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tv   The Papers  BBC News  March 29, 2021 11:30pm-12:01am BST

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of killing a black man, george floyd, last may has begun in the us city of minneapolis. the prosecutor replayed to the court the full nine minutes video showing the former police officer kneeling on mr floyd's neck as he struggled to breathe. derek chauvin faces three counts — second degree murder, third degree murder — and manslaughter. he denies the charges. this defence told the jury there are always two sides to every story. the suez canal authority says a giant ship that has been blocking one of the world's most important waterways for a week has been fully floated. tug boats taking part in the operation honked their horns in celebration. the major french pharmaceutical company has been found guilty of the manslaughter that of a man. —— been found guilty of manslaughter of a
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man linked to a drug that killed. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are jasmine cameron chileshi, political and diplomatic corresopndent for the financial times — and the writer and former fleet street editor eve pollard. welcome fleet street editor eve pollard. back to you both. l at welcome back to you both. let's look at what is already in the metro. the metro leads on the trial of the us policeman accused of murdering george floyd — it says derek chauvin knelt on him for nine minutes and 29 seconds. the express reports that 60 million novavax doses are due to be bottled in britain instead of the eu, declaring it a vaccine victory for the uk.
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the daily mail leads on today's lockdown easing, but calls on the prime minister to speed up the lifting of restrictions as cases and deaths hit a six—month low. the times adds that borisjohnson says england is on course for the reopening of shops, pubs and restaurants in a fortnight. the sun reports says brits can boost their resilience to covid by improving their fitness now that outdoor sports are allowed. the mirror writes that borisjohnson insists he acted with "honesty and integrity" in his dealings withjennifer arcuri, who he's accused of having an affair with. the daily telegraph says world leaders will call for a global pandemic treaty — similar to the settlement formed after the second world war. and the guardian leads on the allegations of sexual misconduct in schools and calls for a "deep dive" ofsted inquiry to establish why complaints were not taken seriously.
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so let's begin... jasmine, at the start, hello to you both, the daily mail, lifting the lock down faster. they are picking up lock down faster. they are picking up what the covid—19 research group backbench mps have been saying over in recent months. yes. backbench mps have been saying over in recent months.— in recent months. yes. that issue. i think the government _ in recent months. yes. that issue. i think the government is _ in recent months. yes. that issue. i think the government is in - in recent months. yes. that issue. i think the government is in quite - in recent months. yes. that issue. i think the government is in quite a i think the government is in quite a tricky position at the moment. ii hand, the messaging is that the vaccine rely is going really well but then on the flip side, there is a sense that we have been told to be cautious in that it is too early to go and hug our grandparents. so the messaging and some of the data coming through is in quite matching and i think the government are quite nervous but particularly this week where we see the listing of some restrictions and slightly higher weather that actually people won't follow the rules as they should be doing. and also a sense that the government is very conscious of what happening in europe where see a new rising number of infections and so
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they are also fears of an ovarian and so while the government is under and so while the government is under a lot of pressure from tory backbenchers to increase the role the ability of lifting restrictions in the speed through things faster, i think will see the government stick to his rather cautious approach going forward. what are our approach going forward. what are your thoughts. — approach going forward. what are your thoughts, eve? _ approach going forward. what are your thoughts, eve? i— approach going forward. what are your thoughts, eve? i agree - approach going forward. what are your thoughts, eve? i agree with | your thoughts, eve? i agree with what jasmine _ your thoughts, eve? i agree with what jasmine had _ your thoughts, eve? i agree with what jasmine had just _ your thoughts, eve? i agree with what jasmine had just said. - your thoughts, eve? i agree with what jasmine had just said. it - your thoughts, eve? i agree with what jasmine had just said. it is| your thoughts, eve? i agree with | what jasmine had just said. it is a pity we _ what jasmine had just said. it is a pity we finally got, can be hug and close _ pity we finally got, can be hug and close and — pity we finally got, can be hug and close and now we have been told not to be _ close and now we have been told not to be and _ close and now we have been told not to be and as — close and now we have been told not to be and as a grandparent i want that hug. — to be and as a grandparent i want that hug, possibly keeping one face away but _ that hug, possibly keeping one face away but i _ that hug, possibly keeping one face away but i think that this mint is very— away but i think that this mint is very strong group of backbench mps pushing _ very strong group of backbench mps pushing and pushing to come out of lockdown_ pushing and pushing to come out of lockdown earlier because they are worried _ lockdown earlier because they are worried about the economy. and they are for— worried about the economy. and they are for nhs— worried about the economy. and they are for nhs areas they have said they have — are for nhs areas they have said they have no desk from back over to over the _ they have no desk from back over to over the last — they have no desk from back over to over the last weekend so that is given— over the last weekend so that is given them the impetus to push even harden _ given them the impetus to push even harden -- _ given them the impetus to push even harder. —— and no deaths from. the
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government— harder. —— and no deaths from. the government have society their own warrant _ government have society their own warrant saying it is the inner lockdown _ warrant saying it is the inner lockdown soap because it is the in an hour— lockdown soap because it is the in an hour they hope it is that there be really— an hour they hope it is that there be really clear that people have got to be very _ be really clear that people have got to be very cautious and very carefut _ to be very cautious and very careful. and i think probably you have _ careful. and i think probably you have to — careful. and i think probably you have to remind one another to be cautious— have to remind one another to be cautious and careful even though we don't _ cautious and careful even though we don't want _ cautious and careful even though we don't want to be.— cautious and careful even though we don't want to be. seven weeks and so britain truly — don't want to be. seven weeks and so britain truly on _ don't want to be. seven weeks and so britain truly on the _ don't want to be. seven weeks and so britain truly on the locks. _ don't want to be. seven weeks and so britain truly on the locks. but - don't want to be. seven weeks and so britain truly on the locks. but of- britain truly on the locks. but of course that doesn't take into account necessarily travel. —— until britain truly unlocked. that seems to be on a lot of peoples minds at the moment, what the restrictions are and what they could be into the late summer. are and what they could be into the late summer-— late summer. justifiably. we all look forward — late summer. justifiably. we all look forward to _ late summer. justifiably. we all look forward to our _ late summer. justifiably. we all look forward to our summer - late summer. justifiably. we all- look forward to our summer holidays. i think the messaging from government on this has been quite contradictory, this mini sense of no holidays abroad and stake patient in the uk. it's a bit conflicting at the uk. it's a bit conflicting at the moment. —— stay vacation. the government are trying to avoid
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making any hard promises i think i recognise that and said the situation in europe remains quite uncertain and theyjust trying to keep all options on the table at the moment which makes political sense but it is quite frustrating for the general public trying to make plans and try to figure out where they can and try to figure out where they can and cannot go the next coming months. ., ., ., months. the final thought on the front -a~e months. the final thought on the front page come _ months. the final thought on the front page come as _ months. the final thought on the front page come as a _ months. the final thought on the front page come as a former - months. the final thought on the . front page come as a former flixster editor, this has to be a classic photo. the three girls drinking champagne. —— fleet street. iwonder if that went on expenses. laughter must go to the times. leading with the story, and other classic front page picture, three for my students in cambridge. —— three female students. have fun. tricky to get the tone right. have fun but be careful. . ~ the tone right. have fun but be careful. , ,, . ., , ., careful. yes. i think washington did aet careful. yes. i think washington did net the
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careful. yes. i think washington did get the tone — careful. yes. i think washington did get the tone right _ careful. yes. i think washington did get the tone right the _ careful. yes. i think washington did get the tone right the press - careful. yes. i think washington did get the tone right the press or - get the tone right the press or earlier today. get the tone right the press or earliertoday. i get the tone right the press or earlier today. i think the government has recognised that there is a general sense of lockdown fatigue, ourthird is a general sense of lockdown fatigue, our third national lockdown, people have been, they haven't seen their families and months, people have not been abroad in months, and i think there is a sense that the government are trying to say to the public look, we understand we ask you to stay at home for months on end and we recognise how difficult this has ben, this is not an opportunity to lift some restrictions. so i think the tone is right over off this is now an opportunity front of the fact that the uk factory will be producing the 60 million novax jabs when they could have been produced elsewhere. is when they could have been produced elsewhere. . . when they could have been produced elsewhere. , ., , when they could have been produced elsewhere— i - elsewhere. is that significant? i don't know _ elsewhere. is that significant? i don't know enough _ elsewhere. is that significant? i don't know enough about - elsewhere. is that significant? i l don't know enough about making vaccines, — don't know enough about making vaccines, not one of my talents, but they seem _ vaccines, not one of my talents, but they seem to— vaccines, not one of my talents, but they seem to be a lot of different levels _ they seem to be a lot of different levels in — they seem to be a lot of different levels in different stages, one of the most — levels in different stages, one of the most complex seems to be putting the most complex seems to be putting the actuai— the most complex seems to be putting the actual stuff that goes into your arm and _
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the actual stuff that goes into your arm and the violence and certain factories, — arm and the violence and certain factories, there only satisfactory to do— factories, there only satisfactory to do it — factories, there only satisfactory to do it and they would do it here. i to do it and they would do it here. i rather— to do it and they would do it here. i rather think they have done a rather— i rather think they have done a rather good job. everybody was worried — rather good job. everybody was worried about the vaccine and what the europeans were doing with the vaccines_ the europeans were doing with the vaccines although peace has been declared — vaccines although peace has been declared on that front slightly. so if they— declared on that front slightly. so if they can — declared on that front slightly. so if they can do it in britain and in fact if_ if they can do it in britain and in fact if you — if they can do it in britain and in fact if you listen to what they were saying _ fact if you listen to what they were saying iast — fact if you listen to what they were saying last week they said actually in the _ saying last week they said actually in the future we have to have our own ability— in the future we have to have our own ability to make vaccines, and britain, _ own ability to make vaccines, and britain, so — own ability to make vaccines, and britain, so that we can never have anybody _ britain, so that we can never have anybody say were going to stop vaccines — anybody say were going to stop vaccines coming to you are up and also vaccines seem to be rather complex— also vaccines seem to be rather complex things to put together. pence _ complex things to put together. pence from this part of the world a bit from _ pence from this part of the world a bit from that part of the well. so it is brilliant they have 60 million more _ it is brilliant they have 60 million more and — it is brilliant they have 60 million more and of course this will be for the under— more and of course this will be for the under 50s, more and of course this will be for the under50s, people more and of course this will be for the under 50s, people probably will barry— the under 50s, people probably will barry essentially should get the vaccine — barry essentially should get the vaccine. ,, ., barry essentially should get the vaccine. ., ., ., .,
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vaccine. some of them who have had it i think. vaccine. some of them who have had it | think. onto — vaccine. some of them who have had it | think. onto the _ vaccine. some of them who have had it i think. onto the daily— it i think. 0nto the daily telegraph. world leaders call for pandemic treaty. what is the politics behind this? they haven't shown that much unity in recent weeks and months. imo. shown that much unity in recent weeks and months.— shown that much unity in recent weeks and months. no. this is a step in a positive — weeks and months. no. this is a step in a positive direction _ weeks and months. no. this is a step in a positive direction with _ weeks and months. no. this is a step in a positive direction with see - in a positive direction with see people like emmanuel macron and angela merkel really saying that now is the time to work together and put aside isolation and loves him and nationalism and i think it is a positive step in the right direction and there is a general sense that this is a global pandemic and there is no use of one country having low infection rates or having a great vaccine programme if countries around it are struggling. ultimately, this is a forest that did the pay attention to borders and there are the possibilities of variance in mutations and so i think there is a general sense of needing to dial down the tone and really say we are all in this together, and we will get out of this pandemic together. will get out of this pandemic to~ether. . .
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will get out of this pandemic to~ether. . , ., ., together. except we are not authentic— together. except we are not authentic only _ together. except we are not authentic only countries - together. except we are not authentic only countries in l together. except we are not i authentic only countries in the debbie h0, some notable omissions. —— except we are not all and it together. -- except we are not all and it together-— -- except we are not all and it to~ether. �* , , together. i'm still interested in china, which — together. i'm still interested in china, which was _ together. i'm still interested in china, which was not _ together. i'm still interested in china, which was not and - together. i'm still interested in china, which was not and still. together. i'm still interested in i china, which was not and still not been _ china, which was not and still not been totally transparent. —— who. the who — been totally transparent. —— who. the who think this wasn't created in a lab because of the wet market in wo hand — a lab because of the wet market in wo hand. shouldn't we be talking to china _ wo hand. shouldn't we be talking to china about this wet market if they are dangerous... to china about this wet market if they are dangerous. . ._ are dangerous... to be fair, they set that one _ are dangerous... to be fair, they set that one down. _ are dangerous... to be fair, they set that one down. they're - are dangerous... to be fair, they i set that one down. they're shutting a lot down elsewhere. —— shut it down. but there are still some going on. �* down. but there are still some going on, �* , ., , , down. but there are still some going on, �* , ., ,, ., down. but there are still some going on. , , ., on. and perhaps other countries that have lived by — on. and perhaps other countries that have lived by having _ on. and perhaps other countries that have lived by having what _ on. and perhaps other countries that have lived by having what markets, i have lived by having what markets, this is _ have lived by having what markets, this is how — have lived by having what markets, this is how people use to go shopping. it is very worrying that if you _ shopping. it is very worrying that if you realise that you can bring the world — if you realise that you can bring the world to his knees with a virus like this, — the world to his knees with a virus like this, that somebody when they might— like this, that somebody when they might use — like this, that somebody when they might use it in a very bad way. it is good _ might use it in a very bad way. it is good they have started this but as you _ is good they have started this but
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as you say, — is good they have started this but as you say, 24 countries is not enough — as you say, 24 countries is not enou:h. �* . as you say, 24 countries is not enou:h. �* , ., as you say, 24 countries is not enou:h. �*, ., ., , ., ., enough. let's go to the guardian. photographs _ enough. let's go to the guardian. photographs and _ enough. let's go to the guardian. photographs and headlines - enough. let's go to the guardian. photographs and headlines about| enough. let's go to the guardian. . photographs and headlines about the derrick shelving trial. i wonder which you made of the first day coverage. —— derek tobin. they started quite quickly, jury selection to witnesses and to people. —— derek chauvin. and after the opening statement. indie people. -- derek chauvin. and after the opening statement.— the opening statement. we are beauinnin the opening statement. we are beginning to — the opening statement. we are beginning to see _ the opening statement. we are beginning to see the _ the opening statement. we are beginning to see the trickling i the opening statement. we are i beginning to see the trickling end of some of the quite harrowing details of george floyd's final moments, hearing the officer was on his neck for more than nine minutes, how he was calling out for his mother in saying that he can't breathe, and so i think that the trial is obviously it is primarily about george floyd but also shedding light on the experience of black americans at the moment and reigniting questions about racism in america and what has actually changed because obviously the
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context among the trial is slightly different, where presidentjoe biden who has place to tackle racial inequality, but obviously racism isn't solved by one person and one president and it takes to and shins and businesses and individuals to change. and i think the trial is also on the police as well and looking at the use of disproportionate force in america because it is notjust george floyd, eric garner, breonna taylor, and so i think it is quite a sensitive trial and one that will definitely pose quite awkward questions for american law enforcement and americans themselves commit figuring out what will racism looks like in 2021. �* , ., out what will racism looks like in 2021. ~ , . ., out what will racism looks like in 2021. �* , ., ., ., 2021. any trial that will need to show america _ 2021. any trial that will need to show america in _ 2021. any trial that will need to show america in the _ 2021. any trial that will need to show america in the world - 2021. any trial that will need to - show america in the world because black lives matter.— show america in the world because black lives matter. yes. yes i think at times has _ black lives matter. yes. yes i think at times has a _ black lives matter. yes. yes i think at times has a very _ black lives matter. yes. yes i think at times has a very good _ black lives matter. yes. yes i think at times has a very good headline l at times has a very good headline and says— at times has a very good headline and says america's stops to watch this that — and says america's stops to watch this that -- — and says america's stops to watch this trial. —— america stops. i've spoken— this trial. —— america stops. i've spoken to — this trial. —— america stops. i've spoken to american relatives and people _ spoken to american relatives and people there. they have all been to
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him even _ people there. they have all been to him even if— people there. they have all been to him even if they were working, they had a _ him even if they were working, they had a tv— him even if they were working, they had a tv set— him even if they were working, they had a tv set and listening to it. it is the _ had a tv set and listening to it. it is the watershed moment now. in a way waiting — is the watershed moment now. in a way waiting to see how the child goes _ way waiting to see how the child goes with— way waiting to see how the child goes with a mix ofjury. that's how this trial— goes with a mix ofjury. that's how this trial goes. and how it goes in minneapolis. it is going to affect the whole of america, it will be an extraordinary event. the the whole of america, it will be an extraordinary event.— extraordinary event. the other big sto in extraordinary event. the other big story in the _ extraordinary event. the other big story in the last _ extraordinary event. the other big story in the last few _ extraordinary event. the other big story in the last few days - extraordinary event. the other big story in the last few days and - extraordinary event. the other big i story in the last few days and weeks i suppose really, it's been the claims of sexual abuse by pupils at state schools. i think it was only a few weeks ago where that apple was started by a pupil of a private school. —— the application. the paper says they've been a surge of claims of sexual abuse by students at state schools.— at state schools. yes. i think it sorta began — at state schools. yes. i think it sorta began as _ at state schools. yes. i think it sorta began as a _ at state schools. yes. i think it sorta began as a reaction - at state schools. yes. i think it sorta began as a reaction to i at state schools. yes. i think it| sorta began as a reaction to the tragic death of sarah everard where we saw a lot of soul searching of institutions and women to really stepping forward and saying these are lived experiences and what we
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have to go through every day and that trickle down in the schools. it was initiallyjust a harm that we may think for the private school and it expanded to state schools and we we are really hearing quite harrowing accounts of young girls detailing situations where they didn't feel protected or supported by the school. and they were experiencing something that they couldn't quite articulate and didn't quite realise what was happening and then hindsight they realise that actually what they were going through less dramatic and should never have happened. so i think there are serious questions to be asked about how we are protecting girls in school and what we are teaching boys in school and just how this whole issue is percolated and how we make sure children are safe as possible in school. bzieri; how we make sure children are safe as possible in school.— as possible in school. very strong statements _ as possible in school. very strong statements over _ as possible in school. very strong statements over the _ as possible in school. very strong statements over the last - as possible in school. very strong statements over the last few - as possible in school. very strong j statements over the last few days from the chief constables simon bailey of the national police chief counsel clergy parent to take their sense to the police if they thought they were responsible. that's a urging parents to take their sons to the police. describing it as the
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next big scandal to the country. absolutely. what is quite interesting is i think a lot of this has been — interesting is i think a lot of this has been a _ interesting is i think a lot of this has been a secret world. girls have barely— has been a secret world. girls have barely talked of the girls or they have _ barely talked of the girls or they have talked to some girls, girls have _ have talked to some girls, girls have not— have talked to some girls, girls have not talked to parents, girls have _ have not talked to parents, girls have tried — have not talked to parents, girls have tried to deflect or keep away from _ have tried to deflect or keep away from boys — have tried to deflect or keep away from boys who think they are... it is amazing — from boys who think they are... it is amazing how it is the secret of teenage — is amazing how it is the secret of teenage girls and it is amazing how many— teenage girls and it is amazing how many women came up to me, all ages, all sorts, _ many women came up to me, all ages, all sorts, and _ many women came up to me, all ages, all sorts, and told me terrible things— all sorts, and told me terrible things that happen to them after the death— things that happen to them after the death of— things that happen to them after the death of sarah everard. and what the policeman— death of sarah everard. and what the policeman is saying, this policeman is saying _ policeman is saying, this policeman is saying we will deal with your problem. — is saying we will deal with your problem, in the past, the police have _ problem, in the past, the police have not— problem, in the past, the police have not perhaps always have the reputation — have not perhaps always have the reputation of listening to girls. but the — reputation of listening to girls. but the outpouring is so huge and of
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course _ but the outpouring is so huge and of course it— but the outpouring is so huge and of course it is— but the outpouring is so huge and of course it is got to be schools in the police _ course it is got to be schools in the police would also gotta be the parehts _ the police would also gotta be the parents and every education in all sorts— parents and every education in all sorts of— parents and every education in all sorts of things come in so many teenagers — sorts of things come in so many teenagers keep this away from their parehts _ teenagers keep this away from their parents and away from teachers. that's _ parents and away from teachers. that's re—education. in parents and away from teachers. that's re-education._ parents and away from teachers. that's re-education. in the other issue is that _ that's re-education. in the other issue is that when _ that's re-education. in the other issue is that when you _ that's re-education. in the other issue is that when you look - that's re-education. in the other issue is that when you look at. issue is that when you look at private schools, these private schools were defending the reputation of the institution and that might be another reason why they wouldn't shy away from confronting any issues like the. == confronting any issues like the. -- they would shy away. i do think there is a sense of institution schools really wanted to save face and not fully confront what is happening within their walls. it is a lot easier to turn a blind eye but i think they share a number of girls and young women that have come forward shows that this isn't something that can be swept under the carpet any more. in this course are going to have to ask themselves
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what is going on in our schools and what is going on in our schools and what more can we do to make sure this doesn't happen again. and i think a lot of mps have commented about this, the department for education is about and something that will go on for quite a long time, quite a lot of scrutiny to see where the story goes next and what schools do. ~ . . where the story goes next and what schools do-— schools do. maria miller calling for a deep dive _ schools do. maria miller calling for a deep dive investigation - schools do. maria miller calling for a deep dive investigation by - schools do. maria miller calling for. a deep dive investigation by ofsted. why hasn't this situation improve? let's go to the ft. david cameron seemed to clear some of the restrictions that he himself put into place when it came to lobbying but now facing potential problems it seems from the committee and standards on public life. this is about his links and his employment for a financier. well, i think there's always a thin line between government and business and
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government and business and government unions. bind government and business and government unions. and people have to make the — government unions. and people have to make the best _ government unions. and people have to make the best of— government unions. and people have to make the best of what _ government unions. and people have to make the best of what they - government unions. and people have to make the best of what they their i to make the best of what they their particular— to make the best of what they their particular partner role is is in it is a _ particular partner role is is in it is a prime _ particular partner role is is in it is a prime minister in will be interesting to see how this goes and how this _ interesting to see how this goes and how this goes in the future. it is amazing — how this goes in the future. it is amazing story because everybody is very keen _ amazing story because everybody is very keen to say that he is been asking _ very keen to say that he is been asking questions and sending messages and trying to find out if this company could be saved and etc, but this— this company could be saved and etc, but this is— this company could be saved and etc, but this is what prime ministers do, having _ but this is what prime ministers do, having seen— but this is what prime ministers do, having seen a few prime ministers up closely _ having seen a few prime ministers up closely. personalas having seen a few prime ministers up closely. personal as an editor. this may be _ closely. personal as an editor. this may be a _ closely. personal as an editor. this may be a special case, i come i like david _ may be a special case, i come i like david cameron, so i feel sympathetic to him _ david cameron, so i feel sympathetic to him -- _ david cameron, so i feel sympathetic to him -- i_ david cameron, so i feel sympathetic to him. —— i like tony blair too. prime— to him. —— i like tony blair too. prime ministers have a very hard 'ob. prime ministers have a very hard job it _ prime ministers have a very hard job it is — prime ministers have a very hard job it is in — prime ministers have a very hard job. it is in america, you have clear— job. it is in america, you have clear rules _ job. it is in america, you have clear rules what they are, you are allowed _ clear rules what they are, you are allowed to — clear rules what they are, you are allowed to have his people as part of your— allowed to have his people as part of your government. if it is a leader— of your government. if it is a leader of— of your government. if it is a leader of a _ of your government. if it is a leader of a large union or a leader
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of a large — leader of a large union or a leader of a large company, they are allowed in. of a large company, they are allowed in here _ of a large company, they are allowed in here we — of a large company, they are allowed in. here, we need to be very clear about— in. here, we need to be very clear about the — in. here, we need to be very clear about the rules. it will be very interesting to see how this plays out. ~ , . interesting to see how this plays out. ~' , , , ., interesting to see how this plays out. .. , , , ~ , out. the key number is that they became instead _ out. the key number is that they became instead to _ out. the key number is that they became instead to make - out. the key number is that they became instead to make £70 - out. the key number is that they - became instead to make £70 million and share options if the company were to float. by anyone's standards, even by oligarchs, that is a lot of money. it is standards, even by oligarchs, that is a lot of money.— is a lot of money. it is a lot of money and — is a lot of money. it is a lot of money and it _ is a lot of money. it is a lot of money and it raises _ is a lot of money. it is a lot of money and it raises questions is a lot of money. it is a lot of- money and it raises questions about how all of this is regulated. we know that the relationship between business and politics is deeply intertwined and often a lot of swapping of figures and the people moving from one sect to another. but it seems like what happened here, has been extraordinary and i think in the coming which we will see more details coming out and it will be we hear more of conversations that have been having phone calls but i think it is not a great look for the former pm and it turns into the
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age—old role of that one role for them and one realfirst—order thing. final story, them and one realfirst—order thing. finalstory, new them and one realfirst—order thing. final story, new briefing room. we talked about american politics before and i think british government trying to emulate that perhaps in the white house bridging room, built across over an old swimming. but in the white house which is what you don't feel the best sweaty in there. what do you think of the new room here? what best sweaty in there. what do you think of the new room here? what was wron: with think of the new room here? what was wrong with the — think of the new room here? what was wrong with the old _ think of the new room here? what was wrong with the old room? _ think of the new room here? what was wrong with the old room? i _ think of the new room here? what was wrong with the old room? i never- wrong with the old room? i never objected — wrong with the old room? i never objected to— wrong with the old room? i never objected to the room they use to use? _ objected to the room they use to use? did — objected to the room they use to use? did you? secondly, it cost over 2 million _ use? did you? secondly, it cost over 2 million. ~ ., use? did you? secondly, it cost over 2 million._ 2.6. _ use? did you? secondly, it cost over 2 million._ 2.6. we - 2 million. 2.6 million! 2.6. we would've _ 2 million. 2.6 million! 2.6. we would've gotten _ 2 million. 2.6 million! 2.6. we would've gotten it _ 2 million. 2.6 million! 2.6. we would've gotten it done - 2 million. 2.6 million! 2.6. we would've gotten it done it - 2 million. 2.6 million! 2.6. we would've gotten it done it for. 2 million. 2.6 million! 2.6. we i would've gotten it done it for far less _ would've gotten it done it for far less i_ would've gotten it done it for far less. i think you may have something to do— less. i think you may have something to do with _ less. i think you may have something to do with electronics and being able to— to do with electronics and being able to have many microphones and many— able to have many microphones and many people in there just as they do at the _ many people in there just as they do at the white house, cameras all the rest of— at the white house, cameras all the rest of it _ at the white house, cameras all the rest of it it — at the white house, cameras all the rest of it. it doesn't look, looks very— rest of it. it doesn't look, looks very blue — rest of it. it doesn't look, looks very blue and brown, which i don't think— very blue and brown, which i don't think that — very blue and brown, which i don't think that is — very blue and brown, which i don't think that is a great colour match but there — think that is a great colour match but there you go. it looks clean. i
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will but there you go. it looks clean. will say but there you go. it looks clean. i will say that. it is brand—new! that is why looks clean! what do you think? this gastritis as it looks like a reality tv show from itv. that's the sketch artist says. it looks a big gary. a sense of trying to emulate american politics. that is not really our style. we are in a showy, we don't go for the big like... ~ . . showy, we don't go for the big like... . ., . , showy, we don't go for the big like... . .. , ., ., like... watch this space. you have no idea. like... watch this space. you have no idea- 0n _ like... watch this space. you have no idea. on that _ like... watch this space. you have no idea. on that note, _ like... watch this space. you have no idea. on that note, you - like... watch this space. you have no idea. on that note, you will. like... watch this space. you have no idea. on that note, you will be| no idea. on that note, you will be in and out of that room much more than the rest of us i'm sure, but we must leave it there. jazmine and eve, lovely to have you on. thank you for the second look of the papers. good evening. i'm gavin ramjaun, and this is your latest sports news. sergio aguero is to leave manchester
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city at the end of the season. it's been confirmed that the striker�*s contract, which expires at the end of the campaign, will not be renewed. he's their record goalscorer, having joined the club in 2011. the club say they hope to have thousands of supporters at the final home game of the season against everton, where they will pay tribute to the player. well, this is some of what aguero had to say on social media — what a ten years it has been. aguero has amassed an incredible 257 goals in 384 appearances in his ten years at the club. four premier league titles, one fa cup and five league cups. there's certain players within football and world football,
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even at the age of 32 — he's going to be 33 in the summer — that the premier league might be too physicalfor him right now. and the demand pep needs from his players, that might be the reason he won't. but you're telling me if aguero's fit, fully fit, even at the age of 33 for next season, that he can't score 15, 20, 25 goals a season — of course he can. after two of his team—mates were racially abused, wales captain gareth bale says he would be prepared tojoin a social media boycott to tackle online abuse. ben cabango and rabbi matondo were targetted on instagram after the win over mexico. wales face the czech republic tomorrow, but three players won't be involved after being sent home for breaking team rules. tomos dafydd has more. the message is clear— but the problem persists. after another weekend when black players were targeted online, there are yet again calls for action. gareth bale, who has close to 44 million followers on instagram,
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suggests a coalition of sport stars, and other personalities boycotting social media could force change. if we had a campaign where a lot of big influencing people in sport, and other forms of life came off social media to make the statement, yeah, i definitely think it could help. if that was the case, i'm obviously all for that. rabbi matondo criticised social media companies, accusing instagram of doing nothing. any form of abuse like that is completely unacceptable. we should have acted straightaway. i had breakfast with both players the following morning and made sure that they were in the right frame of mind and as least affected by it as possible. rabbi matondo and ben cabangojoin a growing list of players who have been suggested to online abuse.
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the former france world cup winner has described racism on social media is too toxic to ignore. he disabled all of his accounts on saturday. people are getting abused - on what they wear, how they speak, ijust felt personally for me j it was time to take a stand. it is easy to get an account and get away with it sometime. _ many want users to have to give more information when opening an account so they can't hide behind anonymity. facebook, which owns instagram, says it has permanently removed to the accounts from which the messages were sent. it's committed it says to doing more. wales management, they will discuss with players the possibility of stepping away from social media during the european championships this summer. the faw say they will do all they can't away ways
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all they can to raise awareness of the problem. they're among a growing number within the game demanding further action from social media platforms to tackle this crisis. tomos dafydd with that report. well, matondo won't be playing in their world cup qualifier against the czech republic tomorrow. the winger, along with hal robson—kanu and tyler roberts, have all been released from the squad after breaching team protocols. the czechs are top of the group with four points from two games. lots of people in england today have been able to resume some outdoor sports, with the likes of tennis, golf, outdoor swimming and organised sports restarting as some covid—i9 restrictions have eased. here is the culture secretary, 0liver dowden, talking about the importance of grassroots sports. after this dreadful, long covid winter, spring is in the air. we can feel the sun coming through. getting grassroots sport was essential. i remember i always said it was a priority to mind to get grassroots sport back. it is the first thing we're bringing back after school. you can see here today, you can see the kids enjoying it, and it's all part of a sense of build—up.
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it's looking forward to a really great summer of sport. we've seen through this covid crisis that one of the biggest determinants apart from age is your physical health, and getting kids started early in good health is essential. it's great to see kids loving sport and enjoying it. it's notjust good for physical health, it's good for their mental health as well. one of the fa cup semi—finals at wembley could be used as a pilot event for the wider return of spectators. it mayjust be local residents invited next month, but it could be up to 4000 people. and that's all the sport for now. hello. after the warmest day of the year so far on monday, we've got more warm weather in the forecast over the next few days for most places away from the northwest of scotland, where it is going to be pretty wet. warm sunshine, though, widely across england and wales.
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early morning mist clearing away gradually. the cloud across the north of england, southern scotland and northern ireland should tend to break up through the day, so a bit of sunshine. long spells of sunshine, though, further south. we have got that rain continuing for the northwest of scotland. there could be some flooding issues, as it is slow moving through tuesday and into wednesday as well, so temperatures in the north around about 16 or 17 degrees. further south, up to about 23 celsius. wednesday, another warm, sunny day across england, wales, southern scotland as well. more cloud and rain, though, across the northern half of scotland which will start to sink its way south. temperatures in the south up to about 23 degrees again, but colder air arriving from that north, and that colder air will affect all of us towards the end of the week. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news, i'm tim willcox with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the death that shook the world. the officer who knelt on george floyd's neck stands trial — in a minneapolis courtroom — both sides lay out their cases. you'll hear it and you'll see at the same time while he is crying out mr chauvin never moves. the knee remains on his neck. sunglasses remain undisturbed on his head and itjust goes on. derek chauvin did exactly what he had been trained to do. the use of force is not attractive, but it is a necessary component of policing. urging caution, for a country longing forfreedom. the british prime minister says people must remain vigilent — even as covid restrictions across england are eased. the brazilian president, reshuffles his cabinet —

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