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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 2, 2021 9:00am-10:01am BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. more than 70 mps launch a campaign against coronavirus vaccine passports, calling them "divisive and discriminatory". campaigners have started legal action against the government over guidance that bans care home residents in england aged 65 and overfrom taking trips outside the home. pub, cafe and restaurant owners criticise new rules which mean all customers have to give their contact details to staff, when premises reopen outdoors in ten days�* time. at least 41 people have been killed and dozens injured in a train crash in taiwan wildlife conservationists warn people to keep their distance from seals this easter weekend, over concerns that disturbing and scaring them can lead to harm. and coming up this hour...
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the bbc has been told that amazon delivery drivers feel under pressure to adopt unsafe and potentially illegal working practices because of their increased workload in the pandemic. good morning and welcome to bbc news. a cross—party group of more than 70 mps have warned about the introduction of a vaccine passport in england. the government is reported to be considering a trial of the scheme which means people would have to show proof of having a covid vaccine before being allowed into some venues, including pubs and concerts. in other developments today — campaigners representing care home residents in england have started a legal challenge against the government over guidance which has banned people over 65 leaving their homes for visits outside.
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care providers have warned these trips may risk the spread of the virus. in scotland, lockdown easing continues. after three months, the �*stay at home�* order has been lifted for millions of people. the scottish government has advised people to stay local and to travel outside of their area. —— and not to travel outside their area. and, ahead of the next easing of the restrictions in england in ten days�* time, pubs are warning that only two fifths may open when allowed as many don't have the outdoor areas suitable to serve customers. more on all that throughout the hour, but first our political correspondent iain watson has more on the campaign opposing vaccine passports. the government wants to reopen the economy fully byjune the 21st in england. it's currently discussing whether proof of vaccination — or of a negative test — could enable pubs and entertainment venues to open, possibly without the need for social distancing. when it comes to trying to make sure we give maximum confidence to business and to customers here in the uk, there are three things.
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there's your immunity — whether you have had it before, so whether you've got natural antibodies anyway. whether you have been vaccinated. and then, of course, whether you've had a test. so those three things working together will, i think, be useful. but the idea of vaccination certificates has united long—standing political opponents — against them. the former labour leader jeremy corbyn and the former conservative leader iain duncan smith are amongst 70 cross—party politicians who'll campaign together to oppose them, calling them discriminatory and divisive. downing street says no final decision has been made on their use, and the government described reports that they could be trialled in theatres and sports grounds as speculation. but on easter monday, the prime minister will have some decisions to announce. he's likely to confirm that restrictions will be eased further in england on april the 12th, allowing beer gardens to reopen as well as nonessential shops. and he'll announce the results of his global travel taskforce. this will set out how foreign travel can resume.
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countries are likely to be categorised as red, amber and green. returning from a red—list country would require hotel quarantine, amber, home quarantine, and green, negative covid tests. but exactly when foreign travel will get the green light is still up in the air. iain watson, bbc news. with me is our political correspondentjonathan blake. an interesting alliance of a vast range of political opinion opposed to these passports? yes. range of political opinion opposed to these passports?— range of political opinion opposed to these passports? yes, it is, now and aaain to these passports? yes, it is, now and again politicians _ to these passports? yes, it is, now and again politicians from - to these passports? yes, it is, now and again politicians from different| and again politicians from different parties _ and again politicians from different parties decide they agree on something and want to do something about— something and want to do something about it. _ something and want to do something about it. it_ something and want to do something about it, it doesn't happen often but it_ about it, it doesn't happen often but it certainly has happened here and it's_ but it certainly has happened here and it's a — but it certainly has happened here and it's a broad alliance, libertarian alliance, the former conservative leader iain duncan smith, — conservative leader iain duncan smith, the leader of the liberal democrats ed davey, the former labour_ democrats ed davey, the former labour leaderjeremy corbyn. some labour leader jeremy corbyn. some backbench_ labour leaderjeremy corbyn. some backbench mps, the ones opposed to the more _ backbench mps, the ones opposed to the more stringent lockdown measures
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and restrictions throughout the pandemic but they've all come together, along with the campaign group _ together, along with the campaign group big brother watch, liberty the 'oint group big brother watch, liberty the joint council for the welfare of recurrence and privacy international, signing to this pledge — international, signing to this pledge which reads we oppose the divisive _ pledge which reads we oppose the divisive and discriminatory use of covid _ divisive and discriminatory use of covid certification to deny individuals access to general services, _ individuals access to general services, businesses orjobs. the concern _ services, businesses orjobs. the concern i — services, businesses orjobs. the concern i think shared by all these politicians — concern i think shared by all these politicians of varying colours is it is too _ politicians of varying colours is it is too much _ politicians of varying colours is it is too much to restrict people's freedoms — is too much to restrict people's freedoms and liberties once the vaccination programme has continued and been _ vaccination programme has continued and been offered to all adults are eligible _ and been offered to all adults are eligible in england and around the ukas— eligible in england and around the uk as well. after the pandemic, peobie — uk as well. after the pandemic, people have put up with too much and this is— people have put up with too much and this is a _ people have put up with too much and this is a step — people have put up with too much and this is a step too far. of course, the government argues it is potentially necessary to keep people safe and _ potentially necessary to keep people safe and may allow parts of the economy— safe and may allow parts of the economy to open up sooner than it would _ economy to open up sooner than it would have — economy to open up sooner than it would have otherwise been able to do so. speaking at a theatre in wolverhampton announcing the next
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round _ wolverhampton announcing the next round of _ wolverhampton announcing the next round of arts funding, the culture secretary — round of arts funding, the culture secretary 0liver dowden talk more about _ secretary 0liver dowden talk more about what the government might do. michael gove, the chancellor of the duchy of lancaster, is conducting a review which i am, of course, participating in as to whether we can make covid certification work so this is not about a vaccine passport, it's about looking at ways of proving that you're covid secure, whether you've had a test or had the vaccine. clearly no decisions have been made and we have to weigh up different factors, the ethical considerations and so on, but it may be a way of ensuring you can get more people back doing the things they love and being in fantastic institutions like this. that was 0liver dowden. when and where might we see the so—called passports trial? where might we see the so-called passmrts trial?— passports trial? there will be ilots in passports trial? there will be pilots in the _ passports trial? there will be pilots in the next _ passports trial? there will be pilots in the next couple - passports trial? there will be pilots in the next couple of i passports trial? there will be - pilots in the next couple of months as part _ pilots in the next couple of months as part of— pilots in the next couple of months as part of the government events research — as part of the government events research programme with which it announced — research programme with which it announced a little while back. the world _ announced a little while back. the world snooker championship, the fa cup, possibly the brit awards as well _ cup, possibly the brit awards as well. these will be used as test events, —
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well. these will be used as test events, really, to see how people can get— events, really, to see how people can get together in large numbers and attend events like that with minimal— and attend events like that with minimal social distancing implies. as part— minimal social distancing implies. as part of— minimal social distancing implies. as part of that, we were expecting testing _ as part of that, we were expecting testing to — as part of that, we were expecting testing to be involved anyway so if you have _ testing to be involved anyway so if you have a — testing to be involved anyway so if you have a negative test result on entry. _ you have a negative test result on entry. and — you have a negative test result on entry, and again when you leave, tracked _ entry, and again when you leave, tracked and — entry, and again when you leave, tracked and any contact you had would _ tracked and any contact you had would be — tracked and any contact you had would be traced as well but there are reports today covid certification of some sort may be involved — certification of some sort may be involved in— certification of some sort may be involved in those pilots as we go later— involved in those pilots as we go later on— involved in those pilots as we go later on into the summer. the key dates— later on into the summer. the key dates of— later on into the summer. the key dates of course urging the 21st, all restrictions— dates of course urging the 21st, all restrictions in england providing things— restrictions in england providing things go— restrictions in england providing things go according to plan, are expected — things go according to plan, are expected to be lifted, but there is a bit of— expected to be lifted, but there is a bit of a — expected to be lifted, but there is a bit of a delay until the end of july which _ a bit of a delay until the end of july which is when the government hopes— july which is when the government hopes everyone will have been offered — hopes everyone will have been offered the vaccine, that is eligible _ offered the vaccine, that is eligible. those i think are the key weeks _ eligible. those i think are the key weeks in — eligible. those i think are the key weeks in between, those dates, when weeks in between, those dates, when we could _ weeks in between, those dates, when we could see some of this implemented.— we could see some of this imlemented. . ,, ., , ., , implemented. talk to us about this idea of a sort _ implemented. talk to us about this idea of a sort of— implemented. talk to us about this idea of a sort of traffic _ implemented. talk to us about this idea of a sort of traffic light - idea of a sort of traffic light system when it comes to foreign travel. ., ., , ., travel. foreign travel is a little different- _ travel. foreign travel is a little different. there _ travel. foreign travel is a little different. there is _ travel. foreign travel is a little different. there is a _ travel. foreign travel is a little different. there is a broad - different. there is a broad acceptance really across the parties
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at westminster and internationally, that there _ at westminster and internationally, that there is going to have to be some _ that there is going to have to be some form — that there is going to have to be some form of vaccine passport involved — some form of vaccine passport involved. because different countries will have different arrangements and that is one area where _ arrangements and that is one area where we — arrangements and that is one area where we will see some form of vaccine — where we will see some form of vaccine passport, covid certification implemented and we had details _ certification implemented and we had details reported today about the kind of— details reported today about the kind of system the government may well bring _ kind of system the government may well bring in when it hopes to be able to— well bring in when it hopes to be able to allow people to travel internationally, not any sooner than the middle — internationally, not any sooner than the middle of may, we will hear more about— the middle of may, we will hear more about this _ the middle of may, we will hear more about this from the prime minister on monday. but it looks like a traffic— on monday. but it looks like a traffic light system is the way things— traffic light system is the way things are heading, countries labelled _ things are heading, countries labelled red, if you travel there will have — labelled red, if you travel there will have to be an enforced quarantine on your return. amber could _ quarantine on your return. amber could nrean— quarantine on your return. amber could mean quarantine at home and dream _ could mean quarantine at home and dream would be free of any quarantine requirements. but i think it is likely— quarantine requirements. but i think it is likely that international travel— it is likely that international travel may well be allowed but still heavily— travel may well be allowed but still heavily restricted from when the government hopes to allow at the earliest, — government hopes to allow at the earliest, the middle of may. jonathan, for the moment,
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earliest, the middle of may. jonathan, forthe moment, thank earliest, the middle of may. jonathan, for the moment, thank you. silkie carlo is the director of the privacy campaigning organisation, big brother watch. it's signed the letter against the introduction of vaccine passports in england. the group has also published a report warning covid passport will lead to segregation throughout the population for the first time in decades. welcome and thank you forjoining us. what is wrong with a passport on a short—term basis if it is just a stage to get us out of lockdown? there's no way that if the government goes ahead with covid passes it would be on a short—term basis. and in fact, michael gove who is backing this idea, when he was arguing against id cards, one of the reasons he gave was when you give the state such exceptional powers as this and especially if you introduce a whole kind of identity infrastructure like this you will never see the back of it and in fact what we will see if we go down this road is covid passes will endure and expand into all kinds of other
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health issues and really, it could become quite a sprawling system, especially because they are being proposed now, at this stage, and it's very strange because we got a very successful vaccination programme. the vast majority of people who are vulnerable to coronavirus have now received a vaccination, we should be starting to see the light at the end of the tunnel, we should be starting to come out of this, rather than introducing an extraordinary architecture of oppression and segregation, a kind of checkpoint britain, we should be starting to open up and see the light at the end of the tunnel. but open up and see the light at the end of the tunnel-— of the tunnel. but over the last ear, of the tunnel. but over the last year. peeple — of the tunnel. but over the last year, people have _ of the tunnel. but over the last year, people have been - of the tunnel. but over the last year, people have been askedl of the tunnel. but over the last i year, people have been asked to of the tunnel. but over the last - year, people have been asked to give up year, people have been asked to give up all sorts of freedoms, civil liberties, for the collective good. and slowly, we are seeing those restrictions left. why then are you so convinced that a passport would be a permanent thing?— so convinced that a passport would be a permanent thing? because the only justification _
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be a permanent thing? because the only justification for _ be a permanent thing? because the onlyjustification for it, _ be a permanent thing? because the onlyjustification for it, i _ be a permanent thing? because the onlyjustification for it, i mean, - onlyjustification for it, i mean, the justification has been onlyjustification for it, i mean, thejustification has been built up for it is in a context of now a vastly diminishing risk. and we are starting to hear, the goalposts keep changing, we are starting to hear it's not about current coronavirus but it's about the variance and if it's being introduced on the basis of a hypothetical future it's being introduced on the basis of a hypotheticalfuture risk, then it's going to be time—limited, it's going to be permanent but stubborn order to be able to execute this, we will have to have digital identification that goes into the backbone of the nhs and the first thing attached to this digital id will be very sensitive health data stop this is the stuff of dystopian nightmares and worse, we are going to see citizens police in each other, whether it's on the door of pubs or football stadiums, asking about your health status, your health data, have you got a green tick or a cross to impose this kind of exclusion and segregation. this
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will be divisive, this will be discriminatory. it will tear communities apart, it means you will be able to go someplace is that your neighbour cannot go, certain members of yourfamily cannot neighbour cannot go, certain members of your family cannot go. it's really quite unthinkable that we would go down this route. and this is, as keir starmer put it, it is not british, we are not a population that lives on licence and it's unthinkable we go down this road. you say it would lead to segregation but it would be an optional segregation, wouldn't it, if you choose not to have the vaccine, you choose not to have the vaccine, you choose not to have the passport, you are opting out certain opportunities?- are opting out certain opportunities? are opting out certain o- ortunities? ~ ., �* ~' opportunities? well, i don't think --eole opportunities? well, i don't think peeple are _ opportunities? well, i don't think people are going _ opportunities? well, i don't think people are going to _ opportunities? well, i don't think people are going to opt _ opportunities? well, i don't think people are going to opt out - opportunities? well, i don't think people are going to opt out of. people are going to opt out of having basic rights and liberties. they will be pushed out. they will be excluded. and you know, for example, if you are a pregnant woman, pregnant women and routinely advised to have the vaccination at the moment, you simply would not be able to go someplace is, unless you
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submit yourself to constant testing. and this idea is well of testing healthy people, all the time, you know, that's going to be very onerous and it could mean you are missing time from work, you are having to get constant tests, do you have to isolate while you wait for a test result? also a lot of the medical bodies advise against testing healthy people all of the time because of the past positive rates. there is a really profound issues and some really profound issues and some really profound issues raised here. whichever way you look at it, there is no safe way to do this. this is a really quite dangerous, frankly unhinged proposal thatis dangerous, frankly unhinged proposal that is against british sensibilities about democracy, freedom, we do not carry, we don't expect people to ask us to show our papers. and i cannot imagine being in a country where people will be turned away because they don't have the right id or or code. we want a common goal, we want to come out of
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lockdown for everyone to be healthy, safe, free. we are not going to get there through coercion, not get there through coercion, not get there through coercion, not get there through segregation and exclusion. ., , there through segregation and exclusion. . , ., there through segregation and exclusion. ., , ., , , exclusion. finally and briefly, if ou exclusion. finally and briefly, if you could. _ exclusion. finally and briefly, if you could, some _ exclusion. finally and briefly, if you could, some of— exclusion. finally and briefly, if you could, some of those - exclusion. finally and briefly, if. you could, some of those people exclusion. finally and briefly, if- you could, some of those people who object on the basis that it's not british to carry these sorts of passports, might have to have them for international travel and if they want to go abroad, they won't bat an eyelid at it. want to go abroad, they won't bat an e elid at it. ~ , eyelid at it. where is the difference? _ eyelid at it. where is the difference? it's - eyelid at it. where is the difference? it's very - eyelid at it. where is the - difference? it's very different because international travel you know, you are at the behest of other countries policies and it may be for a short period of time, and the world health organization advises on this, there are some countries will ask for a test, for example and international travel is a luxury. but to be able to have access to your rights and liberties on your own soil, the country that you are born in, that is a completely different thing. now we are talking about taking a carpet from beneath
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people speed, not allowing people to just live their lives in the country they are born in. it's quite unimaginable and as you have seen today from the cross—sectional parliamentarians who are backing the campaign, if the government goes down this road they are going to have a very big fight on their hands. ., ~' , ., have a very big fight on their hands. ., ,, , ., ., have a very big fight on their hands. . ~' i., ., i. campaigners have started legal action over government guidance that bans older care home residents in england from going on visits outside the home, despite lockdown restrictions being eased. visits are allowed in exceptional circumstances, says the government, and that it is looking to open up more safe options. here's our social affairs correspondent, alison holt. after the toughest of years, care homes are slowly, cautiously beginning to reopen. nearly all residents have had at least one dose of the vaccine, and they're allowed a single named visitor indoors. but government guidance says a trip out is still too risky for older residents. and that's what's being challenged. a legal letter�*s been sent to the department of health
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and social care byjohn's campaign — which represents residents, families and friends. it argues that guidance in respect to visits out is unlawful, and that the ban on outings by residents aged 65 or over is in breach of human rights and equality laws. it also challenges the need for residents who have been out to self—isolate for ia days, saying vaccinations and testing make it unnecessary. people living in care homes — people who are in the last period of their life — were actually deprived of the simple pleasures of going for a walk by the river, going to a park, going out to see perhaps grandchildren playing in a playground. those simple pleasures which mean so much. in its guidance, the government acknowledges that trips out are important for residents, but says it increases the risk of covid getting back into care homes.
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alison holt, bbc news. julia jones is the co—founder ofjohn's campaign — which is leading the legal challenge. and we saw her in that report from allison. julia, thank you for joining us. what with the consequences be for someone, do you believe, if they ignored this guidance and went out on a visit to someone? i guidance and went out on a visit to someone? ~ , guidance and went out on a visit to someone? ~' , ., , someone? i think they would be erfectl someone? i think they would be perfectly 0k- — someone? i think they would be perfectly ok. but _ someone? i think they would be perfectly ok. but | _ someone? i think they would be perfectly ok. but | think - someone? i think they would be perfectly ok. but i think care . someone? i think they would be - perfectly ok. but i think care homes are in a very difficult position. because they are often caught up with problems with their local infection control officers. and with their insurance companies. that's why although people say, well it's just guidance, it's not law, and i would agree with that in a positive way, it's very difficult for them to go against statements such as if somebody goes out they've got to
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self—isolate for ia days which is an absolutely ridiculous and punitive ask. it's hard for care homes to go against guidance. but care homes do need to be aware that there is a legal context and that is the equality legislation which says you must look at people as individuals. and i'm simply amazed that in the zist and i'm simply amazed that in the 21st century, a civil servant could have sat down and written a bit of guidance that simply excludes everybody over 65, no matter what their state of health or mental capacity. their state of health or mental ca aci . ., �* , their state of health or mental caaci . ,, their state of health or mental caaci. ., capacity. that's simply amazing. the word that's used _ capacity. that's simply amazing. the word that's used is _ capacity. that's simply amazing. the word that's used is unprecedented. i word that's used is unprecedented. civil servants and politicians are trying to grapple with something that's so enormous and has killed so many people. surely it's better to err on the side of caution as we
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lift the restrictions?— err on the side of caution as we lift the restrictions? well, to we erha -s lift the restrictions? well, to we perhaps think — lift the restrictions? well, to we perhaps think everybody - lift the restrictions? well, to we perhaps think everybody should | lift the restrictions? well, to we - perhaps think everybody should carry on staying at home then? why should someone who lives in a care home be different? because we are talking about people, we are talking about something like a00,000 people who range from people who have simply gone into live there because perhaps they have some illness like multiple sclerosis which means it's difficult for them to live at home but they've got full mental capacity. what are we doing to their human rights when we doing to their human rights when we say, actually, sorry, you can't go out because you are over 65 and you are living in a care home. they went in there to live in a home with care. not to be imprisoned. hagar care. not to be imprisoned. how necessary _ care. not to be imprisoned. how necessary though _ care. not to be imprisoned. how necessary though is _ care. not to be imprisoned. how necessary though is a _ care. not to be imprisoned. how necessary though is a legal challenge, given that the restrictions are going to be lifted. by restrictions are going to be lifted. by the time you get to fight this in court... you will be at the other side, won't you? court. .. you will be at the other side, won't you?— court... you will be at the other side, won't you? yes, i love the fact he said _ side, won't you? yes, i love the fact he said that. _ side, won't you? yes, i love the fact he said that. this _ side, won't you? yes, i love the fact he said that. this guidancel fact he said that. this guidance came out on march the 8th. it was
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very hasty. they didn't consult with anybody. they remember, there's people in care homes, we have forgotten them again and they brought this out on march the 8th without talking to anybody and people did make representations to the department of health and so we waited. hoping that they would see sense and realise this is completely, it's objectionable, it's discriminatory, it's also unworkable, you can't keep putting people in the cooler for ia days. so we hoped that that they would get over it. but when i've heard the distress from residents, families, last weekend, when everyone else was about to go out and jump in swimming pools and go and play golf and they said once again, our relatives have been forgotten. we thought, 0k, we'd got this ready, we started the challenge actually before christmas. then of course, things were
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different. so we thought, actually, someone has got to stand up and eric this issue because it is a deprivation of liberty. let's see whether it _ deprivation of liberty. let's see whether it gets _ deprivation of liberty. let's see whether it gets to _ deprivation of liberty. let's see whether it gets to court - deprivation of liberty. let's see whether it gets to court or- deprivation of liberty. let's see whether it gets to court or they will change their minds again. julia jones, thank you. owners of pubs, cafes and restaurants are criticising new rules which will allow them to reopen safely outdoors in ten days' time. all customers will have to give their contact details to staff, or check in using the nhs covid app. industry groups say the rules will impose an extra burden on premises, many of which will already be trading at a loss. the government says it's providing as much flexibility as possible to venues. europe's vaccination campaign has been hit by delays and the number of infections is rising in many countries. lockdowns are once again coming into force as governments take action against a third wave. for three days over easter, italy will enforce a total shutdown across the whole country. in france, new restrictions are being rolled out — with schools closing from next week and nonessential shops
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across being told to shut, and germany has extended its current restrictions until 18 april. we can speak now to hans kluge — the world health organisation's regional director for europe. welcome to the programme and nice to have you with us again. how much of this new wave of infections in parts of europe is down to the lack of progress with vaccines? yes. of europe is down to the lack of progress with vaccines? yes. we see a fifth consecutive _ progress with vaccines? yes. we see a fifth consecutive week _ progress with vaccines? yes. we see a fifth consecutive week of _ a fifth consecutive week of increasing numbers in cases and deaths so the simple messages is we are not done with covid—i9 and we have to be very careful we don't undo the 120 days that many of us have been spending in confinement by too quickly reopening. so definitely, one way and the main way
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to go is to accelerate drastically, the roll—out of the vaccines while still fought the people to be cautious, particularly over the holidays. cautious, particularly over the holida s. ., . ., holidays. how concerned are you then that not all countries _ holidays. how concerned are you then that not all countries are _ holidays. how concerned are you then that not all countries are imposing - that not all countries are imposing these lockdown measures? it isn't a blanket thing across all parts of the eu? �* , , blanket thing across all parts of the eu? a , ., ., the eu? there's definitely a need to be more coherent _ the eu? there's definitely a need to be more coherent but _ the eu? there's definitely a need to be more coherent but also - the eu? there's definitely a need to be more coherent but also it - the eu? there's definitely a need to. be more coherent but also it depends on a national risk assessment stop but definitely, better coherence between the countries gradually reopen as recommended. because once governments are going to lift restrictions, it will be very, very difficult to go back and i do understand people, they are tired of the restrictions, because it's a very long period, we used to say vaccination is one of the tools, now we say vaccination is almost the
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tool to come out of the pandemic. the eu says the uk has had an unfair advantage in contracts to do with the production and distribution of vaccines. how much of an excuse is that by the eu that it didn't get its own act together?— that by the eu that it didn't get its own act together? well, i won't contest that _ its own act together? well, i won't contest that the _ its own act together? well, i won't contest that the eu _ its own act together? well, i won't contest that the eu did _ its own act together? well, i won't contest that the eu did not - its own act together? well, i won't contest that the eu did not get - its own act together? well, i won't contest that the eu did not get its| contest that the eu did not get its act together, i think the joint procurement by the european commission was self—reliant, you cannot compare one country with a block of 27 countries and i'm looking from a pan—european perspective so i want this to be done. speed is our best friend here. it's not a race, a race against each other, it's a race against the virus so we need to think pan—european, put aside geopolitics, speed up vaccination production in countries like hungary, the netherlands, reselling and donating instead of hoarding and the countries
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themselves with vaccination infrastructure including creating the vaccine demand because vaccines do save lives. it’s the vaccine demand because vaccines do save lives-— do save lives. it's been great to have you _ do save lives. it's been great to have you with — do save lives. it's been great to have you with us. _ do save lives. it's been great to have you with us. thank - do save lives. it's been great to have you with us. thank you - do save lives. it's been great to have you with us. thank you for do save lives. it's been great to - have you with us. thank you for your in taiwan, at least a1 people have been killed and dozens have been injured in a train crash. officials said the train was travelling to taitung, and derailed just north of huaelien. the train derailed in a tunnel in the east of the country after apparently hitting a maintenance vehicle on the track. the accident comes at the start of a holiday weekend in taiwan, the traditional tomb sweeping holiday, which sees extensive travel across the island. let's get more from our taiwan correspondent, cindy sui whojoins me now from taipei. what more can you tell us? we've just had good news, the authorities say there are no more people trapped in the trains, death toll stands at
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a8, 66 people injured, they were taken to hospital. no more people trapped the trains. that's very good news. the authorities initially had been very worried that there would been very worried that there would be much more people trapped in the last four because of the train which were badly damaged. rescuers had difficulty getting into those cars. but it seems like some of the passengers have left on their own. 0thers passengers have left on their own. others were evacuated by rescue workers. they have gotten everyone accounted for. tell workers. they have gotten everyone accounted for.— accounted for. tell us what the focus of the — accounted for. tell us what the focus of the investigation - accounted for. tell us what the focus of the investigation is - accounted for. tell us what the | focus of the investigation is on. the police are now questioning the driver of the maintenance vehicle that was parked on a slope near the track. the authorities say this vehicle slid down the slope into the tracks come onto the tracks, and hit the last car of the eight carriage train as it was passing through the tunnel. the police say the driver of the vehicle had walked away to a construction site office near the tracks, they were subcontracted out
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by the taiwan railway administration to do some maintenance work on the tracks. he walked away, apparently, according to local media without setting the handbrake on this maintenance vehicle, causing it to slant down to the tracks. —— slide down. slant down to the tracks. -- slide down. ., ~ slant down to the tracks. -- slide down. . ,, i. ., slant down to the tracks. -- slide down. . ,, ., ., , ., ., down. thank you for that update from tai ei. glastonbury festival, the national football museum and bamburgh castle are among thousands of cultural organisations and venues across england that will share £a00 million in government grants and loans. the money is the latest being offered to the culture and heritage sector to help them survive and recover after being forced to close during the pandemic. 0nline retailer boohoo is investigating why the same items of clothing were sold for higher prices across a number of its fashion labels. bbcjounalistjen meierhans discovered the problem when she bought the same coat as herfriend, but from different stores. the coat sold by coast was £3a more than exactly the same coat
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sold by dorothy perkins. and the dorothy perkins branding appeared to have been cut from the care label in the coat sold by coast. in a statement, boohoo, which owns both brands, said the miscommunication was not intentional as teams are not privy to what's being bought and sold across the other parts of the group. wildlife conservationists are warning people visiting the coast over easter weekend to keep clear of any seals they may come across and not disturb them. it's all part of a government—backed campaign by the seal alliance, which says getting too close can lead to seals being injured and even dying. john maguire reports. clearly fearful and distressed, a herd of seals is fleeing the land, heading for the safety of the sea. it's not always an easyjourney, but seals can be spooked easily by people or their dogs getting too close. it's the youngest seals that are the most vulnerable, with only around a quarter of them surviving to adulthood. and as the latest lockdown restrictions ease, conservationists are asking people out walking
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on the coastline to give the animals adequate space. people can disturb them if they are awake and alert or they're moving, then they've been disturbed. and obviously the worst situations are when they crash off the beaches and rocks into the sea and they can damage themselves, cause themselves injury. and all the while that's happening, they're not getting the rest they should be getting. last year's first full lockdown has been credited as one reason why some colonies around our coasts have thrived — having been left alone for weeks on end. but the case of freddie the seal, who died after being attacked by a dog off the lead on the banks of the river thames last month, has highlighted the potential risks to the wild animals of trying to live too close to people. now it's time for a look at the weather.
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matt taylor is here with a glorious picture from scotland. isn't it beautiful? virtual travel is the way to do it. there will be whether it like this through the weekend. that's the good news. and yes, it will feel quite pleasant, the sun is out, but this flip side of the coin, get ready for this, you'll be talking about this by the end of the weekend, cold on monday, and believe it or not, some snow, just about anywhere. it won't lie everywhere but some passing lorries may come your way. but some passing lorries may come yourway. but but some passing lorries may come your way. but today, fairly cloudy, one or two isolated rain showers in eastern england but for most of the uk, good long sunny spells this afternoon, best in the west, and afternoon, best in the west, and after a frosty start, it will feel pleasant with the sun on your back, temperature 13 or 1a degrees compared to seven or 8 degrees with the wind pushing from the north sea towards eastern english coast. call today for the channel islands. cloud clearing for a time this evening, returns tonight across england and
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wales, claudia in northern scotland, in between, scotland and northern ireland, england and wales, pros taking us into the start of the weekend but lots of dry weather to come on saturday, the warmest of the yearin come on saturday, the warmest of the year in scotland and northern ireland, mild on sunday for england and wales, but a bitterly cold wind chill to come on monday. more details to come throughout the morning. hello this is bbc news. the headlines. more than 70 mps launch a campaign against coronavirus vaccine passports, calling them "divisive and discriminatory". campaigners have started legal action against the government over guidance that bans care home residents in england aged 65 and overfrom taking trips outside the home. pub, cafe and restaurant owners criticise new rules which mean all customers have to give their contact details to staff, when premises reopen outdoors in 10 days' time. more than a0 people have been killed and dozens injured in a train crash in taiwan.
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time now for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre. good morning. it's notjust a busy easter weekend of fixtures in rugby league, but all the super league matches are being dedicated to former player mose masoe, whose career was ended by a life changing, spinal injury last january. in the first two matches last night, players wore his name on their shirts, and clubs sold virtual tickets for the matches to raise money for his foundation. he and his wife carisa told me earlier the difference the help can make. it was just so overwhelming. we have had such great support and we are so thankful to everyone for showing their love. this has never happened before in the game so i am very fortunate and lucky as a player that the whole rugby league community is there to support myself and my
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family. there to support myself and my famil . ~ ., there to support myself and my famil . ~ . , ., ., ., family. we have been so emotional, not onl family. we have been so emotional, rrot only these _ family. we have been so emotional, not only these last _ family. we have been so emotional, not only these last 14 _ family. we have been so emotional, not only these last 14 months - family. we have been so emotional, not only these last 14 months but i not only these last 14 months but especially— not only these last 14 months but especially this last week as well. it especially this last week as well. it means— especially this last week as well. it means the world to us. we just can't _ it means the world to us. we just can't believe how many people are going _ can't believe how many people are going out— can't believe how many people are going out of their way to support us. going out of their way to support us it— going out of their way to support us. it really means a lot. the}r going out of their way to support us. it really means a lot. they gave me a chance _ us. it really means a lot. they gave me a chance during _ us. it really means a lot. they gave me a chance during the _ us. it really means a lot. they gave me a chance during the surgery, i us. it really means a lot. they gavel me a chance during the surgery, and said, you might not ever walk again, but in the back of my head, i was stubborn, and i said to myself, i'm going to do this, i'm going to prove you wrong. i'm glad that i am where i am today. you wrong. i'm glad that i am where i am today-— india cricket legend sachin tendulkar is in hospital, as his covid—19 symptoms have got worse. he tested positive six days ago after developing mild symptoms, but after qaurantining himself at home, he has been advised to admit himself to hospital. he's now a7 and is test cricket's all—time leading run scorer, in a record 200 matches. his social media tweet thanked people for their wishes
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and prayers and says the decision to go to hospital is out a of an "abundance of precaution" and that he hopes to be home in a few days. celtic are talking to former bournemouth manager eddie howe about becoming their manager. the bbc understands he's held discussions with members of the club's board. howe left bournemouth in august 2020, when the club was relegated from the premier league. celtic have been without a manager since neil lennon resigned in february. now after the world cup qualifiers, it's straight back into club matches today, and the football league takes centre stage, with the easter weekend often a defining time in promotion and relagtion battles. in promotion and relegation battles. championship leaders norwich city know that two wins, today and on monday, would put them within touching distance of an immediate return to the premier league. they take on preston this afternoon, but having had eight players on international duty in the week, the game has come too early for their manager. this decision is not in the sense of fair play, not in the sense of the integrity of the competition, not in the sense of... yeah, also the quality of the competition —
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not even to speak about the safety and the health and also the mental health of the players. but i spoke about this topic also quite intense and quite detailed a few weeks ago, when there was the possibility to change. right now it's a fact and it's not my topic any more so it's more like we have to deal with it. golf's first major of the year is under way — the women's ana inspiration in california. charley hull is in contention after the first round at mission hills. this chip in at the 11th hole for an eagle helped her to a round of 69. she is 3—under par alongside fellow english players bronte law and georgia hall. they are tied for eighth, three off the leader thailand's patty tavata nakit. the major league baseball season got under way with fans back watching for the first time in more than a year. there were few covid restrictions but a lot of stadiums limiting capacity. the 2020 season was shortened and played without fans being able to attend a single game. a lot of really —— a lot of relief,
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there. that's all the sport for now. the bbc has been told that drivers who deliverfor amazon in the uk feel under pressure to adopt unsafe and potentially illegal working practices because of their increased workload in the pandemic. the online company's sales rose by more than half last year in britain. amazon says it's committed to treating its drivers with respect and there is a hotline to raise concerns. newsnight�*s lewis goodall has been investigating. it's just so convenient, isn't it? you need, you click, you buy. it arrives. i was close to tears at that point. i was cold, i was hungry, i needed the bathroom. and it arrives so quickly. which when so many shops are closed, when you don't want, or you can't, leave your house, seems a deliverance in every sense of the word. as disgusting as it sounds, ijust had to get a cup, or get my shewee and a bottle, and go in the back of the van. their drivers are telling them.
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they need to listen to their drivers on this. they have got to stop ignoring the data. and it is so cheap. you don't even feel as if you are paying for it, but someone is. it is the men and women bringing it to your door. why is it that amazon drivers always seem to be in such a rush to deliver what you want your front door? the answer is that they are in a race against time. we have spoken to several current and former amazon drivers who have told us that the number of deliveries they are being asked to make on a daily basis over the course of the pandemic has increased significantly, and yet they have not been given the appropriate time to compensate. as a result, they say, they are under considerable mental and physical pressure, and are engaging in practices which are sometimes unsafe and even potentially illegal, putting themselves and the public at risk. for reasons you will understand, some of those who agreed to speak to us on camera did so on condition of anonymity.
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amazon is a company that is both ubiquitous and mysterious. in many ways, we know little about it. we don't even know how many drivers deliver its parcels, but we suppose it is in the thousands, perhaps tens of thousands. john — we will call him john — is among them. when i first started delivering parcels, it was 120, 130 drops, about 180 parcels a day. when the pandemic started, they started putting on more workload, to the extent now where it is 320 parcels and nearly 200 drops a day that drivers are doing. it is physically impossible sometimes. are you given any extra pay or time to do that? 0nly during the peak periods, which is six weeks prior to christmas, and that's it. john has delivered for amazon for nearly two years. as stressful as it is, in the main, he continues to enjoy it. but there are those who deliver for a shorter time, for instance, two people we're calling simon and gemma. both lost theirjobs as a result of the pandemic and found work as amazon delivery drivers.
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it was a no—brainer for me. i was looking forward to it, really looking forward to driving, delivering, and getting home to be with the family. you have two days' training in a classroom which was about driving safety. they were very big on safe driving. i was totally unexpected... ..to experience what i did, based on what the training told me. i'm fully aware of road safety. you couldn't adhere to those rules, based on what we had to do. you have 15 minutes to load your van, and some guys, a lot of us couldn't even fit what we had to get in the van, so we had to find other drivers to take the rest of the parcels and obviously, that's stressing them. at that point, i texted the ops manager who met me briefly, for about a minute, to run me through the app, provide me with my boxes and told me to go. at that point, i realised my first drop was 38 miles away. as soon as the driver is in the van,
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it is the beginning of what can be a gruelling experience. if you think amazon knows a lot about you, it is nothing to what it knows about its drivers. every moment, every second, tracked, monitored, assessed, by its in—vehicle app. they monitor you through the app, so they can see how fast you're going, how many parcels you've delivered. theyjust work everything out. you have a time in the morning when you are at the depot and how quickly you've got to load your van, they monitor you on that. they monitor you on the times you scan on and offjobs. everything is being monitored and the workload is getting higher, and getting harder and harder and harder to fulfil those routes in nine hours. you become anxious immediately. you get a list of all the drivers and whether they are behind, or whether they are ahead, so you know if it's you behind, you will see straight away. you will get a visual explanation that you are behind and that puts you at an anxious situation quite badly. so if you are not meeting your target, you get a message - off your manager or whatever saying, "oh, you are seven parcels _ behind, what's going on?"
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0n those messages, it tells you how manyjobs you've got to do, so, you know, there was ones with 185, 225 drops. not packages, drops. so i think mine was 125 on my first day. going down country lanes to deliver parcels when amazon don't even know how bad these lanes are, it might take you 15 minutes to deliver one parcel just because of how bad a country lane is. and the app doesn't take account for that? not a chance, no. sometimes it's like, "oh, . speed up please, speed up, try your best to get as many- as you can done", and, obviously, you are trying to speed up. you are driving dangerously. you can't deliver how amazon want you to deliver. - so every time you hear a ting, you are anxious, you become more worried that you are not going to be able to reach your target. the law says that the maximum a van driver can drive for is ten hours. amazon shifts are nine hours. that's why it's a race against the clock. within that, amazon says there is supposed to be a 30—minute lunch break, but the drivers we've spoken to say that that is a remote prospect,
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as are even more basic requirements. toilet breaks weren't a thing. because the van was so packed, i would have to wait until i had i emptied three totes - so i had a bit of room and, as disgusting as it sounds, ijust had to get a cup _ or get my shewee and a bottle and go in the back of the van. we have all been addicted to amazon during this entire pandemic. in america, just this week, this issue has hit the headlines, again with drivers alleging so little time to make their deliveries that they had to urinate into bottles. amazon have denied that this happens. amazon responded and said you don't believe that thing about peeing in bottles is true. but there are even more serious concerns about safety. every amazon driver i've known, they all speed. i we all park in places _ where you are not supposed to, double yellows, on busy roads. if you've got a house - on a country lane and there is no parking there, _ you have to set up on the side of the road, run -
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across and do your drop. yeah, it's not safe. you've just got to put your hazards on and hope for the best. - amazon told us they have a 2a—hour hotline drivers can phone if they have problems. but here's the rub — they're not even technically employed by amazon. they are self—employed, contracted through a panoply of logistics companies and, yet... everything is controlled by amazon, the route is set by amazon, the workload is set by amazon, the mileage is set by amazon. so, basically, the logistics firm is basicallyjust a middleman, really. say you don't get it done, i mean, does amazon re—employ you? what happens with the logistics firm? your ratings get reduced, your ratings go down if you don't fulfil some parcels because of time constraints or the customer is not in, then i think they base your ratings on eight or nine different ratings, because if you don't deliver parcels, your ratings come down, so you are monitored all the time on every aspect of what you do. and what happens if your ratings continue to fall? the logistics firm will just get rid of you. lay you off?
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yep. and that's quite easy to do? oh, it happens all the time. the turnover of staff is phenomenal. drivers attend an amazon training day. they usually exclusively deliver for amazon and it is an amazon app that tracks and monitors them in their vehicles. and yet, remember, because they are self—employed, they don't have company benefits, they don't get sick pay, they don't get holiday pay and there is little recourse, should the company decide that their services are no longer required. the supreme court unanimously dismisses the appeal from uber. this isn't an issue about amazon alone. all manner of gig economy companies are grappling with an evolving legal situation governing those they employ in one way or another. but amazon is by far the biggest concerned and a change petition demanding the number of deliveries is redeuced has attracted nearly 80,000 signatures, at least some of whom are verified amazon drivers. its organisers say that reform
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is long overdue and the company doesn't want to know what is really going on. i think genuinely, they're currently not gathering. they don't want to know the answer. they know how dangerous this is, their drivers are telling them, they need to listen to their drivers and stop ignoring the data. it is a really simple change for them to make to take the targets back to a safe level. as you see, we put lots of energy into logistics. remember, amazon's uk sales increased by 51% in 2020, a revenue of £20 billion. it has been the beneficiary of a pandemic which has accelerated our move to the online economy, and yet at once, it feels as if we have also gone backwards to a time when the rules about what can legitimately be expected by a company of its workers were much less rigid. oh, my gosh, amazon. i have tried a position at the warehouse. politicians and perhaps the rest of us might need to ask ourselves if that is the future we want, if that convenience is worth the price. the headlines on bbc news. more than 70 mps launch a campaign
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against coronavirus vaccine passports, calling them "divisive and discriminatory". campaigners have started legal action against the government over guidance that bans care home residents in england aged 65 and overfrom taking trips outside the home. pub, cafe and restaurant owners criticise new rules which mean all customers have to give their contact details to staff, when premises reopen outdoors in 10 days' time. a new survey from the early intervention foundation, a charity to improve the lives of children and young people, finds only four in ten adults are confident they'd know how to support a victim of domestic abuse. the research also finds systems of support for child and adult victims of domestic abuse are an "unfair lottery". let's get more on this from the charity's chief executive, drjo casebourne.
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thank you forjoining us. what was the question you asked of people? we the question you asked of people? - asked people if they would know where to go if they had a friend or family member they thought might be a victim of domestic abuse and as you say, only four in ten knew where to go so people don't know where to turn. we also asked if people felt there should be more support for the victims of domestic abuse. 71% felt there should be and 61% of people we spoke to felt the government should be doing more. spoke to felt the government should be doing more-— be doing more. where does this uncertainty _ be doing more. where does this uncertainty stem _ be doing more. where does this uncertainty stem from, - be doing more. where does this uncertainty stem from, do - be doing more. where does this uncertainty stem from, do you i uncertainty stem from, do you believe? ~ , , , believe? well, it is 'ust very unclear for h believe? well, it is 'ust very unclear for people _ believe? well, it isjust very unclear for people about - believe? well, it isjust very i unclear for people about what believe? well, it isjust very - unclear for people about what they should do and where they should turn. this is so important because we know the impact domestic abuse has, particularly on children. it can affect their mental health in the long term. it can mean they are more likely to get involved in anti—social behaviour or criminal behaviour. it means it is harderfor them to form relationships as they grow older. it is a real worry that people don't know where to turn. it people don't know where to turn. it underlines the importance of these
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findings from a long—term perspective. how much worse has it got over the last 12 months with people being stuck at home far more than usual? ~ , ,., , people being stuck at home far more than usual? ~ , , ,, ., ., than usual? absolutely, we know that covid has put — than usual? absolutely, we know that covid has put a _ than usual? absolutely, we know that covid has put a lot _ than usual? absolutely, we know that covid has put a lot of— than usual? absolutely, we know that covid has put a lot of pressure - than usual? absolutely, we know that covid has put a lot of pressure on - covid has put a lot of pressure on families, so financial pressure, people being stuck at home together, as you say, and of course, children and adult victims being less in front of services who might be able to spot the signs of domestic abuse. we have estimated that 15,000 children in any two week period like the easter holidays, for example, we'll be experiencing domestic abuse. but it is probably higher than that due to covid and we have definitely seen things like increased calls to domestic abuse helpline is, for example. 50 increased calls to domestic abuse helpline is, for example.- helpline is, for example. so what are the signs _ helpline is, for example. so what are the signs that _ helpline is, for example. so what are the signs that people - helpline is, for example. so what are the signs that people should| are the signs that people should look out for and what should they do if they have concerns? if look out for and what should they do if they have concerns?— if they have concerns? if they have concerns, if they have concerns? if they have concerns. we _ if they have concerns? if they have concerns, we would _ if they have concerns? if they have concerns, we would recommend i if they have concerns? if they have i concerns, we would recommend they call the national domestic abuse helpline of refuge because it is difficult for individuals to make a
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call over whether someone is expanding domestic abuse or not. but one of the findings of the research todayis one of the findings of the research today is that astonishingly, we still don't know very much about what works to support the children who are victims of domestic abuse. how well resourced are those support services, then? we know over many years, when local authorities have beenin years, when local authorities have been in charge, they have had to make some difficult funding decisions at.— make some difficult funding decisions at. ~ , ., decisions at. absolutely, so our work found _ decisions at. absolutely, so our work found that _ decisions at. absolutely, so our work found that lots _ decisions at. absolutely, so our work found that lots of - decisions at. absolutely, so our work found that lots of services | work found that lots of services were vulnerable to funding cuts and are often piecemeal in terms of local availability. we found a lack of support for very young children and babies, a lack of therapeutic support for children who had been witnesses of severe trauma and abuse. and also lack of kind of tailored services for those from minority ethnic groups. —— are minorities and ethnic groups. we also found a lack of evidence, of the services available, of knowing which ones work so people in local government are having to refer to services on the basis of something being better than nothing and this
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might be a service without a waiting list rather than being able to select a service that we know has the most evidence to impact the children's lives.— children's lives. thank you for 'oinin: children's lives. thank you for joining us- — children's lives. thank you for joining us. thank _ children's lives. thank you for joining us. thank you. - it's just ten days now until the pubs reopen and you can sit outside and have a pint. 0ra or a half! so how have breweries been getting ready, and how are they working out what the demand will be, with plenty of restrictions still in place? phil mackie has been finding out. if you're already savouring your first pint of draught beer on april the 12th, there is a good chance it will be from one of these casks. they are ramping up production at the marston's brewery. they have been making it in the same place and in the same way since the 19th century. during the three lockdowns, hundreds of gallons of beer have been wasted. it's been almost impossible to gauge demand. it was extremely difficult to figure out what to brew and when to brew it.
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but having some knowledge of previous sales and trying to come to some kind of assumption, and gut feel, was really used in all of this and just monitoring things very closely. if it's been tough for the big brewers, it's been even worse for the small independents. last week, dozens staged a protest by pouring beer down the drain which was about to go off. out of date. going down the drain. a tragedy. the lincoln green brewery, in hucknall, has survived where others haven't. this has been the most challenging period of our entire existence and certainly my career to date. it has been mentally challenging and financially challenging for us. will you survive? yeah, definitely. we will come out of the other side with a lot of battle scars. we came into the pandemic completely debt—free and we have essentially had to self—finance our way through all of this.
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60% of pubs in england won't reopen on april the 12th. most that do will be taking a risk. on days like this, the station hotel would normally be rammed with drinkers, but nobody can come until april the 12th. and, by then, the weather might be awful, which means it's impossible for the brewing industry and the pubs to plan for what's to come next. in well over a century, brewers like marston's have never faced a challenge like the pandemic, and they are desperate for things to get back to normal quickly. it's important that the industry recovers, because, ok, the pub isn't just a place for serving beer, it is the central hub of the community. it creates thousands ofjobs, not only in hospitality, but also within the brewing industry and all the allied suppliers and traders. so the economic recovery of the pub is really, really important. the industry has taken a beating and is urging the government to stick to its road map and lift
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all restrictions byjune the 21st. lucy cordrey runs corinium ales — which in normal times brews about 1,000 pints per week at its brewery in cirencester in gloucestershire. thank you forjoining us. you are a nano brewery, i have heard of a microbrewery, what is the difference? abs, microbrewery, what is the difference?— microbrewery, what is the difference? ., , , difference? a nano brewery is even smaller than _ difference? a nano brewery is even smaller than a _ difference? a nano brewery is even smaller than a microbrewery! - difference? a nano brewery is even smaller than a microbrewery! we l difference? a nano brewery is even i smaller than a microbrewery! we are what you would call a two, two and a half brewers barrel length and most microbreweries are 20 times bigger than that. we are very small but it is our livelihood and we don't have any other income, you know, so we rely on our trade and customers to buy the beer. 50 rely on our trade and customers to buy the beer-— buy the beer. so what has the last ear been buy the beer. so what has the last year been like _ buy the beer. so what has the last year been like for _ buy the beer. so what has the last
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year been like for you? _ buy the beer. so what has the last year been like for you? we - buy the beer. so what has the last year been like for you? we were i year been like for you? we were hearing about protests from some breweries, they are throwing away the beer that they have produced. have you had to do that? we haven't et! last have you had to do that? we haven't yet! last year— have you had to do that? we haven't yet! last year was — have you had to do that? we haven't yet! last year was very _ have you had to do that? we haven't yet! last year was very stop - have you had to do that? we haven't yet! last year was very stop and - yet! last year was very stop and start. it was very difficult for everybody and we all had to work out a way of how we were going to adapt to survive. we managed to keep going. we had to focus on bottle sales because obviously, the pubs closed and that is 20% of our trade, to pubs. but overall, i mean, we are down 50% now but yeah, we had to sort of adapt to what we did and it has been a roller—coaster. i think before christmas, normally, you get that build—up, nobody had that this yearin that build—up, nobody had that this year in hospitality to take you through to the quieter months of january and february. so you know, this year potentially could be
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harder, if we don't stick to the road map and open up and have a really good summer! what road map and open up and have a really good summer!— road map and open up and have a really good summer! what help were ou able to really good summer! what help were you able to rely _ really good summer! what help were you able to rely on _ really good summer! what help were you able to rely on from _ really good summer! what help were you able to rely on from the - you able to rely on from the government to get you through? him. government to get you through? um, we were able — government to get you through? um, we were able to _ government to get you through? urn, we were able to have... we pay business rates so we got the initial grant at the beginning of the lockdown last year, which was a massive help, actually. and then later, before christmas, we applied for some more grant support, local support, that the local councils were giving and we managed to get some of that. and again, it has been a real lifeline. it is not sustainable, carrying on as we are, and we did close injanuary on fabry because it was not worth our while opening. we put ourselves on furlough. this month, march, and now into april but march has been really quiet, we are down 50%, as i say. it is not sustainable to carry on like
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this. we have been trying deliveries and things, trying to adapt as we go but we are not quite sure what is coming all the time so you have to be quite flexible. i coming all the time so you have to be quite flexible.— be quite flexible. i suppose the size of your _ be quite flexible. i suppose the size of your company _ be quite flexible. i suppose the size of your company means i be quite flexible. i suppose the | size of your company means you be quite flexible. i suppose the i size of your company means you can bejust size of your company means you can be just that. we wish you well. thank you forjoining us. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt. hello. first things first. it will be pleasant through the part of the easter weekend, lots of dry weather to come in when the sun is out, it will feel quite mild at times but then there is monday. arctic air comes in, it stands much colder and there will be some snow flurries around. what is happening with the temperature? colderair around. what is happening with the temperature? colder air with us, the blue colours, this slice of yellow, something mother, scotland and northern ireland for saturday and england and wales on sunday and then we have on the floodgates to the arctic air, that i mentioned, and as i will show you, the snow will come with it. out there today, no snow
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around of course, plenty of cloud across parts of eastern england and one or two isolated showers, but driver the vast majority. best of the sunshine in the west and the lightest of the wind. after a chilly and frosty starting places this morning, with sunshine on your back and light wind, 13 or 1a degrees is the high and the west, and it will feel reasonably pleasant for the time of year but still feeling chilly down the north sea coasts, seven or 8 degrees for some. it will stay breezy here as well as we go into tonight, after brief clear spells, more cloud rolling in, more clout in northern scotland tonight but with clear skies across the rest of scotland, northern ireland and western fringes of england and wales, frosty start to the weekend but sunny. the cloud across the bulk of england will thin and break at times during the day to allow more sunshine to develop. staying cloudy on the east coast. a bit more cloud across the far north of scotland but with sunshine out, temperatures set to rise, eastern parts of northern ireland and eastern parts of scotland, 15 or 16. 8—12 across england and wales. but we switch
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things around on sunday. more sunshine developing for england and wales, a bit more cloud in the channel islands, turning cloudy and windy for scotland and northern ireland through the day and we will eventually see some rain which will turn to sleet and snow late in the day. temperatures at their height before dropping later, 8 degrees in the north but we could hit 15 or 16 across parts of east wales and eastern england. and here comes the arctic air, after a night of rain turning to sleet and snow, pushing southwards, we open the door to snow showers and some pretty icy wind all the way from the arctic. best chance of a covering of snow in northern scotland, down to eastern parts of england, particularly in the likes of the north york moors and on the heels of northern ireland and maybe snowdonia. but for most, sunny spells and the odd passing snow shower and temperatures, 5—9, with wind touching gale force in places, it will feel sub zero.
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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. more than british 70 mps launch a campaign against coronavirus vaccine passports, calling them �*divisive and discriminatory�* more than a0 people have been killed and dozens injured in a train crash in taiwan campaigners have started legal action against the uk government over guidance that bans care home residents in england aged 65 and overfrom taking trips outside the home. pub, cafe and restaurant owners in england criticise new rules which mean all customers have to give their contact details to staff, when premises reopen outdoors in 10 days time wildlife conservationists warn people to keep their distance from seals this easter weekend, over concerns that disturbing and scaring them can lead to harm

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