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tv   BBC News with Katty and Christian  BBC News  April 1, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. first came the plan, now the sales—pitch. president biden wants americans to back a $2 trillion plan to fix our crumbling roads and bridges. republicans on the hill think it costs too much, and that it doesn't cover the nuts—and—bolts of what the nation really needs. big government is back. mr biden�*s cabinet meets at the white house for the first time. five of them will be tasked with �*selling' this plan to the public and to the lawmakers. the un secretary general tells me vaccine passports are not the way to go, warning they'll lead to even more global inequality. that full interview is just ahead. also in the programme.... only 10% of some 900 million people in europe have had a single dose of coronavirus vaccine. the world health organisation calls that "unacceptable".
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and tricksters and pranksters, now�*s your chance! it's april fool's day. laura thinks she is going to make me the fool, with a quiz on what's true, and what's fiction. fat chance. hello, i'm laura trevelyan in washington. christian fraser is in london. america's infrastructure is crumbling. the society of engineers gives it a c minus. our bridges are ancient, our roads are cracked, our trains run on creaking rails, and our power grid has definitely seen better days. most americans would agree — it's time to repair our national arteries. but getting agreement on what's fixed — and who pays — is another matter. president biden�*s answer, unveiled yesterday, is a $2 trillion infrastructure plan that will touch everything from transport infrastructure
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and green housing tojob training and manufacturing subsidies. and today begins the hardestjob of all — selling the extra spending and tax increases to the voting public. in the last few hours, president biden convened the first cabinet meeting of his administration, and top of the agenda is �*communicating the plan' to voters. the president named five cabinet members, including transport secretary pete buttigieg, who would have special responsibility for making the sales pitch. working with my team _ in the white house, these cabinet members will represent many in dealing with congress, - engage the public in selling the plan and help work outi the details as we refine it and move forward. i —— represent me. heather boushey is a member of president biden�*s council of economic advisers. shejoins us now. welcome to the programme. pete buttigieg made a really good point today, saying at some stage,
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democracies have to prove that they can build infrastructure on the same scale and at the same rate as autocracies, and he is a very good point. this is a real test for america. point. this is a real test for america-— point. this is a real test for america. , ,. ., , ., , america. this is certainly a test. the united _ america. this is certainly a test. the united states _ america. this is certainly a test. the united states has _ america. this is certainly a test. the united states has been - america. this is certainly a test. i the united states has been falling behind, _ the united states has been falling behind, the amount of money we've invested _ behind, the amount of money we've invested in— behind, the amount of money we've invested in innovation and infrastructure and the kind of things— infrastructure and the kind of things that we make —— make it possible — things that we make —— make it possible for people to get to work, for the _ possible for people to get to work, for the power to always keep on in our homes — for the power to always keep on in our homes and also importantly, in our homes and also importantly, in our human— our homes and also importantly, in our human infrastructure. it's this package _ our human infrastructure. it's this package that will go a long way for making _ package that will go a long way for making those investments to put us on a more _ making those investments to put us on a more competitive path. majorities in both houses in congress, some republican lawmakers like the minority senate leader mitch mcconnell say the economy is recovering quite well enough on its own without any further help, and
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the taxation plan you have is going to damp investment and undercut growth. ma; to damp investment and undercut urowth. y . . to damp investment and undercut urowth. g ., . ., growth. my advice to the ministration _ growth. my advice to the ministration is _ growth. my advice to the ministration is if - growth. my advice to the ministration is if you - growth. my advice to the | ministration is if you want growth. my advice to the - ministration is if you want to do an infrastructure _ ministration is if you want to do an infrastructure bill, _ ministration is if you want to do an infrastructure bill, let's _ ministration is if you want to do an infrastructure bill, let's do - ministration is if you want to do an infrastructure bill, let's do an - infrastructure bill, let's do an infrastructure _ infrastructure bill, let's do an infrastructure bill. _ infrastructure bill, let's do an infrastructure bill. let's - infrastructure bill, let's do an infrastructure bill. let's don't turn — infrastructure bill. let's don't turn it— infrastructure bill. let's don't turn it into _ infrastructure bill. let's don't turn it into a _ infrastructure bill. let's don't turn it into a massive - infrastructure bill. let's don't turn it into a massive effort. infrastructure bill. let's don'ti turn it into a massive effort to raise — turn it into a massive effort to raise taxes _ turn it into a massive effort to raise taxes on _ turn it into a massive effort to raise taxes on businesses - turn it into a massive effort to raise taxes on businesses and| raise taxes on businesses and individuals _ raise taxes on businesses and individuals.— raise taxes on businesses and individuals. , , . . individuals. the specific point he would probably _ individuals. the specific point he would probably lay _ individuals. the specific point he would probably lay out _ individuals. the specific point he would probably lay out in - individuals. the specific point he | would probably lay out in making this today is that the spending spans eight years, but the taxation goes over 15 years, so you're passing on the bill to the next generation. passing on the bill to the next generation-— passing on the bill to the next generation. well, i don't think that's quite — generation. well, i don't think that's quite true _ generation. well, i don't think that's quite true in _ generation. well, i don't think that's quite true in this - generation. well, i don't think that's quite true in this case. i that's quite true in this case. these — that's quite true in this case. these are _ that's quite true in this case. these are capital investments, the kind of— these are capital investments, the kind of investments through time. you put _ kind of investments through time. you put a — kind of investments through time. you put a big amount of money into build _ you put a big amount of money into build that— you put a big amount of money into build that bridge or to upgrade that school_ build that bridge or to upgrade that school or— build that bridge or to upgrade that school or to build that childcare centre — school or to build that childcare centre or— school or to build that childcare centre or to fix the power grid, and then you _ centre or to fix the power grid, and then you pay— centre or to fix the power grid, and then you pay it off over time. but here's_ then you pay it off over time. but here's the — then you pay it off over time. but here's the thing, and the tax proposal— here's the thing, and the tax proposal the president has laid out, those _ proposal the president has laid out, those taxes are permanent. spending is not _
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those taxes are permanent. spending is not to _ those taxes are permanent. spending is not. to make sure our economy is more _ is not. to make sure our economy is more resilient — is not. to make sure our economy is more resilient to climate change, to address— more resilient to climate change, to address all— more resilient to climate change, to address all of these questions about how we _ address all of these questions about how we transfer people across the country _ how we transfer people across the country and communities, and then there _ country and communities, and then there is— country and communities, and then there is a _ country and communities, and then there is a sensible tax plan associated with it, but will stay in place _ associated with it, but will stay in place this — associated with it, but will stay in place. this will reduce deficit and -ive place. this will reduce deficit and give us _ place. this will reduce deficit and give us more resources over time. i also want _ give us more resources over time. i also want to— give us more resources over time. i also want to emphasise that the tax side of— also want to emphasise that the tax side of this— also want to emphasise that the tax side of this is also, will also have economic— side of this is also, will also have economic benefits. there was a tax reform _ economic benefits. there was a tax reform that — economic benefits. there was a tax reform that happened in 2017 that created _ reform that happened in 2017 that created strong incentives for forms to ship— created strong incentives for forms to ship profits overseas, that created — to ship profits overseas, that created those distortions in our tax system _ created those distortions in our tax system. american business needs this kind of— system. american business needs this kind of infrastructure plan, and the most _ kind of infrastructure plan, and the most profitable companies should be paying _ most profitable companies should be paying theirfair most profitable companies should be paying their fair share to make sure that america can be competitive and benefit _ that america can be competitive and benefit them in the future. and that america can be competitive and benefit them in the future.— benefit them in the future. and yet
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in the short — benefit them in the future. and yet in the short term, _ benefit them in the future. and yet in the short term, the _ benefit them in the future. and yet l in the short term, the congressional budget office is predicting that the size of the national debt will be greater than economic output later this year. does this administration and not worry about that, that it could drive up inflation? haste and not worry about that, that it could drive up inflation?- could drive up inflation? we are certainly worried _ could drive up inflation? we are certainly worried about - could drive up inflation? we are certainly worried about and - could drive up inflation? we are - certainly worried about and watching these _ certainly worried about and watching these issues. we've inherited as many— these issues. we've inherited as many countries have this enormous crisis _ many countries have this enormous crisis because of the pandemic, and we all— crisis because of the pandemic, and we all know— crisis because of the pandemic, and we all know that until we get our hands _ we all know that until we get our hands around the pandemic, until be deal with— hands around the pandemic, until be deal with that crisis which is costing _ deal with that crisis which is costing government resources, congress — costing government resources, congress will be able to get on track — congress will be able to get on track so— congress will be able to get on track. so the spending we've already done is _ track. so the spending we've already done is really important to shoring up done is really important to shoring up our— done is really important to shoring up our economy. the united states needs— up our economy. the united states needs to _ up our economy. the united states needs to make the next step, we make these _ needs to make the next step, we make these investments, they are going to allow our— these investments, they are going to allow our country to thrive and create — allow our country to thrive and create that strong and better infrastructure, and there's a plan to pay— infrastructure, and there's a plan to pay for— infrastructure, and there's a plan to pay for it — infrastructure, and there's a plan to pay for it but we also need to rememher— to pay for it but we also need to remember that we have historically low rates — remember that we have historically low rates. there are not strong signs— low rates. there are not strong signs of— low rates. there are not strong signs of inflation, and you will keep— signs of inflation, and you will keep an — signs of inflation, and you will keep an eye on this, but there's a
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lot of— keep an eye on this, but there's a lot of room — keep an eye on this, but there's a lot of room right now to make investments that are going to put the economy on stronger footing. while _ the economy on stronger footing. while this— the economy on stronger footing. while this may seem partisan on capitol— while this may seem partisan on capitol hill, this is not partisan for the — capitol hill, this is not partisan for the american people. there are both majorities who believe this kind of— both majorities who believe this kind of spending on infrastructure is the _ kind of spending on infrastructure is the best— kind of spending on infrastructure is the best thing for them and their communities. yet is the best thing for them and their communities.— bill communities. yet you have in that bill not just _ communities. yet you have in that bill not just spending _ communities. yet you have in that bill notjust spending on _ communities. yet you have in that bill notjust spending on roads - communities. yet you have in that j bill notjust spending on roads and bridges, but also spending on carers. is the caring economy really what americans want fixed? is in it roads they're bothered about? fine what americans want fixed? is in it roads they're bothered about? one of the thin . s roads they're bothered about? one of the things we've _ roads they're bothered about? one of the things we've learned _ roads they're bothered about? one of the things we've learned in _ roads they're bothered about? one of the things we've learned in the - the things we've learned in the united — the things we've learned in the united states in 2020 is that if you don't _ united states in 2020 is that if you don't have — united states in 2020 is that if you don't have access to care, it's very. — don't have access to care, it's very. very— don't have access to care, it's very, very difficult to work. also if you _ very, very difficult to work. also if you don't _ very, very difficult to work. also if you don't have broadband, it can be difficult — if you don't have broadband, it can be difficult to work. this package makes _ be difficult to work. this package makes important steps forward in both kinds— makes important steps forward in both kinds of infrastructure investments. we know that the most important _ investments. we know that the most important aspect that any country
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has is _ important aspect that any country has is its — important aspect that any country has is its people and resources, and making _ has is its people and resources, and making those investments to ensure we can— making those investments to ensure we can retain our labour supply, that we — we can retain our labour supply, that we are _ we can retain our labour supply, that we are focused on seeing those as a core _ that we are focused on seeing those as a core part of infrastructure. and _ as a core part of infrastructure. and they— as a core part of infrastructure. and they have what they need to get to work— and they have what they need to get to work is— and they have what they need to get to work is an important piece of the puzzle. _ to work is an important piece of the puzzle. and — to work is an important piece of the puzzle, and that's what it's an important _ puzzle, and that's what it's an important part of this plan. heather. _ important part of this plan. heather, nice to talk to you. over 80% of the coronavirus vaccine doses that have been administered so far have been used by the world's richest countries. when the vaccines were developed, the wealthiest countries pre—ordered their supply from multiple drug companies to ensure they had access to the most effective. in some cases, the us a perfect example, governments have ordered enough vaccines to cover their populations several times over. but there are other countries that have trouble securing any doses at all. and none too surprisingly, the number of vaccinated people in low—income countries, is shockingly low. the united nations secretary—general antonio guterres calls this inequality a moral outrage. he says wealthy countries shouldn't
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stockpile vaccines — access to the jab should be a human right, in his view. i sat down with the secretary general at un headquarters in new york to talk more about the global vaccine roll—out. secretary general, thank you so much forjoining us. mr; secretary general, thank you so much forjoining us— secretary general, thank you so much forjoining us._ the - forjoining us. my pleasure. the united states _ forjoining us. my pleasure. the united states and _ forjoining us. my pleasure. the united states and other - forjoining us. my pleasure. the i united states and other developed countries are stockpiling coronavirus vaccines. what is your reaction to this situation?- reaction to this situation? we've been asking _ reaction to this situation? we've been asking develop _ reaction to this situation? we've been asking develop countries i reaction to this situation? we've i been asking develop countries not reaction to this situation? we've - been asking develop countries not to stockpile _ been asking develop countries not to stockpile and to share the vaccines they have — stockpile and to share the vaccines they have bought into the... to share _ they have bought into the... to share them _ they have bought into the... to share them early to developing worlds, — share them early to developing worlds, because if you want to defeat — worlds, because if you want to defeat the covid, you need to defeat everywhere and it's very important to start _ everywhere and it's very important to start vaccinating especially front—line workers and vulnerable populations everywhere. the front-line workers and vulnerable populations everywhere. the united states is saying _ populations everywhere. the united states is saying that _ populations everywhere. the united states is saying that it's _ populations everywhere. the united states is saying that it's holding - states is saying that it's holding onto its stockpile because it may want to vaccinate adolescents for
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example. is that a good reason to hold on to it... ? it’s example. is that a good reason to hold on to it... ?_ hold on to it... ? it's important to vaccinate — hold on to it... ? it's important to vaccinate the _ hold on to it... ? it's important to vaccinate the whole _ hold on to it... ? it's important to vaccinate the whole population, i hold on to it... ? it's important to i vaccinate the whole population, but for us, _ vaccinate the whole population, but for us, the — vaccinate the whole population, but for us, the primordial is to vaccinate _ for us, the primordial is to vaccinate those in the front line and those — vaccinate those in the front line and those honourable groups everywhere —— of the priority is. and _ everywhere —— of the priority is. and the — everywhere —— of the priority is. and the reason is very simple. we have _ and the reason is very simple. we have a _ and the reason is very simple. we have a virus— and the reason is very simple. we have a virus that mutates, and we see that _ have a virus that mutates, and we see that the — have a virus that mutates, and we see that the mutations are more frequent — see that the mutations are more frequent than spreading is more frequent — frequent than spreading is more frequent too. so, if we don't stop the spreading in the virus of developing countries, there will be more _ developing countries, there will be more and — developing countries, there will be more and more variants and that might— more and more variants and that might put— more and more variants and that might put into question the vaccines that exist _ might put into question the vaccines that exist today. that means those vaccines _ that exist today. that means those vaccines might become useless for the future, — vaccines might become useless for the future, so to make the vaccination campaigns in the global more _ vaccination campaigns in the global more expected, we need to make sure that we _ more expected, we need to make sure that we are _ more expected, we need to make sure that we are able to vaccinate globally _ that we are able to vaccinate globally to avoid spreading and with
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spreading development of new variants — spreading development of new variants that might create a serious problem _ variants that might create a serious roblem. �* , ., variants that might create a serious roblem. �*, ., ., ., ., ~ problem. there's a lot of talk here in the united _ problem. there's a lot of talk here in the united states _ problem. there's a lot of talk here in the united states about - problem. there's a lot of talk here in the united states about a - problem. there's a lot of talk here | in the united states about a vaccine passport so that people can begin to live their lives again. but what concerns do you have about the idea of a vaccine passport? the concerns do you have about the idea of a vaccine passport?— of a vaccine passport? the main roblem of a vaccine passport? the main problem with — of a vaccine passport? the main problem with a _ of a vaccine passport? the main problem with a vaccine - of a vaccine passport? the main problem with a vaccine passport of a vaccine passport? the main i problem with a vaccine passport is eguity~ _ problem with a vaccine passport is eguity~ is— problem with a vaccine passport is equity. is it— problem with a vaccine passport is equity. is it possible to have a vaccine — equity. is it possible to have a vaccine passport that facilitates its changes in movement? at the same time, _ its changes in movement? at the same time, that— its changes in movement? at the same time, that creates a new level of inequality— time, that creates a new level of inequality in the world. that is the concern _ inequality in the world. that is the concern we — inequality in the world. that is the concern. we see that there is huge inequality— concern. we see that there is huge inequality in the way people have access _ inequality in the way people have access to — inequality in the way people have access to vaccination and treatment, and huge _ access to vaccination and treatment, and huge inequality in the way that countries _ and huge inequality in the way that countries are able to mobilise resources _ countries are able to mobilise resources for their capital. —— economy~ _ resources for their capital. —— economy. that's why we insist to have _ economy. that's why we insist to have it _ economy. that's why we insist to have it affected really fervent developing countries, middle income countries _ developing countries, middle income countries that needed order to be
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able to— countries that needed order to be able to get into their populations, with the _ able to get into their populations, with the massive mobilisations of resources — with the massive mobilisations of resources. ~ . , with the massive mobilisations of resources. ~ ., , , ., resources. what is the lesson that ou ho -e resources. what is the lesson that you hope the _ resources. what is the lesson that you hope the world _ resources. what is the lesson that you hope the world has _ resources. what is the lesson that you hope the world has learned i resources. what is the lesson that i you hope the world has learned from the pandemic? the you hope the world has learned from the pandemic?— the pandemic? the biggest lesson is to understand _ the pandemic? the biggest lesson is to understand our _ the pandemic? the biggest lesson is to understand our fragility _ the pandemic? the biggest lesson is to understand our fragility as - the pandemic? the biggest lesson is to understand our fragility as a - to understand our fragility as a satiety~ — to understand our fragility as a satiety~ in _ to understand our fragility as a satiety. in relation to the pandemic, climate change, in relation— pandemic, climate change, in relation to the lack of capacity to have _ relation to the lack of capacity to have control in our technological development. so we are very fragile, and when _ development. so we are very fragile, and when we recognise, when we are humble _ and when we recognise, when we are humble enough to recognise this, i hope _ humble enough to recognise this, i hope we _ humble enough to recognise this, i hope we learn that we need solidarity to fight the challenges that are — solidarity to fight the challenges that are so clear in today's world. thank _ that are so clear in today's world. thank you — that are so clear in today's world. thank you so much forjoining us. it is a pleasure.
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it's really interesting, the secretary general told me he can't force countries to do anything, he just has this moral platform, so he's going to try to use it. {lilia he's going to try to use it. ok, well, he's going to try to use it. ok, well. he's _ he's going to try to use it. ok, well, he's going _ he's going to try to use it. ok, well, he's going to _ he's going to try to use it. ok, well, he's going to have - he's going to try to use it. ok, well, he's going to have to he's going to try to use it. oil, well, he's going to have to talk he's going to try to use it. oi, well, he's going to have to talk to the wealthiest countries. the wealthiest countries may be in a better position than the poorest, but it doesn't necessarily follow they will get the roll—out right. in fact, the who has today described the performance in europe as unacceptably slow. the world health organisation counts 50 countries in its europe region of those, 27 are in partial or full coronavirus lockdowns. france goes into anther national four week lockdown from saturday. schools will move to remote learning. non—essential shops will close and all domestic travel has been banned. elsewhere in europe, austria is closing all nonessential businesses in the capital vienna, and people are being asked to stay at home. slovenia has started a 12—day lockdown, and people are only allowed to leave the country if they can prove they've been vaccinated. the flip side of all this is serbia, where they've mostly been using the chinese vaccine and the roll—out has been so successful, people are now
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flocking to belgrade, where foreigners are being offered free jabs. but the general picture in europe — bleak. only 10% of some 900 million people in the region have had a single dose of coronavirus vaccine, and the world health organization was fiercely critical today of europe's performance. in a statement, the who directorfor europe, hans kluge, says "vaccines present our best way "out of this pandemic, but the roll—out has "been unacceptably slow" for more on this, we'rejoined now by world health organization spokesperson robb butler. rob, thanks for going on. who do you blame for this unacceptably slow roll—out? blame for this unacceptably slow roll-out? , , l blame for this unacceptably slow roll-out? , , . l, blame for this unacceptably slow roll-out? l, , l l, roll-out? thanks very much for the cuestion, roll-out? thanks very much for the question, christian. _ roll-out? thanks very much for the question, christian. i— roll-out? thanks very much for the question, christian. i don't- roll-out? thanks very much for the question, christian. i don't know i roll-out? thanks very much for the question, christian. i don't know if| question, christian. idon't know if there's— question, christian. i don't know if there's a _ question, christian. i don't know if there's a single answer. you've got to look— there's a single answer. you've got to look at— there's a single answer. you've got to look at this from both the manufacturers' perspective. they manufacture rs' perspective. they need _ manufacturers' perspective. they need those vaccines quite literally off the _ need those vaccines quite literally off the lines faster. we need it out
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from _ off the lines faster. we need it out from the _ off the lines faster. we need it out from the fridge is, of course, and into people's arms as quickly as possible — into people's arms as quickly as possible. there is no one single entity— possible. there is no one single entity to— possible. there is no one single entity to blame, so the manufacturers have a responsibility, the government have a responsibility to fast—track their vaccination. the front— to fast—track their vaccination. the front line _ to fast—track their vaccination. the front line health care workers have been _ front line health care workers have been doing — front line health care workers have been doing a terrificjob of getting these _ been doing a terrificjob of getting these vaccines out to the communities. they can only do the 'obs communities. they can only do the jobs if— communities. they can only do the jobs if their— communities. they can only do the jobs if their communities except the vaccine, _ jobs if their communities except the vaccine, so — jobs if their communities except the vaccine, so everybody has a role to play here — vaccine, so everybody has a role to play here. there's not a single entity— play here. there's not a single entity we _ play here. there's not a single entity we can blame. we've got almost — entity we can blame. we've got almost a — entity we can blame. we've got almost a million deaths, approaching almost a million deaths, approaching a million _ almost a million deaths, approaching a million deaths.— a million deaths. you're not blaming an one, a million deaths. you're not blaming anyone. but— a million deaths. you're not blaming anyone. but the _ a million deaths. you're not blaming anyone, but the eu _ a million deaths. you're not blaming anyone, but the eu commission - a million deaths. you're not blaming anyone, but the eu commission is i anyone, but the eu commission is putting the blame firmly on manufacturers, yet there are millions of doses sitting in fridges. then when you look at the response of national governments, take germany, they cleared astrazeneca for use. their government first bandit for people
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over 65, and now they said it's ok for people over 65 —— they've banned it. what are people meant to the combat? , l, l, �*, l, combat? first and foremost, it's a ve aood combat? first and foremost, it's a very good signal — combat? first and foremost, it's a very good signal that _ combat? first and foremost, it's a very good signal that we're - combat? first and foremost, it's a j very good signal that we're picking up very good signal that we're picking up these _ very good signal that we're picking up these vaccines. so our safety surveillance systems are working across _ surveillance systems are working across europe. thus the first thing we need _ across europe. thus the first thing we need to— across europe. thus the first thing we need to note. of course, it's going _ we need to note. of course, it's going to — we need to note. of course, it's going to impact confidence when we have a _ going to impact confidence when we have a report of a, in this case, association _ have a report of a, in this case, association with a particular vaccine _ association with a particular vaccine. so it's understandable... you don't — vaccine. so it's understandable... you don't believe in the german government's insertions? ila. you don't believe in the german government's insertions?- you don't believe in the german government's insertions? no, i think the verdict is — government's insertions? no, i think the verdict is not _ government's insertions? no, i think the verdict is not astrazeneca. - the verdict is not astrazeneca. there's— the verdict is not astrazeneca. there's been a lot of astrazeneca bashing _ there's been a lot of astrazeneca bashing over these last few months. we have _ bashing over these last few months. we have to — bashing over these last few months. we have to remember this is a highly effective _ we have to remember this is a highly effective vaccine, this is a vaccine that is— effective vaccine, this is a vaccine that is deduced and solved at cost
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and does — that is deduced and solved at cost and does not require equipments or specialist _ and does not require equipments or specialist equipment. we can get into all— specialist equipment. we can get into all four corners of the world. what _ into all four corners of the world. what we're — into all four corners of the world. what we're saying is the risks of the vaccine _ what we're saying is the risks of the vaccine are nowhere near the risks _ the vaccine are nowhere near the risks of— the vaccine are nowhere near the risks of covid—19 and this pandemic. the risk— risks of covid—19 and this pandemic. the risk of— risks of covid—19 and this pandemic. the risk of the vaccine does not outweigh— the risk of the vaccine does not outweigh the risk of covid, so we're saying _ outweigh the risk of covid, so we're saying countries should continue, but if— saying countries should continue, but if countries of course wish to pause, _ but if countries of course wish to pause, to— but if countries of course wish to pause, to suspend, to have a look at the data. _ pause, to suspend, to have a look at the data, which is not conclusive at this point— the data, which is not conclusive at this point and suspend the vaccination programmes with astrazeneca but continuing other vaccines, — astrazeneca but continuing other vaccines, then fine. they have the right— vaccines, then fine. they have the right to _ vaccines, then fine. they have the right to do — vaccines, then fine. they have the right to do that. but our recommendation is still to go ahead and vaccinate.— recommendation is still to go ahead and vaccinate. robb, on the question of vaccines. — and vaccinate. robb, on the question of vaccines, pfizer _ and vaccinate. robb, on the question of vaccines, pfizer said _ and vaccinate. robb, on the question of vaccines, pfizer said after - of vaccines, pfizer said after people get the second dose, they'll get six months of protection against for coronavirus. does this mean we'll be stuck in an endless cycle
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vaccination?— vaccination? no, i don't think it will. ithink— vaccination? no, i don't think it will. i think we're _ vaccination? no, i don't think it will. i think we're jumping - vaccination? no, i don't think it will. i think we're jumping a - vaccination? no, i don't think it i will. i think we're jumping a little bit ahead — will. i think we're jumping a little bit ahead of the game. the greatest news we've — bit ahead of the game. the greatest news we've had today on the pfizer vaccine _ news we've had today on the pfizer vaccine was — news we've had today on the pfizer vaccine was the protection after six months _ vaccine was the protection after six months. after those two doses, the effectiveness is going well beyond our expectations. let's also remember that it wasjust our expectations. let's also remember that it was just a matter of months — remember that it was just a matter of months ago we were all thrilled to hear— of months ago we were all thrilled to hear about a 50, 60% effective vaccine _ to hear about a 50, 60% effective vaccine that was on the development. now all— vaccine that was on the development. now all of— vaccine that was on the development. now all of these vaccines have surpassed that. we now all of these vaccines have surpassed that.— now all of these vaccines have surassed that. l l, , , l, surpassed that. we lost you there, sor . surpassed that. we lost you there, sorry- thanks _ surpassed that. we lost you there, sorry. thanks very _ surpassed that. we lost you there, sorry. thanks very much _ surpassed that. we lost you there, sorry. thanks very much for - surpassed that. we lost you there, sorry. thanks very much for being | sorry. thanks very much for being with us. let's get some of the day's other news. at least four people, including a child, have been killed in a shooting at an office building in southern california. police said they were called to the two—storey building in orange, south of los angeles. officers shot and wounded the suspect who was taken to hospital. police say the 44—year—old man knew the victims. google is to place limits on future
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remote working for its employees, as part of plans to reopen its offices. the tech giant says its staff will have to apply to work from home if they want to do so more than 1a days in a year. google says it will continue its remote working arrangements until september. cruise ships have been banned from entering the historic centre of venice. italy's culture minister said the decision came in response to a request from un cultural body, unesco, over claims the ships cause pollution and erode the foundations of the city. large ships will now have to dock at the city's industrial port until a permanent solution is found. for those watching on bbc world news, we'll be right back. boris johnson's special advisor on ethnic minorities has resigned. samuel kasumu's decision to stand down comes a day after the publication of a controversial
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government—commissioned report into race disparity. here's the reaction from author and historian, david olusoga. the government admits that that many people who gave evidence to the report did speak of other experiences of institutional racism, and that doesn't appear in the report. i think that is disturbing. again, i think this is a report about false binaries and strawmen. people don't say britain isn't and institutionally racist country because britain's not an institution. people talk about racism existing in a structural form within many british institutions, and i think this report shows that the government is being left behind. company after company, organisation over organisation is looking at their structures, looking at their practices and their cultures and trying to take some of the spirit of black lives matter seriously and trying to create the society that we want, a society in which people aren'tjudged and their life choices aren't determined by their race. the same as by their class or their gender or their sexuality. but we don't do that by denying it. shakespeare's hamlet is one of the most popular
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and performed plays in the world, while sir ian mckellen is one of the most celebrated and versatile actors — famous for his classical roles as well as starring in the screen adaptation of the lord of the rings as gandalf. he's now starring in a staging of hamlet. that will be one of the first major productions to open injune, once lockdown restrictions on theatres are hopefully eased. our arts editor will gompertz met sir ian at the theatre royal windsor, just as rehearsals began, to talk about playing the young prince of denmark at the age of 81. of all occasions to inform against me and spur my dull revenge! the mode, these days, of casting people who don't necessarily look the part, because it's the inner person you're going after, and if i can rake around inside and discover the young man in me, then hopefully it'll be all right. strikes me that the biggest challenge is the physicality, is the movement. well, what am i to do?
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i can't pretend i'm 20. no one's going to believe it. but i can feel that i'm 20. it is going to be an 80—year—old man playing a man 50 years younger. i have played gandalf, who was over 7,000 years old. no one said i was too young! you shall not pass! i think it's fair to say, or true to say, at least, you first played hamlet as a child when you had your toy theatre, didn't you ? yes, yes, i'd be about ten or 11. my parents gave me a pollock's toy theatre, which was a theatre that you have to cut up and reassemble. cardboard. and behind a tea towel, i was saying the words. i did a shortened version of hamlet just after christmas lunch! and you cannot have imagined then that you would be playing it, what, 70 years later? no, of course not, no. i thought i'd be playing polonius, if not the skull, by this time! yorick�*s skull. there will be people who come to collect this hamlet. i remember when i played it in 1971, two old gentleman came
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round to see me afterwards and said, "congratulations, "you're our 73rd hamlet". in the last 12 months? it's been pretty devastating. during my lifetime, the theatres in london were closed for longish periods during the second world war, but always sprang back. so, 50 years after this hamlet... it is an unweeded garden that grows to seed. sir ian mckellen once again plays the prince, undimmed by the whips and scorns of time. will gompertz, bbc news. still so versatile. do you know what he's also famous for? do you know where he was born? no idea. ma; for? do you know where he was born? no idea. g l, l, l,, l, l, no idea. my hometown. i was going to sa , iwas no idea. my hometown. i was going to say. i wasjust — no idea. my hometown. i was going to say, i wasjust looking _ no idea. my hometown. i was going to say, i wasjust looking where - no idea. my hometown. i was going to say, i wasjust looking where we - say, i was just looking where we were watching that. he's actually a wicken fen. —— wigan fan. let's move
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on. today's is the 1st of april, when it's customary to play practicaljokes. and i don't know about you, but i woke up this morning to find the kids throwing water over each other in the sitting room. it's also the day when it's acceptable — even expected — thatjournalists will publish patently false stories that readers and viewers will then write in about. and complain about. which is, christian, a good excuse for a quiz. some of these headlines i'm about to show you are obvious april fool's jokes from today. any idiot could spot that. others are real stories from today that are not made up, and you have to guess which ones are the april fool's. this should be no problem. are you ready? this should be no problem. are you read ? l, ll, l, this should be no problem. are you ready?_ 0k- - this should be no problem. are you | ready?_ ok. number this should be no problem. are you - ready?_ ok. number one ready? yeah, come on. ok. number one for the daily _ ready? yeah, come on. ok. number one
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for the daily star... _ april fools aprilfools or real? april fools or real? real. very aood. april fools or real? real. very good- you _ april fools or real? real. very good. you didn't _ april fools or real? real. very good. you didn't cheat! - april fools or real? real. very good. you didn't cheat! onto | april fools or real? its—i very good. you didn't cheat! onto the next one. the daily express... aprilfull or real? april full or real? real. two for two. april full or real? real. two for two- number— april full or real? real. two for two. number three. _ false! false! april full. false! false! aprilfull. you're really doing — false! false! aprilfull. you're really doing pretty _ false! false! aprilfull. you're really doing pretty well. - false! false! aprilfull. you're i really doing pretty well. finally, the sun. laughter.
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false. l, hello there. it's been a much colder day today across many parts of the uk. the highest temperatures have been the southwest of england earlier on in the afternoon in cornwall. we had highs of 19 degrees. at the same time though, one area that's been very warm over the past few days, lincolnshire, with the cloud coming in off the north sea, it was only nine celsius. the cloud did eventually break up to give some late sunshine but the clouds coming back in across parts of england and overnight, feeding into northern areas of scotland. elsewhere, we're going to have some clear skies, northern ireland, particularly scotland away from the cloudy north, there will be some frost around. the risk of frost extends its way into northern england and wales and also parts of the midlands too. and right the way through the easter weekend, it remains on the courtside with further frost at night.
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—— on the cold side. on easter monday, it is going to feel particularly cold in the wind and could have some wintry showers around too. the odd showers possible down to the coast of eastern scotland, northeast england on friday morning and before that cloud moves and meant, but got some sunshine. the cloud filters its way through the eastern side of england and further west, we've got sunshine and also the sunshine in northern ireland after that cold start. 1a degrees is the high on friday and again across more eastern areas of the uk, we are struggling up to nine or ten celsius. cooler air across the uk, it is trapped underneath that area of high pressure and at least it is keeping it fine and dry. but with the breeze off the north sea again, we can expect more cloud down the eastern side of england perhaps for a while into the midlands too. but for many other western and northern parts of the uk, it looks like we should enjoy some sunshine at least and temperatures beginning to lift a little because scotland. —— across scotland. but again, the highest temperatures around 13 degrees. heading into easter sunday, it doesn't look too bad across most of england and wales.
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lighter winds in the south and some sunshine. further north, the winds do strengthen. we've got this band of rain coming into scotland and northern ireland and then behind that, the stern wintry and it turns wintry and the temperatures for the start to drop away. but it should be a less cold day with the sunshine and later winds for the eastern side of england. but it gets colder everywhere in time for easter monday. that weather front moves down and brings in some rain and there's all the winter weather following behind, and we can trace the winds of the way back to the arctic, a real arctic blast of air for easter monday, feeling cold in the wind and there could be some sleet and snow showers as well.
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you're watching bbc news with me laura trevelyan in washington, christian fraser is in london. our top stories... senate minority leader mitch mcconnell vows to fightjoe biden's ambitious infrastructure plan every step of the way. george floyd's girlfriend speaks of his struggle with opioid addiction — on day four of one of the most closely watched murder trials in american history. also in the programme... on the opening day of the baseball season here in america — we look back at the game's history of segregation, and what the sport has been doing about it. and — president biden has a to do list, just like you, me or christian. well, sort of. i'm guessing ours don't have global implciations. well, maybe christian's does.
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its day four in the murder trial of former minneapolis officer derek chauvin. and today we have been learning more about george floyd's personal life and his opiate addiction. on the stand this morning was mr floyd's girlfriend, courteney batya ross, who gave emotional testimony about his long time battle with prescription drugs. she is the first person to take the stand who personally knew mr floyd. ms ross said she's noticed in the weeks before he died that george floyd's mood had changed, and he was using again. here's the defence team questioning her about mr floyd overdosing in march last year. i went to go pick floyd up| from his house that night. i thought i was taking him to work. he wasn't feeling good, j his stomach really hurt, he was doubled over in pain. just wasn't feeling well and he said
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he had to go to the hospital. - so i took him straight to the hospital. - you later learned that that was due to an overdose? yes. we also have been hearing these past few hours from a paramedic seth bravinder, who told the court that when he arrived at the scene floyd was already in cardiac arrest. "from what i could see where i was at, he said. i couldn't see any breathing,". mr bravinder said mr floyd flatlined in the ambulance about three blocks away as they tried to revive him. lets go live to the court house and speak to the bbc�*s lebo diseko. there's nothing wrong with being addicted to opiate prescription drugs, there are millions of people in america who suffer that way. and so we should notjudge mr floyd for his addiction. the only question i haveis his addiction. the only question i have is why it is the prosecution using its own witnesses to cast mr
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floyd in something that potentially the jury could see in a negative light? the jury could see in a negative liuht? ~ ~' , the jury could see in a negative liuht? ~ ~ , l, l, light? well i think they wanted to make exactly _ light? well i think they wanted to make exactly that _ light? well i think they wanted to make exactly that point, - light? well i think they wanted to make exactly that point, that - light? well i think they wanted to | make exactly that point, that drug addiction — make exactly that point, that drug addiction happens to americans of all different colours, all different socioeconomic backgrounds. there's a history— socioeconomic backgrounds. there's a history when— socioeconomic backgrounds. there's a history when it comes, particularly to cases _ history when it comes, particularly to cases involving police brutality, and people of colour. black men, abusing _ and people of colour. black men, abusing drug addiction as a narrative _ abusing drug addiction as a narrative to painter the person who is the _ narrative to painter the person who is the complainant in a negative light _ is the complainant in a negative light so — is the complainant in a negative light so i — is the complainant in a negative light. so i think that the prosecution were trying to take charge — prosecution were trying to take charge of— prosecution were trying to take charge of that narrative. they know that for— charge of that narrative. they know that for the — charge of that narrative. they know that for the defence that was something that is a key part of their— something that is a key part of their argument, that derek chauvin behave _ their argument, that derek chauvin behave the — their argument, that derek chauvin behave the way he did because george floyd posed a threat. so i think they— floyd posed a threat. so i think they were — floyd posed a threat. so i think they were trying to humanise george george _ they were trying to humanise george george floyd the manic with the father. — george floyd the manic with the father, the father, the partner and also show— father, the father, the partner and
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also show that drug addiction happens _ also show that drug addiction happens to so many different types of people _ happens to so many different types of people and that's not necessarily a reflection on his character.- a reflection on his character. we've also been learning _ a reflection on his character. we've also been learning about _ a reflection on his character. we've also been learning about the - also been learning about the interaction at the time between the police and paramedics who arrived to find, as we havejust police and paramedics who arrived to find, as we have just been police and paramedics who arrived to find, as we havejust been hearing, mr floyd not breathing. can you put that into context, why is that important?— that into context, why is that important? that into context, why is that imortant? , , l, important? just listening to it was re important? just listening to it was pretty devastating. _ important? just listening to it was pretty devastating. you _ important? just listening to it was pretty devastating. you have - important? just listening to it was pretty devastating. you have the l pretty devastating. you have the paramedic who words you just summed up paramedic who words you just summed up and _ paramedic who words you just summed up and his— paramedic who words you just summed up and his partner also saying that when _ up and his partner also saying that when they— up and his partner also saying that when they arrived on the scene mr floyd _ when they arrived on the scene mr floyd was— when they arrived on the scene mr floyd was dead. the second paramedic pretty— floyd was dead. the second paramedic pretty much— floyd was dead. the second paramedic pretty much summed it up in that way _ pretty much summed it up in that way and — pretty much summed it up in that way. and secondly describing having to come _ way. and secondly describing having to come a _ way. and secondly describing having to come a writing the checks for mr floyd _ to come a writing the checks for mr floyd public policy and having to ask derek chauvin to move up. he was still on _ ask derek chauvin to move up. he was still on mr_ ask derek chauvin to move up. he was still on mr floyd whilst they were checking — still on mr floyd whilst they were checking for his pulse and do this check— checking for his pulse and do this check to— checking for his pulse and do this check to see whether he was alive.
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his second — check to see whether he was alive. his second paramedic was much less passionate _ his second paramedic was much less passionate the first, they're both very measured in their tone. so to hear— very measured in their tone. so to hear in _ very measured in their tone. so to hear in that— very measured in their tone. so to hear in that kind of in contrast to what _ hear in that kind of in contrast to what we — hear in that kind of in contrast to what we heard earlier in the day and also so _ what we heard earlier in the day and also so matter—of—factly, we arrived he was _ also so matter—of—factly, we arrived he was to _ also so matter—of—factly, we arrived he was to all— also so matter—of—factly, we arrived he was to all intents and purposes dead, _ he was to all intents and purposes dead. we — he was to all intents and purposes dead, we had to tell the police to move _ dead, we had to tell the police to move from — dead, we had to tell the police to move from his neck. you dead, we had to tell the police to move from his neck.— move from his neck. you for listening _ move from his neck. you for listening closely _ move from his neck. you for listening closely to - move from his neck. you for listening closely to the - move from his neck. you for. listening closely to the defence line of questioning. how are they trying to defend a former officer derek chauvin, based on the questions you've can hearing them asking today and on other days? i think that when it comes to the paramedics they are trying to basically ask questions that show the police are not medical professionals.— the police are not medical professionals. the police are not medical rofessionals. , l, , l l, professionals. they do it they can but they are _ professionals. they do it they can but they are not _ professionals. they do it they can but they are not trained - professionals. they do it they can but they are not trained in - professionals. they do it they can but they are not trained in the - professionals. they do it they can i but they are not trained in the same way that— but they are not trained in the same way that paramedics are trained, so they would — way that paramedics are trained, so they would not have had the same knowledge that paramedics when they arrived _
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knowledge that paramedics when they arrived. when it comes to george floyd's— arrived. when it comes to george floyd's girlfriend and partner they are trying — floyd's girlfriend and partner they are trying to show that her testimony was not reliable, showing differences between the testimony she gave _ differences between the testimony she gave or statements to gauge the fbi and _ she gave or statements to gauge the fbi and what she gave on the stand. also showing that george floyd may have taken drugs that she did not know— have taken drugs that she did not know about or she did not know everything he was doing. and lastly the friends he was with on the day he died _ the friends he was with on the day he died had also sold him drugs, that they— he died had also sold him drugs, that they had dealt drugs to mr floyd — that they had dealt drugs to mr floyd i— that they had dealt drugs to mr floyd. i think this goes into the narrative — floyd. i think this goes into the narrative that they have that he may be was _ narrative that they have that he may be was aggressive, that he was somebody that needed to be brought under— somebody that needed to be brought under control and that's why derek chauvin— under control and that's why derek chauvin did — under control and that's why derek chauvin did what he did.— under control and that's why derek chauvin did what he did. thank you so much, chauvin did what he did. thank you so much. we _ chauvin did what he did. thank you so much, we are _ chauvin did what he did. thank you so much, we are joined _ chauvin did what he did. thank you so much, we are joined now- chauvin did what he did. thank you so much, we are joined now from i so much, we arejoined now from south we're joined now from south carolina by house majority whip, congressmanjim clyburn. thank you for being with us. regardless of the verdict in this trial, do you think that there has
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been a change in american policing tactics in the wake of george floyd's death?— tactics in the wake of george floyd's death? tactics in the wake of george flo d's death? l, ~ , l, , l floyd's death? thank you very much for havin: floyd's death? thank you very much for having me- _ floyd's death? thank you very much for having me. i— floyd's death? thank you very much for having me. i do _ floyd's death? thank you very much for having me. i do think _ floyd's death? thank you very much for having me. i do think that - for having me. i do think that people — for having me. i do think that people are _ for having me. i do think that people are now— for having me. i do think that people are now seeing - for having me. i do think that people are now seeing what i for having me. i do think that- people are now seeing what some of the complaints— people are now seeing what some of the complaints have _ people are now seeing what some of the complaints have been _ people are now seeing what some of the complaints have been all- people are now seeing what some of the complaints have been all about. | the complaints have been all about. and i_ the complaints have been all about. and i do— the complaints have been all about. and i do believe _ the complaints have been all about. and i do believe that _ the complaints have been all about. and i do believe that there - the complaints have been all about. and i do believe that there are - and i do believe that there are lessons — and i do believe that there are lessons to— and i do believe that there are lessons to be _ and i do believe that there are lessons to be learned - and i do believe that there are lessons to be learned from - and i do believe that there are| lessons to be learned from this trial~ _ lessons to be learned from this trial~ i— lessons to be learned from this trial~ i find _ lessons to be learned from this trial. ifind it— lessons to be learned from this trial. i find it very _ lessons to be learned from this trial. i find it very interesting i trial. i find it very interesting that— trial. i find it very interesting that while _ trial. i find it very interesting that while it _ trial. i find it very interesting that while it gathered - trial. i find it very interesting that while it gathered out. trial. i find it very interesting that while it gathered out on| trial. i find it very interesting . that while it gathered out on the sidewalk— that while it gathered out on the sidewalk watching _ that while it gathered out on the sidewalk watching this _ that while it gathered out on the sidewalk watching this man's - that while it gathered out on the| sidewalk watching this man's life being _ sidewalk watching this man's life being snuffed _ sidewalk watching this man's life being snuffed out _ sidewalk watching this man's life being snuffed out of _ sidewalk watching this man's life being snuffed out of his- sidewalk watching this man's life being snuffed out of his body- sidewalk watching this man's life. being snuffed out of his body they called _ being snuffed out of his body they called for— being snuffed out of his body they called for the _ being snuffed out of his body they called for the police. _ being snuffed out of his body they called for the police. they - being snuffed out of his body they called for the police. they were i called for the police. they were looking — called for the police. they were looking at — called for the police. they were looking at four _ called for the police. they were looking at four or— called for the police. they were looking at four or five _ called for the police. they were i looking at four or five policeman, but they— looking at four or five policeman, but they called _ looking at four or five policeman, but they called the _ looking at four or five policeman, but they called the police. - looking at four or five policeman, but they called the police. that i but they called the police. that ought — but they called the police. that ought to — but they called the police. that ought to tell _ but they called the police. that ought to tell you _ but they called the police. that ought to tell you that - but they called the police. that ought to tell you that there's i but they called the police. that ought to tell you that there's a| ought to tell you that there's a tremendous— ought to tell you that there's a tremendous amount _ ought to tell you that there's a tremendous amount of - ought to tell you that there's a| tremendous amount of respect ought to tell you that there's a - tremendous amount of respect for good _ tremendous amount of respect for good police — tremendous amount of respect for good police officers. _ tremendous amount of respect for good police officers. so— tremendous amount of respect for good police officers. so they- tremendous amount of respect for good police officers. so they were| good police officers. so they were asking _ good police officers. so they were asking the — good police officers. so they were asking the police _ good police officers. so they were asking the police department- good police officers. so they were asking the police department to l good police officers. so they were . asking the police department to send somebody— asking the police department to send
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somebody out — asking the police department to send somebody out here _ asking the police department to send somebody out here because - asking the police department to send somebody out here because you've i asking the police department to send i somebody out here because you've got somebody out here because you've got some rogue _ somebody out here because you've got some rogue cops — somebody out here because you've got some rogue cops out _ somebody out here because you've got some rogue cops out here _ somebody out here because you've got some rogue cops out here that - somebody out here because you've got some rogue cops out here that are - some rogue cops out here that are killing _ some rogue cops out here that are killing a _ some rogue cops out here that are killing a man _ some rogue cops out here that are killing a man so _ some rogue cops out here that are killing a man. so i _ some rogue cops out here that are killing a man. so i think— some rogue cops out here that are killing a man. so i think that - some rogue cops out here that are killing a man. so i think that this. killing a man. so i think that this is what _ killing a man. so i think that this is what we — killing a man. so i think that this is what we need _ killing a man. so i think that this is what we need to _ killing a man. so i think that this is what we need to learn. - killing a man. so i think that this| is what we need to learn. there's killing a man. so i think that this. is what we need to learn. there's no anti-police _ is what we need to learn. there's no anti—police attitude _ is what we need to learn. there's no anti—police attitude in _ is what we need to learn. there's no anti—police attitude in the _ anti—police attitude in the african—american- anti—police attitude in the - african—american community. that demonstrates— african—american community. that demonstrates it _ african—american community. that demonstrates it more _ african—american community. that demonstrates it more than - african—american community. thatl demonstrates it more than anything else _ demonstrates it more than anything else so _ demonstrates it more than anything else so on — demonstrates it more than anything else so on both— demonstrates it more than anything else. so on both sides _ demonstrates it more than anything else. so on both sides of— demonstrates it more than anything else. so on both sides of this- demonstrates it more than anything else. so on both sides of this coin i else. so on both sides of this coin there _ else. so on both sides of this coin there are — else. so on both sides of this coin there are lessons _ else. so on both sides of this coin there are lessons to _ else. so on both sides of this coin there are lessons to be _ else. so on both sides of this coin there are lessons to be learned. i else. so on both sides of this coin i there are lessons to be learned. you make a good — there are lessons to be learned. make a good point, it struck me there are lessons to be learned.” make a good point, it struck me that the instinct to lead the people on the instinct to lead the people on the payment knew that there was something wrong just did not seem to occurfor something wrong just did not seem to occur for whatever reason to these police officers. there is a pattern in the country, it's hanging over this trial that indictments against police officers don't always result in a conviction. looking at the numbers, from 2005 to 2019101; police numbers, from 2005 to 2019104 police officers were charged with murder or manslaughter, of that number only 35 were convicted. what does that tell you? that number only 35 were convicted. what does that tell you?— does that tell you? that tells me that all of those _ does that tell you? that tells me that all of those things _
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does that tell you? that tells me j that all of those things happened before _ that all of those things happened before people _ that all of those things happened before people saw— that all of those things happened before people saw george - that all of those things happened before people saw george floydl before people saw george floyd apartment— before people saw george floyd apartment incident. _ before people saw george floyd apartment incident. but - before people saw george floyd apartment incident. but i - before people saw george floyd apartment incident. but i think. apartment incident. but i think those — apartment incident. but i think those numbers— apartment incident. but i think those numbers will— apartment incident. but i think those numbers will change i apartment incident. but i think. those numbers will change going forward — those numbers will change going forward yes. _ those numbers will change going forward. yes, what— those numbers will change going forward. yes, what happens- those numbers will change going forward. yes, what happens in. those numbers will change going i forward. yes, what happens in these instances _ forward. yes, what happens in these instances so — forward. yes, what happens in these instances so often, _ forward. yes, what happens in these instances so often, you _ forward. yes, what happens in these instances so often, you don't - forward. yes, what happens in these instances so often, you don't have i instances so often, you don't have body _ instances so often, you don't have body cameras, _ instances so often, you don't have body cameras, you _ instances so often, you don't have body cameras, you don't - instances so often, you don't have body cameras, you don't have i instances so often, you don't have i body cameras, you don't have people videoing _ body cameras, you don't have people videoing the — body cameras, you don't have people videoing the activity. _ body cameras, you don't have people videoing the activity. i'm _ body cameras, you don't have people videoing the activity. i'm not - body cameras, you don't have people videoing the activity. i'm not too i videoing the activity. i'm not too sure _ videoing the activity. i'm not too sure there — videoing the activity. i'm not too sure there would _ videoing the activity. i'm not too sure there would even _ videoing the activity. i'm not too sure there would even be - videoing the activity. i'm not too sure there would even be a i videoing the activity. i'm not too sure there would even be a triali sure there would even be a trial going _ sure there would even be a trial going on— sure there would even be a trial going on right _ sure there would even be a trial going on right now— sure there would even be a trial going on right now were - sure there would even be a trial going on right now were it- sure there would even be a trial going on right now were it not. sure there would even be a trial. going on right now were it not for the fact— going on right now were it not for the fact that _ going on right now were it not for the fact that people _ going on right now were it not for the fact that people stopped i going on right now were it not for the fact that people stopped by. going on right now were it not for. the fact that people stopped by and they turned — the fact that people stopped by and they turned on— the fact that people stopped by and they turned on their _ the fact that people stopped by and they turned on their devices - the fact that people stopped by and they turned on their devices and i the fact that people stopped by and they turned on their devices and a i they turned on their devices and a video— they turned on their devices and a video did — they turned on their devices and a video did the _ they turned on their devices and a video did the whole _ they turned on their devices and a video did the whole thing. - they turned on their devices and a video did the whole thing. that's. video did the whole thing. that's was going — video did the whole thing. that's was going to _ video did the whole thing. that's was going to be _ video did the whole thing. that's was going to be happening i video did the whole thing. that's was going to be happening going forward — was going to be happening going forward. people _ was going to be happening going forward. people have _ was going to be happening going forward. people have a - was going to be happening going forward. people have a different| was going to be happening going i forward. people have a different set of circumstances _ forward. people have a different set of circumstances going _ forward. people have a different set of circumstances going into - forward. people have a different set of circumstances going into these i of circumstances going into these trials _ of circumstances going into these trials that— of circumstances going into these trials that we _ of circumstances going into these trials that we have _ of circumstances going into these trials that we have had _ of circumstances going into these trials that we have had in - of circumstances going into these trials that we have had in the i of circumstances going into these i trials that we have had in the past. and what— trials that we have had in the past. and what you — trials that we have had in the past. and what you make _ trials that we have had in the past. and what you make of— trials that we have had in the past. and what you make of the - trials that we have had in the past. and what you make of the fact i trials that we have had in the past. j and what you make of the fact that the death of george floyd prompted a racial reckoning, notjust here in america but around the world? you know, i america but around the world? you know. i was — america but around the world? you know. i was very —
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america but around the world? you know, i was very moved and impressed by that _ know, i was very moved and impressed by that the _ know, i was very moved and impressed by that the late — know, i was very moved and impressed by that. the late jon _ know, i was very moved and impressed by that. the late jon lewis _ know, i was very moved and impressed by that. the late jon lewis who - know, i was very moved and impressed by that. the late jon lewis who was i by that. the late jon lewis who was a friend _ by that. the late jon lewis who was a friend of— by that. the late jon lewis who was a friend of mine, _ by that. the late jon lewis who was a friend of mine, we _ by that. the late jon lewis who was a friend of mine, we shared - by that. the late jon lewis who was a friend of mine, we shared more i a friend of mine, we shared more than _ a friend of mine, we shared more than a _ a friend of mine, we shared more than a 50 — a friend of mine, we shared more than a 50 year— a friend of mine, we shared more than a 50 year relationship. i a friend of mine, we shared more than a 50 year relationship. jon . than a 50 year relationship. jon lewis_ than a 50 year relationship. jon lewis and — than a 50 year relationship. jon lewis and i_ than a 50 year relationship. jon lewis and i sat _ than a 50 year relationship. jon lewis and i sat in _ than a 50 year relationship. jon lewis and i sat in the _ than a 50 year relationship. jon lewis and i sat in the back- than a 50 year relationship. jon lewis and i sat in the back of. than a 50 year relationship. jon. lewis and i sat in the back of the house _ lewis and i sat in the back of the house chamber— lewis and i sat in the back of the house chamber as _ lewis and i sat in the back of the house chamber as we _ lewis and i sat in the back of the house chamber as we saw - lewis and i sat in the back of the house chamber as we saw the i lewis and i sat in the back of the i house chamber as we saw the black lives matter— house chamber as we saw the black lives matter events _ house chamber as we saw the black lives matter events unfold - house chamber as we saw the black lives matter events unfold and - house chamber as we saw the black lives matter events unfold and we l lives matter events unfold and we both concluded _ lives matter events unfold and we both concluded that _ lives matter events unfold and we both concluded that we _ lives matter events unfold and we both concluded that we sensed . lives matter events unfold and we i both concluded that we sensed going on, both concluded that we sensed going on. that_ both concluded that we sensed going on. that which— both concluded that we sensed going on, that which we _ both concluded that we sensed going on, that which we felt _ both concluded that we sensed going on, that which we felt back _ both concluded that we sensed going on, that which we felt back in - both concluded that we sensed going on, that which we felt back in the - on, that which we felt back in the 60s _ on, that which we felt back in the 60s and — on, that which we felt back in the 60s. and that's _ on, that which we felt back in the 60s. and that's why— on, that which we felt back in the 60s. and that's why i— on, that which we felt back in the 60s. and that's why i spoke - on, that which we felt back in the 60s. and that's why i spoke out. 60s. and that's why i spoke out about— 60s. and that's why i spoke out about this — 60s. and that's why i spoke out about this defined _ 60s. and that's why i spoke out about this defined the - 60s. and that's why i spoke out about this defined the police, . about this defined the police, because — about this defined the police, because i_ about this defined the police, because i saw— about this defined the police, because i saw with _ about this defined the police, because i saw with that - about this defined the police, because i saw with that kind i about this defined the police, i because i saw with that kind of headline — because i saw with that kind of headline did _ because i saw with that kind of headline did to _ because i saw with that kind of headline did to us _ because i saw with that kind of headline did to us back- because i saw with that kind of headline did to us back in- because i saw with that kind of headline did to us back in the i because i saw with that kind of. headline did to us back in the 60s when _ headline did to us back in the 60s when they— headline did to us back in the 60s when they came _ headline did to us back in the 60s when they came out _ headline did to us back in the 60s when they came out with - headline did to us back in the 60s when they came out with burn, i headline did to us back in the 60s . when they came out with burn, baby, burn _ when they came out with burn, baby, burn so _ when they came out with burn, baby, burn so we — when they came out with burn, baby, burn so we will _ when they came out with burn, baby, burn. so we will see _ when they came out with burn, baby, burn. so we will see just _ when they came out with burn, baby, burn. so we will see just on - when they came out with burn, baby, burn. so we will see just on this - burn. so we will see just on this triat _ burn. so we will see just on this triat african _ burn. so we will see just on this trial. african americans - burn. so we will see just on this| trial. african americans believing in the _ trial. african americans believing in the police _ trial. african americans believing in the police department. - trial. african americans believing in the police department. they. trial. african americans believing. in the police department. they went out and _ in the police department. they went out and voted — in the police department. they went out and voted last _ in the police department. they went out and voted last year— in the police department. they went out and voted last year to _ in the police department. they went out and voted last year to elect - in the police department. they went out and voted last year to elect one| out and voted last year to elect one of their— out and voted last year to elect one of their own — out and voted last year to elect one of their own to— out and voted last year to elect one of their own to be _ out and voted last year to elect one of their own to be the _ out and voted last year to elect one of their own to be the attorney - of their own to be the attorney generat—
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of their own to be the attorney general of— of their own to be the attorney general of the _ of their own to be the attorney general of the state. _ of their own to be the attorney general of the state. that's - of their own to be the attorney| general of the state. that's the chief— general of the state. that's the chief taw— general of the state. that's the chief law enforcement - general of the state. that's the chief law enforcement officer. i general of the state. that's the i chief law enforcement officer. and they love — chief law enforcement officer. and they love the _ chief law enforcement officer. and they love the guy _ chief law enforcement officer. and they love the guy. so _ chief law enforcement officer. and they love the guy. so we - chief law enforcement officer. and they love the guy. so we have - chief law enforcement officer. and they love the guy. so we have to i they love the guy. so we have to learn _ they love the guy. so we have to learn that — they love the guy. so we have to learn that if— they love the guy. so we have to learn that if people _ they love the guy. so we have to learn that if people public - learn that if people public experiences _ learn that if people public experiences that - learn that if people public experiences that drive - learn that if people public . experiences that drive them learn that if people public - experiences that drive them in so many— experiences that drive them in so nrany of— experiences that drive them in so many of these _ experiences that drive them in so many of these instances, - experiences that drive them in so many of these instances, and - experiences that drive them in soj many of these instances, and you have _ many of these instances, and you have good — many of these instances, and you have good positive _ many of these instances, and you have good positive experiences . many of these instances, and you . have good positive experiences that the police _ have good positive experiences that the police departments, _ have good positive experiences that the police departments, you - have good positive experiences that the police departments, you have . the police departments, you have good _ the police departments, you have good bossibte _ the police departments, you have good possible experiences- the police departments, you have good possible experiences with l the police departments, you have. good possible experiences with the cops on— good possible experiences with the cops on the — good possible experiences with the cops on the street. _ good possible experiences with the cops on the street. it's _ good possible experiences with the cops on the street. it's just - good possible experiences with the cops on the street. it's just that - cops on the street. it's just that simple — cops on the street. it's “ust that simle. ~ ., �* cops on the street. it's 'ust that simle. ~ ., �* ., simple. we don't often get the chief whi on simple. we don't often get the chief whip on the — simple. we don't often get the chief whip on the programme _ simple. we don't often get the chief whip on the programme so - simple. we don't often get the chief whip on the programme so we - simple. we don't often get the chief whip on the programme so we want| simple. we don't often get the chief. whip on the programme so we want to turn the other issue is on your brief. as a video on our website today that getting a lot of pick—up, and you might have seen it but i will describe it to you. it's from the border and it is thermal imaging camera at the border filming the wall at what we see on top of the wall at what we see on top of the wall is a people smuggler dropping two very young children, in fact they are ecuadorian children, under they are ecuadorian children, under the ground on the us side. they are, i should just point out, both well and safe. that's about it four metre
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drop there. itjust shows the scale of the problem. do you think from where you're sitting there a congressional solution to the immigration problem at the border? will thank you so much for bringing those _ will thank you so much for bringing those two _ will thank you so much for bringing those two children _ will thank you so much for bringing those two children up. _ will thank you so much for bringing those two children up. i _ will thank you so much for bringing those two children up. i spoke - will thank you so much for bringing i those two children up. i spoke about them _ those two children up. i spoke about them on _ those two children up. i spoke about them on another— those two children up. i spoke about them on another programme - those two children up. i spoke about them on another programme this. them on another programme this morning — them on another programme this morning. because _ them on another programme this morning. because i— them on another programme this morning. because i was- them on another programme this morning. because i was talking l them on another programme this- morning. because i was talking about what i _ morning. because i was talking about what i know— morning. because i was talking about what i know about _ morning. because i was talking about what i know about immigration. - morning. because i was talking about what i know about immigration. we l what i know about immigration. we ought _ what i know about immigration. we ought to— what i know about immigration. we ought to think— what i know about immigration. we ought to think of _ what i know about immigration. we ought to think of immigration - what i know about immigration. we ought to think of immigration in - ought to think of immigration in every— ought to think of immigration in every sense _ ought to think of immigration in every sense of— ought to think of immigration in every sense of the _ ought to think of immigration in every sense of the word. - ought to think of immigration in every sense of the word. i- ought to think of immigration in - every sense of the word. i remember as a child _ every sense of the word. i remember as a child the — every sense of the word. i remember as a child the so—called _ every sense of the word. i remember as a child the so—called great- as a child the so—called great migration— as a child the so—called great migration that _ as a child the so—called great migration that took - as a child the so—called great migration that took place - as a child the so—called greati migration that took place with blacks — migration that took place with blacks in _ migration that took place with blacks in the _ migration that took place with blacks in the south _ migration that took place with blacks in the south going - migration that took place with . blacks in the south going north. they— blacks in the south going north. they did — blacks in the south going north. they did not _ blacks in the south going north. they did not go _ blacks in the south going north. they did not go because - blacks in the south going north. they did not go because they i blacks in the south going north. - they did not go because they wanted to, i they did not go because they wanted to, itotd _ they did not go because they wanted to, i told someone _ they did not go because they wanted to, i told someone this _ they did not go because they wanted to, i told someone this morning, - they did not go because they wanted i to, i told someone this morning, 82% of my— to, i told someone this morning, 82% of my college — to, i told someone this morning, 82% of my college graduating _ to, i told someone this morning, 82% of my college graduating class - to, i told someone this morning, 82% of my college graduating class left - of my college graduating class left south _ of my college graduating class left south carolina. _ of my college graduating class left south carolina. not _ of my college graduating class left south carolina. not because - of my college graduating class left south carolina. not because theyi south carolina. not because they wanted _ south carolina. not because they wanted to, — south carolina. not because they wanted to, they— south carolina. not because they wanted to, they were _ south carolina. not because theyj wanted to, they were immigrants internally— wanted to, they were immigrants internally commit— wanted to, they were immigrants internally commit domestically. i wanted to, they were immigrants - internally commit domestically. they left south _ internally commit domestically. they left south carolina _ internally commit domestically. they left south carolina going _ internally commit domestically. they left south carolina going to - internally commit domestically. they left south carolina going to look- left south carolina going to look for opportunity _ left south carolina going to look for opportunity. that's - left south carolina going to look for opportunity. that's what - left south carolina going to look. for opportunity. that's what people do. for opportunity. that's what people do that's — for opportunity. that's what people
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do that's what _ for opportunity. that's what people do. that's what human _ for opportunity. that's what people do. that's what human beings- for opportunity. that's what people do. that's what human beings do. i for opportunity. that's what people l do. that's what human beings do. so ithink— do. that's what human beings do. so i think that _ do. that's what human beings do. so i think that joe — do. that's what human beings do. so i think that joe biden _ do. that's what human beings do. so i think thatjoe biden made _ do. that's what human beings do. so i think thatjoe biden made a - i think thatjoe biden made a tremendous— i think thatjoe biden made a tremendous choice _ i think thatjoe biden made a tremendous choice when - i think thatjoe biden made a tremendous choice when he| i think thatjoe biden made a - tremendous choice when he gave the daughter— tremendous choice when he gave the daughter of— tremendous choice when he gave the daughter of immigrants— tremendous choice when he gave the daughter of immigrants the - tremendous choice when he gave the daughter of immigrants the job - tremendous choice when he gave the daughter of immigrants the job to . daughter of immigrants the job to try to _ daughter of immigrants the job to try to bring — daughter of immigrants the job to try to bring some _ daughter of immigrants the job to try to bring some sense _ daughter of immigrants the job to try to bring some sense to- daughter of immigrants the job to try to bring some sense to this i try to bring some sense to this effort — try to bring some sense to this effort here _ try to bring some sense to this effort here in— try to bring some sense to this effort here in the _ try to bring some sense to this effort here in the country. - try to bring some sense to this effort here in the country. i- try to bring some sense to this . effort here in the country. i think kamata _ effort here in the country. i think kamala harris _ effort here in the country. i think kamala harris will— effort here in the country. i think kamala harris will do _ effort here in the country. i think kamala harris will do a _ effort here in the country. i think kamala harris will do a great - effort here in the country. i think kamala harris will do a great job| kamala harris will do a great job because — kamala harris will do a great job because she, _ kamala harris will do a great job because she, at _ kamala harris will do a great job because she, at the _ kamala harris will do a great job because she, at the always - kamala harris will do a great job because she, at the always say, | kamala harris will do a great job - because she, at the always say, has experiences — because she, at the always say, has experiences that— because she, at the always say, has experiences that allow— because she, at the always say, has experiences that allow her- because she, at the always say, has experiences that allow her to - because she, at the always say, has experiences that allow her to be - experiences that allow her to be very informed _ experiences that allow her to be very informed on— experiences that allow her to be very informed on these - experiences that allow her to be very informed on these kinds . experiences that allow her to be very informed on these kinds of| very informed on these kinds of issues, — very informed on these kinds of issues, and _ very informed on these kinds of issues, and if— very informed on these kinds of issues, and if anybody - very informed on these kinds of issues, and if anybody can - very informed on these kinds of issues, and if anybody can find i very informed on these kinds ofi issues, and if anybody can find a batatabte — issues, and if anybody can find a palatable solution _ issues, and if anybody can find a palatable solution i— issues, and if anybody can find a palatable solution i think- issues, and if anybody can find a palatable solution i think she - issues, and if anybody can find a i palatable solution i think she will. speaking — palatable solution i think she will. speaking of— palatable solution i think she will. speaking of the _ palatable solution i think she will. speaking of the pressing - palatable solution i think she will. speaking of the pressing issues. palatable solution i think she will. . speaking of the pressing issues that face the biden administration, one of them is one that you are expert in. republicans in georgia have passed a new voting law which they say is expanding access to early voting, but we are seeing in more than a0 bills a republican controlled state houses nationwide which critics say restrict the right to vote. what do you think is
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happening?— to vote. what do you think is haueninu? ~ ~ . to vote. what do you think is ha enin: ? ~ ,, . . happening? well i think that we all know that georgia _ happening? well i think that we all know that georgia has _ happening? well i think that we all know that georgia has a _ happening? well i think that we all know that georgia has a past - happening? well i think that we all know that georgia has a past that i know that georgia has a past that they don't— know that georgia has a past that they don't seem _ know that georgia has a past that they don't seem to _ know that georgia has a past that they don't seem to want - know that georgia has a past that they don't seem to want to - know that georgia has a past that they don't seem to want to turn l they don't seem to want to turn toose~ _ they don't seem to want to turn toose~ you've _ they don't seem to want to turn loose. you've got _ they don't seem to want to turn loose. you've got a _ they don't seem to want to turn loose. you've got a governor. they don't seem to want to turn i loose. you've got a governor down there _ loose. you've got a governor down there that — loose. you've got a governor down there that seems _ loose. you've got a governor down there that seems to _ loose. you've got a governor down there that seems to have - loose. you've got a governor down there that seems to have a - there that seems to have a tegistature _ there that seems to have a legislature working - there that seems to have a legislature working with i there that seems to have a i legislature working with him there that seems to have a - legislature working with him that's trying _ legislature working with him that's trying to— legislature working with him that's trying to hold _ legislature working with him that's trying to hold onto _ legislature working with him that's trying to hold onto the _ legislature working with him that's trying to hold onto the past. - legislature working with him that's trying to hold onto the past. but . legislature working with him that's trying to hold onto the past. but ii trying to hold onto the past. but i will say _ trying to hold onto the past. but i will say this. _ trying to hold onto the past. but i will say this, to _ trying to hold onto the past. but i will say this, to the _ trying to hold onto the past. but i will say this, to the governor - trying to hold onto the past. but i will say this, to the governor of l will say this, to the governor of georgia — will say this, to the governor of georgia and _ will say this, to the governor of georgia and everybody- will say this, to the governor of georgia and everybody else, i will say this, to the governor of georgia and everybody else, if| will say this, to the governor of. georgia and everybody else, if you want _ georgia and everybody else, if you want to _ georgia and everybody else, if you want to see — georgia and everybody else, if you want to see a _ georgia and everybody else, if you want to see a vast _ georgia and everybody else, if you want to see a vast exodus - georgia and everybody else, if you want to see a vast exodus of- georgia and everybody else, if youj want to see a vast exodus of those corporations— want to see a vast exodus of those corporations speaking _ want to see a vast exodus of those corporations speaking out - want to see a vast exodus of those corporations speaking out today, l corporations speaking out today, coca-cola, — corporations speaking out today, coca—cola, home _ corporations speaking out today, coca—cola, home depot, - corporations speaking out today, coca—cola, home depot, delta. corporations speaking out today, i coca—cola, home depot, delta air lines— coca—cola, home depot, delta air lines and— coca—cola, home depot, delta air lines and google _ coca—cola, home depot, delta air lines and google just _ coca—cola, home depot, delta air lines and google just announced i lines and google just announced setting _ lines and google just announced setting up— lines and google just announced setting up some _ lines and google just announced setting up some kind _ lines and google just announced setting up some kind of- lines and google just announced setting up some kind of thing - lines and google just announced . setting up some kind of thing down there. _ setting up some kind of thing down there. those — setting up some kind of thing down there, those corporations - setting up some kind of thing down there, those corporations are - setting up some kind of thing down there, those corporations are not. there, those corporations are not going _ there, those corporations are not going to — there, those corporations are not going to stand _ there, those corporations are not going to stand for— there, those corporations are not going to stand for these - there, those corporations are not going to stand for these kind - there, those corporations are not going to stand for these kind of. going to stand for these kind of legislation _ going to stand for these kind of legislation. and _ going to stand for these kind of legislation. and so— going to stand for these kind of legislation. and so they - going to stand for these kind of legislation. and so they had - going to stand for these kind of. legislation. and so they had better take a _ legislation. and so they had better take a hard — legislation. and so they had better take a hard look— legislation. and so they had better take a hard look at— legislation. and so they had better take a hard look at what _ legislation. and so they had better take a hard look at what they - legislation. and so they had better take a hard look at what they are l take a hard look at what they are doing _ take a hard look at what they are doing if— take a hard look at what they are doing if they— take a hard look at what they are doing if they want _ take a hard look at what they are doing if they want georgia - take a hard look at what they are doing if they want georgia to - doing if they want georgia to continue _ doing if they want georgia to continue to— doing if they want georgia to continue to grow, _ doing if they want georgia to continue to grow, if - doing if they want georgia to continue to grow, if as - doing if they want georgia to continue to grow, if as was l doing if they want georgia to i continue to grow, if as was said doing if they want georgia to - continue to grow, if as was said in the past _ continue to grow, if as was said in the past when _ continue to grow, if as was said in the past when i _ continue to grow, if as was said in the past when i was _ continue to grow, if as was said in the past when i was coming - continue to grow, if as was said in
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the past when i was coming along| the past when i was coming along that attanta — the past when i was coming along that atlanta was _ the past when i was coming along that atlanta was a _ the past when i was coming along that atlanta was a city— the past when i was coming along that atlanta was a city too - the past when i was coming along that atlanta was a city too big - the past when i was coming along that atlanta was a city too big to. that atlanta was a city too big to hate, _ that atlanta was a city too big to hate. wett — that atlanta was a city too big to hate. well they— that atlanta was a city too big to hate, well they had _ that atlanta was a city too big to hate, well they had better- that atlanta was a city too big to hate, well they had better get . that atlanta was a city too big to hate, well they had better get a| hate, well they had better get a life, hate, well they had better get a life. they — hate, well they had better get a life, they better— hate, well they had better get a life, they better get _ hate, well they had better get a life, they better get a _ hate, well they had better get a life, they better get a handle i hate, well they had better get aj life, they better get a handle on what _ life, they better get a handle on what they're _ life, they better get a handle on what they're doing _ life, they better get a handle on what they're doing here. - life, they better get a handle on. what they're doing here. because what _ what they're doing here. because what they— what they're doing here. because what they are _ what they're doing here. because what they are doing _ what they're doing here. because what they are doing will- what they're doing here. because what they are doing will have - what they are doing will have tremendous— what they are doing will have tremendous adverse - what they are doing will have | tremendous adverse impacts. what they are doing will have - tremendous adverse impacts. it's already— tremendous adverse impacts. it's already threatening _ tremendous adverse impacts. it's already threatening to _ tremendous adverse impacts. it's already threatening to take - tremendous adverse impacts. it's already threatening to take the l already threatening to take the all-star— already threatening to take the all—star basketball— already threatening to take the all—star basketball game - already threatening to take the all—star basketball game away| already threatening to take the - all—star basketball game away and i think these — all—star basketball game away and i think these best _ all—star basketball game away and i think these best ballplayers, - all—star basketball game away and i think these best ballplayers, thesei think these best ballplayers, these basebatt— think these best ballplayers, these baseball players, _ think these best ballplayers, these baseball players, these _ think these best ballplayers, these baseball players, these football. baseball players, these football players. — baseball players, these football ptayers. they— baseball players, these football players. they are _ baseball players, these football players, they are not _ baseball players, these football players, they are not going - baseball players, these football players, they are not going to l baseball players, these football . players, they are not going to see their— players, they are not going to see their children, _ players, they are not going to see their children, their— players, they are not going to seei their children, their grandchildren, their children, their grandchildren, their cousins— their children, their grandchildren, their cousins their— their children, their grandchildren, their cousins their aunts _ their children, their grandchildren, their cousins their aunts and - their children, their grandchildren, | their cousins their aunts and uncles being _ their cousins their aunts and uncles being treated — their cousins their aunts and uncles being treated this _ their cousins their aunts and uncles being treated this way. _ their cousins their aunts and uncles being treated this way. they- their cousins their aunts and uncles being treated this way. they are i their cousins their aunts and unclesi being treated this way. they are not going _ being treated this way. they are not going to _ being treated this way. they are not going to stand — being treated this way. they are not going to stand for— being treated this way. they are not going to stand for it. _ being treated this way. they are not going to stand for it.— going to stand for it. congressman, thank ou going to stand for it. congressman, thank you so _ going to stand for it. congressman, thank you so much _ going to stand for it. congressman, thank you so much for— going to stand for it. congressman, thank you so much forjoining - going to stand for it. congressman, thank you so much forjoining us. i thank you so much forjoining us. thank you for having me. stay with us on bbc news, still to come. exploring an unfortunate chapter from america's sporting past. as baseball season gets under way, we'll look at the history of segreation, and what the sport has been trying to do about it.
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the life and legacy of diana, princess of wales' is to be recognised with a blue plaque in london. it's thought it could be placed at her earl's court flat, where she lived before her marriage to prince charles. english heritage says it will be one of six new plaques dedicated to pioneering women. anna eavis is english heritage's curatorial director — and explains the criteria nominated people have to meet to receive a plaque. as long as the candidate meets three important conditions. they have to have done something incredible, made a great contribution to society. they have to have been dead for 20 years, and there needs to be a london building with which they are associated. that building needs to survive. so what happens is we receive nominations, and in this case the nomination came through the london assembly who had conducted a campaign inviting people to nominate more women for plaques. it then goes to our panel. we have an expert panel who consider our plaque nominations. we put up around 12 every year, but we get a lot more nominations than that so it is competitive.
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diana was, by any standards, and extraordinarily significant figure in late 20th century britain, and actually in the world really. she was very famous, wasn't she? and she had great personal charisma and warmth. she seemed to be able to connect with everyone she met. but i think it was the fact that she put all of that to great use, particularly in her help in destigmatize in hiv—aids in the late 80s and early 90s. those very important photographs that were taken of her shaking hand, or holding the hand of aids sufferers. and also the work she did with the red cross on landmines towards the end of her life. and so the panel felt that she was absolutely a worthy candidate for a plaque.
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it's spring here in the us, that means warmer weather, flowers blooming, and — the return of baseball. and after last year's short season, featuring games without fans, opening day couldn't come soon enough. some things will be the same, some different. they are this time planning to play a full season, that's 162 games, from now until early fall. but still covid measures will be strictly enforced, and there's something else, for the first time, the records set by black players in the early part of the last century, in the so called he go league, will be incorporated into major league records. that term, the negro league is jarring — and it takes us back to the era of racial segreation.
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the league was a separate organisation of teams with african american players, who weren't allowed to play in the majors. the league existed for about three decades in the first half of the 20th century, but the accomplishments of its players were not counted as �*official�* by the sport. until now. as you probably already know our friend and collegue ron christie is a big baseball fan in fact christian and i have watched the washington nationals with him. he is here with us now. ron, thank you so much for being with us to discuss the past of america's pastime. so although the he go league existed in the beginning of the 20th century, if we go from the 19th century which shows us the chicago union giant you can see that they were separate leaks back then. is the history of baseball and in a real sense the history of segregation in america as well? i history of segregation in america as well? ., , . ,
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well? i do believe that baseball is intertwined _ well? i do believe that baseball is intertwined with _ well? i do believe that baseball is intertwined with jim _ well? i do believe that baseball is intertwined with jim crow, - well? i do believe that baseball is intertwined with jim crow, with i intertwined withjim crow, with segregation. but it's also a moment for optimism. and a moment of hope. and i'm _ for optimism. and a moment of hope. and i'm very— for optimism. and a moment of hope. and i'm very glad that major league basebatt— and i'm very glad that major league baseball recognise the contributions of hundreds of athletes of coaches, of hundreds of athletes of coaches, of staff— of hundreds of athletes of coaches, of staff who toiled in the most horrific — of staff who toiled in the most horrific segregated settings and that they chose to honour the records — that they chose to honour the records and accomplishments of those black players. this is a stain on the history— black players. this is a stain on the history of america but also a great _ the history of america but also a great day— the history of america but also a great day great path forward to finally — great day great path forward to finally recognise the contributions these _ finally recognise the contributions these folks made on and off the field _ these folks made on and off the field. if— these folks made on and off the field. , . ~ . . field. if we 'ust talk about what ma'or field. if we just talk about what major league _ field. if we just talk about what major league baseball - field. if we just talk about what major league baseball is - field. if we just talk about what major league baseball is doing| field. if we just talk about what . major league baseball is doing it's going to honour the statistical achievements of the players in the league. so what is that going to mean in practice?— league. so what is that going to mean in ractice? ~ ., ., . mean in practice? with going to mean that who had — mean in practice? with going to mean that who had how— mean in practice? with going to mean that who had how many _ mean in practice? with going to mean that who had how many hits _ mean in practice? with going to mean that who had how many hits and - mean in practice? with going to mean| that who had how many hits and home runs: _ that who had how many hits and home runs, strike—outs by pictures, earned — runs, strike—outs by pictures, earned run _ runs, strike—outs by pictures, earned run averages. now you are going _ earned run averages. now you are going to _ earned run averages. now you are going to be — earned run averages. now you are going to be able to go back dozens
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and dozens of decades into the leaks in a term _ and dozens of decades into the leaks in a term used by darden doctor martin— in a term used by darden doctor martin luther king back then and we now have _ martin luther king back then and we now have a — martin luther king back then and we now have a finally more complete history— now have a finally more complete history and contributions with black athtetes _ history and contributions with black athletes in — history and contributions with black athletes in america's past time. what _ athletes in america's past time. what does that mean? we talked about this, your dad thinks that your granddad might have played in the league but we are a bit shaky on that, we don't know. does it mean that, we don't know. does it mean that those records will now be for public consumption, will you be able to go in and look at them for instance? it to go in and look at them for instance?— to go in and look at them for instance? , ., instance? it will be part of the fabric of baseball _ instance? it will be part of the fabric of baseball history. - instance? it will be part of the | fabric of baseball history. look instance? it will be part of the i fabric of baseball history. look at my grandfather, my grandfather told me of— my grandfather, my grandfather told me of stories playing in the he go teaks, _ me of stories playing in the he go teaks, my— me of stories playing in the he go leaks, my dad mentioned this and i'm looking _ leaks, my dad mentioned this and i'm looking for— leaks, my dad mentioned this and i'm looking for those records but i can tell you _ looking for those records but i can tell you one thing, a table at something like jackie robinson mentioned to my grandparents. and he .ave mentioned to my grandparents. and he gave a _ mentioned to my grandparents. and he gave a tot _ mentioned to my grandparents. and he gave a tot of— mentioned to my grandparents. and he gave a lot of people who grew up in
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the segregated south hope. it gave them optimism, give them someone to emulate _ them optimism, give them someone to emulate and _ them optimism, give them someone to emulate and now having the ability to have _ emulate and now having the ability to have these records folded in as part of— to have these records folded in as part of a _ to have these records folded in as part of a more complete history, a more _ part of a more complete history, a more textured and nuanced version of major— more textured and nuanced version of major league baseball is a day that we att— major league baseball is a day that we all applaud for those of us who love major— we all applaud for those of us who love major league baseball. i�*ve love ma'or league baseball. i've been love major league baseball. i've been reading — love major league baseball. is: been reading about jackie love major league baseball. i�*9: been reading about jackie robinson been reading aboutjackie robinson today. he went to fight in the second world war and actually served in a segregated battalion in the war. he served for the 761 black panthers tank battalion. which tells you that, i suspect the second world war was the catalyst for change but this went on for some years. he got into the major league in 19a7. i know you have on your bookcase a plaque that your dad prized off the wall in west virginia, is what we are talking about here. it’s wall in west virginia, is what we are talking about here.— are talking about here. it's a really horrific _ are talking about here. it's a really horrific plaque. - are talking about here. it's a really horrific plaque. it - are talking about here. it's a -
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really horrific plaque. it denotes white _ really horrific plaque. it denotes white and — really horrific plaque. it denotes white and coloured facilities. and i had that— white and coloured facilities. and i had that totally broken down, took seven _ had that totally broken down, took seven layers of paint and i had it reconstructed to what it looked like when _ reconstructed to what it looked like when it _ reconstructed to what it looked like when it was issued in the 1920s. why? _ when it was issued in the 1920s. why? because it is a stark reminder that segregation, jim crow, overt racial— that segregation, jim crow, overt racial discrimination is not too far in america's— racial discrimination is not too far in america's past, and as we talk about— in america's past, and as we talk about the — in america's past, and as we talk about the negro leaks and baseball look about the negro leaks and baseball took at _ about the negro leaks and baseball look at this as a simple and we are able to— look at this as a simple and we are able to go— look at this as a simple and we are able to go to law school and college but so _ able to go to law school and college but so may— able to go to law school and college but so may blacks were denied the basic— but so may blacks were denied the basic civil— but so may blacks were denied the basic civil rights of education just decades— basic civil rights of education just decades ago and it's a stark reminder— decades ago and it's a stark reminder to decades ago and it's a stark reminderto me of decades ago and it's a stark reminder to me of how far we have come _ reminder to me of how far we have come but _ reminder to me of how far we have come but still how far we yet have to go _ come but still how far we yet have to no. �* :, :, come but still how far we yet have toao. �* :, :, , to go. before we go... sorry i was 'ust to go. before we go... sorry i was just going — to go. before we go... sorry i was just going to — to go. before we go... sorry i was just going to say _ to go. before we go... sorry i was just going to say i — to go. before we go... sorry i was just going to say i want _ to go. before we go... sorry i was just going to say i want to - to go. before we go... sorry i was just going to say i want to get - to go. before we go... sorry i was| just going to say i want to get your thoughts on something because i love all of the stories we are almost out of time and i want to show you this. this was snapped at president biden's big announcement, he was checking this at the podium. it's a presidential to do list. and when you look at this he he has had his
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lunch. but as if you might forget in an action—packed day. you might spend a lot of time in the white house, want to get your thoughts whether george w had a to do list like this one. he whether george w had a to do list like this one.— like this one. he did, and in fact ou saw like this one. he did, and in fact you saw president _ like this one. he did, and in fact you saw president biden's - like this one. he did, and in fact - you saw president biden's president bush had _ you saw president biden's president bush had a — you saw president biden's president bush had a card and it's of the schedule — bush had a card and it's of the schedule of the president. and they titeratty— schedule of the president. and they literally schedule you from the minute — literally schedule you from the minute you get in the oval office, president — minute you get in the oval office, president bush about 630 in the morning. — president bush about 630 in the morning, untilthe president bush about 630 in the morning, until the time they go home — morning, until the time they go home. and it's a meeting with policy advisers. _ home. and it's a meeting with policy advisers, beating with the cabinet from _ advisers, beating with the cabinet from a _ advisers, beating with the cabinet from a meeting with constituents. they even— from a meeting with constituents. they even have, and our producer will love _ they even have, and our producer will love this, we will even have something that says personal or staff time. so the even schedule when _ staff time. so the even schedule when the — staff time. so the even schedule when the president can use the rest room _ when the president can use the rest room or— when the president can use the rest room or hit— when the president can use the rest room or hit the gym. personal and staff time — room or hit the gym. personal and stafftime~ i— room or hit the gym. personal and staff time. i think we all need someone _ staff time. i think we all need someone to give us one of those. i need _ someone to give us one of those. i need some — someone to give us one of those. i need some of my own personal or staff time — need some of my own personal or staff time. i�*m need some of my own personal or staff time-— need some of my own personal or staff time. �* :, :, ~ staff time. i'm on holiday next week and my wife — staff time. i'm on holiday next week and my wife artie _ staff time. i'm on holiday next week and my wife artie has _ staff time. i'm on holiday next week and my wife artie has a _ staff time. i'm on holiday next week and my wife artie has a two - staff time. i'm on holiday next week and my wife artie has a two do - staff time. i'm on holiday next week and my wife artie has a two do list i and my wife artie has a two do list and my wife artie has a two do list and it's as long as your arm. and i don't think there's any downtime on
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it. i have already looked.— it. i have already looked. happy easter! hello there. colder air has arrived across more of the country now. and it's going to be a long time before we see temperatures back into the low 205 that they were on wednesday, 2a degrees in norfork. move things on 2a hours and on thursday those same areas in england have much more cloud. temperatures were struggling to get in doubled figures. it was quite a change, a shock to the system. write the way through easter weekend it's going to remain on the cold side. a risk of frost at night but it will feel particularly cold on monday as the wind will be stronger, were going to find wintry showers around too. that could be one or two range i was threatening the east coast of scotland, northeast england on friday morning before the sunshine comes out later. more cloud coming down the eastern side of england but sunny sky eggs are likely further west after a cold and potential
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frosty start. but temperatures maximum 13 or 1a degrees in the sunshine. colder for eastern england and eastern parts of scotland. and the colder air has been rotating around this area of high pressure. it's late—night extending itself southwards. at least the high is keeping us fine and dry but could be a frosty start again where we had clear skies on saturday. looks like the breeze will push more clouds again into eastern parts of england perhaps into the midlands too. and the far north of scotland. but elsewhere there will be sunshine after a frosty start. those temperatures aren't rising at all. it is going to be another chilly day on saturday. if we move into easter sunday, most of england and wales it looks a bit better. the winds won't be a strong, there be some sunshine. the winds do pick up as you had further north. we've got this band of rain sweeping down into scotland and northern ireland followed by some increasingly wintry weather and temperatures falling. temperatures for eastern england should be a bit higher on sunday, 13 or 1a degrees. but it does get colder everywhere
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and even colder, i think, for easter monday. that weather front takes some rain southwards. then that wintry weather follows on behind and we could trace the winds all the way back to the arctic. an arctic blast of cold air will be sweeping down across the whole of the country. it will be accompanied by strong to gale force winds which will make it feel cold. there'll be some sunshine, showers are likely to develop and a lot of the showers will be affecting coastal areas, anywhere exposed to that cold northerly wind. a mixture of hail, sleet and snow. most of the snow over the hills. those are the temperatures, 8 degrees at best. southern england, south wales but it will feel colder everywhere given the strength of the wind. and that cold arctic air is firmly in place on monday. continues in place on tuesday as well. it's almost a repeat performance. perhaps a little more sunshine over inland areas
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where we won't see so many showers. you can see how we've got these lines of wintry showers coming in on that northerly airflow. again, a lot of snow to come over the higher ground in northern parts of scotland. temperatures still no better than seven or 8 degrees. cold air, arctic air in place on tuesday. we start to change things a bit during wednesday. an area of low pressure, that will strengthen the winds on thursday, rained down on thursday in northern areas will see some sleet and snow as well and then some low pressure pulling away and they would start to engage that cold arctic air which returns later on in the week. perhaps not as cold as it will be to the start of the week, but no sign of anything warming up at all in the longer—range outlook.
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tonight at ten, a court convicts for the first time a serving british police officer of terrorism offences. benjamin hannam, who's 22, a probationary officer in the metropolitan police, was a member of the banned far right neo—nazi group, national action. why did you join a terrorist organisation, thenjoin why did you join a terrorist organisation, then join the why did you join a terrorist organisation, thenjoin the police? he was also found guilty of fraud, for lying on his police application form. never before has a serving police officer been prosecuted for being the member of a terrorist group. the case raises serious questions over vetting procedures at britain's biggest police force. also tonight... a warning from the head of nhs england before the bank holiday weekend — people must remain cautious, as covid lockdown restrictions ease.
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the founder of liberty steel admits the company owes

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