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tv   Brexitcast  BBC News  April 2, 2021 1:30am-2:01am BST

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by the bbc which appear to show the killing of unarmed civilians in ethiopia's northern tigray region, by people wearing ethiopian army uniforms. ethiopia's government says it's open to independent investigations but added that social media posts and claims cannot be taken as evidence. george floyd's girlfriend has described how they both struggled with opioid addiction. her testimony came as the murder trial of former police officer derek chauvin entered it's fourth day. he denies charges of murder and manslaughter. chauvin�*s defence team say mr floyd died because of ill—health and drug overuse. a british metropolitan police officer has been found guilty of belonging to a banned neo—nazi terror group. twenty two year—old benjamin hannam is the first serving officer, to be convicted of a terror offence after he joined far right extremist group national action, which was banned in 2016. now on bbc news, brexitcast.
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hello again, laura. hello. hello again, laura. hello. hello chris. _ hello again, laura. hello. hello chris. do _ hello again, laura. hello. hello chris. do you - hello again, laura. hello. hello chris. do you knowl hello again, laura. hello. . hello chris. do you know why brexitcast has been brought back? it brexitcast has been brought back? , . ., , back? it is an anniversary. screaming _ back? it is an anniversary. screaming popular- back? it is an anniversary. i screaming popular demand. back? it is an anniversary. - screaming popular demand. laura was riuht. screaming popular demand. laura was right. occupational _ was right. occupational therapy- _ was right. occupational therapy. one _ was right. occupational therapy. one of - was right. occupational therapy. one of our - was right. occupational - therapy. one of our bosses said we should have a special season when we look at what has happened since three months after the uk left the eu and brexit became a proper thing. this is a contribution to our box — this is a contribution to our box set _ this is a contribution to our box set-— this is a contribution to our boxset. a” , box set. apparently your third anniversary — box set. apparently your third anniversary is _ box set. apparently your third anniversary is leather, - box set. apparently your third anniversary is leather, your. anniversary is leather, your second is cotton and your face is paper. what is the three month anniversary? at,
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is paper. what is the three month anniversary? a quarter of a iece month anniversary? a quarter of a piece of _ month anniversary? a quarter of a piece of paper- _ month anniversary? a quarter of a piece of paper. a _ month anniversary? a quarter of a piece of paper. a glass - month anniversary? a quarter of a piece of paper. a glass of - a piece of paper. a glass of warm wine. _ a piece of paper. a glass of warm wine. earwax. - a piece of paper. a glass of warm wine. earwax. yes, l a piece of paper. a glass of l warm wine. earwax. yes, the earwax- _ warm wine. earwax. yes, the earwax. welcome _ warm wine. earwax. yes, the earwax. welcome to - warm wine. earwax. yes, the earwax. welcome to the - warm wine. earwax. yes, the i earwax. welcome to the earwax anniversary of brexitcast which is pre—recorded a little bit in advanced so if you want to go what happened five minutes ago, we will not be telling you. this will be a much higher intellectual claim. we are particularly reliant on the diver calle crossing. —— calle dover crossing. the diver calle crossing. -- calle dover crossing. hello. it is adam in — calle dover crossing. hello. it is adam in the _ calle dover crossing. hello. it
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is adam in the studio. - calle dover crossing. hello. it is adam in the studio. laura l calle dover crossing. hello. it| is adam in the studio. laura in the same _ is adam in the studio. laura in the same studio _ is adam in the studio. laura in the same studio but _ is adam in the studio. laura in the same studio but two - is adam in the studio. laura in l the same studio but two metres apart. the same studio but two metres a art. ., ., the same studio but two metres a art. ., . �* , , apart. katie in a brussel. chris at _ apart. katie in a brussel. chris at westminster. - apart. katie in a brussel. i chris at westminster. hello everyone- _ chris at westminster. hello everyone- it _ chris at westminster. hello everyone. it is _ chris at westminster. hello everyone. it is good - chris at westminster. hello everyone. it is good to - chris at westminster. hello everyone. it is good to be l everyone. it is good to be back. the reason we are back is because it is a good three months since the uk left the transition period, left the single market, left the customs union and the economic brexit after the political brexit. we thought this would be a good moment to look back a bit. assess where we are and maybe look into the future as much as anyone can. i thought we would start off with a bit of class with ursula von der leyen talking on christmas eve — i have not had a haircut since then — and she was quoting all
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then — and she was quoting all the greats of literature to talk about this moment and this is a moment where they cite the trade and cooperation agreement. to trade and cooperation agreement.— trade and cooperation aareement. ., ., , agreement. to our friends in the united — agreement. to our friends in the united kingdom, - agreement. to our friends in the united kingdom, i- agreement. to our friends in the united kingdom, i wantl agreement. to our friends in i the united kingdom, i want to say, parting is such sweet sorrow, but to use a line from t5 sorrow, but to use a line from ts eliot, what we call the beginning is often the end and to make an end is to make a beginning. to make an end is to make a beginning-— to make an end is to make a bearinnin. ., , ., beginning. three months lateri am still not _ beginning. three months lateri am still not sure _ beginning. three months lateri am still not sure what _ beginning. three months lateri am still not sure what that - am still not sure what that quote means but that is my fault not hers. what has the relationship been like? tricky. i think relationship been like? tricky. i think tricky — relationship been like? tricky. i think tricky on _ relationship been like? tricky. i think tricky on northern - i think tricky on northern ireland, vaccines, tricky and also quite spiky. and unsettled and it does not feel yet like it has settled into a kind of
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groove, i think that is fair to say for a variety of different reasons. one big caveat is that we are still in the pandemic and we do not have a sense of what are full fat brexit would look like because we have been handling this political and practical problem. i would say scratchy- _ practical problem. i would say scratchy- i _ practical problem. i would say scratchy. ithink— practical problem. i would say scratchy. i think unexpectedlyi scratchy. i think unexpectedly bumpy — scratchy. i think unexpectedly bumpy from the eu perspective. ithink— bumpy from the eu perspective. i think there had been hopes out that_ i think there had been hopes out that after proper brexit had — out that after proper brexit had been done, so at the end of the year. — had been done, so at the end of the year, that could be the chance _ the year, that could be the chance for new beginnings in the end _ chance for new beginnings in the end as ursula von der leyen - correct— the end as ursula von der leyen — correct pronunciation — saidm _ - correct pronunciation - said- - -— - correct pronunciation - - said. . ._ how did i say said... laughter. how did i say it? moving _ said... laughter. how did i say it? moving on- _ said... laughter. how did i say it? moving on. there _ said... laughter. how did i say it? moving on. there was - said... laughter. how did i say it? moving on. there was a - feeling in the eu that after all the _ feeling in the eu that after
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all the political tussle of the negotiations it was over that the two _ negotiations it was over that the two sides would be able to normalise relations and be able to pay— normalise relations and be able to pay un— normalise relations and be able to pay up loose ends and have a much _ to pay up loose ends and have a much more _ to pay up loose ends and have a much more positive relationship going _ much more positive relationship going forward and that actually has not — going forward and that actually has not happened, for a number of reasons— has not happened, for a number of reasons which i am sure we will now— of reasons which i am sure we will now unpack. i think the vaccine _ will now unpack. i think the vaccine crisis has fed into that— vaccine crisis has fed into that 100%. there is no way you could _ that 100%. there is no way you could see — that 100%. there is no way you could see eu and uk vaccine relations— could see eu and uk vaccine relations without the prism of brexit — brexit. it isjust incredible. ifeel— brexit. it isjust incredible. i feel we _ brexit. it isjust incredible. i feel we are right back there in the — i feel we are right back there in the old _ i feel we are right back there in the old days of interpreting both — in the old days of interpreting both sides and seeing each side talking — both sides and seeing each side talking right past one another once — talking right past one another once again. | talking right past one another once again-— once again. i wonder though and it is almost _ once again. i wonder though and it is almost too _ once again. i wonder though and it is almost too early _ once again. i wonder though and it is almost too early to - once again. i wonder though and it is almost too early to say - it is almost too early to say but — it is almost too early to say but how _ it is almost too early to say but how much _ it is almost too early to say but how much the - but how much the bumpkin is in the last few months is - but how much the bumpkin is in the last few months is actually. the last few months is actually going — the last few months is actually going to — the last few months is actually going to he _ the last few months is actually going to he the _ the last few months is actually going to be the ongoing - going to be the ongoing realitv _ going to be the ongoing reality. surely- going to be the ongoing reality. surely there - going to be the ongoing reality. surely there is i going to be the ongoing i reality. surely there is an inevitability _ reality. surely there is an inevitability that - reality. surely there is an inevitability that would i reality. surely there is an| inevitability that would be scratched _ inevitability that would be scratched in _ inevitability that would be scratched in the _ inevitability that would be
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scratched in the future? i | scratched in the future? realise i was quite scratched in the future ?|i realise i was quite native because i thought... there was that sort of idea that the rules based when they are in black and white, there is a little bit of leeway and politics comes in and it is in everyone's interest to have cordial relations and i was so naive and it surprised me that things got so scratchy so quickly but maybe i should not have been surprised. we look at the people involved, the environment. the vaccine wasn't life and death which raises the stakes. �* ,., . , stakes. and when the politics are different, _ stakes. and when the politics are different, there _ stakes. and when the politics are different, there will- stakes. and when the politics are different, there will be i are different, there will be different for two neighbours. the uk and the continent separated in lots of ways, culturally, politically, intellectually, separated emotionally. everybody wants to be friends but also it is
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friends and rivals. it be friends but also it is friends and rivals.- be friends but also it is friends and rivals. it is like a coople — friends and rivals. it is like a coople got _ friends and rivals. it is like a couple got divorced i friends and rivals. it is like a couple got divorced and l friends and rivals. it is like i a couple got divorced and they are still— a couple got divorced and they are still knowing each other when — are still knowing each other when they drop off the kids. it is still— when they drop off the kids. it is still like you are still annoyed that you took all the dvds — annoyed that you took all the dvds. ,, ., , ., ., , dvds. showing my age. people i think are still _ dvds. showing my age. people i think are still harbouring - dvds. showing my age. people i think are still harbouring the i think are still harbouring the kind of scars... is at the right word? kind of scars. .. is at the right word?— kind of scars... is at the right word? justifying the osition right word? justifying the position they _ right word? justifying the position they took - right word? justifying the position they took in i right word? justifying the position they took in the | position they took in the previous— position they took in the previous years. - position they took in the previous years.- position they took in the previous years. exactly. both sides, previous years. exactly. both sides. this— previous years. exactly. both sides, this is _ previous years. exactly. both sides, this is putting - previous years. exactly. both sides, this is putting it i sides, this is putting it simplistically, but they have a point — simplistically, but they have a point to— simplistically, but they have a point to prove. eu leaders still— point to prove. eu leaders still want to show that brexit was not _ still want to show that brexit was not a good idea and for the government it is in the government it is in the government interest to show brexit— government interest to show brexit was a great idea. company vaccine crisis and the
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government saying, post brexit uk, we — government saying, post brexit uk, we are able to approve vaccine, _ uk, we are able to approve vaccine, by our own, that you says — vaccine, by our own, that you says you _ vaccine, by our own, that you says you would have been able to do _ says you would have been able to do that _ says you would have been able to do that but look at the terrible _ to do that but look at the terrible history. —— the eu. somehow— terrible history. —— the eu. somehow it has got dragged into this debate. somehow it has got dragged into this debate-— this debate. it comes back to the pandemic. _ this debate. it comes back to the pandemic. if— this debate. it comes back to the pandemic. if you - this debate. it comes back to the pandemic. if you want i this debate. it comes back to the pandemic. if you want to | the pandemic. if you want to know the size of the queues is a non—eu passport holder we have not experienced that. losing your mobile phone. irate losing your mobile phone. we cannotjudge the effect losing your mobile phone. we cannot judge the effect of brexit— cannot judge the effect of brexit for quite a long time to come — brexit for quite a long time to come. ., .., , brexit for quite a long time to come, ., . ., , , , brexit for quite a long time to come. ., , , , ., come. you can be sure it is not worked out _ come. you can be sure it is not worked out exactly _ come. you can be sure it is not worked out exactly as - come. you can be sure it is not worked out exactly as the i come. you can be sure it is not| worked out exactly as the prime minister used to promise. that takes us to _ minister used to promise. that takes us to our— minister used to promise. that takes us to our next _ takes us to our next retrospective clip. on the day
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of the trade deal being done, not the bad brussels sprouts joke. i not the bad brussels sprouts 'oke. ., , ., ., joke. i thought you did not like that — joke. i thought you did not like that joke. _ joke. i thought you did not like that joke. he - joke. i thought you did not like that joke. he was i joke. i thought you did not i like that joke. he was talking like that 'oke. he was talking about like that joke. he was talking about the _ like that joke. he was talking about the claim _ like that joke. he was talking about the claim that - like that joke. he was talking about the claim that there i about the claim that there would not be non— tariff barriers. would not be non- tariff barriers-— would not be non- tariff barriers. , ., barriers. there will be no nontariff _ barriers. there will be no nontariff barriers - barriers. there will be no nontariff barriers to i barriers. there will be no j nontariff barriers to trade instead there will be a giant free—trade zone which we will be a member and at the same time be able to do free—trade deals is one uk whole and entire. , , , .,, entire. remind us why people were scratching _ entire. remind us why people were scratching their- entire. remind us why people were scratching their heads? l were scratching their heads? because there are nontariff barriers like filling in forms, expert checks, all sorts of things that have made a big difference. forall that things that have made a big difference. for all that the prime minister wanted to say that and it is very important that and it is very important
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that in the deal were not terrace but there are now, however you look at it and spinning, there right extra checks and extra hassles. that became very clear, very quickly, particularly by one very angry scottish fishermen. the managing director... irate the managing director... we cannot get — the managing director... we cannot get the _ the managing director... - cannot get the product to market next week, we the gates of westminster and dumping shellfish on your gate, rotten, the same way as the government is rotten to the call. ~ ., ~' government is rotten to the call. ~ ., ~ ., . call. would you like to correct my pronunciation? _ call. would you like to correct my pronunciation? eu - call. would you like to correct i my pronunciation? eu exporters are facing much less hassle.
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the uk external border with eu is getting delayed. presumably europeans are not complaining? that is not something we are hearing — that is not something we are hearing about on the eu side. there — hearing about on the eu side. there is— hearing about on the eu side. there is a _ hearing about on the eu side. there is a recognition do hear it from eu businesses that— do hear it from eu businesses that export to the uk as well as uk— that export to the uk as well as uk businesses exporting to the eu, — as uk businesses exporting to the eu, and awareness — we're talking — the eu, and awareness — we're talking about teething problems - these — talking about teething problems — these are permanent barriers, these _ — these are permanent barriers, these non- _ — these are permanent barriers, these non— tariff barriers and what — these non— tariff barriers and what the _ these non— tariff barriers and what the eu keeps fishing for, excuse — what the eu keeps fishing for, excuse the terrible bun, has been — excuse the terrible bun, has been for— excuse the terrible bun, has been for a _ excuse the terrible bun, has been for a long time, is an agreement with the uk over plant — agreement with the uk over plant and animal rules and what they mean, of course, in the eu is harmonisation which the uk is harmonisation which the uk is not — is harmonisation which the uk
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is not keen on because it once it diverged _ is not keen on because it once it diverged from eu rules so that— it diverged from eu rules so that very— it diverged from eu rules so that very familiar push— pull that— that very familiar push— pull that we _ that very familiar push— pull that we felt throughout the negotiations, it will be so much _ negotiations, it will be so much easier if we had the same rules. _ much easier if we had the same rules, is— much easier if we had the same rules, is back here when it comes— rules, is back here when it comes to _ rules, is back here when it comes to plant and animal products. comes to plant and animal products-— comes to plant and animal roducts., , ., ., products. just to boil it down, unless the — products. just to boil it down, unless the government i unless the government in the uk now or— unless the government in the uk now or in — unless the government in the uk now or in the _ unless the government in the uk now or in the future _ unless the government in the uk now or in the future is _ unless the government in the uk now or in the future is willing i now or in the future is willing to do— now or in the future is willing to do a — now or in the future is willing to do a bit— now or in the future is willing to do a bit more _ now or in the future is willing i to do a bit more harmonisation and that— to do a bit more harmonisation and that maiming _ to do a bit more harmonisation and that maiming we _ to do a bit more harmonisation and that maiming we cannot i to do a bit more harmonisation| and that maiming we cannot do deals— and that maiming we cannot do deals elsewhere, _ and that maiming we cannot do deals elsewhere, the _ and that maiming we cannot do deals elsewhere, the practical. deals elsewhere, the practical reality— deals elsewhere, the practical reality for— deals elsewhere, the practical reality for businesses - deals elsewhere, the practical reality for businesses is - deals elsewhere, the practical reality for businesses is that i reality for businesses is that this is— reality for businesses is that this is a _ reality for businesses is that this is a permanent - reality for businesses is that this is a permanent thing i reality for businesses is that this is a permanent thing to| this is a permanent thing to -et this is a permanent thing to get used _ this is a permanent thing to get used to _ this is a permanent thing to get used to. it— this is a permanent thing to get used to-_ get used to. it has certainly cost but _ get used to. it has certainly cost but coming _ get used to. it has certainly cost but coming back- get used to. it has certainly cost but coming back to i get used to. it has certainly cost but coming back to the get used to. it has certainly i cost but coming back to the big debate — cost but coming back to the big debate about brexit, there will be issues — debate about brexit, there will be issues like that but the government keeps saying wait for the — government keeps saying wait for the other side of brexit. also— for the other side of brexit. also the _ for the other side of brexit. also the government jumped for the other side of brexit. also the governmentjumped in quite quickly with funds to compensate the fishermen. money has been spent and directed at
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these sectors. as agricultural trades change do they get caught up in these nontariff barriers? the other thing that comes up almost every day, and maybe he may have happen in a time we record this, about northern ireland and for me, the standout quote in this complicated issue was michael gove on a video from his very grand office painting a metaphorfor grand office painting a metaphor for what the metaphor was like for the eu over the northern ireland bit of the brexit. ~ , ., ., brexit. when the plaintext of, ou aet brexit. when the plaintext of, you get that — brexit. when the plaintext of, you get that increased - brexit. when the plaintext of, you get that increased level. brexit. when the plaintext of, j you get that increased level of template and then you reach a level and the crew tells you to take your seatbelt off and enjoy some gin and tonic and venus. we're not at that gin
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and tonic level yet. i venus. we're not at that gin and tonic level yet.- and tonic level yet. i love that. i have _ and tonic level yet. i love that. i have to _ and tonic level yet. i love that. i have to say - and tonic level yet. i love that. i have to say stop i and tonic level yet. i love i that. i have to say stop but we are so — that. i have to say stop but we are so far _ that. i have to say stop but we are so far off the venus stop when — are so far off the venus stop when it— are so far off the venus stop when it comes to northern ireland, _ when it comes to northern ireland, i_ when it comes to northern ireland, i think there has been a wrecker— ireland, i think there has been a wrecker vision on the eu side that— a wrecker vision on the eu side that basically the deal that was — that basically the deal that was sold to the public and to politicians and member states and so — politicians and member states and so on _ politicians and member states and so on as having been done on island — and so on as having been done on island actually was not ready— on island actually was not ready - _ on island actually was not ready — that island. i hear that quite a lot. by eu diplomats. —— ireland. we were not ready— diplomats. —— ireland. we were not ready and that is why it has — not ready and that is why it has been _ not ready and that is why it has been so difficult to get off the _ has been so difficult to get off the ground.— off the ground. practical stuff, inevitably - off the ground. practical stuff, inevitably our- stuff, inevitably our conversations involve what is highfalutin high politics but i was watching the northern ireland affairs committee here in westminster the other day and andrew liners the boss of the miners food services food group was talking about mozzarella shortages in northern ireland and it sounds amusing, doesn't it, but it
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matters businesswise about getting cheese across the irish sea from great britain to northern ireland and it being held up in boxes while they are waiting for vets sniff around looking at cheese. that is the nature of looking at and sorting it out before a foodstuff passes into the of ireland. it foodstuff passes into the of ireland. . , , ireland. it matters hugely politically _ ireland. it matters hugely politically as _ ireland. it matters hugely politically as well. - ireland. it matters hugely| politically as well. totally. this has — politically as well. totally. this has caused _ politically as well. totally. this has caused a - politically as well. totally. this has caused a big i politically as well. totally. i this has caused a big concern and big problems in the unionist politicalfear and big problems in the unionist political fear in northern ireland. the dup which of course right now is part of the power—sharing agreement at stormont which, remember, but did not work for years and it took a huge amount of deal to get both sides to the table to have the stormont government up and running and functioning. there is now massive pressure on the dup, the unionist community has huge concern, there have been all sorts of chatter and reporting and it is hard to work categorically what is going on but real tensions, some port officials were withdrawn from one shift over safety concerns, there has been suggestions of an uptick in
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tensions and the government in westminster is very, very worried about the politics of this and we can also forget to mention that the eu pressed the nuclear button... mention that the eu pressed the nuclear button. . ._ nuclear button... hovered over the nuclear button. .. hovered over the nuclear— nuclear button... hovered over the nuclear button. _ nuclear button... hovered over the nuclear button. ok, - nuclear button... hovered over the nuclear button. ok, well, i the nuclear button. ok, well, the nuclear button. ok, well, the did the nuclear button. ok, well, they did not _ they did not go through with it... it they did not go through with it... ., , they did not go through with it... . , ., , they did not go through with it... , ., ,, so it... it was a bit of spun. so adam, _ it... it was a bit of spun. so adam, explained _ it... it was a bit of spun. so adam, explained to - adam, explained to people, article 16 was seen in westminster is a hugely aggressive move from the eu early— aggressive move from the eu early on. _ early on, the end ofjanuary? article 16 _ early on, the end ofjanuary? article 16 is the bit of the northern ireland protocol in the brexit deal, and remember this is the divorce still not the trade treaty which came later, article 16, the safeguarding clause and lots of treaties have these kinds of clauses. there may be not quite as potentially dramatic as they are in this case, it means that if there is a serious social or economic or security problem, then you can unilaterallyjust stop applying your bit of the deal in the place where it applies. laura, what you are getting at is when the eu was first developing its mechanism
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for monitoring the export of vaccines out of the eu into other countries, so they could potentially stop them and keep them in the eu, they said oh, so we can make this new mechanism work in northern ireland we will use article 16. andy got put on black and white in the proposalfor about andy got put on black and white in the proposal for about three hours and in the three hours it existed in black and white, this solution, so in glasgow, around it was enormous and it was a friday night and i was watching the film of cats at the same time so it was a very intense evening! watching that weird film and getting texts about this dramatic thing! exactly, i will never forget it! it exactly, i will never forget it! ~ , ., it! it went bonkers here and when you — it! it went bonkers here and when you call— it! it went bonkers here and when you call it _ it! it went bonkers here and when you call it an - it! it went bonkers here and i when you call it an aggressive move, laura, idon't when you call it an aggressive move, laura, i don't think it was meant to be an aggressive move at all, it was a stupid move. internally in the eu, it was, i mean, people were going ballistic. absolutely, you know, diplomats who worked on the brexit negotiations, people inside the commission who had worked on brexit negotiations
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were their hair out. i worked on brexit negotiations were their hair out.— were their hair out. i don't aet it. were their hair out. i don't get it. well. _ were their hair out. i don't get it. well, the _ were their hair out. i don't i get it. well, the assumption is it is a technocrat, _ get it. well, the assumption is it is a technocrat, you - get it. well, the assumption is it is a technocrat, you know, i it is a technocrat, you know, a suit, who says oh, there is a bit of a loophole in these controls because of the special brexit deal in northern ireland and that means there is no hard border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland so if the eu wants to be able to keep vaccines produced in the eu, in eu territory, we have that back door there into the uk through northern ireland. well, we had better close it over this. well, we had better close it over this-— well, we had better close it over this. they still pressed the button _ over this. they still pressed the button though, - over this. they still pressed the button though, didn't i over this. they still pressed i the button though, didn't they? crosstalk. they never actually -ot crosstalk. they never actually got as _ crosstalk. they never actually got as far — crosstalk. they never actually got as far as becoming the real world. ,, ,, �* got as far as becoming the real world. . . �* | got as far as becoming the real world._ i know i got as far as becoming the real world._ i know that world. crosstalk. i know that does not matter. _ world. crosstalk. i know that does not matter. for— world. crosstalk. i know that does not matter. for people i does not matter. for people here, it does not matter. for people here. itjust— does not matter. for people here, itjust showed, - does not matter. for people here, itjust showed, it i here, itjust showed, it underlined _ here, itjust showed, it underlined also - here, itjust showed, it underlined also the i here, itjust showed, itl underlined also the kind here, itjust showed, it i underlined also the kind of suspicion _ underlined also the kind of suspicion that— underlined also the kind of suspicion that people i underlined also the kind of suspicion that people had i underlined also the kind of. suspicion that people had all the way— suspicion that people had all the way through _ suspicion that people had all the way through that - suspicion that people had all. the way through that actually, lots of — the way through that actually, lots of people _ the way through that actually, lots of people in _ the way through that actually, lots of people in the _ lots of people in the commission-
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lots of people in the i commission particularly lots of people in the - commission particularly never really— commission particularly never really understood _ commission particularly never really understood the - really understood the sensitivity _ really understood the sensitivity of - really understood the i sensitivity of northern really understood the - sensitivity of northern ireland and ireland _ sensitivity of northern ireland and ireland. they— sensitivity of northern ireland and ireland. they were - sensitivity of northern ireland and ireland. they were happy| sensitivity of northern ireland i and ireland. they were happy to talk about— and ireland. they were happy to talk about the _ and ireland. they were happy to talk about the importance - and ireland. they were happy to talk about the importance of i talk about the importance of ireland — talk about the importance of ireland and _ talk about the importance of ireland and the _ talk about the importance of ireland and the good - talk about the importance of ireland and the good fridayl ireland and the good friday agreement— ireland and the good friday agreement but— ireland and the good friday agreement but never- ireland and the good friday- agreement but never understood actually — agreement but never understood actually the _ agreement but never understood actually the way _ agreement but never understood actually the way that _ agreement but never understood actually the way that northern i actually the way that northern ireland — actually the way that northern ireland is, _ actually the way that northern ireland is, parts— actually the way that northern ireland is, parts is— actually the way that northern ireland is, parts is on- actually the way that northern ireland is, parts is on the i ireland is, parts is on the island _ ireland is, parts is on the island of— ireland is, parts is on the island of ireland - ireland is, parts is on the island of ireland but- ireland is, parts is on the island of ireland but part| ireland is, parts is on the i island of ireland but part of the uk _ island of ireland but part of the uk. ~ island of ireland but part of the uk. . ., ., ., the uk. we took away the moral hiuh the uk. we took away the moral high ground- _ the uk. we took away the moral high ground. exactly. _ the uk. we took away the moral high ground. exactly. if- high ground. exactly. if you remember— remember the eu in september when the government said it may have to break international law in a specific and limited way, and do the same thing, and to override parts of the brexit agreement on northern ireland in order to safeguard free trade throughout the united kingdom, and the eu went how can you even do that? do you not realise how serious this is? we spent so much time negotiating this agreement and boom, on that friday night exactly, that was the impression given by the eu, absolutely fairly, plenty of people in the eu thought exactly the same thing as you were saying, laura, and it also plays into the critics who always said, were suspicious of
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the eu for something else who said you talk about northern ireland and the peace process in northern ireland and wanting to protect it but you are thinking about protecting the single market.— thinking about protecting the single market. ursula von der le en single market. ursula von der leyen said — single market. ursula von der leyen said it _ single market. ursula von der leyen said it was _ single market. ursula von der leyen said it was a _ single market. ursula von der leyen said it was a mistake i single market. ursula von der i leyen said it was a mistake and she deeply regretted it all, cutie, how...— she deeply regretted it all, cutie, how... how long did it take her— cutie, how... how long did it take her to — cutie, how... how long did it take her to say _ cutie, how... how long did it take her to say that, - cutie, how... how long did it| take her to say that, though? it take her to say that, though? it created _ take her to say that, though? it created a real question mark about her political mouth and ability because one of- about her political mouth and ability because one of the i ability because one of the things— ability because one of the things it _ ability because one of the things it has _ ability because one of the things it has changed, i ability because one of the i things it has changed, adam, ability because one of the - things it has changed, adam, is a new_ things it has changed, adam, is a new team _ things it has changed, adam, is a new team in _ things it has changed, adam, is a new team in charge _ things it has changed, adam, is a new team in charge since - a new team in charge since this, since _ a new team in charge since this, since all— a new team in charge since this, since all of— a new team in charge since this, since all of our- a new team in charge since this, since all of our good i a new team in charge since . this, since all of our good old days— this, since all of our good old days of— this, since all of our good old days of talking _ this, since all of our good old days of talking about - this, since all of our good old days of talking about brexit l days of talking about brexit all the _ days of talking about brexit all the time. _ days of talking about brexit all the time. is _ days of talking about brexit all the time.— days of talking about brexit all the time. is in charge, he is one of— all the time. is in charge, he is one of the _ all the time. is in charge, he is one of the vice _ all the time. is in charge, he is one of the vice president | all the time. is in charge, he. is one of the vice president of the commission and actually there — the commission and actually there been a change of personnel in the uk side because captain gove of peanut fame _ because captain gove of peanut fame is — because captain gove of peanut fame is still a cabinet minister but lord frost who is the one — minister but lord frost who is the one who negotiated the trade — the one who negotiated the trade deal, he has taken over the running of that show. within— the running of that show. within his first week as a cabinet _ within his first week as a cabinet minister, he upped the anti-a — cabinet minister, he upped the anti—a little bit because he is, his—
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anti—a little bit because he is, his grace period where the uk was — is, his grace period where the uk was delaying the full introduction of the northern iretand _ introduction of the northern ireland protocol, for things like — ireland protocol, for things like pharmaceuticals, parcels and supermarket goods, he at a stroke _ and supermarket goods, he at a stroke expended that period until— stroke expended that period until october which, for the eu, — until october which, for the eu, was— until october which, for the eu, was his vertical of article 16. ., , ., ., , , 16. he does not get to spend time with — 16. he does not get to spend time with michel— 16. he does not get to spend time with michel barnier- time with michel barnier anymore so things really have changed! he anymore so things really have chanced! . anymore so things really have chanced! , . ,., ., ~' changed! he is writing a book and i am changed! he is writing a book and i am in — changed! he is writing a book and i am in it! it _ changed! he is writing a book and i am in it! it is _ changed! he is writing a book and i am in it! it is not - and i am in it! it is not coming— and i am in it! it is not coming out until may. | and i am in it! it is not coming out until may. i hope it is in the acknowledgements. i coming out until may. i hope it| is in the acknowledgements. by the is in the acknowledgements. by the way, i'm throwing to this, i was reading tony conley, our good friend from rte in ireland, his blog, and he pointed out, i approach this pronunciation with a sense of jeopardy for fear that katya will put me right, with marys ships give so him and lord frost are old markers from the brussels circuit going back to 2005 and the eu held the presidency of the eu and he was the slovak ambassador and lord
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frost of the british diplomat i have to say more attention is being paid to the departure of captain gove and arrival of david frost, was seen as a close sign here in brussels at least that the government wanted to be quite tough with the eu when it came to implementing the brexit deal on northern ireland. david frost's reputation here is one of, he has been described to me as a brexit ideologue and has been seen as quite inflexible. that is the reputation _ seen as quite inflexible. that is the reputation he - seen as quite inflexible. that is the reputation he has - seen as quite inflexible. that is the reputation he has here and so, his arrival was seen as sort of a snapshot of tougher days to come ahead.- days to come ahead. talking about the — days to come ahead. talking about the future _ days to come ahead. talking about the future because - days to come ahead. talking about the future because we have — about the future because we have to _ about the future because we have to go soon, what things will you — have to go soon, what things will you be looking out for in the next _ will you be looking out for in the next three months and the three — the next three months and the three months after that and the three _ three months after that and the three months after that and the three months after that? isn�*t three months after that? isn't it all about — three months after that? isn't it all about scratching - three months after that? isn't it all about scratching is - three months after that? isn't it all about scratching is and how — it all about scratching is and how scratchy _ it all about scratching is and how scratchy it _ it all about scratching is and how scratchy it is? - it all about scratching is and how scratchy it is? we - it all about scratching is and how scratchy it is? we are l it all about scratching is and i how scratchy it is? we are back where — how scratchy it is? we are back where we — how scratchy it is? we are back where we were _ how scratchy it is? we are back where we were at _ how scratchy it is? we are back where we were at the - how scratchy it is? we are back where we were at the start - where we were at the start though— where we were at the start though how _ where we were at the start though how does - where we were at the start though how does that - where we were at the start| though how does that level where we were at the start -
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though how does that level out as normal— though how does that level out as normal or— though how does that level out as normal or are _ though how does that level out as normal or are we _ though how does that level out as normal or are we in- though how does that level out as normal or are we in this - as normal or are we in this sort — as normal or are we in this sort of— as normal or are we in this sort of beginnings - as normal or are we in this sort of beginnings of - as normal or are we in this sort of beginnings of a - as normal or are we in this| sort of beginnings of a new thing — sort of beginnings of a new thing and _ sort of beginnings of a new thing and so _ sort of beginnings of a new thing and so things - sort of beginnings of a new thing and so things may. sort of beginnings of a new- thing and so things may smooth out? _ thing and so things may smooth out? isn't— thing and so things may smooth out? isn't michael— thing and so things may smooth out? isn't michael gove's klaini out? isn't michael gove's klain thing again, peanuts? when do we get — thing again, peanuts? when do we get to— thing again, peanuts? when do we get to the _ thing again, peanuts? when do we get to the peanuts? - thing again, peanuts? when do we get to the peanuts? isn't. we get to the peanuts? isn't uuite we get to the peanuts? isn't quite useful— we get to the peanuts? isn't quite useful to _ we get to the peanuts? isn't quite useful to have - we get to the peanuts? isn't quite useful to have the - we get to the peanuts? isn't quite useful to have the eu| we get to the peanuts?- quite useful to have the eu to bash— quite useful to have the eu to bash though, still, when needed? you know, is there an incentive? _ needed? you know, is there an incentive? doesn't it work quite _ incentive? doesn't it work quite well for the prime minister, for example, two, when — minister, for example, two, when it— minister, for example, two, when it comes to the vaccine debate, _ when it comes to the vaccine debate, to keep out of it? do not attack _ debate, to keep out of it? do not attack the eu?— debate, to keep out of it? do not attack the eu? that is the o- osite not attack the eu? that is the opposite of— not attack the eu? that is the opposite of bashing. - not attack the eu? that is the opposite of bashing. the - not attack the eu? that is the l opposite of bashing. the moral hiuh opposite of bashing. the moral high ground. — opposite of bashing. the moral high ground, guess, _ opposite of bashing. the moral high ground, guess, but - opposite of bashing. the moral high ground, guess, but on - opposite of bashing. the moralj high ground, guess, but on the other— high ground, guess, but on the other hand, you have the newspapers that bash brussels and you — newspapers that bash brussels and you have cabinet ministers who might be tougher on the eu or so— who might be tougher on the eu or so isn't— who might be tougher on the eu or so isn't it quite a useful sort — or so isn't it quite a useful sort of— or so isn't it quite a useful sort of got back i think it is for some, isn't it? a political tool to have. i for some, isn't it? a political tool to have.— toolto have. i do not think it is auoin toolto have. i do not think it is going to — toolto have. i do not think it is going to be _ toolto have. i do not think it is going to be as _ toolto have. i do not think it is going to be as relevant - is going to be as relevant anymore, i think it is already a lot less relevant and actually it is the vaccines
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tensions that have really put it back into people's purview. there is a password. but for me —— posh word. i will be looking at what actually happens over northern ireland because the stability for the rest, for the relations inside the uk and stability between the two communities in belfast and around stormont has got really big, big, big implications and ithink big, big, big implications and i think that is important. remember that the eu still with european parliament still has not ratified the brexit deal, you know, the trade agreement, so we _ you know, the trade agreement, so we are — you know, the trade agreement, so we are waiting for that and there — so we are waiting for that and there are _ so we are waiting for that and there are whispers could then be used — there are whispers could then be used as a possible reset moment— be used as a possible reset moment between the two sides in their grabbing for the peanuts. ithink— their grabbing for the peanuts. i think that is very unlikely, i think that is very unlikely, i have — i think that is very unlikely, i have to _ i think that is very unlikely, i have to say, some big moment, we have — i have to say, some big moment, we have had _ i have to say, some big moment, we have had to pose a big moments before and it is a bit of a _ moments before and it is a bit of a damp _ moments before and it is a bit of a damp squib at the end of the day— of a damp squib at the end of the dayor— of a damp squib at the end of the day ora of a damp squib at the end of the day or a damp blank esteem but at. — the day or a damp blank esteem but at, some suggest on both sides— but at, some suggest on both sides actually that, to me, it would — sides actually that, to me, it would not _ sides actually that, to me, it would not take very much to get
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rid of some of the bumps when it comes — rid of some of the bumps when it comes to the practicalities between the two sides. for example, musicians or actors, their— example, musicians or actors, their free _ example, musicians or actors, their free movement can some deal— their free movement can some deal be — their free movement can some deal be done? what about easing the movement of guide dogs for the movement of guide dogs for the blind — the movement of guide dogs for the blind if they are going to travel— the blind if they are going to travel between the eu and the uk? _ travel between the eu and the uk? could something be done about— uk? could something be done about the status of the eu's non- — about the status of the eu's non— ambassador ambassador to the uk _ non— ambassador ambassador to the uk or— non— ambassador ambassador to the uk or vice—versa? non— ambassador ambassador to the uk orvice—versa? quite small— the uk orvice—versa? quite small things where agreements could _ small things where agreements could be — small things where agreements could be found quite easily, that— could be found quite easily, that really could improve that mood — that really could improve that mood music on both sides. now, mood music on both sides. now, my friend. _ mood music on both sides. now, my friend. we — mood music on both sides. now, my friend, we leave _ mood music on both sides. now, my friend, we leave you - mood music on both sides. now, my friend, we leave you as - my friend, we leave you as always with the feeling that a deal could be done. laughter. and with thoughts of damp languor stands and bowls of dusty peanuts and... crosstalk. a vintage brexitcast. dusty peanuts and. .. crosstalk. a vintage brexitcast.— a vintage brexitcast. happy earwax anniversary, - a vintage brexitcast. happy earwax anniversary, one . a vintage brexitcast. happy | earwax anniversary, one and all. .,, all. .. ., . all. the most romantic thing an one all. the most romantic thing anyone has _ all. the most romantic thing anyone has ever _ all. the most romantic thing anyone has ever said - all. the most romantic thing anyone has ever said to - all. the most romantic thing anyone has ever said to me! j anyone has ever said to me! goodbye! _
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anyone has ever said to me! goodbye!— anyone has ever said to me! goodb e! _ _ goodbye! goodbye. goodbye. goodbye- _ goodbye! goodbye. goodbye. goodbye. brexitcast. - goodbye. brexitcast. brexitcast. from the bbc. hello there. temperatures have been coming down day by day and it's going to stay chilly now into the easter period but with high pressure nearby, we should see quite a bit of sunshine around, though it'll be cold with overnight frost so gardeners and growers, beware. and then as we head on into easter monday, a significant cold, arctic blast will bring us a mixture of sunshine and also wintry showers. so for good friday, we've got high pressure building in, some slightly cooler air around it, and it will be breezier across northern and eastern areas. here's where we'll see most of the cloud — northern—eastern scotland, eastern england, maybe the odd light shower around through the morning. through the day, it looks like eastern air in parts of england will stay rather cloudy and breezy and cool. further west, the best of the sunshine, and it's here from northern ireland down
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through wales and the south west where we could make 13 or ia degrees, otherwise, a lot cooler across northern and eastern areas. as we head through good friday night and into saturday morning, it'll stay quite breezy and cloudy across the eastern half of the country. clearer skies and lighter winds further north and west so here, we'll see a widespread frost versus lows of 3—5 degrees further east. our area of high pressure still with us then as we head through saturday and, indeed, into sunday but it starts to retreat away and that's where we start to see the floodgates open to the arctic through sunday night into easter monday. saturday then, another dry day, thanks to high pressure. best of the sunshine across northern and western areas with lighter winds. more cloud, though, for central and eastern england, more of a breeze, so quite chilly here. temperatures reaching highs of around 12 or 13 degrees in the sunnier spots, so not too bad — pretty much temperatures what we should be looking at for early april. for easter sunday, it looks like we'll have another fine day but as our area of high pressure retreats away, it'll allow wetter and windier weather and colder weather
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to arrive across the north of the uk. but further south, england and wales dry with some sunshine but quite mild with highs of ia or 15 degrees. then it's all change through sunday into easter monday — we open the floodgates to the arctic, weather front sinks southwards, lots of isobars on the charts, so it's going to be very windy. a cold and strong northerly wind feeding in plenty of hail, sleet and snow showers pretty much anywhere. there will be some sunshine in between but we could see some significant accumulations of snow over the hills across northern scotland. so with that cold arctic wind, it's going to feel much colder than what we expect at 4—8 degrees.
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he welcome to bbc news. i'm lewis vaughan jones. our top stories: the bbc has obtained disturbing videos which appear to show the massacre of unarmed civilians in northern ethiopia. george floyd's former girlfriend reflects on his life and their battle with addiction on day four of ex—police officer derek chauvin's trial. police in belgium clash with thousands of people attending a hoax concert in brussels. and two youtube stars known for carrying out pranks escape long jail terms after a fake bank robbery stunt went wrong.

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