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tv   Lockdown  BBC News  April 4, 2021 9:30pm-10:01pm BST

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he's under house arrest. he's accused of being involved in a plot to destabilise the country. england is to trial covid passports, in a bid to allow the safe return of mass events. the fa cup final will be among the pilots. a scaled back easter sunday, although the choir was able to perform at canterbury cathedral. at the vatican, the pope called for vaccines to be shared with the world's poorest countries. and it's a double win for cambridge in both the men's and the women's boat race. now on bbc news, across the uk, covid—19 has claimed the lives of more than 126,000 people. behind each death, of course, is a very personal story of loss. 0n the one year anniversary, last month, of the first nationwide lockdown, the bbc�*s spotlight team heard
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from some of those grieving in northern ireland. a warning — the programme has some content which some may find upsetting. the way ahead is hard, and it is still true that many lives will sadly be lost.
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my name's joan fulton. i'm from newtownards. i lost my brother billy to covid—19 last year on 23rd march, and thatjust happened to be the day that borisjohnson made the official lockdown. he went to england when he was about 17 and he joined the army and after he came out of the army, he went to long—distance lorry driving, and absolutely loved it, until later on he had taken a heart attack, which left the heart quite damaged, and he then retired. and he took up a hobby after that, going to markets, buying and selling. and he... a bit like del boy, maybe. i used to call him santa claus because he'd white hair
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and a white beard. 0n the wednesday, which was the 18th of march, i took him down to island hill, and i remember sitting down at island hill. he was talking about how we used to go down there for picnics as kids, and he talked about my mum and dad and the boys and my sister, and then we headed back home. on friday morning i got a phone call from him, and he sounded afraid, and he sounded anxious. isaid to i said to him, just step into the water. he said, that beautiful,
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joan. and i said, yeah, iwill remember you like that. those were his last words to me. this is his last words to me — "hey, joan, i said a prayer for you today." i says, "did you?", and he goes, "i did." i says, "did you say a wee prayerfor you?" he says, "i did." i said, "will i see you later?" "i'll see you later." his last words. last words, "see you later." but the difference with billy'sjourney and mine, billy went to the undertakers and i got going home.
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my hope is that we learn to be a people that really look and say, "what was really important this year? "what did we really miss?" i think it's company with each other. so maybe when we get that opportunity to get together again we'll be kinder to each other, and we'll get past thinking of ourselves, and just look after each other. applause my name is noeleen henry. i'm from ballymena. i began working in icu when i was 28, antrim area hospital. i first remember hearing about an illness in china and i can
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remember the very day — i was doing calls, community calls, and i heard "covid," "corona," and then it literallyjust hit. the patients were admitted one after the other, the beds were filled. the only way i could describe it was hell on earth. literally, hell on earth. the patients were so, so ill, and from my experience i have never come across any other patient with any other disease that i have nursed being so sick. people literally couldn't breathe. the worst thing was whenever the doctors were telling the patients they were going to sleep, and you were trying to reassure the patients that they would wake up — most of them didn't, and you were literally their last... the last person that they'd seen,
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the last voice they heard, before they went to sleep. after the first wave came and went, there wasjust relief. we just thought, "that's it, it's gone." my name is eugene ferry. i'm from here, derry city. i lost my father to covid. he was also eugene ferry. he was aged 62. he was from the creggan estate. he was a baker most of his life. my mum, lorraine, and they got together in 1979. - and then they married in 1984. he was a big man but he was a larger—than—life character. | like, most of the photos he's in,
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he's either dressed up, - he's having a laugh with his friends — he was a bubbly sort of person. i i here in derry, everybody knew mei daddy or else me daddy knew them. people just knew him, like pubs and stuff. i like, it wasn't his job to be - an entertainer but once the singer stopped in the bar at night, like, he was always - encouraged with his singing. people just gradually brought their chairs i closer to me father. "name the song," and he would — he would give it a go. _ # falling in love with you...# i remember him — like, i the restrictions was lifting and he was, like, at 12 o'clock at night, "we're going, - we're going to the caravan." that's how he was, like a big child on christmas day, - waiting for the restrictions to lift coming into september. - everybody was enjoying being back in the pubs. | it was just after the eat 0ut - to help out, and then the r rate hit high here, and then -
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we all contracted covid. 0n the thursday morning, the 29th, he woke me mammy at 20 to six . in the morning saying, "lorraine, i don't feel too good, _ "i think i'm gonna need to go to the hospital or go - to the doctors." he didn't get carried out- into the ambulance, he walked in the ambulance perfectly fine. ijust struggling with his breath, i and he just turned round and said "see you later, love." they said they were moving him to icu, they needed to put himl on a hood so that it was i a constant flow of oxygen. once the hood was over his head, he felt like a lot _ of pressure being put on him, like, claustrophobic — - he felt claustrophobic with the hood on him. the last time i spoke to me dad - was the tuesday the 3rd of november. he contacted us actually, - he was sitting eating an ice pop through the hood, so he was, - he was cracking up because there was no good tv, he was missing homes under. the hammer, and then he asked me what was the results at the weekend cause i canny get _
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nothing here, sort of cracking up a bit in terms of he couldn't get no normal tv, what he was used - to doing. there's a scene in- armageddon at the end of the movie wheneverl the daughter and father speak to each other via a video call, that's how i said - goodbye to me father. he wasn't responding, _ he was on a ventilator, he was tubed up and we were speaking to him. me sister actually sung two songs to him then we were told - that he'sjust passed. i go to his grave every day and have a conversation, though, just - "thanks for everything," - and it's mad because the day that i had my first everjob interview, i wasn't going to go he came up. and got me out of bed, just wee small things, i like thanks for, - thanks for getting me out of bed that day, - and thanks for everything basically, growing up.
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my my name is julie, my name isjulie, originally from the 0lympians but now i in northern ireland. i lost my mum in october 2020. -- ireland. i lost my mum in october 2020. —— originally from the philippines. she is a mother of three beautiful girls. my philippines. she is a mother of three beautiful girls.— philippines. she is a mother of three beautiful girls. my name is brendan, three beautiful girls. my name is brendan. i'm _ three beautiful girls. my name is brendan, i'm from _ three beautiful girls. my name is brendan, i'm from belfast. - three beautiful girls. my name is brendan, i'm from belfast. i- three beautiful girls. my name is brendan, i'm from belfast. i was brendan, i'm from belfast. iwas emma's— brendan, i'm from belfast. iwas emma's partner. my brendan, i'm from belfast. i was emma's partner.— brendan, i'm from belfast. i was emma's partner. brendan, i'm from belfast. i was emma's artner. g . , , ., , emma's partner. my mum was 57 years old when she _ emma's partner. my mum was 57 years old when she passed _ emma's partner. my mum was 57 years old when she passed and _ emma's partner. my mum was 57 years old when she passed and things - emma's partner. my mum was 57 years old when she passed and things i - old when she passed and things i would remember are definitely her signature smile. itjust melt your heart. signature smile. it 'ust melt your heart. ~ . , signature smile. it 'ust melt your heart. ~ ., , ., signature smile. it 'ust melt your heart. ., , ., , ., , heart. we had 'ust over ten years to . ether. heart. we had 'ust over ten years together. i — heart. we had just over ten years together. i loved _ heart. we had just over ten years together. i loved every _ heart. we had just over ten years together. i loved every minute i heart. we had just over ten years together. i loved every minute ofj together. i loved every minute of it. together. i loved every minute of it she _ together. i loved every minute of it she was— together. i loved every minute of it. she was loving person. i loved
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her to— it. she was loving person. i loved her to bits — it. she was loving person. i loved her to bits i_ it. she was loving person. i loved her to bits. i loved her to bits. my mum is her to bits. i loved her to bits. ij�*i mum is originally her to bits. i loved her to bits. m mum is originally from her to bits. i loved her to bits. m1 mum is originally from the philippines and from as young as i can remember, she said to me that i born as a nurse. for her, nursing is not a job, it is her passion. she is so, like, proud to wear uniform. i remember her saying that, oh, one of my dreams is by the age of 40, i will be working as a nurse and in a different country, wherever that may be. so she actually arrived in county tyrone in 2002 and then moved to the city hospital.
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my my mum got a kidney transplant in july 2020. we got a phone call from the hospital and told us that the operation would happen within 24 hours and we were just so overjoyed for her. i kidney transplant is a gift of life, so that is how she referred to it. she said she was going to have the gift of life. she was telling brendan we're going go travelling! was telling brendan we're going go travellin! ., was telling brendan we're going go travellin! . ., was telling brendan we're going go travelling!_ thank | travelling! travel the world. thank ou for travelling! travel the world. thank you forthinking — travelling! travel the world. thank you for thinking of _ travelling! travel the world. thank you for thinking of me, _ travelling! travel the world. thank you for thinking of me, thank - travelling! travel the world. thank you for thinking of me, thank you | you for thinking of me, thank you for your— you for thinking of me, thank you for your prayers _ you for thinking of me, thank you for your prayers and _ you for thinking of me, thank you for your prayers and thoughts. it| you for thinking of me, thank you. for your prayers and thoughts. it is amazing _ for your prayers and thoughts. it is amazing 0" — for your prayers and thoughts. it is amazin. ' , ., for your prayers and thoughts. it is amazin. q ., . .,, for your prayers and thoughts. it is amazin. q ., . amazing. on the 1st of october, both of us were not _ amazing. on the 1st of october, both of us were not feeling _ amazing. on the 1st of october, both of us were not feeling well— amazing. on the 1st of october, both of us were not feeling well and - amazing. on the 1st of october, both | of us were not feeling well and emma said, of us were not feeling well and emma said. we _ of us were not feeling well and emma said. we will— of us were not feeling well and emma said, we will go down and get checked — said, we will go down and get checked in and were both positive. and they— checked in and were both positive. and they came to me that night, not necesserily—
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and they came to me that night, not necessarily for me, but one of the two of— necessarily for me, but one of the two of us — necessarily for me, but one of the two of us. she insisted that i get in the _ two of us. she insisted that i get in the ambulance first and that is her being — in the ambulance first and that is her being a — in the ambulance first and that is her being a nurse. sol in the ambulance first and that is her being a nurse. so i got in the ambulance — her being a nurse. so i got in the ambulance. and that is the last time i saw— ambulance. and that is the last time i saw emma — ambulance. and that is the last time i saw emma. alive.— i saw emma. alive. friday the 9th of october. _ i saw emma. alive. friday the 9th of october, had _ i saw emma. alive. friday the 9th of october, had to _ i saw emma. alive. friday the 9th of october, had to put - i saw emma. alive. friday the 9th of october, had to put her i i saw emma. alive. friday thej 9th of october, had to put her on the normal oxygen and so, the next day, when she said to me that she is really exhausted, she was saying to me, like, iwill do my really exhausted, she was saying to me, like, i will do my best to fight, but i can't fight this. imiss i miss everything about her. we had
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great _ i miss everything about her. we had great plans— i miss everything about her. we had great plans to get married. i miss her food — great plans to get married. i miss her food too. i miss her food! and believe _ her food too. i miss her food! and believe me. — her food too. i miss her food! and believe me, i myself and wouldn't fancy— believe me, i myself and wouldn't fancy it _ believe me, i myself and wouldn't fan it. . , , fancy it. the hardest thing this ast few fancy it. the hardest thing this past few months _ fancy it. the hardest thing this past few months is _ fancy it. the hardest thing this past few months is to - fancy it. the hardest thing this past few months is to watch i fancy it. the hardest thing this | past few months is to watch my fancy it. the hardest thing this i past few months is to watch my son looking at all of the photos, kissing them and him missing my mum because they have built such an amazing bond. a few days ago, he heard my mum's voice and he was so excited and he saw that that voice was coming from my mum's phone and he put his hand on my lap. he looked at me and i burst into tiers. that is one of the things i'm finding
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really, really difficult this past few months. my name is fatherjames 0'reilly and i my name is fatherjames 0'reilly and l have _ my name is fatherjames 0'reilly and l have been— my name is fatherjames 0'reilly and i have been a priest coming up on five years — i have been a priest coming up on five years. when covid—19 hit, there was a _ five years. when covid—19 hit, there was a lot— five years. when covid—19 hit, there was a lot of— five years. when covid—19 hit, there was a lot of fear and confusion, and initially, _ was a lot of fear and confusion, and initially, it— was a lot of fear and confusion, and initially, it seemed to be that nurses— initially, it seemed to be that nurses and doctors will go into the patients _ nurses and doctors will go into the patients, but that is it, no one else — patients, but that is it, no one else. things changed probably in mid april _ else. things changed probably in mid april. father felix was the first patient — april. father felix was the first patient i — april. father felix was the first patient i attended to with covid—19. iron hunted him with the last great and he _ iron hunted him with the last great and he went to the lord —— i anointed _ and he went to the lord —— i anointed him. there was something spiritual— anointed him. there was something spiritual and symbolic in that moment— spiritual and symbolic in that moment that i on the ministry that he had _
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moment that i on the ministry that he had run — moment that i on the ministry that he had run for so long. little by little. _ he had run for so long. little by little. as— he had run for so long. little by little, as the pandemic increased, before _ little, as the pandemic increased, before i_ little, as the pandemic increased, before i knew it, i was coming little, as the pandemic increased, before i knew it, iwas coming in and out — before i knew it, iwas coming in and out of— before i knew it, iwas coming in and out of the hospital three and four times — and out of the hospital three and four times a day. seven days a week. emotionally. — four times a day. seven days a week. emotionally, it is incredibly challenging and patients who have been administered the last right, who have — been administered the last right, who have subsequently onto the lord, is easily— who have subsequently onto the lord, is easily in _ who have subsequently onto the lord, is easily in the hundreds. i have had moments, at those times where i 'ust had moments, at those times where i just needed _ had moments, at those times where i just needed to have a good cry. and ithink— just needed to have a good cry. and i think i_ just needed to have a good cry. and i think iiust — just needed to have a good cry. and i think ijust felt like i couldn't cope _ i think ijust felt like i couldn't cope any— i think ijust felt like i couldn't cope any more. it doesn't mean you are weak _ cope any more. it doesn't mean you are weak, but you are human. when i think— are weak, but you are human. when i think of— are weak, but you are human. when i think of the _ are weak, but you are human. when i think of the last year, part of me is wondering, why? why is god allowing — is wondering, why? why is god allowing this to happen? but i am also incredibly thankful because i
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believe _ also incredibly thankful because i believe that there is always hope. i have seen— believe that there is always hope. i have seen hope in the lives and actions — have seen hope in the lives and actions of— have seen hope in the lives and actions of the nurses and doctors in the hospital, the care workers, health— the hospital, the care workers, health care assistants. i will never lose the _ health care assistants. i will never lose the hope i have seen in those people _ lose the hope i have seen in those people i_ lose the hope i have seen in those people i have encountered over the last year~ _ covid has wrecked me professionally and personally. i lost my husband, alan, covid. he was 63. he passed away on the 6th of january this year. allen was from colin maggie ——
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a manager of pubs all his life, so he was a very sociable man. we met when i was a student nurse just on a normal night out, as student nurses did back then. he was slightly older than me, and i thought, no, i need somebody my own age. but he wooed me, wine and dined me and we were togetherfor me, wine and dined me and we were together for 29 me, wine and dined me and we were togetherfor 29 years. we have me, wine and dined me and we were together for 29 years. we have three lovely kids. he loved man united, much to my disgust. and on top of that, then, wejust loved our holidays. i got to speak to him a couple of times, but then he phoned and said the doctors were going to put the tube down his throat and his last
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words to me, look after the family. even at that stage, i thought, he will be ok, he will be fine. so, from the 1st ofjanuary will be ok, he will be fine. so, from the 1st of january then, to the sixth, i sat with alan, but unfortunately, from about the fourth, his condition deteriorated. fatherjames, such a gracious man in such a lovely person, came in and anointed allen and, although our new nothing about it, it settled me and gave me great hope. it nothing about it, it settled me and gave me great hope.— gave me great hope. it was 'ust awful because i gave me great hope. it was 'ust awful because here i gave me great hope. it was 'ust awful because here was i gave me great hope. it was 'ust awful because here was a i gave me great hope. it wasjust i awful because here was a woman, an incredible _ awful because here was a woman, an incredible woman, who has served and fought— incredible woman, who has served and fought this _ incredible woman, who has served and fought this thing so faithfully and now she — fought this thing so faithfully and now she was on the receiving end, so to speak _ now she was on the receiving end, so to speak it— now she was on the receiving end, so to speak. it was really tough. my
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to speak. it was really tough. grandson, to speak. it was really tough. m1 grandson, jack, is nine. he has down syndrome. jack is nonverbal, but he has a few words and you just every now and again, where granddad? so he hasn't really got a grasp of it yet. they were like two peas in a pod. they were like two peas in a pod. they went everywhere together. so how, for an annual child with special needs, how do they understand that? —— nine—year—old child. the impact on me isjust emptiness. i have been told i have to try and find a new normal, but i don't want to find a new normal. i was quite happy with my normal that i had. the kids still live with me, so i have great destruction, but the
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problem is, whenever they go to their beds and i am left at night, their beds and i am left at night, the space allen will have sat on. —— great distraction. i the space allen will have sat on. -- great distraction.— great distraction. i am robert mooney and _ great distraction. i am robert mooney and i'm _ great distraction. i am robert mooney and i'm from - great distraction. i am robert mooney and i'm from north l great distraction. i am robert i mooney and i'm from north belfast. great distraction. i am robert - mooney and i'm from north belfast. i was married — mooney and i'm from north belfast. i was married to lucy and she was 41 and passed — was married to lucy and she was 41 and passed away on february 22 2021. we have _ and passed away on february 22 2021. we have four children together. me and lisa, _ we have four children together. me and lisa, who met in 1994. basically. _ and lisa, who met in 1994. basically, teenagers. iwas and lisa, who met in 1994. basically, teenagers. i was walking home _ basically, teenagers. i was walking home with — basically, teenagers. i was walking home with my cousin one night, lisa approached — home with my cousin one night, lisa approached me and says, you have beautifui— approached me and says, you have beautiful eyes, i will work with you. _ beautiful eyes, i will work with you. so— beautiful eyes, i will work with you, so she started linking me. i says. _ you, so she started linking me. i says. thank— you, so she started linking me. i says, thank you, you have beautiful hair _ says, thank you, you have beautiful hair so— says, thank you, you have beautiful hair so we — says, thank you, you have beautiful hair. so we kept talking. i was only 15, never— hair. so we kept talking. i was only 15, never had — hair. so we kept talking. i was only 15, never had a girlfriend before,
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but i _ 15, never had a girlfriend before, but iiust— 15, never had a girlfriend before, but ijust grasp onto lisa and from there _ but ijust grasp onto lisa and from there on— but ijust grasp onto lisa and from there on in. — but ijust grasp onto lisa and from there on in, we were childhood sweethearts. i'mjust there on in, we were childhood sweethearts. i'm just happy that i have _ sweethearts. i'm just happy that i have so— sweethearts. i'm just happy that i have so many memories of her. almost every— have so many memories of her. almost every photo _ have so many memories of her. almost every photo of her, she has a smile and that— every photo of her, she has a smile and that is— every photo of her, she has a smile and that is lisa oliver. always happy — and that is lisa oliver. always happy and smiling, affectionate, 'ust happy and smiling, affectionate, just wanting to hold her again. —— that is— just wanting to hold her again. —— that is lisa — just wanting to hold her again. —— that is lisa all over. you can see the smite — that is lisa all over. you can see the smile and that is my lisa. i would — the smile and that is my lisa. i would give _ the smile and that is my lisa. i would give anything to do that again — would give anything to do that again. anything. icame i came home from workjust after 4pm
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on wednesday the 17th of february. she had _ on wednesday the 17th of february. she had a _ on wednesday the 17th of february. she had a temperature of 39. and that was— she had a temperature of 39. and that was a — she had a temperature of 39. and that was a red flag right away to me, having had it myself back in novemher— me, having had it myself back in november ijust knew she added. the next morning, her birthday, february 18, the _ next morning, her birthday, february 18, the positive test came back. i didn't— 18, the positive test came back. i didn't think— 18, the positive test came back. i didn't think of sending her to hospital— didn't think of sending her to hospital because her breathing was fine, and _ hospital because her breathing was fine, and there were no signs she was in _ fine, and there were no signs she was in immediate danger. on the monday— was in immediate danger. on the monday morning, i walked in and she was~~~ _ monday morning, i walked in and she was~~~ i_ monday morning, i walked in and she was~~~ i knew— monday morning, i walked in and she was... i knew she was gone. the 999 people _ was... i knew she was gone. the 999 people were — was... i knew she was gone. the 999 people were on the phone telling me what to— people were on the phone telling me what to do. _ people were on the phone telling me what to do, to give any chance, i had to— what to do, to give any chance, i had to do— what to do, to give any chance, i had to do cpr on her. even though i knew— had to do cpr on her. even though i knew she _ had to do cpr on her. even though i knew she was gone, i continued for about— knew she was gone, i continued for
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about five _ knew she was gone, i continued for about five minutes. until the ambulance came. then the paramedic came _ ambulance came. then the paramedic came into _ ambulance came. then the paramedic came into the room and he just said, look, _ came into the room and he just said, look. l'm _ came into the room and he just said, look. l'm hot— came into the room and he just said, look, i'm not even going to do anything. _ look, i'm not even going to do anything, son. she is gone. she has treen— anything, son. she is gone. she has been gone _ anything, son. she is gone. she has been gone a — anything, son. she is gone. she has been gone a while. thursday came, 12 days after— been gone a while. thursday came, 12 days after we — been gone a while. thursday came, 12 days after we laid her to rest at the funeral, it came to quick, to be honest. _ the funeral, it came to quick, to be honest. but— the funeral, it came to quick, to be honest, but the kids were given four weeks _ honest, but the kids were given four weeks hearts with their mum's ashes in them _ weeks hearts with their mum's ashes in them she — weeks hearts with their mum's ashes in them. she loved pink and butterflies, so they were just perfect _ butterflies, so they were just perfect. they will keep them for the rest of— perfect. they will keep them for the rest of their life. their mum will always— rest of their life. their mum will always be — rest of their life. their mum will always be with them. and i'm going
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to miss _ always be with them. and i'm going to miss her— always be with them. and i'm going to miss her being a mum to our four boys _ to miss her being a mum to our four boys she— to miss her being a mum to our four boys she did— to miss her being a mum to our four boys. she did all the hard work and our four— boys. she did all the hard work and our four boys are our liam mccarron legacy— our four boys are our liam mccarron legacy and _ our four boys are our liam mccarron legacy and that will get me through life without her. my priority is those — life without her. my priority is those boys. —— those boys are her legacy~ _ those boys. —— those boys are her legacy~ that — those boys. —— those boys are her legacy. that is myjourney now going forward _ good evening.
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for most of us, easter sunday has brought sunshine and temperatures for some as high as 17 degrees. but if you're in the north of the uk, you will know the weather has been changing. that was the scene in shetland earlier on, with snow showers and very cold air, and that cold air is going to dig its way all the way southwards through tonight and into tomorrow. so, the start of the new week, some cold days and frosty nights in store. there will be snow showers quite widely, and blizzard conditions across northern scotland, the snow really packing in here as we head through the night. cold air coming in behind this cold front, bringing a band of cloud and patchy rain. in southern areas overnight, temperature staying above freezing but in the northern half of the uk, very cold indeed, —8 in parts of scotland, where it will be snowing in parts in the morning, especially in the north. a band of patchy rain will tend to break up and push
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southward but behind that, all of us getting the cold conditions with a mixture sunshine and showers. showers down the eastern coast, into northern ireland and perhaps wales and the south west as well, blown in on strong winds, particularly in northern scotland, gusts up to 70mph. so while the thermometer may read between three and nine degrees, it will feel subzero for some, —4 the feels—like temperature in aberdeen, and the snow keeps coming across northern scotland. some really poor travelling conditions here. monday night, widely it will be cold with a frost for most places and then getting into tuesday, another day of sunny spells and showers, most of the showers falling as snow or perhaps hail in places. mainly across coastal areas, though some developing inland in parts of england and wales through the afternoon. another cold—feeling day but a subtle change on the way as we head into the middle part of the week, courtesy of this frontal system developing out west. it is a warm front, bringing cloud
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and patchy rain but also something a little less cold. no heatwave, but those temperatures will climb a little through the middle part of the week, double digits towards the south, but in northern areas, friday will turn cold again.
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england is to trial covid passports, in a bid to allow the safe return of mass events and nightclubs. one pilot is the fa cup final. you'll need to show you've had a jab, a negative test, or have covid antibodies. not everyone is on—side. there is the thing about having your liberties taken away, which is really quite worrying. how do you make people safe and feel reassured, and how do you make sure we still have that freedom? we'll be asking what further details we can expect from borisjohnson's announcement tomorrow. also tonight: a socially—distanced choir at canterbury cathedral, as the archbishop calls for a better future for all, in the easter service. a political crisis injordan —
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the king's half—brother says

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