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tv   The Papers  BBC News  April 2, 2021 11:30pm-12:01am BST

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this is bbc world news. our main headlines. police guarding the us capitol building in washington have shot a man dead after he ran over two police officers, killing one of them. no motive for the man's actions has yet been given. the trial of former minneapolis police officer derek chauvin, accused of killing george floyd, has continued for a fifth day. a senior police officer who attended the scene said he had never been trained to kneel on someone�*s neck. more than 50 people are thought to have died when a high speed passenger train came off the rails in taiwan. eyewitnesses have suggested it hit a construction vehicle which had slipped into its path. the indian cricket star sachin tendulkar has been admitted to hospital, after suffering from coronavirus for more than a week. he tweeted that he had been admitted as a matter of precaution.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are jason beattie of the daily mirror and sian griffiths of the sunday times. welcome back to you both. tomorrow's front pages starting with a story from the daily telegraph. it says vaccinated britons would avoid covid tests and quarantine, under government plans to allow foreign summer holidays. it's also one of a number of papers to publish a picture of the queen, with her son and heir to the throne, prince charles. the daily mirror says the easing of lockdown rules has sparked a massive boost in staycation holidays in the uk. the guardian carries a warning that patients could be waiting up to two
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years for vital operations by the time of the next election, due to what's been described as a "truly frightening" backlog of care, caused by the pandemic. the times reports a pledge from the head of nhs england, that the successful vaccination programme will be used as a "blueprint for the future" of the health service. the daily express says that care home residents will soon be reunited with their families in a proposed easing of the visiting restrictions. according to the daily mail, a new political memoir by alan duncan, borisjohnson�*s deputy when he was foreign secretary, reveals vicious tory infighting. and the financial times says an independent scotland would inherit a large hole in its public finances because lower than expected tax revenues, brexit and coronavirus have increased the country's budget deficit. so, let's begin.
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a lot of papers that we have already and once again our big thanks to our guests jason and sian. just the daily telegraph carrying the story of what has been happening in washington, the attack on the us capitol building. but not many of the papers have been on the front pages but let's start jason this time with you and we will focus in on the daily telegraph and most of the pages have the picture of the queen but let's talk about the foreign holidays for the vaccinated, a traffic light system, i would try to get the traffic covers right the last time around, i failed in the last time around, i failed in the last hour, bread, amberand last time around, i failed in the last hour, bread, amber and green, talk potentially about what we will be hearing about on monday this traffic light plan in terms of people who have been vaccinated and the potential of going on holiday. —— the colour red. the potential of going on holiday. -- the colour red.— the potential of going on holiday. -- the colour red. boris johnson has auoin to -- the colour red. boris johnson has going to do — -- the colour red. boris johnson has going to do this _ -- the colour red. boris johnson has going to do this press _ -- the colour red. boris johnson has going to do this press conference i -- the colour red. boris johnson has going to do this press conference on monday— going to do this press conference on monday sending out the plans to
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hopefully allow international travel and so _ hopefully allow international travel and so people could go on summer holiday _ and so people could go on summer holiday. and this will depend on a number_ holiday. and this will depend on a number of— holiday. and this will depend on a number of factors. one of the things they are _ number of factors. one of the things they are looking at is if you have had both— they are looking at is if you have had both of yourjabs and therefore you have _ had both of yourjabs and therefore you have up to 95% protection, then you have up to 95% protection, then you will_ you have up to 95% protection, then you will be _ you have up to 95% protection, then you will be able to go abroad and it will depend a lot on pursue precocity and what other countries have in _ precocity and what other countries have in place themselves and the level_ have in place themselves and the level and — have in place themselves and the level and affection in those companies. and then you can go withoui— companies. and then you can go without having to quarantine on your return _ without having to quarantine on your return -- _ without having to quarantine on your return. —— reciprocity. you have to quarantine — return. —— reciprocity. you have to quarantine at _ return. —— reciprocity. you have to quarantine at home if you are from one of— quarantine at home if you are from one of the — quarantine at home if you are from one of the red list countries you had to— one of the red list countries you had to stay— one of the red list countries you had to stay in hotels the cost you if upwards — had to stay in hotels the cost you if upwards of 1700 plus pounds. this is potentially good news but it will depend _ is potentially good news but it will depend on what is actually happening in the _ depend on what is actually happening in the countries you want to go to, some _ in the countries you want to go to, some countries such as croatia and greece _ some countries such as croatia and
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greece have — some countries such as croatia and greece have said they are looking to welcome _ greece have said they are looking to welcome travellers who have been vaccinated. but there will be issues in terms _ vaccinated. but there will be issues in terms of— vaccinated. but there will be issues in terms of what is slightly discriminatory if you have not had a vaccine _ discriminatory if you have not had a vaccine for — discriminatory if you have not had a vaccine for people who want holidays, you have young children or you have _ holidays, you have young children or you have teenagers or something and your children are in their 20s, it could _ your children are in their 20s, it could he — your children are in their 20s, it could be problematic. that is a really— could be problematic. that is a really good point actually. the devil in the — really good point actually. tie: devil in the detail really good point actually. he devil in the detail as really good point actually. tt9 devil in the detail as usual with these things is the wording that we have here in the telegraph sian is that the government says the plantings are fluid, so what we are seeing here and what we can hear on monday could potentially change. —— the planning that we are hearing about. at the countries listed in terms of the green light countries could be as few as 12. yes terms of the green light countries could be as few as 12.— terms of the green light countries could be as few as 12. yes and not all of them _ could be as few as 12. yes and not all of them in _ could be as few as 12. yes and not all of them in europe. _ could be as few as 12. yes and not all of them in europe. because - could be as few as 12. yes and not all of them in europe. because we are seeing this third wave of
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infection of covid infections sweeping through europe now. but i think the thing that is very interesting is again this idea that we will have possible vaccination certificates for travel. and a lot of people are very unhappy about that because as jason said, this idea of discrimination and if you can't have the jab at because of health reasons or allergies or whatever, what does that mean? you can't have a certification, does that mean you can't go abroad or do you absolutely have to quarantine and paid these very high costs to stay in a hotel? it's complicated but borisjohnson seems quite clear, the quote here in this story, there is definitely going to be a world in which international travel will use vaccine passports. it does look at though —— as though many countries
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now are discussing bringing in this as a way of opening up their economies and opening up their economies and opening up their economies to terrorism. —— to tourism. economies to terrorism. -- to tourism-— economies to terrorism. -- to tourism. ~ ., ., tourism. while we are looking at the final details of— tourism. while we are looking at the final details of travelling _ tourism. while we are looking at the final details of travelling abroad, - final details of travelling abroad, your paperjason is talking about this staycation stampede, difficult to plan it going abroad so people are looking at staycation ng. i abroad so people are looking at staycation ng— staycation ng. i have had more opportunity _ staycation ng. i have had more opportunity to _ staycation ng. i have had more opportunity to look _ staycation ng. i have had more opportunity to look at - staycation ng. i have had more opportunity to look at details. l staycation ng. i have had more| opportunity to look at details. it is getting — opportunity to look at details. it is getting disney —like in cornwall, if you _ is getting disney —like in cornwall, if you are — is getting disney —like in cornwall, if you are trying to book a self catering — if you are trying to book a self catering holiday in cornwall, they are almost at 100% capacity. it goes beyond _ are almost at 100% capacity. it goes beyond self catering, a lot of campsites which you think would be -ood campsites which you think would be good option, they are getting booked up good option, they are getting booked up as well— good option, they are getting booked up as well and not just in cornwall, it is and _ up as well and not just in cornwall, it is and holiday spots across the uk. it is and holiday spots across the uk this — it is and holiday spots across the uk this is — it is and holiday spots across the uk. this is great news in terms of it will—
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uk. this is great news in terms of it will help — uk. this is great news in terms of it will help a — uk. this is great news in terms of it will help a wad of industries that have _ it will help a wad of industries that have had a tough time, the tourism — that have had a tough time, the tourism industry doing the lockdown and being _ tourism industry doing the lockdown and being forced to stay at home. you can't — and being forced to stay at home. you can't begrudge that for them, they will— you can't begrudge that for them, they will see more business in the uk but _ they will see more business in the uk but the — they will see more business in the uk but the downside is for understandable reasons a lot of these _ understandable reasons a lot of these places are putting their prices — these places are putting their prices up _ these places are putting their prices up as well. so it will not necessarily be a cheap holiday. not a chea necessarily be a cheap holiday. tint a cheap holiday and also we need the weather. this weekend already, this easter weekend and the weather is dropping miserably, sian. we need the weather but staycation ng looks like it will bump up the domestic travel industry. —— staycationing bump. travel industry. -- staycationing bum - . :, ~' , :, travel industry. -- staycationing bum - . . ~ , :, ., bump. the weather like everyone i am dreamin: bump. the weather like everyone i am dreaming on — bump. the weather like everyone i am dreaming on lying _ bump. the weather like everyone i am dreaming on lying on _ bump. the weather like everyone i am dreaming on lying on a _ bump. the weather like everyone i am dreaming on lying on a beach - bump. the weather like everyone i am dreaming on lying on a beach with - dreaming on lying on a beach with the sun beating down. i have come from one of the most beautiful parts of the uk, saint david's in west
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wales, and these are tourist hotspots. and i know that already many of the little businesses there like the little hotels and bed and breakfast places are seeing huge demand for bookings. once people can travel from england into wales and they can open up their restaurants again. there is a lot of advance bookings, prices have been put up but i'm just so glad in a way that our local businesses are getting a chance hopefully this summer to recover some of their profits and also that people willjust get to see these amazingly beautiful places that we have abandoned a little bit because we have been so spoiled with cheap foreign holidays. t am because we have been so spoiled with cheap foreign holidays.— cheap foreign holidays. i am sold, i will have to — cheap foreign holidays. i am sold, i will have to start _ cheap foreign holidays. i am sold, i will have to start googling - cheap foreign holidays. i am sold, i will have to start googling and - cheap foreign holidays. i am sold, i will have to start googling and find | will have to start googling and find out a little bit more, it sounds absolutely lovely. {30 out a little bit more, it sounds absolutely lovely.— absolutely lovely. go to pembrokeshire, - absolutely lovely. go to pembrokeshire, it's - absolutely lovely. go to - pembrokeshire, it's amazing... absolutely lovely. go to _ pembrokeshire, it's amazing... the secret place — pembrokeshire, it's amazing... t“t9 secret place that we have
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broadcasted on bbc news. moving on! let's go to the guardian because it describes it as a frightening nhs backlog and when you look at the detail of this, jason, what sir david nichols of the nhs england former chief has been saying in the back wall, it is frightening and it is very much the word.— is very much the word. yes, the statistics are _ is very much the word. yes, the statistics are quite _ is very much the word. yes, the statistics are quite grim. - is very much the word. yes, the statistics are quite grim. we - is very much the word. yes, the i statistics are quite grim. we knew it was— statistics are quite grim. we knew it was had — statistics are quite grim. we knew it was bad but the waiting lists have _ it was bad but the waiting lists have piled up during covid and pandemic. at the moment it's about 4.5 pandemic. at the moment it's about 45 million _ pandemic. at the moment it's about 4.5 million people in england waiting — 4.5 million people in england waiting for an operation or some sort of— waiting for an operation or some sort of procedure. according to this report— sort of procedure. according to this report by— sort of procedure. according to this report by the end of the year, it could _ report by the end of the year, it could he — report by the end of the year, it could he as _ report by the end of the year, it could be as high as 6.9 million, that is— could be as high as 6.9 million, that is truly— could be as high as 6.9 million, that is truly frightening. as a quotes— that is truly frightening. as a quotes sir david nicholson, this is a political— quotes sir david nicholson, this is a political problem potentially for boris _ a political problem potentially for borisjohnson who has a political problem potentially for boris johnson who has still got this hi-h boris johnson who has still got this high backlog by the time we approach
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the general election, you could see something — the general election, you could see something potentially awkward for the prime minister and you raise other— the prime minister and you raise other questions about the preparedness and the investment in the nhs _ preparedness and the investment in the nhs before the pandemic struck. but he _ the nhs before the pandemic struck. but he also cites i think an interesting problem. also a potential time for the nhs itself because — potential time for the nhs itself because it can provide a service that people can come to expect, and people _ that people can come to expect, and people could start to lose faith in and that — people could start to lose faith in and that worries me as well. and also, the and that worries me as well. and also. the report _ and that worries me as well. 9ch also, the report looks at the article looking at the number of people waiting for hospital treatment, sian. nearly 4.59 million people but they talk about a hidden waiting lists which is really worrying, people that have not diagnosed yet and don't know yet that they need help.— that they need help. that's right and so the _ that they need help. that's right and so the numbers _ that they need help. that's right and so the numbers could - that they need help. that's right and so the numbers could rise . that they need help. that's right| and so the numbers could rise to that they need help. that's right - and so the numbers could rise to 6.9 million by the end of the year which is absolutely massive. this story is interesting and such a contrast to
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that story that we were discussing earlier about in the times which wasn't so much more upbeat which quotes sir david nicholson's successors or simon stevens the current chief executive of the nhs who is very much a saying that we can learn lessons from the way we handle the coronavirus crisis especially from our hugely successful vaccination programme and we can apply that thinking that we go to the most vulnerable, the most frail, and be up by some preventative medicine early on. and we can use that to treat things like cancer and heart conditions and strokes and get the people before they get really, really sick. so while the story in the times and so upbeat, this story is very pessimistic about the future for the nhs because of these massive waiting lists and backlogs for a whole range of treatments. lt shows the way the papers go, isn't it present because the times as he was saying, sir simon stevens is
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saying the successful vaccination programme across the uk will be a blueprint for the future of the health service. while talking on vaccinations let's look at the ft, jason. astrazeneca and these blood clots, talk us through this because seven people have died and of course it is an absolute tragedy for the families of all those people. they have died from these blood clots but 18 million people have had the vaccination. it's an interesting one. , :, vaccination. it's an interesting one. ., ., ., one. yet, so the alarm about the otential one. yet, so the alarm about the potential and _ one. yet, so the alarm about the potential and we _ one. yet, so the alarm about the potential and we had _ one. yet, so the alarm about the potential and we had to - one. yet, so the alarm about the potential and we had to be - one. yet, so the alarm about the potential and we had to be very l potential and we had to be very careful— potential and we had to be very careful here, and the link between the astrazeneca jab and these blood clots was _ the astrazeneca jab and these blood clots was first raised by medical agencies — clots was first raised by medical agencies in europe. the european medical— agencies in europe. the european medical agency has repeatedly now said that _ medical agency has repeatedly now said that the jab is safe. but now we are _ said that the jab is safe. but now we are hearing for the first time
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that a _ we are hearing for the first time that a very— we are hearing for the first time that a very small number, 30 cases out of— that a very small number, 30 cases out of lot — that a very small number, 30 cases out of 18.1 million people who have had the _ out of 18.1 million people who have had the astrazeneca jab, have gone on to— had the astrazeneca jab, have gone on to develop blood clots and sadly seven _ on to develop blood clots and sadly seven have — on to develop blood clots and sadly seven have died. what they don't know— seven have died. what they don't know and — seven have died. what they don't know and this is what they are still investigating, whether this is coincidental or whether it is linked to the _ coincidental or whether it is linked to the iah — coincidental or whether it is linked to the jab. just out of interest, i think— to the jab. just out of interest, i think it's — to the jab. just out of interest, i think it's quite important to. the 3000 _ think it's quite important to. the 3000 cases of thrombosis in the uk each month, it is quite a common incident — each month, it is quite a common incident 0n— each month, it is quite a common incident. on a scale of that and as you say— incident. on a scale of that and as you say on— incident. on a scale of that and as you say on a — incident. on a scale of that and as you say on a scale of a number of people _ you say on a scale of a number of people being vaccinated, it is very, very small— people being vaccinated, it is very, very small and obviously all the authorities keep saying that the dru- authorities keep saying that the drug is— authorities keep saying that the drug is safe. authorities keep saying that the drug is safe-— authorities keep saying that the dru: is safe. ~ , . ~' drug is safe. absolutely, thank you for makin: drug is safe. absolutely, thank you for making that _ drug is safe. absolutely, thank you for making that point, _ drug is safe. absolutely, thank you for making that point, they - drug is safe. absolutely, thank you for making that point, they they i drug is safe. absolutely, thank youj for making that point, they they -- for making that point, they they —— h mra saying there is no link to the
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vaccine proven. but the psychological sian, people beginning to worry about the kind of impact... the pr around this is very difficult to manage i suppose, it is a difficult one having had the astrazeneca jab, let's put it this way, i've not had a clot. l astrazeneca jab, let's put it this way, i've not had a clot.- way, i've not had a clot. i had it in the first _ way, i've not had a clot. i had it in the first dose _ way, i've not had a clot. i had it in the first dose as _ way, i've not had a clot. i had it in the first dose as well - way, i've not had a clot. i had it in the first dose as well but - way, i've not had a clot. i had it in the first dose as well but i i in the first dose as well but i guess the worry is that people will be worrying and thinking should i have a second dose? how serious are the risks? but i think you just have to look at the figures, 30 cases of blood clots as jason said, that's one case in every 600,000 people who have received the jab and there is no causal proof either. so that's a very, very low risk. and i think that when the experts say that the benefits outweigh the risks, that does seem to be pretty clear. what i
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find strange and puzzling is these countries including france and canada and most recently germany have actually now recommended that younger people avoid the jab because of this but what clots issue. and thatjust of this but what clots issue. and that just seems to of this but what clots issue. and thatjust seems to me very strange thinking because the risks of contracting coronavirus and the consequences of that seem so much more severe than the possibility of, this very small possibly of getting a blood clot. this very small possibly of getting a blood clot-— a blood clot. exactly but it is mixed messaging _ a blood clot. exactly but it is mixed messaging that - a blood clot. exactly but it is mixed messaging that then l a blood clot. exactly but it is - mixed messaging that then creates concern amongst people, but it's a story that just isn't going away. another story in the times that isn't going away is what is happening with the former prime minister david cameron, jason. this is all very murky. so we knew thanks— this is all very murky. so we knew thanks to — this is all very murky. so we knew thanks to reported by the financial times— thanks to reported by the financial times and — thanks to reported by the financial times and the sunday times that david _ times and the sunday times that david cameron had contacted, texted
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rishi sunak— david cameron had contacted, texted rishi sunak on behalf of this company run by his former friend to try and _ company run by his former friend to try and secure some of the covid contracts — try and secure some of the covid contracts. now we learned that he also contacted a junior minister at the department of treasury. this raises _ the department of treasury. this raises all— the department of treasury. this raises all sorts of questions. we really— raises all sorts of questions. we really need to find out the full details — really need to find out the full details of this correspondence. david _ details of this correspondence. david cameron is refusing to say anything — david cameron is refusing to say anything. interestingly by using texts. _ anything. interestingly by using texts, they may not be subject to freedom — texts, they may not be subject to freedom of information act laws, so that seems— freedom of information act laws, so that seems slightly unsatisfactory and then— that seems slightly unsatisfactory and then of course if it is more than _ and then of course if it is more thaniust— and then of course if it is more thanjust the text, and then of course if it is more than just the text, there were the further— than just the text, there were the further conversations and what did the ministers who are at the moment we had _ the ministers who are at the moment we had to— the ministers who are at the moment we had to make clear have said it was referred to officials and i never — was referred to officials and i never went further beyond that, but
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we need _ never went further beyond that, but we need to— never went further beyond that, but we need to know all the details and ithink— we need to know all the details and i think the — we need to know all the details and i think the allegations keep piling up i think the allegations keep piling up but _ i think the allegations keep piling up but the clarity is still a long way to— up but the clarity is still a long way to be _ up but the clarity is still a long way to be found. the up but the clarity is still a long way to be found.— up but the clarity is still a long way to be found. the current rules, mr cameron _ way to be found. the current rules, mr cameron had _ way to be found. the current rules, mr cameron had doesn't _ way to be found. the current rules, mr cameron had doesn't appear- way to be found. the current rules, mr cameron had doesn't appear to | mr cameron had doesn't appear to have done anything wrong. but we will see what happens next in terms of the papers. the daily mail, let's bring sian on this, this is a book being serialised in the mail starting on saturday and it is a book by alan duncan, borisjohnson's deputy, and the headline speaks for itself really. yes deputy, and the headline speaks for itself reall . , , : :, deputy, and the headline speaks for itself reall . , , ~ :, :, itself really. yes it is... a lot of alliteration _ itself really. yes it is... a lot of alliteration there. _ itself really. yes it is... a lot of alliteration there. this - itself really. yes it is... a lot of alliteration there. this looks i itself really. yes it is... a lot of alliteration there. this looks a l alliteration there. this looks a ratherjolly alliteration there. this looks a rather jolly serialisation. alliteration there. this looks a ratherjolly serialisation. alan rather jolly serialisation. alan duncan ratherjolly serialisation. alan duncan as you say, this is his political memoir called in the thick of it. apparently he is one of these politicians who rates his diary every day, notes down even the
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smallest thing. and the daily mail has brought the serialisation of the book and in this first extract, duncan apparently describes the prime minister is a buffoon and says that they had a blazing row when they were both at the foreign office over a press report about diplomats treating boris as an international joke. and when mrjohnson said, "why don't they take me seriously? why don't they take me seriously? why don't just don't they take me seriously? why don'tjust domestic be seriously?" duncan apparently replied, look in the expletive mirror!" so i think apparently it looks as though this extract and this book are full of such rather full —— extract and this book are full of such ratherfull —— rather colourful stories was that there is no love lost between alan duncan and boris johnson. he was once described as borisjohnson's looper johnson. he was once described as boris johnson's looper scooper because he had to clear up boris johnson's mess so often in terms of kind of diplomatic gaffes and so on when he was at the foreign office, very close to theresa may, he
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resigned before borisjohnson became prime minister when it what does the borisjohnson was going to become prime minister. —— when it looked as though. it feels a little bit like political score settling. very interesting to read.- political score settling. very interesting to read. jason, will you be come a — interesting to read. jason, will you be come a competing _ interesting to read. jason, will you be come a competing newspaper, | interesting to read. jason, will you i be come a competing newspaper, but will you be looking forward to reading this? l will you be looking forward to reading this?— will you be looking forward to reading this? i could have been mildly entertained _ reading this? i could have been mildly entertained by _ reading this? i could have been mildly entertained by it. - reading this? i could have been mildly entertained by it. it i reading this? i could have been mildly entertained by it. it is i reading this? i could have been mildly entertained by it. it is a | mildly entertained by it. it is a slightly— mildly entertained by it. it is a slightly retrospective and it doesn't _ slightly retrospective and it doesn't seem to go much further in terms _ doesn't seem to go much further in terms of— doesn't seem to go much further in terms of the kind of ferocity of the insult _ terms of the kind of ferocity of the insult. what alan duncan said when he was _ insult. what alan duncan said when he was an— insult. what alan duncan said when he was an mp! it is less of a playground and no insight into how competent or incompetent boris johnson — competent or incompetent boris johnson was when he was foreign secretary— johnson was when he was foreign secretary which i think most people acknowledge and i was not his finest time _ acknowledge and i was not his finest time. in _ acknowledge and i was not his finest time. , :, acknowledge and i was not his finest time. i:, :,, :, acknowledge and i was not his finest time. :, time. in your opinion, jason. i wouldjust_ time. in your opinion, jason. i would just leave _ time. in your opinion, jason. i would just leave that - time. in your opinion, jason. i | would just leave that therefore supports and with the daily mirror.
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a lot of the papers have had images of the queen and her son prince charles, they have been walking having an easter stroll in the garden in windsor, an interesting take on prince philip.— take on prince philip. gorgeous hotos of take on prince philip. gorgeous photos of the — take on prince philip. gorgeous photos of the daffodils - take on prince philip. gorgeous photos of the daffodils in i take on prince philip. gorgeous photos of the daffodils in the i photos of the daffodils in the background from a very easter like photos, and the mirror is suggesting that prince philip and not prince charles will be at the queen's site on easter sunday. at a private visit to church which is very good news because it's only about two weeks ago since prince philip was discharged from hospital having spent about one month having treatment for a heart condition. so very nice news according to the mirror of course that he will be by the queen's site at easter sunday at church. at the age of 99. and the queen's site at easter sunday at church. at the age of 99.— church. at the age of 99. and jason the exclusive _ church. at the age of 99. and jason the exclusive in _ church. at the age of 99. and jason the exclusive in your— church. at the age of 99. and jason the exclusive in your paper - church. at the age of 99. and jason the exclusive in your paper so i church. at the age of 99. and jason the exclusive in your paper so you l the exclusive in your paper so you will give us all the intel. the
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ro al will give us all the intel. the royal family _ will give us all the intel. the royal family do _ will give us all the intel. the royal family do these - will give us all the intel. the royal family do these things very well, _ royal family do these things very well, don't they? this is the first time _ well, don't they? this is the first time that— well, don't they? this is the first time that families will be getting together after the lockdown restrictions have been slightly east and this— restrictions have been slightly east and this is— restrictions have been slightly east and this is a very fine example of a son and _ and this is a very fine example of a son and his — and this is a very fine example of a son and his mother enjoying themselves in the gardenjust like so many— themselves in the gardenjust like so many other families across the country _ so many other families across the country no— so many other families across the country. no mention of the relatives in america _ country. no mention of the relatives in america i— country. no mention of the relatives in america i notice.— in america i notice. let's not go there. i in america i notice. let's not go there- i had _ in america i notice. let's not go there. i had to _ in america i notice. let's not go there. i had to say _ in america i notice. let's not go there. i had to say the - in america i notice. let's not go there. i had to say the daily i there. i had to say the daily express wins the headline, one just loves a walk in the fresh air, air is an heir to the throne spelled the efforts of so well done to the express. thank you both as always, lovely to have you on this evening and good friday wishing you both a very happy easter and peaceful easter as well. as always a big thank you to our viewers as well. any comments you would like to make on social media and twitter, the hashtag is bbc papers. thanks for
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watching. hello i'm lizzie greenwood—hughes, here with your latest sports news. gloucester have been knocked—out of european rugby union's champions cup. they were beaten 27—16 by la rochelle tonight. the french side, second in their domestic league were slick and although gloucester kept up the pressure la rochelle never looked in much danger, this their second try after 22 minutes as arthur retiere squeezing over in the corner. la rochelle will play scarlets or sale in the quarterfinals. meanwhile london irish are through to the european challenge cup quarter finals after pulling off an incredible late comeback to beat cardiff blues despite playing neary half the game with 14 men. —— playing nearly half the game. in the other games, bath beat zebre and glasgow lost to montpellier. football now and championship
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leaders norwich were denied their 10th win in 11 games after preston equalised in the 95th—minute. emi buendia's first—half goalfor norwich looked like it was enough to give them yet another victory. but then deep into injury time, brad potts' deflected shot went in to make it 1—1. norwich are six points ahead of watford, who beat sheffield wednesday 1—0. so this is how it looks at the top of the championship table, a big gap between the top two and third placed swansea who've just lost to birmingham tonight. bournemouth have boosted their play off chances with a win against middlsbrough today. at the bottom, an important win for wycombe today, they beat blackburn. and birmingham's win was also huge against swansea. but defeats for rotherham and sheffield wednesday. inverness caledonian thistle are through to the third round of the scottish cup. are through to the third they beat ross county 3—1 after coming form a goal down to reach the next stage with danny mckay shrugging off defenders to score the second goal. the manager of the premier league
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leaders manchester city pep guardiola has said they're unlikely to buy a replacement striker this summer because they're all too expensive. sergio aguero will leave the club at the end of the season and guardiola has been looking at options for a new forward, but says they can't afford the asking price. a lot, lot, a lot of big chances we are not going to sign a striker for the next season, we cannot afford it. it is impossible. all the clubs are struggling financially, we are not an exception. they have played incredible in this position, young players in the academy who play. i don't what is going to happen. maybe it is going to be him, maybe, but maybe we are not going to buy any striker for the next season. now with covid restrictions still affecting super league, st helens�* stadium hosted both of today's games. a tough day for leigh as they were beaten 44—12 by warrington while castleford came through a tight match
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with leeds 18—10. alex gulrajani watched the action. the dream return to super league for leigh wasn't to be last week with a narrow defeat to wigan. and today's test against warrington proved to be another uphill battle. half an hour on of the clock and the game was effectively over as a contest. four tries including this from gareth widdop gave warrington a huge advantage at the break. and it was a gap that leigh wouldn't come close to closing. four more tries for wolves and a second one for widdop wrapped things up as they ran out 44—12 winners. leeds rhinos and castleford tigers were looking to build on opening weekend wins, and it was tiger to pressed ahead early with two tries. the second—tier coming from nile evalds. the rhinos though fought back. luke briscoe got them moving in the right direction and when matt prior went over in the second half, it became a two—point game. but cas would have enough and something a little
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bit more to come — jordan turner's third try of the season enough for them to seal victory. alex gulrajani, bbc news. the first women's major of the year, the ana inspiration in california, is looking really competitive as the second round continues. england's georgia hall is still very much in contention, in the clubhouse on 5—under after a second round of 70 which included four birdies. you can keep up to date with the very latest throughout the evening on the bbc sport website and app. finally this month's diving world cup, which was due to be staged in tokyo, has been cancelled due to covid concerns. it's less than four months until the olympics begin in the city, but swimming's world governing body fina has decided to abort the world cup there which was both a test event and final qualifer for the games, criticising the japanese government by accusing them of "not properly ensuring the safety of participants". our olympic reporter nick hope has more. tokyo olympic organisers have spoken
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very positively of late about the prospect of a problem free games this summer despite obviously the global health pandemic caused by covid—19 but the cancellation of unofficial olympic test event shows that all is not well in the host nation. —— an official. now, this is a significant move by fina, there one of the biggest international sporting governing bodies and in the letter i've seen, they are damning in their criticism of the japanese organisers and the nation's government when it comes to covid protocols and also safety. it's obviously a huge blow for divers like tom daly and jack laugher who were due to compete, but it's also the last thing that the olympic organisers needed at a time when the japanese public are beginning to become increasingly sceptical about whether the games should be taking place in their country at all. our olympics reporter nick hope reporting there. there's much more on our website, bbc.co.uk/sport but for me and the team, that's all the sport for now. hello there. a lot of dry weather
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is on the cards for the day ahead and in the south on sunday. but it's all change in the north. and behind that weather front, by the time we get to easter monday, it will be much colder, an arctic blast and a strong, biting north wind. it's still going to be chilly enough this morning with a touch of frost, a little bit of mist and fog around where we've kept the starry skies. but that's where we'll see the best of the sunshine. it's likely to be cloudier, and notjust for northern scotland, but central and eastern england, parts of eastern wales. but even here, it should lift and break a little into the afternoon, just remaining a bit overcast for lincolnshire, east anglia and the south east. where we see the lengthier sunny spells, that's where we'll see the higher temperatures, but still feeling chilly with a breeze in southern and eastern areas, which we tend to lose a bit of during the night. we pick up this westerly wind. our weather fronts starts to advance, so just a slight frost as we head towards sunday morning. and a fairly decent day, with slightly higher temperatures for many and more sunshine. but changes are afoot with a much colder easter monday.
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this is bbc news. i'm kasia madera with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. a police officer dies after being rammed by a car outside the us capitol building in washington. another officer is being treated in hospital. the suspect, who emerged from the car with a knife and ran at officers, was shot and died in hospital. the suspect did start lunging toward us capitol police officers, at which time us capitol police officers fired upon the suspect. the us national guard has been deployed in the area. the us capitol was put on lockdown. the top homicide investigator for the us city of minneapolis
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gives evidence on day five of the george floyd murder trial.

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