronavirus, the stats, if you have coronavirus, the dying are much higher. absolutely, that's how the roller has worked. and there's a lot of uncertainties with these blood clots because they are so rare. but based on the data we have so far it's estimated that for every 600,000 astrazeneca vaccinations in the uk there could be one case of this very rare type of blood clot in the brain. if you compare that, for example, to a middle—aged slightly overweight man his risk of death
8:08 pm
from coronavirus is one in 13,000. that really one another. a no—brainer for that really one another. a no—brainerfor a person of that really one another. a no—brainer for a person of that age with that type of health status. when do they think they will have a conclusive decision to be able edit there to continue with these trials or give more information with the other we are getting big announcements this week from the european medicines agency, also the world health organization, the uk regulator also looking into this and we should expect a statement from them at some point. once we get all that information back we should have an idea of communal, if this trial is going to start up again. as you say, there's no rush with children. they feel like this quite a lot of uncertainty but those things we can definitely be certain of. covid—19 poses a real risk so if older have certain health conditions or work on the front line you are at risk of covid and we know both pfizer and
8:09 pm
astrazeneca vaccines reduce that risk. the reduced hospitalisations the true reduced death and transmission. even we are hearing this news it's important to bear that in mind. and astrazeneca is the vaccination for the world. so the consequences of this are huge. let's take a look at the latest government figures for coronavirus — there were 2,379 new coronavirus infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period which means that on average the number of new cases reported per day in the last week is 3,256. across the uk an average of 3,536 people were in hospital with coronavirus over the seven days to 1st april. 20 deaths were reported — that's people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—19 test. on average in the past week — 30 deaths were announced every day. the total number of deaths so far across the uk is 126,882. the uk is continuing its programme
8:10 pm
of mass vaccinations, in the latest 2a hour period, more than 40,000 people have had their first dose of one of the three approved covid—19 vaccines. taking the overall number of people who've had theirfirstjab tojust over 31.6 millon. the number of people who've had their second dose of the vaccine in the latest 2a hour period is 611,590. that takes the total number of people who've had their second jab to just under five and a half million people. the government says it's right to be looking at the idea of covid passports as a means of returning to a more normal life. today borisjohnson said they could help signal a person is not contagious. while the details are yet to be confirmed, the passports would be used to prove you have immunity from the virus. they would show whether you've had a coronavirus vaccination, or a recent negative
8:11 pm
coronavirus test result. or proof of natural immunity, because you've had covid in the previous 6 months. ministers have made it clear that what it calls covid certification would not be needed to access essential services, but some conservative mps are still warning that the plans could create a two—tier society. our political correspondent, iain watson, has more. if this looks normal to you it's probably a sign of how covid has changed the world. the prime minister was visiting and astrazeneca act today but as lockdowns are about to ease in england it doesn't want to see another wave. the government is trialling the use of covid status certificates, or vaccine passports, this spring at big sporting events. so what information could these contain? a number of signals that you can give that you're not contagious. so first of all, your immunity. if you had it that's going to be
8:12 pm
important, and number two, vaccination will be useful. but don't forget also the importance of testing. the government believes that certificates could be of most use for venues such as nightclubs and sports stadiums were social distancing is difficult. with downright unattractive. but this won't happen straightaway. the government has made it clear that covid certificates foot�*s will not be required from april the 21 beer gardens and nonessential shops open in england, or on may the 17th went into hospitality along with theatres and cinemas are due to reopen but afterjune the 21st when the government hopes to remove most remaining restrictions it is possible certificates could be introduced. a government document introduced yesterday states covid status certification is likely to become a feature of our lives until the threat from the pandemic recedes. so if this is to become the new normal, we asked different generations in leeds how they would adapt.
8:13 pm
certainly i'd be more confident about going to a cinema or theatre if there were vaccine passports. yeah, i would happily carry a piece of paper that said i'd had the vaccine and i've had a test. i think it might be a bit. damaging for businesses. a significant number of borisjohnson�*s own mps are up in arms about covid certificates, denouncing them as intrusive and divisive. but some others are more concerned about how widely they might be used are perhaps notjust for big events but later in the year even for a trip to the local pub. so a row is brewing in westminster. and as the government hasn't ruled out allowing nonessential retailers to ask if you're covid free, labour are hardening their opposition. i'm not going to support a policy that for here in my list a constituency of sunbury wants to go into next, or h&m, they have to produce a proper vaccination certificate on their phone on an app.
8:14 pm
i think that discriminatory. the prime minister hasn't made a final decision on covid certificates but is now at least considering things that would have seemed unthinkable last spring. iain watson, bbc news. police searching for missing student richard okorogheye said today that inquiries are continuing, following the discovery of a man's body in epping forest in essex. the 19—year—old, who has sickle cell disease, was last seen leaving his home in west london two weeks ago. sangita myska has the latest. it is here, the remote woodland of epping forest, that has become the focus of the police investigation into the disappearance of the teenager richard okorogheye. following a search by police divers, a body was found in this lake yesterday. officers have yet to identify who it is. the whereabouts of richard, a 19—year—old student at oxford brookes university, remains unknown, though officers
8:15 pm
today say they have made intensive efforts to find him. our officers, with the assistance from specialist search teams, dogs and police horses and colleagues from essex police have been carrying out extensive searches in epping forest since 19—year—old richard was last seen on cctv in the area two weeks ago. the body was found in the lake behind me late last night by local officers who had been working in the area. they contacted the metropolitan police who are in charge of the investigation into richard's disappearance. although the fingertip searches seem to have come to an end, large sections of epping forest remain sealed off. richard left his west london home on 22nd march. he has sickle cell disease and had been shielding throughout lockdown. but his family say he left without medication or a jacket. richard was seen taking a bus at around 8:45pm. he was next picked up on this cctv camera in essex.
8:16 pm
a short walk away from epping forest at 12:a0am in the morning. richard's mother says it took police another five days before they began to look for her son. i was told that richard was an adult, he can make his decisions, he can go out and come back whenever he feels like. in response, the police tonight told the bbc that they have worked tirelessly to find richard and they are continuing to appeal to anyone with information to contact them. sangita myska, bbc news, epping forest. the headlines on bbc news. the oxford—astrazeneca coronavirus vaccine trial on children and teenagers is temporarily paused tonight — as the uk regulator investigates whether there is a possible link with rare blood clots in adults. the government says it's right to be looking at the idea of covid passports as a means of returning to a more normal life.
8:17 pm
borisjohnson says they could help signal a person is not contagious. police searching for missing student richard okorogheye say a body, has been found in a pond in epping forest. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's chetan. good evening, we'll start in the champions league where both liverpool and manchester city are in action in the first legs of their quarter final ties. city are at home to borrussia dortmund, gundogan back for them, much of the talk before the match about erling haaland but no goals so far. and that is the case in madrid where liverpool have started with salah, mane and jota up front. chelsea play porto tomorrow off the back of their first defeat under manager thomas tuchel. they lost 5—2 to west brom on saturday and tuchel�*s revealed that "things got heated" in a "serious situation" between teammates kepa arrizabalaga and antonio rudiger in training the next day:
8:18 pm
they are all competitors and want to win training matches, so things got a little too heated up and it was not ok. but the reaction to it, how the guys handled the situation, especially tony and the others were amazing, and showed how much they have for each other. because they sorted out directly, there was no, they cleared the air immediately. and that was the most important. there was nothing left one day after. bayern munich forward serge gnabry has tested positive for covid 19, so he'll miss their champions league first leg against paris saint—germain tomorrow, that's a repeat of last years final. the german international is said to be fine but isolating at home. a big night in the championship, norwich look like they will extend their lead at the top of the table. they're playing huddersfield and can
8:19 pm
go eight points clear of watford in second with a win. it's currently 4—0 afterjust half an hour. third placed brentford meanwhile could move within six points of watford if they beat birmingham, it's 0—0 early in the second half. scotland have lined up two friendlies injune ahead of the european championship, they'll play the netherlands in portugal and luxembourg away before they face the czech republic at hampden park in their group opener. that's one of four matches that will be played in glasgow in the tournament. uefa's asked all 12 participating cities to let them know by tomorrow how many fans will be able to safely attend games. scotland's first minster — nicola sturgeon — says she's hopeful some spectators will be able to return: we're still in a global pandemic. i can't stand here in early april and give absolute 100% guarantees forjune
8:20 pm
on anything, really. that's not the nature of what we're dealing with, but i'm very, very hopeful — i'm hopeful that i might be at hampden to cheer on scotland in the european championships — and we will be working hard to make that happen. after 8 years at castleford tigers daryl powell will be head coach at warrington wolves next year. powell is the super league's longest serving coach and had already said he'd leave the club at the end of this season. he's agreed a three year deal at warrington and takes over from steve price who's returning to australia. sarah taylor's coming out of retirement to play for welsh fire in the inaugral hundred competition this summer. the 31—year—old stepped away from professional cricket two years ago because of anxiety and has recently taken up a coaching role with the sussex senior men's team. taylor's wicketkeeping and batting saw her named world cricketer
8:21 pm
of the year four times in the white ball game, and she won two 50 over world cups and one t20 world cup. and the defending champion dustinjohnson has been paired with england's lee westwood for the opening two rounds at augusta national, with the masters getting under way on thursday. johnson is favourite to win the green jacket again as the current world number one, whilst westwood is in good form himself having finished second at the players championship last month. full details are on the bbc sport website. that's all the sport for now. we'll have more for you on the bbc news channel later on. the stormont assembly is set to be recalled from easter recess for an emergency debate following days of violence and disorder in parts of northern ireland. police say 41 of its officers have been injured as a result of the unrest in some loyalist areas.
8:22 pm
ten arrests have been made so far. our ireland correspondent emma vardy has been looking at what's behind the violence. the crowd should disperse - immediately as force is about to be used against violent individuals. armoured land rovers braced over successive days. this is the most violence on the streets of northern ireland has seen for some time. the attacks, mostly carried out by teenagers, cause real harm to officers. burns and head injuries. when officers responded to the incidents that they are met with petrol bombs, with heavy masonry, with debris that has already been prepared. so to me that indicates a degree of orchestration, preparation and an attempt by the people involved. tension has been building in loyalist areas over this past lockdown. rising resentment over the brexit arrangements, a new partition for trade in the irish sea, which
8:23 pm
many of you is weakening northern ireland's place in the uk. and fury over sinn fein politicians who escaped prosecution for attending the funeral of a former ira leader, which many saw as a blatant disregard for covid rules. what i see within the unionist and loyalist community now is grassroots legitimate and justified anger, which is widespread throughout the entire community. you say there is legitimate anger, but is that to legitimise violence? do you condemn what has happened? when it comes to loyalists on the ground there has been a lot of protests that are taking place, there will probably be a lot more, and like i said, loyalist activists are doing their utmost to dissuade people from engaging in violence. the rioting was sporadic and still considered relatively low level here. but police believe paramilitary organisations who still have influence in some communities, had some involvement. signs of anger over the irish sea border are everywhere you look here. but to say that what happened at the weekend is a direct result of brexit
8:24 pm
isn't the full picture. loyalist paramilitaries are under pressure from police who have been cracking down on their criminal activities. a series of recent raids and arrests have targeted paramilitary links drugs operations. i certainly think in a particular area of northern ireland that there are malign and criminal elements who are whipping up some of our young people. i've spoken to some of the youth workers in that area and i do think there is a need to bring those young people into diversionary activities. unauthorised marches by loyalist flute bands were last night a symbol of non—violent protest, and sources say more are planned in the days ahead. emma vardy, bbc news. a man's appeared in court, charged with causing the death of a two week old baby, by dangerous driving. cairan morris was rushed to hospital, after the incident in brownhills near walsall on easter sunday, but he died from his injuries.
8:25 pm
james davis, who's 3a, will appear at wolverhampton crown court next month. ben godfrey reports. throughout the day, flowers and soft toys have been laid at the end of brown hills high street to remember ciaran morris. parents brought their own children to pay respects. ciaran morris, just two weeks old, was being taken for an afternoon walk on easter sunday in his pram. he was struck by a white bmw, which left the road, mounted the pavement, and pinned the pram against the wall. 34—year—old james paul davies from walsall, seen here outside wolverhampton magistrates�* court today, faces four charges. davis kept his arms folded through most of the 20 minute hearing. his charged with causing death by dangerous driving, causing death by driving while uninsured, failing to stop at the scene of a crash, and failing to report a collision.
8:26 pm
he was remanded in custody, and will appear at wolverhampton crown court in may. ciaran�*s teenage parents said... tonight, more tributes have been left at the scene. "god bless yourfamily", read one. as police continue to appeal for witnesses, the community is rallying around the family. more than £19,000 has been raised for them online. the pandemic may be a massive medical challenge but for millions of families it is also a financial one. according to government figures, nearly nine million people had to borrow more money last year because of the impact of coronavirus.
8:27 pm
the virus has heightened regional inequalities and widened the gap between the high paid and low paid. our business correspondent sarah corker has been speaking to two families — and just a warning — her report contains flashing images. we were like basically reaching out and saying, look, we are scared about what is happening. can we pay 65% of our rent this month so we�*ve got a bit of money back? the main thing isjust trying to pay the bills and that's the hardest bit. i'm one of the fortunate ones because my daughter helps me out and i feel bad about that. it should be the other way round. family finances squeezed by the pandemic. across britain, covid has changed the way we live, work, and our ability to pay the bills. basically they served us with a court notice for eviction. for the morgan family, the impact was immediate and unexpected. akeem and eleanor run their own company, running creative art workshops across liverpool but all of that stopped.
8:28 pm
what impact did lockdown have on your ability to earn money? we went from being self—employed on regular work to basically universal credit. it was really difficult, because it wasn't just our roles as professionals within our community, it was also as a family and parents and how do we navigate this? covid has also brought regional inequalities into sharper focus. outside of london and the south—east, you are less likely to be able to do yourjob from home. in parts of the north of england they have had especially high infection rates and have been under severe local lockdowns far longer than anywhere else. not all parts of the country will be able to bounce back from this pandemic in the same way. so areas in the north of england, for example, will be starting this
8:29 pm
pandemic from a point of low resilience, lower levels of public health and fewer opportunities for people. in mansfield in nottinghamshire, margaret�*s work as a supply teacher dried up. everybody is trying to compete for the fewjobs that are out there. she will have to work at least another five years to get her state pension, but has struggled to find another job. so the roles have reversed. daughter cordelia is the main breadwinner with her salary of around £16,000. it's a huge responsibility. because most of my money . is going on running the house and supporting my mum as well. so, there often isn't much left for me. i i feel bad that i'm having to put her in this situation, because, you know, well, we had no choice, really, and my daughter has been very generous. she has given me most of her wage at the moment which is allowing us to tick over.
8:30 pm
my son is a student so he can't contribute very much. margaret is now retraining with the help of a university grant. akeel and eleanor have caught up on the bills as their work comes back. and both families hope that the worst is now behind them. sarah corker, bbc news. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with tomasz. well, jack frost is going to pay us a visit once again tonight. certainly been a very chilly day today, with wintry showers. there are fewer wintry showers around now. they are in the process of dying away. most of them, through the early hours, still across parts of scotland, where we still have a strong wind blowing in from the north. elsewhere, the winds are starting to die down, the skies are clear and we�*ll have that frost forming by early on wednesday morning. —1 or —2 degrees in the south of the country. could be four orfive below in the glens of scotland. so, wednesday starts off quite sunny for most of us. still some wintry showers there in the morning across scotland. then, i think the clouds
8:31 pm
will increase, so it�*s variable amounts of cloud, i think, through the afternoon. still pretty chilly — 4 in newcastle, 7 or 8 in london — but the winds will be lighter on wednesday, so that means it�*s not going to feel quite as cold. and the following couple of days, thursday and friday, it looks as though the temperatures are going to recover a little bit. hello, this is bbc news with tim willcox. the headlines: the oxford—astrazeneca coronavirus vaccine trial on children and teenagers is temporarily paused tonight — as the uk regulator investigates whether there is a possible link with rare blood clots in adults. the government says it�*s right to be looking at the idea of covid passports as a means of returning to a more normal life. borisjohnson says they could help signal a person is not contagious. police searching for missing student
8:32 pm
richard okorogheye say a body, has been found in a pond in epping forest. disperse immediately. in northern ireland, the stormont assembly is recalled — after several nights of violence has resulted in 41 police officers being injured. that stinks. and tributes have been paid the actor paul ritter, who�*s died of a brain tumour at the age of 54— he was best known for his role in �*friday night dinner�* — we�*ll speak to one of his co—stars shortly. fresh calls have been made to deport members of a notorious grooming gang — after one of the men was spotted in the town where he abused young girls more than a decade ago. qari abdul rauf, abdul aziz and adil khan were jailed in 2012 for attacks in rochdale, greater manchester. the trio have been facing deportation since 2018 after losing an appeal to retain their british citizenship. annabel tiffin reports.
8:33 pm
the ringleader of the rochdale child grooming gang, photographed shopping in the town where he committed his crimes, six years after he was supposed to be deported. the photo which emerged in a national newspaper at the weekend has horrified his victims and those seeking compensation for them. these girls have lifelong injuries, ptsd, they will never recover and they try to manage the symptoms but something like this will put them back to square one. this taxi driver was one of nine men jailed in 2012 for a catalogue of serious sex offences against young vulnerable victims in rochdale. he was released from prison in 2014 having served 2.5 years of his sentence. in 2016, one of the girls spoke of her fear of coming face—to—face with one of her abusers. my symptoms include anxiety, i will not go out, i will not go out or socialised and i am nervous
8:34 pm
i will see one of them again. i have palpitations if i see somebody i suspect might be one of the abusers. in 2015, proceedings began to deport three members of the gang. in 2017 the three men appealed but in 2018 that appeal was rejected. the grooming scandal cast a deep and shameful shadow over rochdale. the victims were let down by the very people who should have been looking after them. the authorities believe that despite being children, the girls were making life choices and even consenting to sex. for some, this latest incident shows the victims are being let down once again. a former detective quit the force to speak out on failures in dealing with grooming gangs. it makes my blood boil
8:35 pm
that the victims are the last consideration in our criminal justice system and they are overlooked time and time again. the town mp is calling on the home office to deport the men. i think it is incumbent on the home secretary now to show willing and what she intends to do and make sure she carries out the promise that she herself has made and the promises her predecessors made many years ago now. in a statement, the home office said it was determined to tackle child sex exploitation and that cases of foreign national offenders involved in these crimes have recently been reviewed and they intend to update their victims. the son of the new us presidentjoe biden has been defending himself against allegations of corruption dating back to when his father
8:36 pm
was barack obama�*s vice president. hunter biden told the bbc he failed to apreciate that his involvement in a ukrainian gas company could be percieved in the wrong way. three months on from his father�*s inauguration — hunter biden has published a memoir that also deals with his addictions to alcohol and crack cocaine. mishal husain has been talking to him. hunter got thrown out of the military. he was thrown out, dishonourably discharged... that's not true. he wasn't dishonourably discharged. ..for cocaine use. and he didn�*t have a job until you became vice president. none of that is true. once you became vice president he made a fortune in ukraine and china and moscow. that is simply not true. 2020, and hunter biden�*s name resounded on the campaign trail. for donald trump, his lobbying work and personal life were a way to attack his fatherjoe. the elder biden�*s senate career began in the aftermath of tragedy. he was sworn in at the hospital bedside of hunter and his older brother beau, both injured in the 1972 car crash that killed their mother and baby sister.
8:37 pm
in 2015, beau biden died of a brain tumour. by that time, hunter was already on the board of the ukrainian gas company burisma, a role for which he was paid a reported $50,000 a month while his father was the vice president and involved in us policy on ukraine. i created a perception, a perception that was wielded against us in an incredibly wild and conspiratorial way. and the biden name is synonymous with democracy and transparency, and that�*s why i said that it was gold to them. after his brother�*s death, his life spiralled out of control. his marriage ended, and his addiction saw him buying drugs on the streets of washington, dc. at one point, his dealer moved into his apartment. an amazing woman, much older than me, had lived on the streets
8:38 pm
for a very long time, who i developed a friendship with but, you know, a friendship based off our mutual addiction to crack cocaine. and he didn't have a job. my son, like a lot of people, like a lot of people you know at home, had a drug problem. he has overtaken it. he has fixed it. he has worked on it. and i'm proud of him. hunter biden credits the love of his family and his new wife, melissa, with making it possible for him to get clean. but he still has debts to pay off, and while his father is in the white house he�*ll continue to face scrutiny about what work he can or should do. mishal husain, bbc news. 26 centres to help new, expecting and bereaved mothers with their mental health are being set up across england. health officials say it�*s part of the biggest transformation of maternal mental health services in the world. our health correspondent
8:39 pm
laura foster reports. one, two, three, whoa! for many people, having a baby is the most wonderful moment of their life. but around a quarter of women have trouble with their mental well—being during pregnancy, and in the two years after giving birth. lizzie suffered from post—traumatic stress disorder while she was pregnant after she previously had a miscarriage. i panicked about everything, and everything was going to cause a miscarriage, to the point where i couldn�*t drive. so my husband at that point told me i needed to speak to my midwife and sort of pushed me to be a bit more open about it. and she referred me to the mental health team. this chair? yes. at this hub in plymouth, they offer both maternity services and highly specialist psychological treatments as well as bereavement counselling. the idea is by having everything under one roof,
8:40 pm
it�*s easier to get help, meaning they will be able to help thousands more people every year. it's very important for them to access mental health support quickly. because baby and children can't wait, so when you have a woman in the perinatal period, she needs to nurse a dependent child. and actually if her mental health is not great, then that can impact on her ability to nurse her child. work on these hubs began before the coronavirus pandemic but nhs england says the last year could mean even more demand for their mental health services. a lot will depend on how society unlocks, as it were, over the spring and the summer now. what happens in the year ahead. because women who are struggling don�*tjust need services or benefit from services, they often benefit from the support of their friends, or their mother and toddler groups. ten sites will be ready in the next few months.
8:41 pm
the remaining 16 are set to have opened their doors by this time next year. laura foster, bbc news. there�*s just under a week to go until we can have a drink and a meal at a pub or restaurant in england — as long as we sit outside. nina warhurst has been finding out what preparations are taking place to re—open. will you be ready here for the 12th? yeah, should be done by thursday. the pressure�*s on. these stones will become new walls for a new beer garden and a new alfresco way of drinking. we can�*t wait. the team are all raring to go. i can�*t wait to get back to work. we start back next week and i think itjust going to be amazing to get back in the pub, cleaning it back up. i think when the beer truck arrives, the regulars in the village will all be out cheering. i just can�*t wait. let�*s face it, april on the lancashire—greater manchester border, you are not guaranteed sunshine. what do you do if it rains, how do you ride that storm financially? we just keep an eye on the weather. the team are on flexible furlough
8:42 pm
so they are still looked afterfinancially, luckily, so they will earn at least what they are earning now or more throughout april, which is brilliant, from the government. and to be honest, i know at least a0 people around here that, whether it�*s rain or shine, they will want to sit under that brolly over there having a pint anyway. so we are probably one of the pubs that will still manage to open even when it�*s absolutely wet through. you�*re excited, aren�*t you? very! but maximising outdoor space isn�*t an option at the hungry duck, because, well, there isn�*t any. joe knows why safety must come first. his dad ended up in icu with covid. he is happy to wait until may to reopen but needs to know how. how we'll be interacting with guests, social distancing, other mitigating factors like screens, masks, sanitiser, music levels, can people sing karaoke? takeaway boxes have generated some revenue, but nowhere near enough. how bad have things been?
8:43 pm
we owe people money, some people have been fantastic, some people less so. every time we catch up, and then we get reeled back again. what are your big concerns long term? if we see some sort of recession within the entire economy, whereby spending contracts, that could be the deathknell for quite a lot of independent businesses and some larger businesses alike. and despite the enormous challenges of the past year, are you still excited about doing this again? what our industry is, on balance, is a vocation. i'm very fortunate that i've found my calling if you will, in life, and that's to be in hospitality. nina warhurst, bbc news, bury, greater manchester. the headlines on bbc news... the oxford—astrazeneca coronavirus vaccine trial on children and teenagers is temporarily paused
8:44 pm
tonight — as the uk regulator investigates whether there is a possible link with rare blood clots in adults. the government says it�*s right to be looking at the idea of covid passports as a means of returning to a more normal life. borisjohnson says they could help signal a person is not contagious. police searching for missing student richard okorogheye say a body has been found in a pond in epping forest. the actor paul ritter, who was best known for his role in friday night dinner on channel four, has died of a brain tumour at the age of 5a. he played martin goodman in the popular comedy. he also appeared in the drama, chernobyl, and the films harry potter and the half—blood prince, and quantum of solace. his family said he died peacefully at home with his family at his side. paying tribute, the actor stephen mangan,
8:45 pm
who had known ritter since they were students, said he had "so much talent and it shone from him even as a teenager". fellow actor sanjeev kohli described him as "one of the most versatile & brilliant actors that has ever drawn breath" — and that "if paul ritter was in something, it made it good." con o�*neill, who worked with ritter on chernobyl, said he used to sit in awe of ritter scene after scene — and that he was "one of our finest character actors." the creator of friday night dinner, robert popper said he was a deeply clever, funny, intelligent, kind man and that one of his fondest memories of him was filming the following scene. you remember when you were little, we had an argument or you weren�*t speaking? like every five seconds. i made this for you — the conversation spindle. which is? first you give the thing a spin, then it lands on a number from one to ten. four.
8:46 pm
then four is bridges. and then we have a conversation about bridges. bridges? or if it lands on a different number, there is, my family, capital cities, horses. fascinating subjects. go on, adam. you have a spin. 0k. number six. the future of space travel. the future of space travel? now you talk about the future of space travel. seriously? i will help you. adam, what do you think... ..is the future of space travel? i have no idea. i know that. we�*re just having a conversation. 0k. the futre, we will be living on the moon. rubbish. all right, i will only... how are you going to fly 7 billion bloody people, even more if in the future, to the
8:47 pm
bloody moon? idiot. oh, i rememberthis game now. what about all the stuff you would have to bring up there? honestly. the food, the building material. where will we get bleeding water from? all right, dad. living on the moon. you need to get that head of yours out your backside and get real. and we can speak now to one of paul ritter�*s friday night dinner co—stars, tom rosenthal. we saw in that sketch. thank you for joining us. extraordinarily young, and funny, and gifted, how do you remember him?— and funny, and gifted, how do you remember him? well, to be honest, it was 'ust remember him? well, to be honest, it wasjust so dedicated _ remember him? well, to be honest, it wasjust so dedicated to _ remember him? well, to be honest, it wasjust so dedicated to acting. - remember him? well, to be honest, it wasjust so dedicated to acting. i - was just so dedicated to acting. i remember i asked him once whether he treats comedy roles any different from his trauma roles and he said he didn�*t. he did a similar all the way he all the way through chernobyl. he
8:48 pm
was there an incredibly serious person, which is remarkable considering the fact that he created this comic character which is so beloved and i think people often like shot his catchphrases in the street and they think that their dads are like him. but as people have said, the guy was just remarkably intelligent and that is what translated, unbelievable acting talent, he could be a comedian and do so many things. b5 talent, he could be a comedian and do so many things.— do so many things. as an older erson do so many things. as an older person myself. _ do so many things. as an older person myself, i— do so many things. as an older person myself, i understand i do so many things. as an older i person myself, i understand some do so many things. as an older - person myself, i understand some of the traits, when you are watching him doing these things. what was he like? you are a younger actor compared to him. he is very much or was the driving force in that series, but did that come across in the way that he acted with the rest of you? the way that he acted with the rest of ou? ., ., , , the way that he acted with the rest of ou? ., , ., of you? that “0b is so not make me and simon — of you? that job is so not make me and simon played _ of you? that job is so not make me and simon played the _ of you? that job is so not make me and simon played the brothers. - of you? that job is so not make me and simon played the brothers. we have two or three lines is seen and we always got our lines wrong and he
8:49 pm
will come in and barely ever make mistakes without he was so dedicated and professional. and it really gracious to me. it was my firstjob and always made me feel very welcome and always made me feel very welcome and whilst his talent was extremely intimidating at the person he really wasn�*t but his intellect was intimidating. he was the best crossword puzzle or i ever met. he had an incredible memory from facts and people and he really cared deeply for people and remember every little thing about everybody on the crew in a way that always come it is a real, something to aim for. remembering every single person a to something. and i�*ll always be very grateful having to work with them. he was a straight actor as well, being a film. awarded, nominated for an olivier and a tony. he had quite an olivier and a tony. he had quite a career. he
8:50 pm
an olivier and a tony. he had quite a career. . . an olivier and a tony. he had quite a career. ., ., ., , a career. he had a remarkable career. perhaps _ a career. he had a remarkable career. perhaps he _ a career. he had a remarkable career. perhaps he only - a career. he had a remarkable career. perhaps he only got i career. perhaps he only got recognition in the later stages of his career but he deserved it. again, he was in the chernobyl show, which won so many awards and he was the star turning that and you can�*t really do not make he holds it all together. as you say, it is an amazing gift to, what he did in that show is something some ridiculous but so real, it is an amazing performance and a testament to how great an actor he was. a really bizarre day. ifeel great an actor he was. a really bizarre day. i feel everybody�*s grief. bizarre day. i feel everybody's arief. , bizarre day. i feel everybody's .rief. , ~ ., bizarre day. i feel everybody's arief. , ~ ., grief. did you know he was ill? aaain a grief. did you know he was ill? again a testament _ grief. did you know he was ill? again a testament to - grief. did you know he was ill? again a testament to the i grief. did you know he was ill? j again a testament to the man, grief. did you know he was ill? i again a testament to the man, the last year on tv come he was having headaches. it would just take paracetamol and get on with it. and
8:51 pm
a few months later, they got more serious and he went to the hospital but he was very private. he didn�*t want to tell us. we only found out recently on the ten year anniversary documentary. when that goes out, the fans will be able to see me and he looks different. the medical treatment took a toll on his body but under that point he didn�*t want us to said no and didn�*t want to buy the rest. he was an amazing person who is genuinely private. he never wanted to be a burden. and then formulating comedy he had to do. he just never complain. —— the humiliating comedy. an ultimate professional and hilarious. there he isjust gone too professional and hilarious. there he is just gone too soon and is very sad. isjust gone too soon and is very sad. �* , .., . ., ~ sad. i've seen the catch one. and the fossil one. _ sad. i've seen the catch one. and the fossil one. -- _ sad. i've seen the catch one. and the fossil one. -- the _ sad. i've seen the catch one. and the fossil one. -- the ketchup i sad. i've seen the catch one. and i the fossil one. -- the ketchup one. the fossil one. —— the ketchup one. what was come if you had to think of
8:52 pm
one single what would it be? laughter. to be honest, it was him he tried to come a one time, they show was stupid, i walked in the door and he got scared and he tried to hit me and i ducked and he had his hand on the wall and that is the constant think he is constantly going through, going to physical pain for the show. he smacked his hand so hard and it is so funny... don�*t tell me what he said. i�*ve seen that one as well. you don't tell me what he said. i've seen that one as well.- seen that one as well. you can imagine- _ seen that one as well. you can imagine. there _ seen that one as well. you can imagine. there he _ seen that one as well. you can imagine. there he said - seen that one as well. you can imagine. there he said news. | seen that one as well. you can i imagine. there he said news. the death of paul _ imagine. there he said news. the death of paul ritter— imagine. there he said news. the death of paul ritter at _ imagine. there he said news. the death of paul ritter at the - imagine. there he said news. the death of paul ritter at the age i imagine. there he said news. the death of paul ritter at the age of| death of paul ritter at the age of 54. tom, thank you for coming on to talk about him. now, it�*s hard to find an upside to the pandemic but one unexpected benefit of lockdown has been some truly stunning views of the night sky. according to new research from a countryside charity it�*s because levels of light pollution
8:53 pm
fell dramatically during the pandemic. as our chief environment correspondent, justin rowlatt reports, light pollution can affect human health and wildlife by disturbing biological cycles and behaviours. this is what a truly dark sky looks like. billions of stars wheel above the kielder observatory in northumberland. set deep in a forest, the observatory enjoys the darkest skies in england. and, throughout lockdown, senior astronomer dan monk has been filming the incredible views. people often do get emotional when they sit underneath this amazing dark sky and they realise how small they are in the universe. it can actually make people cry, at times. it�*s estimated 85% of us have never seen a truly dark sky. it means we are missing out because — it gives us a sense of our place in the universe, the awesome vastness of space.
8:54 pm
but look at this. even a tiny light is enough to extinguish the stars and bring us right back down to earth. the reduction in light pollution this year is an exception. satellite images show the night sky has been getting steadily lighter across the world. changes in light have been linked with obesity, heart disease, depression and even cancer. you see, she's shaking? and some animals suffer even more profoundly. there are such a range of animals which are negatively impacted from this. when you think of our migrating birds, for instance, which are drawn off course by lights. insects, vast numbers of moths drawn to those lights, where they batter themselves to death or where they are predated by bats which change their behaviour to visit those lights, perhaps to their advantage, but to the deficit of other species of bats.
8:55 pm
so all of this is happening out there in our night. so what can be done? the good news is we can tackle light pollution relatively easily. small measures like businesses making sure they are turning their lights off at night time when the buildings aren't in use. also, local government making sure that street lamps are properly shaded and the lights targeted, so it is not spilling out there and creating unnecessary light blight. that will mean more of us can see sights like this. justin rowlatt, bbc news, northumberland. not sure how clear the net will be the next few days. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with tomasz. —— these guys. well, after a cold day comes a cold evening and a frosty night, but here�*s the good news. over the next two or three days, it is actually going to turn a little less cold — not mild by any means. in fact, the temperatures will remain below the average for the remainder of the week and into the weekend,
8:56 pm
but at least we�*re going to lose that biting arctic wind. you can see the wind here just from the motion of the clouds. you can see the satellite picture looping here, the clouds moving in roughly from the north, due south, so that�*s where our weather�*s been coming from — sleet, snow showers, rain showers in places, too, and that gusty wind. but this is what it looks like through this evening and overnight, largely clear across most of the uk, and the winds are dying down too. in fact, that current of cold air is slipping out into the north sea. —1 or —2 very early on wednesday morning in the south. could be as low as —4 or —5 in the glens of scotland. so, wednesday is looking something like this — lots of sunshine around in the morning, sparkling and crisp, the winds will be lighter. you�*ll notice that. then in the afternoon, the weather changes. the winds shift, we will get this westerly breeze which is going to waft in some cloud, so it will end up being an overcast afternoon for some of us on wednesday. still chilly — 4, 5, 6 celsius. now, wednesday evening, we start to see a real change
8:57 pm
in the northwest here. in fact, the winds are coming off the atlantic — in fact, more out of the southwest — so that means that by early on thursday morning, we�*re generally frost—free. the weather has changed by then. no longer do we have the arctic winds from the north. and the reason for it is this weatherfront, which is sweeping to the north of us. you can see the wind arrows here blowing out of the southwest, so some outbreaks of rain and fairly cloudy weather across, broadly, the northwest of the uk on thursday. there�*s some sunshine and you�*ll definitely notice milder conditions in the south of the uk — temperatures of around 11 degrees, for example, in birmingham and in london. now, this slightly milder weather will only be temporary, because once this weather front clears through, we open up the doors to another blast, a resurgence, of colder air from the arctic. so, yes, it temporarily turns a little bit milder through thursday and friday, and then come the weekend, it looks as though it�*s going to turn a bit colder again.
8:58 pm
8:59 pm
9:00 pm
this is bbc news. vaccine passports — luv �*em or hate �*em, people are talking about �*em. here in the us, the pushback has been fierce. while here in the uk, there�*s more of a divide — and not always the way you�*d think. the biden adminstration has pretty much dismissed the idea of vaccine passports and some states have gone further, banning them outright. americans' privacy and rights should be protected so that these systems are not used against people unfairly. in places like israel though those passports can be your ticket to a post—pandemic lifestyle. we�*ll speak to someone enjoying the good life injerusalem — vaccine certificate in hand. also in the programme... the experts are weighing in, on day seven of the derek chauvin trial.
9:01 pm
a police trainer says the former officer was wrong to place his knee

41 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on