Skip to main content

tv   The Papers  BBC News  April 1, 2021 10:30pm-10:45pm BST

10:30 pm
during rehearsals at the theatre royal in windsor. of all occasions to inform against me and spur my dull revenge! the mode, these days, of casting people who don't necessarily look the part, because it's the inner person you're going after, and if i can rake around inside and discover the young man in me, then hopefully it'll be all right. it strikes me that the biggest challenge is the physicality, is the movement. well, what am i to do? i can't pretend i'm 20. no—one�*s going to believe it. but i can feel that i'm 20. it is going to be an 80—year—old man playing a man 50 years younger. i have played gandalf, who was over 7,000 years old. no—one said i was too young! you shall not pass! i think it's fair to say, or true to say, at least, you first played hamlet as a child when you had your toy theatre, didn't you?
10:31 pm
yes, yes, i'd be about10 orii. my parents gave me a pollock's toy theatre, which was a theatre that you have to cut up and reassemble. cardboard. and behind a tea towel, i was saying the words. i did a shortened version of hamlet just after christmas lunch! and you cannot have imagined then that you would be playing it, what, 70 years later? no, of course not, no. i thought i'd be playing polonius, if not the skull, by this time! yorick�*s skull. there will be people who come to collect this hamlet. i remember when i played it in 1971, two old gentleman came round to see me afterwards and said, "congratulations, you're our 73rd hamlet. " why, madam, it is common. if it be, why seems it's so particular with thee? seems, madam? nay, it is. i know not seems. shakespeare was not unfamiliar with pandemics and plagues. how do you think theatre�*s going to respond
10:32 pm
to what's happened in the last 12 months? it's been pretty devastating. during my lifetime, the theatres in london were closed for longish periods during the second world war but always sprang back. so 50 years after this hamlet... it is an unweeded garden that grows to seed. ..sir ian mckellen once again plays the prince, undimmed by the whips and scorns of time. will gompertz, bbc news. that's it. now on bbc one, time for the news where you are. have a very good night. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are clare cohen, women's editor at the daily telegraph, and joe mayes, politics reporter for bloomberg. tomorrow's front pages
10:33 pm
starting with... were having slight issues in terms of it problems or something like that. but our political reporter for bloomberg is with us. great to see you and just trying to reestablish medications with claire. so hopefully we will get that up and running shortly. let's start with the daily mail. they say covid passports are to be introduced, which we'll need to attend entertainment venues like theatres and football stadiums. the i leads with an exclusive, reporting on links between the roles of david cameron's former ministers and their subsequentjobs within the private sector. uk tax payers funded a vaccine factory in the netherlands which is at the heart of a threatened blockade by the european commission, that's according to the daily telegraph. after the prime minister's senior adviser on ethnic minorities quit amid a row over a government—commissioned report on race, doreen lawrence says it gives "�*racists the green light�*. that's on the front page of the guardian. and finally the daily mirror leads
10:34 pm
with news that we're for a summer of fun — with the entertrainment industry expecting millions in funding to help it bounce back. so let's begin... we are expected to speak to clare shortly, butjoe we have used so let's start. we're going to take off with the daily telegraph. the telegraph leading with taxpayers funding the factory which is at the heart of the vaccine row. british taxpayers investing in this dutch vaccine and yes it's all got rather messy but let's talk us through the line that the telegraph has. it’s line that the telegraph has. it's uuite a line that the telegraph has. it�*s quite a remarkable new development in this vaccine row. the telegraph has learned that as you say british taxpayer money was used to fund this factory in the netherlands where astrazeneca doses are being
10:35 pm
produced. they say that up to £21 million was put in by health secretary matt hancock and the eu did not find this plant and indeed the government of the netherlands did not put money in either. this is a new development which has caused understandable anger amongst conservative mps in the public when you seem like the british taxpayer has made this retribution and therefore should be getting these doses, as we know the eu has the stance of saying they will not allow the export of astrazeneca doses until the eu citizens have had to what's been allocated to them. we can see is the development of the court to really stoke this row once more. . , . court to really stoke this row once more. . y . _, court to really stoke this row once more. . , . more. thanks very much joe, i hope we have got — more. thanks very much joe, i hope we have got clare _ more. thanks very much joe, i hope we have got clare up, _ more. thanks very much joe, i hope we have got clare up, yes _ more. thanks very much joe, i hope we have got clare up, yes we - more. thanks very much joe, i hope we have got clare up, yes we do. i we have got clare up, yes we do. good to see you and apologies to our viewers that you've been a little bit late but technical, you know the zouma error that we have. hopefully you had a chance to look at the telegraph as well and just building a whatjoe has been saying. bring us
10:36 pm
up—to—date, what do we know about the taxpayers, or how much british taxpayers have been funding this particular factory?— taxpayers have been funding this particular factory? apologies for my lateness first _ particular factory? apologies for my lateness first of _ particular factory? apologies for my lateness first of all. _ particular factory? apologies for my lateness first of all. we've - particular factory? apologies for my lateness first of all. we've been - lateness first of all. we've been funding — lateness first of all. we've been funding a — lateness first of all. we've been funding a lot. this looks like it's 21 miiiion— funding a lot. this looks like it's 21 million on top of the 84 that we already— 21 million on top of the 84 that we already knew about which had been .one already knew about which had been gone into— already knew about which had been gone into funding and development for astrazeneca, for the oxford jab. a flood _ for astrazeneca, for the oxford jab. a flood of— for astrazeneca, for the oxford jab. a flood of british taxpayer money has gone — a flood of british taxpayer money has gone into this. it comes is some slight _ has gone into this. it comes is some slight comfort that actually the government spent on this factory back at— government spent on this factory back at the beginning of the pandemic last year when we know that billions _ pandemic last year when we know that billions a _ pandemic last year when we know that billions a pound spent on ppe contract — billions a pound spent on ppe contract some of which came into nothing _ contract some of which came into nothing but this can be looked at as a strategic— nothing but this can be looked at as a strategic decision. reporting that the dutch— a strategic decision. reporting that the dutch were offered to come in at
10:37 pm
this investment and we are in this situation — this investment and we are in this situation where the british invested in the _ situation where the british invested in the dutch did not and that's only going _ in the dutch did not and that's only going to _ in the dutch did not and that's only going to inflame the row that's ongoing — going to inflame the row that's onauoin. �* . going to inflame the row that's onauoing ., , ,, going to inflame the row that's onuuoin.�* ., ,, ., ongoing. and a spokesperson for astrazeneca _ ongoing. and a spokesperson for astrazeneca refused _ ongoing. and a spokesperson for astrazeneca refused to - ongoing. and a spokesperson forj astrazeneca refused to comment ongoing. and a spokesperson for- astrazeneca refused to comment about 0xford spokesperson saying they are not aware of any former letters sent by the government. let's move on to the guardian because this is a further story developing as it follows doreen lawrence, lady lawrence commenting on the race report which we had heard more about yesterday. does the report has been criticised and talk us through lady lawrence prospect perspective on this. the green light according to
10:38 pm
lady lawrence. she this. the green light according to lady lawrence-— this. the green light according to lad lawrence. . ,, a, , . lady lawrence. she speaks with such authority on — lady lawrence. she speaks with such authority on these _ lady lawrence. she speaks with such authority on these issues, _ lady lawrence. she speaks with such authority on these issues, they - authority on these issues, they state will push back to termination by 20 years in this country and the conclusions that report came to. and again this will only continue the backlash and number ten is already come under lots of fire for who wrote the report, the kind of background that assumptions the people had coming into the process and it's only stoke that further. it sums up what a lot of people in the bme community feel about this and it's not good for number ten. indeed. this is one of these continuing discussions about this. the independent as well has the experts that were named in the race review but were not actually consulted. that's all been coming out today as well. just remind us as to what's been happening because a lot of various different angles when
10:39 pm
it comes to this report that we had heard about yesterday.— heard about yesterday. leading british historians, _ heard about yesterday. leading british historians, authors - heard about yesterday. leading british historians, authors and l british historians, authors and academics whose names appear to this report— academics whose names appear to this report saying today, and i suspect we will _ report saying today, and i suspect we will see — report saying today, and i suspect we will see more coming out saying that in_ we will see more coming out saying that in fact — we will see more coming out saying that in fact they had nothing to do that _ that in fact they had nothing to do that and — that in fact they had nothing to do that. and that they would not have had anything to do that, some of them _ had anything to do that, some of them had — had anything to do that, some of them had they been asked, the academic— them had they been asked, the academic stephen boren said he better— academic stephen boren said he better invited to a roundtable for black— better invited to a roundtable for black history month and it was made up black history month and it was made up of people on this commission and as presumably have his name has ended _ as presumably have his name has ended up— as presumably have his name has ended up on this report. and there's been _ ended up on this report. and there's been other— ended up on this report. and there's been other university academics comihg — been other university academics coming out in this independent story saying _ coming out in this independent story saying that _ coming out in this independent story saying that they feel like they've been _ saying that they feel like they've been rest represented. it is astonishing, really, and it's a shame — astonishing, really, and it's a shame because all of the report has 'ust shame because all of the report has just received a huge amount of criticism — just received a huge amount of criticism already, and some of it rightly. — criticism already, and some of it rightly, there are some insights in it that _ rightly, there are some insights in it that l _ rightly, there are some insights in it that i think are probably very useful— it that i think are probably very useful when it comes to a specific
10:40 pm
communities but all of that is being completely wiped out by the row that is being _ completely wiped out by the row that is being caused by this. which seems like it— is being caused by this. which seems like it could've very avoidable. and on to of like it could've very avoidable. and on tap of this _ like it could've very avoidable. and on top of this we _ like it could've very avoidable. fific on top of this we had the like it could've very avoidable. a"ic on top of this we had the prime minister's senior adviser samuel quitting over this report as well. this report not going down very well at all. it this report not going down very well at all. , , ~ , ., at all. it seems like the wheels are cominu at all. it seems like the wheels are coming out — at all. it seems like the wheels are coming out from _ at all. it seems like the wheels are coming out from every _ at all. it seems like the wheels are coming out from every direction. i at all. it seems like the wheels are l coming out from every direction. the backlash we are talking about and aides resigning as well the stuff you read that this kind of event actually sets back the process for creating reconciliation and a better feeling in this country about racism. it makes it seem like we are going backwards. it's not ideal that is played out in this way. let’s is played out in this way. let's move onto _ is played out in this way. let's move onto the _ is played out in this way. let's move onto the mirror - is played out in this way. let's move onto the mirror we - is played out in this way. let's move onto the mirror we are l is played out in this way. let's move onto the mirror we are being promised a summer of i find the paper, talk us through it.- paper, talk us through it. £400 million, all— paper, talk us through it. £400 million, all the _ paper, talk us through it. £400 million, all the problems- paper, talk us through it. £400 million, all the problems of- paper, talk us through it. £400 million, all the problems of be| million, all the problems of be overcome _ million, all the problems of be
10:41 pm
overcome and now we are unlocking. it overcome and now we are unlocking. it seems _ overcome and now we are unlocking. it seems a _ overcome and now we are unlocking. it seems a little unlikely. i admire the optimism as we go which are first rule — the optimism as we go which are first rule of— the optimism as we go which are first rule of six weekend. i suppose it's the _ first rule of six weekend. i suppose it's the shot — first rule of six weekend. i suppose it's the shot in the arm of the good news _ it's the shot in the arm of the good news we _ it's the shot in the arm of the good news we all— it's the shot in the arm of the good news we all need. but the fact, passports — news we all need. but the fact, passports are mentioned on this front— passports are mentioned on this front page, that's subbing is still very much— front page, that's subbing is still very much looming. whether we will need to— very much looming. whether we will need to be _ very much looming. whether we will need to be allowed to re—engage with social— need to be allowed to re—engage with social activities. need to be allowed to re—engage with socialactivities. i need to be allowed to re—engage with social activities. i appreciate the shot of— social activities. i appreciate the shot of optimism ahead of the easter weekend _ shot of optimism ahead of the easter weekend but i'm not sure it's entirely, _ weekend but i'm not sure it's entirely, it— weekend but i'm not sure it's entirely, it might be a little misplaced. it entirely, it might be a little misplaced-— entirely, it might be a little mislaced. , ., , misplaced. it comes as the figures are showing _ misplaced. it comes as the figures are showing a _ misplaced. it comes as the figures are showing a decrease _ misplaced. it comes as the figures are showing a decrease in - misplaced. it comes as the figures are showing a decrease in cases. l misplaced. it comes as the figures i are showing a decrease in cases. the figures are looking promising, arguably looking at a locking down, and easing of the lockdown. so a summer of fun? people will want to hear this although i guess be warned. to hear this although i guess be warned. ., , .,
10:42 pm
warned. to get is going in the right direction, hospitalisation _ warned. to get is going in the right direction, hospitalisation going - direction, hospitalisation going down an all quite dramatically. the issue around vaccine passports will be pretty critical here as for when these big events can go ahead and will you have to show some kind of certification to prove a negative test? and we will get an update in the days and weeks ahead but recent to be optimistic, but this is the pandemic and who knows how it will get from here. we pandemic and who knows how it will get from here-— pandemic and who knows how it will get from here. we also hearing about this possibility _ get from here. we also hearing about this possibility of _ get from here. we also hearing about this possibility of new— get from here. we also hearing about this possibility of new ways, - this possibility of new ways, claire, of people when they eventually go to the hospitality areas or pubs, basically, the everybody will have to log in, so to speak. this signing in and there was a bit of controversy about that whether that will help or hinder the hospitality sector which desperately needs a boost. but again that kind of everybody over the age of 16 having to sign in could further propagate what is essentially where
10:43 pm
we are meant to be going out and possibly enjoying ourselves, this won't help. the possibly en'oying ourselves, this want help.— possibly en'oying ourselves, this won't hel. ., , ., , won't help. the idea is to help the economy get _ won't help. the idea is to help the economy get back _ won't help. the idea is to help the economy get back on _ won't help. the idea is to help the economy get back on its _ won't help. the idea is to help the economy get back on its feet, - won't help. the idea is to help the economy get back on its feet, and j economy get back on its feet, and help the _ economy get back on its feet, and help the hospitality industry which we all— help the hospitality industry which we all know has been so terribly head. _ we all know has been so terribly head. and — we all know has been so terribly head, and of course where we were before _ head, and of course where we were before is _ head, and of course where we were before is that when you went out to a pub— before is that when you went out to a pub one _ before is that when you went out to a pub one member of your household had to— a pub one member of your household had to sign— a pub one member of your household had to sign in which you would think would _ had to sign in which you would think would cover— had to sign in which you would think would cover all bases but the suggestion now is the everything a person— suggestion now is the everything a person will have to sign in. that's an awful— person will have to sign in. that's an awful lot— person will have to sign in. that's an awful lot of administration, that's— an awful lot of administration, that's very arduous for business is already— that's very arduous for business is already incredibly stretched for having — already incredibly stretched for having to follow staff, severing her and told _ having to follow staff, severing her and told economic losses now they're to sort _ and told economic losses now they're to sort of— and told economic losses now they're to sort of really enforce these rules — to sort of really enforce these rules that people will not be happy with _ rules that people will not be happy with we _ rules that people will not be happy with. we just need to be coming together— with. we just need to be coming together to help them and i'm not sure this _ together to help them and i'm not sure this is — together to help them and i'm not sure this is going to do it. which is going — sure this is going to do it. which is going to — sure this is going to do it. which is going to cause more division in the way— is going to cause more division in the way the — is going to cause more division in the way the vaccine passports but ashley— the way the vaccine passports but ashley will as well.— ashley will as well. what do you reckon with _ ashley will as well. what do you reckon with your _ ashley will as well. what do you reckon with your bloomberg - ashley will as well. what do you reckon with your bloomberg hat | ashley will as well. what do you - reckon with your bloomberg hat on, what's the, how are companies sort of dealing with this proposal? if
10:44 pm
you think about it from a micro economics perspective is the simple problem of you have to have an extra person to do that administration because you have to have someone on the door costly checking people and give that's an employee this not doing something more productive. that's one consideration. and the hospitality sector are not keen to have this effort extra arduous burden put on them but if it's the thing required to allow them to bring customers and they might have to suck it up and say, ok, we have to suck it up and say, ok, we have to do this. these are all balancing things that could be different how it plays out. i will have to watch and see, but quite a bit of concern for people we have spoken to thus far. let's have a look at the telegraph and its bring you in on this, claire. women's football left behind a concussion. as the women's editorfor behind a concussion. as the women's editor for the behind a concussion. as the women's editorfor the daily behind a concussion. as the women's editor for the daily telegraph, behind a concussion. as the women's editorfor the daily telegraph, you are here to talk through this thankfully. are here to talk through this thankfully-—
10:45 pm
are here to talk through this thankfully. are here to talk through this thankfull . , , , .,, , thankfully. this is the phrase being used that women _ thankfully. this is the phrase being used that women are _ thankfully. this is the phrase being used that women are being - thankfully. this is the phrase being used that women are being treated thankfully. this is the phrase being i used that women are being treated as second—class citizens. this is the back— second—class citizens. this is the back of— second—class citizens. this is the back of the — second—class citizens. this is the back of the report last month left found _ back of the report last month left found that women are twice as likely to suffer— found that women are twice as likely to suffer a _ found that women are twice as likely to suffer a brain injury in sport. rugby— to suffer a brain injury in sport. rugby and _ to suffer a brain injury in sport. rugby and football picked out a particular but now it emerges that in the _ particular but now it emerges that in the women's super league there's only one _ in the women's super league there's only one doctor at his side of the pitch— only one doctor at his side of the pitch to — only one doctor at his side of the pitch to help deal with any incidents. whereas in the premier league _ incidents. whereas in the premier league there are four doctors. so a gender— league there are four doctors. so a gender gap— league there are four doctors. so a gender gap opening up in sportjust to add _ gender gap opening up in sportjust to add onto the other gender gaps we already— to add onto the other gender gaps we already know exist in sport. but you know _ already know exist in sport. but you know this _ already know exist in sport. but you know this is — already know exist in sport. but you know this is something that really .oes know this is something that really goes across women's health, not just in the _ goes across women's health, not just in the realm — goes across women's health, not just in the realm of sport. it was only the beginning of last or perhaps in 2019 that — the beginning of last or perhaps in 2019 that it was discovered women are far— 2019 that it was discovered women are far more likely to die of heart attacks— are far more likely to die of heart attacks in— are far more likely to die of heart attacks in this country because the models _ attacks in this country because the models the paramedics practice getting — models the paramedics practice getting mouth—to—mouth on are designed — getting mouth—to—mouth on are designed to the male body and not the female body so when they are prompted — the female body so when they are prompted with a real women having a heart _ prompted with a real women having a heart attack _ prompted with a real women having a heart attack they don't know what to
10:46 pm
do.

8 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on