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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 2, 2021 10:00pm-10:31pm BST

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an attack on the us capitol in washington — the suspect and a police officer are dead, and a second officer is injured. a car ploughed through the barricade surrounding the building, striking the two officers. the driver then emerged with a knife. and it is with a very, very heavy heart that i announce one of our officers has succumbed to his injuries. for hours, washington remained tense and the capitol precinct was put in lockdown we'll bring you all the latest from the scene. also tonight: as the government considers vaccine passports for venues like pubs and theatres, dozens of mps pledge to oppose the idea. at least 50 people are killed after a train derails and crashes in a tunnel in taiwan.
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and the huge growth of the video games industry during lockdown leads to a major recruitment drive by developers. good evening. a police officer has died and another is in hospital after an attack on the us capitol, described as a senseless act by a spokesman. the attacker rammed a vehicle into a barricade and then emerged brandishing a knife. he was then shot dead by police. senior officers say at this stage the attack doesn't appear to be terror—related, although the investigation continues. let's go to our north america editor, jon sopel.
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jon. reeta, there's a palpable sense of shock at the capitol tonight that once again it has come under attack, once again it has come under attack, once again it has come under attack, once again another capitol policeman has been killed. he was billy evans, who'd been serving with the capitol police for many years, and in the past few momentsjoe biden and his wife had issued a statement saying they are heartbroken at the news. the suspect was driving the car has also been named as noah green, a 25—year—old from indiana, african—american stop but why did he do it? that is what police are now investigating. we've been here before. lunchtime on a cold easter day, and another emergency at the capitol. a man in a blue car rams two us capitol police officers near a barrier. as he gets out of his vehicle, knife in hand, he's shot and has now died. immediately, congress goes into lockdown. a helicopter�*s summoned and lands
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in front of the capitol building. and the national guard, which has been on duty since the capitol riots ofjanuary 6th, is mobilised. another terrifying moment for those who work in the congressional offices. at a hastily organised news conference, confirmation that one of the police officers has died as well. and it is with a very, very heavy heart that i announce one of our officers has succumbed to his injuries. but the assailant doesn't seem to have been on anyone�*s radar screens, and police are saying there doesn't seem to be an ongoing threat. it does not appear that he is known to the capitol police or the metropolitan police department at this time. sir? is this a terrorism-related incident? _ it does not appear to be terrorism—related, but obviously we'll continue to investigate to see if there is some type of nexus along those lines. it was only a few days ago that some of the intense
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security around the capitol, following january's shocking assault, was eased. just a week ago, the driver wouldn't have been able to get as close to the building as he did. what's happened today may be totally unrelated to the events of january the 6th, but there is a terrible sense of deja vu — a further heightening of the feeling of vulnerability. and once again, above america's august and imposing capitol building, flags have been ordered to fly at half—staff. and once again the difficult questions that need to be asked — do they put up the barriers that have just come down? do they rebuild the razor wire that has surrounded the capitol? how do you function as an open democracy when there are so many people who seem to want to do its damage? questions that are not only america is phased but other liberal democracies around the
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world. jon, many thanks, jon sopel there reporting from washington. more than 70 mps, including 41 conservatives, have condemned the idea of vaccine passports for entry into public venues or workplaces in england. the policy, which would mean people showing a certificate confirming their covid status, has been described as divisive and discriminatory. downing street says no final decision has been made. our political correspondent nick eardley has more. a small taste of freedom — many people have been making the most of being allowed to meet friends outdoors again, but when michael i feel more normal with busy pubs and restaurants, stadiums and theatres? it's one of the questions the government is considering, and weatherproof you had a vaccine or a negative test could reduce, maybe even remove, the need for social distancing. i think it's a good idea, but with all things, it needs testing. ijust don't, i don't know.
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i feel like it would create a division in society, personally. i would love to, - because i work in a pub. so will you need a certificate to get in here in the future? some sort of vaccine possible does look likely for international travel, but it's more controversial at home. a group of 70 mps, including a former labour and conservative leader, have spoken out today, writing... i'm not convinced that vaccine passport — i'm not convinced that vaccine passport for use within the uk is proportionate to the risk. it would be divisive. — proportionate to the risk. it would be divisive, effectively creating an underclass of people who are not vaccinated. many of whom will not be vaccinated _ vaccinated. many of whom will not be vaccinated for medical reasons. the government — vaccinated for medical reasons. tie: government is hoping vaccinated for medical reasons. ti9
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government is hoping to allow more people back into theatres, like this one in wolverhampton. this is not about a vaccine passport, it is about looking at ways of proving that you are covid—secure, whether you have had a test or have had the vaccine. clearly, no decisions have been made, because we have to weigh up different factors, the ethical considerations and so on, but it may be a way of getting more people back to doing the things they love and being in fantastic institutions like this. i , whilst there will be test events in the next few weeks, including at wembley for in the next few weeks, including at wemble j :, : in the next few weeks, including at wemblej :, ~ , over the past year, we have got used to the government making massive decisions which have a big impact on individualfreedoms, but as society slowly opens up again, we face another big question — is it fair to ask people to prove they have been vaccinated or had a negative test to pop into the pub or out for dinner? if they do happen, vaccine passports would be temporary, and they might not be used everywhere. some devolved governments are yet to be convinced they would be effective.
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there are also concerns about the practicalities. the there are also concerns about the practicalities— practicalities. the additional burden of— practicalities. the additional burden of the _ practicalities. the additional burden of the vaccine - practicalities. the additional. burden of the vaccine passport practicalities. the additional- burden of the vaccine passport could really scupper things, it could make us feel that we are discriminating against sections of the population that are unable to have a vaccine, like pregnant women.— that are unable to have a vaccine, like pregnant women. there will also be more detail— like pregnant women. there will also be more detail next _ like pregnant women. there will also be more detail next week _ like pregnant women. there will also be more detail next week about - like pregnant women. there will also be more detail next week about a - be more detail next week about a strategy for allowing holidays again, likely to involve a traffic light system based on how safe each country is. we've started getting some of our freedoms back, country is. we've started getting some of ourfreedoms back, but there's a lot to consider in the coming weeks. nick eardley, bbc news. pakistan is among four countries which have been added to england's red list of places from where almost all travel is banned. from next friday, only british and irish nationals, or uk residents, will be allowed to return home from pakistan, bangladesh, the philippines and kenya. they will have to self—isolate for ten days in a government—approved hotel. the latest government figures show there were 3,402 new coronavirus infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period.
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because of the bank holiday, there's no data today for wales. on average, a,i72 new cases were reported per day in the last week. that's down by around a third on this time last week. there are 3,723 patients in hospital with covid—i9. 52 deaths were reported in the latest 24—hour period, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—i9 test. again, that number doesn't today include wales. on average in the past week, 43 deaths were announced every day, taking the total number to 126,816. 0n vaccinations, almost 154,000 people have had theirfirstjab in the latest 24—hour period, bringing the total to just over 31.3 million. and almost 5 million people have now had two doses. the uk's medical regulator has said that,
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out of 30 cases of rare blood clotting in people who've had the oxford—astrazeneca jab, seven people have died. that's out of a total of 18 million administered doses. the mhra said a review was ongoing but that no link to the vaccine had been proven. it stated that people should continue to get their vaccines when invited to do so, because the benefits outweigh any risks. 0ur science correspondent rebecca morelle is here with me. how should people interpret these findings? well, it is really important to emphasise that no link between these rare blood clots in the astrazeneca vaccine has been proven, but the uk regulator is investigating this, and these blood clots are really unusual. they are accompanied by low levels of platelets, these are a type of blood sell that at low levels normally cause bleeding, not blood clots, and they are serious, so the mhra has had 30 cases
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reported, and we will end this evening that of these, seven people have sadly died, and i have been deaths reported in europe too. the incidence is low, out of 18 million vaccinations of the astrazeneca jab given, and the regulator also said that defies a jab, they've seen two cases of brain blood clots. —— the pfizerjab. but these are without the unusual low platelet counts. the thing we need to unpick is whether these clots are happening naturally, because they can, although they are rare, or whether they are an extremely rare reaction to the jabs. we don't know the answer to that yet, but some countries are restricting the use of the astrazeneca jab, the netherlands for example not giving it to people under the age of 60, but the uk is continuing with its roll—out, and it has stressed, along with the who and the european medicines agency, that the european medicines agency, that the benefits of vaccination definitely outweigh any potential
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risks. , : : :, definitely outweigh any potential risks. , ., ~ definitely outweigh any potential risks. , : :, ~ i:, borisjohnson has urged people not to socialise indoors with other households this easter weekend, saying that outdoors is generally much safer. his message was echoed by police forces across england, as millions are expected to enjoy the first weekend of eased covid restrictions to meet up with family and friends. mairead smyth reports from liverpool. a glorious good friday in liverpool's sefton park. birthdays no longer in lockdown. michaela turned 30 today. yeah, it'sjust more like chilled out. i can actually get outside and stuff and see people, so it'sjust easier and more like relaxed, rather than just trying to do stuff at home. if i was at home, i'd probablyjust get a takeaway and chill out or something, so it's just good to like sit with people, i suppose. i'm dead excited, because i haven't been able to see everyone for ages, so it wasjust nice to be able to put something together for them. today's bank holiday is the first chance for many people to meet with friends and family since lockdown restrictions eased on monday, but health experts are warning it's important to stick to the rules of two households or six people together if we are to continue
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along the road map. merseyside police say patrols will happen in popular places like this, keen to keep numbers down and people apart — a plan echoed by forces up and down the country. we are trying to tread that line between the rules changing and people being able to enjoy just those slight relaxations, but at the same time, trying to make sure that people don't think it's ok to go back to how it was before, everything's totally normal, because that's when we start to affect public health issues that have been so prevalent. and in scotland, today is the start of new rules — stay at home changed to stay local, now the same as wales. but any change to that message in northern ireland is still more than a week away. back in liverpool, the easing of lockdown lifting the spirits of people in this park. i love coming here, it's one of my highlights of 2021.
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i love it here. i love the park, the people, and i love meeting them. hopefully, we won't go into another lockdown, and it will stay open, everyone will behave. fingers crossed. - fingers crossed, yeah. mairead smyth, bbc news. at least 50 people have been killed in a passenger train crash in taiwan. hundreds of others were trapped in the wreckage. the train, packed with local tourists, derailed in a tunnel after a maintenance vehicle reportedly slid onto the tracks. 0ur correspondent john sudworth reports. the train, travelling south from taiwan's capital and along the island's mountainous east coast, was packed with people ahead of what is a long holiday weekend here. just as it was entering a tunnel, it's believed to have been derailed by a lorry that slipped onto the track from a nearby construction site. rescuers worked to free those
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trapped in carriages ripped apart by the impact. reports suggest that, with almost 500 people on board, many had been standing up. "the lorry slid off the road and crashed into the train," this worker says. "now all of the front carriages are damaged." some passengers were able to walk to safety. but the mangled wreckage blocking the inside of the tunnel meant others had to use the roof of the train to escape. ambulances ferried dozens of injured people to local hospitals. "i was thrown to the floor, i hit my head, and it started bleeding," this woman says. "there was no space on the sides of the tunnel." "we had to climb onto the carriage roof to get out." taiwan's premier, su tseng—chang, visited the scene,
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while family members gathered to identify the dead. and the scale of the loss of life left a profound sense of shock on a national holiday meant to be a time that brings loved ones together. the president, tsai ing—wen, described it as heartbreaking. the islands state—owned railway network, while reliable and efficient, has suffered a small number of fatal accidents over the years. this is being described as the worst in decades. john sudworth, bbc news, taipei. some regional airports are warning it will take them years to recoverfrom the pandemic, and that there could be yet more damage if short—haul flights to europe are not allowed this summer. uk airports are losing £5.3 million every day, and research suggests that local communities have seen greater unemployment than the national average. 0ur transport correspondent caroline davies reports.
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no holiday excitement. no last—minute suncream purchases or pre—flight pints. apart from a skeleton staff for today's one flight in and out, southampton airport stands near empty, waiting. as does martin, one of the only taxi drivers still coming here for work. lucky if we get one trip a day. it's not enough, and the savings are right at the end now, so you're sort of looking, thinking, blimey, what am i going to do now? you know, there's lots of people that are on furlough at the moment. they are all in the same boat as i am, you know, they're thinking, if this airport doesn't stay, what am i going to do? southampton airport, like many smaller airports, was hit twice last year. firstly by the collapse of flybe, that ran many of its routes, then by the pandemic. the number of people claiming unemployment benefit in nearby eastleigh was 1a7% higher in january 2021 than january 2020. the fact that there are no passengers
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doesn'tjust have an impact on the airport and the airline and the people who work here. some local businesses have said they are concerned that the airport recovers too. just under 30 miles away, rhh franks makes parts for commercial and military aircraft. having a thriving regional airport brings lots of job opportunities to people, but also inspires younger generations to get into the world of aviation. it creates a wide pool of personnel within the local area that businesses like rhh franks can thrive from. many regional airports are worried airlines will return to bigger airports first. derek provan runs southampton, aberdeen and glasgow airports. it's been unspeakably hard for us this year. at this moment in time, our sole focus is on maintaining our airports to remain open. but of course there is a commercial reality. with no flybe and its smaller aircraft, southampton wants to extend its runway so it can accommodate larger planes. the local area committee turned down the proposal. the local council
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will look at it soon. as well as worries about noise, there are concerns about the environment. as we talk about building back better, should we be making airports bigger? we already have more capacity in our airports in the uk than we could possibly use within our carbon budget. creating morejobs in high—carbon industries, i don't think is the best way to meet net—zero or the best way to give people long—term and secure employment. the industry says it does have plans to reduce its carbon emissions. airports have received some business rates relief and used the furlough scheme, but they say that help is a drop in the ocean. a government spokesperson says it has pledged £7 billion to aviation and is continuing to explore how best to support the travel industry. more announcements are expected on international travel from england. as many wait for a date for take—off, smaller airports will be hoping
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they are not left behind. caroline davies, bbc news, southampton. during the pandemic, video games have been a growing source of entertainment and a way for many people to socialise online. the last year has seen increased investment in the uk games sector, so much so that developers are hiring new staff in large numbers, as marc cieslak reports. the uk games industry has experienced massive success in the last 12 months. one example of this is developer sports interactive. based in east london's olympic park, it's grown as a business so much, it's moving to new, bigger offices. so this area here is where programmers and artists will be. it's very much been set up for a new way of working. as a studio, we've been going forjust under 30 years. 0riginally started in two kids' bedrooms in shropshire. since then, we've grown to 200. in london's brick lane, the games might be on a smaller scale, like this mobile title mochi
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from indie developer love shark, but expansion is occurring here too. so we've been around for about three years now, and we make games for teenage girls. so these days 84% of teenage girls play video games. it's actually more popular of a hobby than shopping. so we've doubled the size of our team in the last year. during covid, gaming has seen a huge boom. this has led to massive financial success. last year, the uk games market generated £7 billion — up nearly 30% on the year before. as the jobs market is left reeling from the effects of the covid—19 pandemic, could a career in video games beckon for many? and are people equipped with the right skills for a career in the industry? the unfortunate reality is that there is a skills gap. there are lots ofjobs that people could retrain to be looking to do. if you've worked in sales, with the kind of mind that you've got that's constantly looking at numbers and targets, and analysing those to find out who
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you need to be calling to sell to, retrain to be a data analyst, because it's notjust games that need more data analysts, it's every company in the uk needs more people looking at data. as big as the video games industry is, can it really have a significant impact on the uk jobs market? it's a relatively small portion of overalljobs. if you supportjobs across a number of sectors, obviously that builds up to a bigger number. i think it's legitimate to have a strategy that focuses on specific industries. a source of entertainment and employment, video games are a truly successful 21st—century combination of art, commerce and technology. marc cieslak, bbc news. that's it. now on bbc one, time for the news where you are. have a very good night.
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welcome to bbc london. some of the best known attractions in london are to get a share of the emergency culture recovery fund set up by the government. st paul's and the transport museum will receive almost £900,000 good evening, you are watching bbc news. let's return now to our top story, the attack on the us capitol in which one police officer was killed and the suspected attacker was shot dead. earlier this evening the head of the us capitol police held a news conference, let's hear what she had to say. it is held a news conference, let's hear what she had to say.— what she had to say. it is with a heavy heart _ what she had to say. it is with a heavy heart that _ what she had to say. it is with a heavy heart that i _ what she had to say. it is with a heavy heart that i come - what she had to say. it is with a heavy heart that i come here i what she had to say. it is with a l heavy heart that i come here this afternoon to shed some light on the incident that occurred at the united
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states capital. at approximately 1:02pm this afternoon the suspect entered will be referred to as the north barricade of the capital. the suspect rammed his car into two of our officers and then hit the north barricade barrier. at such time the suspect exited the vehicle with a knife in hand. 0ur officers that engage the suspect, he did not respond to verbal commands. the suspect did start lunging toward us capitol police officers at which time us capitol police officers fired upon the suspect. at this time, the suspect has been pronounced deceased. two us capitol police
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officers were transported to two different hospitals. and it is with a very, very heavy heart that i announce one of our officers had succumbed to his injuries. we are not able to release any information, names, age, date of birth or anything of that nature at this time because we still have to notify the next of kin. ijust ask because we still have to notify the next of kin. i just ask that the public continue to keep us capitol police and their families in your prayers. this has been extremely difficult time for capitol police after the events of january six and now the events that have occurred here today. so i ask that you keep our us capitol police family in your thoughts and prayers. at this time i'm going to turn it over to the
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metropolitan police chief, mr robert conti for the metropolitan police department's portion of this investigation. thank you. good afternoon. _ investigation. thank you. good afternoon, i'm _ investigation. thank you. good afternoon, i'm robert- investigation. thank you. good afternoon, i'm robert conti - investigation. thank you. good afternoon, i'm robert conti acting chief_ afternoon, i'm robert conti acting chief of— afternoon, i'm robert conti acting chief of the metropolitan police department. 0ur chief of the metropolitan police department. our members responded to the department. 0ur members responded to the us— department. our members responded to the us capital todayjust after 1:00pm — the us capital todayjust after 1:00pm to investigate and officer involved — 1:00pm to investigate and officer involved shooting. at this time the metropolitan police department's harbour _ metropolitan police department's harbour side division as well as internal— harbour side division as well as internal affairs division will now take _ internal affairs division will now take of— internal affairs division will now take of the investigation with respect — take of the investigation with respect to the shooting death that occurred _ respect to the shooting death that occurred as well as the officers death — occurred as well as the officers death lot _ occurred as well as the officers death. lot of information that we release _ death. lot of information that we release the public at this time and we certainly will be looking very closely — we certainly will be looking very closely with our partners at the us capitoi— closely with our partners at the us capitol police, and at this time i 'ust capitol police, and at this time i just want— capitol police, and at this time i just want to extend my deepest
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condolences on behalf of the entire metropolitan police department to all of the _ metropolitan police department to all of the officers at the united states— all of the officers at the united states capital police for their service — states capital police for their service and unfortunately for the loss of— service and unfortunately for the loss of life that has occurred here today— loss of life that has occurred here today at _ loss of life that has occurred here today at the united states capital. what _ today at the united states capital. what can — today at the united states capital. what can you tell residents that live here — what can you tell residents that live here as— what can you tell residents that live here as well— what can you tell residents that live here as well as _ what can you tell residents that live here as well as those - what can you tell residents that live here as well as those that l what can you tell residents that. live here as well as those that work in the _ live here as well as those that work in the area? — live here as well as those that work in the area? m— live here as well as those that work in the area?— in the area? at this time it does not appear _ in the area? at this time it does not appear to — in the area? at this time it does not appear to be _ in the area? at this time it does not appear to be an _ in the area? at this time it does not appear to be an ongoing - in the area? at this time it does - not appear to be an ongoing threat. we are _ not appear to be an ongoing threat. we are obviously in the very early stages _ we are obviously in the very early stages of— we are obviously in the very early stages of our investigation, when you understand the motivation behind this senseless act to the metropolitan police department will certainly _ metropolitan police department will certainly be doing that. any metropolitan police department will certainly be doing that.— certainly be doing that. any reason that he would _ certainly be doing that. any reason that he would have _ certainly be doing that. any reason that he would have been _ certainly be doing that. any reason that he would have been known - certainly be doing that. any reason that he would have been known to| that he would have been known to capitol police or any indication he was someone that has been around capitol before, spotted or anything like that? it capitol before, spotted or anything like that? :, , :, ., , , ., ., , like that? it does not appear he was known to the _ like that? it does not appear he was known to the capitol _ like that? it does not appear he was known to the capitol police - like that? it does not appear he was known to the capitol police or- known to the capitol police or metropolitan police department at this time. is metropolitan police department at this time. , , :, metropolitan police department at this time. , , ., :, , this time. is this a terrorism related incident? _ this time. is this a terrorism related incident? it - this time. is this a terrorism related incident? it does - this time. is this a terrorism j related incident? it does not this time. is this a terrorism - related incident? it does not appear to be terrorism _
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related incident? it does not appear to be terrorism related _ related incident? it does not appear to be terrorism related but - to be terrorism related but obviously we will continue to investigate to see if there's some type of— investigate to see if there's some type of nexus along those lines. what _ type of nexus along those lines. what is — type of nexus along those lines. what is the national guard mission look like the next couple of days? i will refer to that to the united states — will refer to that to the united states capital police. i will refer to that to the united states capital police.- will refer to that to the united states capital police. i would say that at this _ states capital police. i would say that at this time _ states capital police. i would say that at this time investigation i states capital police. i would say that at this time investigation is | that at this time investigation is still in its pulmonary stages so we have that information, and the capitol police as far as security posture remains in a steady state at this time. we are very thankful for our national guard partnership, we do have national guard on the campus by the security posture at this time remains the same. hello there. a lot of dry weather is on the cards for the day ahead. and in the south on sunday but it's all changed in the north. he had met with the front by the time we get to easter monday it will be much colder. an arctic blast strong biting north wind. it is still going to be chilly and enough this morning with a bit of mist and fog around
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where we've kept the starry skies. that's where was he the best of the sunshine. it's likely to be cloudy and not just for northern scotland but central eastern wales and even here at lift and break a little into the afternoon. just remain a bit overcast mainly in the southeast. we see the lengthy and sunny spells that's where was he the highest temperatures without still feeling chilly with the breeze in southern and eastern areas. which we tend to lose a bit of during the knife was up we pick up this westerly wind, where the front starts with that. just a slight frost as we head toward sunday morning. and a fairly decent day with a slightly higher temperatures for many and more sunshine but changes are afoot with a much colder easter monday. this is bbc world news,
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the headlines. an attack on the us capitol in washington — a car is rammed into security barriers, a police officer is kileld and another injured. the suspect is shot dead. as the uk government considers vaccine passports for venues like pubs and theatres — dozens of mps pledge to oppose the idea. the trial of former minneapolis police officer derek chauvin, accused of killing george floyd, has resumed for another day. senior police officers who attended the scene have been explaining the training they have received for arresting suspects. the indian cricket star sachin tendulkar has been admitted to hospital, after suffering from coronavirus for more than a week. he tweeted that he had been admitted as a matter of precaution.

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