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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  March 25, 2021 7:00pm-8:01pm GMT

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cold their day by four or 5 degrees. cold their day with the showers. dryer for most of us on saturday. more unsettled weather saturday night into sunday. hello, i'm ros atkins. this is outside source. president biden has rejected the idea that there is a crisis on the us—mexico border. the overwhelming majority of people coming to the border crossing are being sent back. the coming to the border crossing are being sent back.— coming to the border crossing are being sent back. the only people we are not going _ being sent back. the only people we are not going to _ being sent back. the only people we are not going to let _ being sent back. the only people we are not going to let sit _ being sent back. the only people we are not going to let sit there - being sent back. the only people we are not going to let sit there on - are not going to let sit there on the other side of the rio grande by themselves with no help our children. his first press conference as president, 65 days after taking office. joe biden has a said he expects he will run for president in four years time and he set a new target for the vaccination roll—out. 200 million shots and 100 days. i know it's ambitious, twice our original goal, but no other country
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in the world has even come close. we will bring you a comprehensive rundown of what the president said at the press conference, he also talked about china, gun control and about former president trump. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. 0ron bbc 0r on bbc news channel or bbc world news. we will start in washington, dc. joe biden has held his first ever formal white house press conference as us president. 25 us and international journalists were in the room. one issue that came up repeatedly was the surge in the surge in migration on its southern border with mexico. the vast majority, the overwhelming majority of people coming to the border and crossing are being sent back, are being sent back. thousands, tens of thousands of people who are over 18
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years of age and single, people one at a time coming, have been sent back, sent home. we're sending back the vast majority of the families that are coming. we're trying to work out now with mexico their willingness to take more of those families back, but that's what's happening. they're not getting across the border. yesterday — president biden tasked the vice president, kamala harris with controlling migration at the southern border. the numbers have spiked in recent months. this was tijuana on sunday. many arriving here have fled poverty and violence in central america. hundreds though are unaccompanied children — who are being held in immigration detention facilities, in the us like this one in texas. these pictures on monday show the cramped conditions inside the camps. children are huddled together in makeshift rooms. they're sleeping on thin mattresses on the floor under foil blankets.
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we're told this government—run facility is housing 1,000 people. republicans are blaming joe biden�*s migration policies for a surge in illegal migration — something the president flatly denies. the truth of the matter is nothing has changed. as many people came, 20% increase in children at the border in my administration. 31% in the last year in 2019 before the pandemic and the trump administration. —— 28%. it happens every single solitary year. let’s bring in the bbc posse gary 0'donoghue who was watching all of this in washington. interesting there was this focus on migration, where the us media wants to focus. it's a thing that is i really is —— it's a thing that is i really is —— i suppose blown up in the last few weeks, one of those things politicians refer to as events and
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the sheer scale of the numbers coming across the board or something like 5000 children being put in those camps, it has drawn focus away from perhaps the vaccination programme and the covid relief bill and away the president would've preferred it not to. but he was pretty forthright in the sense with his policy on children, he said he wasn't going to change his mind and giving them some waivers, he would not let them sit on the banks of the rio grande as he put it but he was insisting he was turning most families around and home. stag families around and home. stay around gary _ families around and home. stay around gary we _ families around and home. stay around gary we have _ families around and home. stay around gary we have more to ask you about. another issue that came up was north korea — yesterday it fired two ballistic missiles into the sea of japan. here'sjoe biden on his redlines. we're consulting with our allies and partners, and there will be responses if they choose to escalate. we will respond accordingly. but i am also prepared for some form of diplomacy. but it has to be conditioned
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upon the end result of denuclearisation. joe biden has also addressed his relationship with china plaza president xijinping. he relationship with china plaza president xi jinping. he doesn't have a democrat _ president xi jinping. he doesn't have a democrat with _ president xi jinping. he doesn't have a democrat with a - president xi jinping. he doesn't have a democrat with a small i president xi jinping. he doesn't . have a democrat with a small deep bonein have a democrat with a small deep bone in his body but he is a smart quy- bone in his body but he is a smart guy. he is one of those guys like putin who thinks that autocracy is the way of the future and democracy can't function and an ever complex world. when i was elected, he called to congratulate me, i think to the support of the china experts who were his people on the call as well as mine listening. we had a two hour conversation. fortwo as mine listening. we had a two hour conversation. for two hours. and we made several things clear to one another. i made it clear to him again what i've told in person to him on several occasions that we are
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not looking for confrontation, although we know that there will be steep, steep competition.— steep, steep competition. another development _ steep, steep competition. another development that _ steep, steep competition. another development that raised _ steep, steep competition. another development that raised eyebrowsj steep, steep competition. another- development that raised eyebrows was this one. reporter: have you decided whether you are going to run| for reelection in 2024? you haven't set up a reelection campaign yet as your predecessor had by this time. my predecessor needed to! he laughs my predecessor... oh, god i miss him. laughter no — the answer is yes, my plan is to run for reelection, that's my expectation. that would make joe that would makejoe biden 81 at the next us election. let's bring in gary again and gary i always take these kinds of things with a pinch of salt because the moment you can think you might not run, the whole dynamic changes of your first term. i think that's right. i think in some ways you have to say that but having said all that before the election there was fairly strong indications from the biden camp that he saw himself as perhaps a one term
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president, something of an interim and transitional leader but perhaps when you are a leader perhaps you can't within your first 100 days say "by the way i'm done after this." the opposite innocence would be much more surprising at this stage. but nevertheless that will get a lot of focus here is you can imagine. we will come back to you in a moment gary. another point i want to mention. whilejoe biden regularly gives interviews — he's waited longer than any of his predecessors in the last century to hold a formal news conference. mr biden has been president for nine weeks. by this point — barack 0bama had held two. george w bush had held three, bill clinton — five. and by this point — donald trump had held one press conference on his own — and four with foreign leaders. politico offers this explanation for the delay...
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that is a popular theory. the atlantic tells us it's more strategic... gary 0'donoghuejoins me from washington. there was a lot of attention or whether mr biden would make a gaffe or offer some explanation as to why he has taken a while. what was your reading of how he performed? i think it was reasonably _ reading of how he performed? i think it was reasonably solid, _ reading of how he performed? i think it was reasonably solid, he _ reading of how he performed? i tn “if. it was reasonably solid, he seemed to lose his train of thought at one particular time. to lose his train of thought at one particulartime. he to lose his train of thought at one particular time. he got a little bit snappy with one or two reporters about their questions, suggesting that somehow when someone suggested he was happy with the state the children were living in at the border, that has been a trademark of his during the campaign but it was
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62 minutes and that is quite a long time forjoe biden, he normally keeps it to two or three questions when he talks to reporters after events. i think they would be pretty please with him having got through that. i think it's also worth marking of course that despite all the questions he asked about foreign policy and relations with other countries and about the domestic policy, he made it very clear that despite all this, the big next priority was infrastructure, a big infrastructure bill, infrastructure spending, americanjobs. he is clearly focused on that big theme as well. , . .,, ., clearly focused on that big theme as well. , ~ ., , ., ., ~' clearly focused on that big theme as well. , . .,, ., ., ~ i. well. gary in washington, thank you ve much well. gary in washington, thank you very much indeed. _ well. gary in washington, thank you very much indeed. we _ well. gary in washington, thank you very much indeed. we will - well. gary in washington, thank you very much indeed. we will stay - well. gary in washington, thank you very much indeed. we will stay in i very much indeed. we will stay in the us because i want to spend some minutes looking at the pandemic. the us has conducted one of the fastest vaccine roll—outs in the world. 130 million doses have been given — more than any other country. a quarter of all adults have had at least one dose. here'sjoe biden on that. on december 8th, i indicated that i hoped to get 100 million
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shots in people's arms in my first 100 days. we met that goal last week by day 58, 42 days ahead of schedule. now, today, i'm setting a second goal. and that is we will by my 100th day in office have administered 200 million shots in people's arms. that's right, 200 million shots in 100 days. i know it's ambitious, twice our original goal, but no other country in the world has even come close. but the challenge — as ever — is getting people to take the jab. attention is turning to vaccine hesitancy among republicans. according to a poll by health policy think tank — the de beaumont foundation — 22% of republicans who voted for donald trump are unwilling to get a vaccine. that figure was 29% among 18 to 49—year—olds. apoorva mandavilli is
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the new york times science correspondent in new york. very good to have you back on the programme. how do we understand this reticence among some americans to get the vaccine? it’s reticence among some americans to get the vaccine?— get the vaccine? it's not entirely surprising- _ get the vaccine? it's not entirely surprising. right _ get the vaccine? it's not entirely surprising. right from _ get the vaccine? it's not entirely surprising. right from the - get the vaccine? it's not entirely - surprising. right from the beginning of the pandemic everything about the pandemic has been controversial, even something as simple as mask wearing has been something that a lot of republicans have rejected. so with the vaccine, almost everybody has been nervous about it from the start because first of all scientists were saying at the very beginning we probably wouldn't see a vaccine for years and then the name 0peration warp speed,, that didn't have, people thought the vaccine was may be developed to quickly, maybe to cut corners, it is not safe, but then for these particular voters the republicans you were mentioning, a lot of conservative leaders and new
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sources have really spread some misinformation and some myths about the virus and about the vaccine and they haven't really been vaccinated publicly, even former president trump hasn't been vaccinated publicly so that's a really big difference. all of these things give these men the message that the vaccine is may be something they don't need or something they should even trust. . , don't need or something they should even trust. ., , . . even trust. that is the reticence some americans _ even trust. that is the reticence some americans feel _ even trust. that is the reticence some americans feel but - even trust. that is the reticence i some americans feel but evidently joe biden is not overly concerned about that because he just set this new target for the vaccine roll—out. how realistic does that look to you? it's actually extremely achievable. it's actually extremely achievable. i think this is very difficult of president biden, he likes to under promise and over deliver. note that he said 200 million shots in arms, that's not 200 million people and we are already at 130 million shots. evenif are already at 130 million shots. even if you go at exactly the same pace we are now which is about 2.5 million doses a day, we will go well past that 200 million mark. apoorva can also ask — past that 200 million mark. apoorva can also ask you _ past that 200 million mark. apoorva can also ask you about _ past that 200 million mark. apoorva can also ask you about the _ can also ask you about the possibility of vaccinating children?
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i know you have been reporting on this in the new york times where have we got you in that prospect was back there was actually news about that just today. back there was actually news about that just today-— thatjust today. pfizer has 'ust started a criticali thatjust today. pfizer has 'ust started a critical trial �* thatjust today. pfizer has 'ust started a critical trial in h that just today. pfizer has just i started a critical trial in children who are younger than 12, so six months to 12 years old and they have already had a trial ongoing in kids 12 and up, same with modernity. their trial in younger children started in last week. we will probably see result for older children this summer and for younger children this summer and for younger children a bit towards the end of the year but i think it is a good chance that most children will be vaccinated by the beginning of next year. —— same with moderna. vaccinated by the beginning of next year. -- same with moderna. apoorva, we alwa s year. -- same with moderna. apoorva, we always thank— year. -- same with moderna. apoorva, we always thank you _ year. -- same with moderna. apoorva, we always thank you for _ year. -- same with moderna. apoorva, we always thank you for your _ year. -- same with moderna. apoorva, we always thank you for your help. - we always thank you for your help. that is apoorva mandavilli the new york times science correspondent and you could read her reporting on the new york times website. we have to talk once again about this enormous ship in the suez canal, it is still step up we are updating you on what people are trying to do about that.
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two a very rare interview from prince albert of monaco. he has been speaking to my interview —— my colleague about the interview given ljy colleague about the interview given by prince harry and meghan markle. it's difficult for someone in my place. i can understand the pressures they were under. but i think this type of public display of dissatisfaction to say the least, these types of conversations should be held within the intimate quarters of the family and it doesn't really have to be laid out in the public sphere like that. so it didn't bother me a little bit, i can understand where they were coming from in a certain way but i think it was not the
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appropriate form to be able to have these kind of discussions. —— for roma. this is 0utside source live from the bbc newsroom. 0ur lead story is? in his first press conference as president, joe biden has dismissed the idea that there is a crisis on the idea that there is a crisis on the us—mexico border and he has also set a new target of 200 million coronavirus vaccinations in his first 100 days. eu leaders are discussing how to improve their vaccine roll—out. here they all are speaking to each other virtually. they're dealing with two problems — rising cases and faltering vaccine supplies. one possible response is to restrict the eu's vaccine exports. the president of the european commission offered a justifcation for such an approach...
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for context, 77 million doses is more than the number ofjabs given to eu citizens so far. but angela merkel argued today that the uk and the us approach means the eu has to change course. translation: we see very clearly that vaccines produced _ in the uk remain in the uk. the united states are not exporting, and so that leaves us in a position where we have to ask whether what we produce in europe should be allowed to leave because this virus is continually mutating, and the situation will continue well beyond this year. on wednesday the uk and the eu tried to assure us everything was on track. in a joint statement they said they are... but two facts remains — the uk and the us are far ahead of the eu on vaccines. and the eu is still
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considering export controls. and this is prime minister boris johnson's reply to that idea. i don't want to see blockades of vaccines or of medicines, i don't think that's the way forward, either for us or for any of our friends. it remains to be seen if the export controls will happen. this is a member of the european parliament's public health committee. i don't think that we want to use it. i am optimistic that the joint agreement between the eu and uk as well as the summit today will help to solve the problem without entering a vaccine war. well as ever with the eu — one challenge is to get all 27 members to agree an approach. here's our brussels correspondent nick beake with the latest on where we've got to. what we are seeing though if not division, a change of approach between different eu countries.
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0n the one hand you've got italy and france. they're very keen to go ahead, it would seem, with the sort of proposals the european commission was talking about yesterday — that's to say tightening export controls on vaccines leaving european soil. 0n the other hand, you've got the swedes and the belgians. they're saying that any sort of restrictions could have a pretty bad effect, really, on vaccinations and the component parts of vaccines and notably the very delicate global supply chains. that's something they want to avoid. there are many dynamics here — but in a purely practical sense — this is a supply problem. and for that the eu primarily blames astrazeneca for not being able to deliver the number of doses it had hoped to. here's another member of the european parliament. i think it should be made perfectly clear that the eu does not have a problem with the uk. the eu has a problem with astrazeneca because astrazeneca is not fulfilling their promises, their contractual obligations.
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astrazeneca admits it can't deliver as many doses as it had hoped. it doesn't though accept that it failed to fulfil its contract. there's no agreement on this. the polish prime minister has in politico... in other words, astrazeneca won't be able to export its vaccines from the eu — unless it delivers the expected amounts to the eu. here's our europe editor katya adler. what i am hearing is it is unlikely the eu leaders will give the green light to those controls tonight. the european commission says they should and says it has exported so many vaccines despite short supply here. one eu diplomats saying to me 20 0ne eu diplomats saying to me 20
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million were sent to the uk since december. but that the eu is still waiting to receive one vaccine back from the uk in return. but a lot of those eu leaders don't like the idea of blocking vaccine exports. trade minded countries like the netherlands or ireland say it could trash the eu's reputation and disrupt global supply chains needed to make vaccines. but make no mistake, all of these leaders are under a lot of public pressure to take action. though under a lot of public pressure to take action. thouthim is number of eu countries introducing lockdown measures because of a third wave of the virus and as i say vaccines are in short supplies. —— belgium is. away from the politics if you ask people if they want to take vaccines away from the uk to keep in themselves, they do not say that. they are going under government and eu to sort out as what they see is their vaccine mass and to hurry up and getjabs into arms here. their vaccine mass and to hurry up and get jabs into arms here. and get 'abs into arms here. thanks to and get jabs into arms here. thanks to ka a and get jabs into arms here. thanks to katya adler— and get jabs into arms here. thanks to katya adler for _ and get jabs into arms here. thanks to katya adler for that. _ and get jabs into arms here. thanks to katya adler for that. let's - and get jabs into arms here. thanks to katya adler for that. let's turn i to katya adler for that. let's turn to katya adler for that. let's turn to one of the most followed stories in the world, all to do with the
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suez canal, one of the busiest trade routes in the world, but it is spot for a third day because this mega container ship is still waged into its sandy banks. this is the latest pictures of the efforts to un—watch this thing. but it is difficult, it is 200,000 tonnes. the canal is an absolutely crucial trading route but no one is getting through at the moment. it provides a relatively quick way for cargoes to travel between asia and europe and for oil supplies to get from the middle east to europe. the alternative is far from quick. it involves going around the southern tip of africa which is thousands of kilometres longer and can take more than a week more. these images show the backlog of ships stuck in the canal. they have nowhere to go at the moment. let's here from the shipping analyst peter sand. , , ., , ., sand. this is not 'ust container shi s. sand. this is not 'ust container ships. these — sand. this is not 'ust container ships. these are — sand. this is notjust container ships. these are bulk- sand. this is notjust container ships. these are bulk carriers l ships. these are bulk carriers carrying grain cargoes as well. this is crude oil, oil product carrying gasoline and diesel to feed our
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cars. , , ., , , gasoline and diesel to feed our cars. the ship that is stuck is called the — cars. the ship that is stuck is called the ever— cars. the ship that is stuck is called the ever given, - cars. the ship that is stuck is i called the ever given, operated cars. the ship that is stuck is - called the ever given, operated by the time and use shipping company evergreen marine and it is owned by a japanese firm who has apologise for the disaster. here is theo from the bbc business unit. the ever given is one of a varied new generation of mega ships, huge vessels hundreds of metres long capable of carrying hundreds of thousands of containers. the suez canal was built in 1859 and although it was recently expanded, it remains a very narrow and tricky prospect for such large ships. the question now is how much longer it'll take for the canal to be fully reopened? along the way it will only add to the disruption to global supply chains already caused by the covert outbreak. and ultimately that means potential shortages and higher costs for businesses that may already be struggling. that ship is in the
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middle of the story and so is each let's hear from sally who is middle of the story and so is each let's hearfrom sally who is in middle of the story and so is each let's hear from sally who is in the north of the country. we let's hear from sally who is in the north of the country.— north of the country. we are now standin: north of the country. we are now standing in _ north of the country. we are now standing in front _ north of the country. we are now standing in front of— north of the country. we are now standing in front of the _ standing in front of the headquarters of the suez canal authority, the city of is malia in northern egypt, navigation in the canal has been temporarily suspended and efforts have been under way to dislodge the huge ship that ran aground and block the waterways since tuesday. experts believe rescue efforts might take days given the huge size of the ship and the heavy cargo on board. the ship weighs more than 200,000 tonnes. it is nearly 400 metres long and around 60 metres wide. haifa is nearly 400 metres long and around 60 metres wide.— 60 metres wide. now i report about africa's elephants _ 60 metres wide. now i report about africa's elephants because - 60 metres wide. now i report about africa's elephants because they - 60 metres wide. now i report about africa's elephants because they are | africa's elephants because they are far more threatened than previously thought. 0ur science correspondent victoria gill has more. the largest [and animals on earth.
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but their size has not protected them from the impacts of poaching or from the continued destruction of the fastest weights of interconnected habitat they need. this latest red list of threatened species considered to be the comprehensive report on how a nation —— nature is bearing on increasingly crowded planet puts africa prospects �*s seven elephants in the increasingly endangered category. forest elephants are now closer to extension, critically endangered. it is an alarm bell for us. there are too many —— two main reasons for these declines. 0ne too many —— two main reasons for these declines. one is poaching. 0f these declines. one is poaching. of these declines. one is poaching. of these animals for their ivory. and these animals for their ivory. and the second one is habitat loss through human activities that take place in total disregard of the needs of these animals. across africa there _ needs of these animals. across africa there are _ needs of these animals. across africa there are now _ needs of these animals. across africa there are nowjust - needs of these animals. across africa there are nowjust over l africa there are nowjust over 400,000 wild elephants. in its latest examination of decades of
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habitat surveys has shown that the demand for ivory still drives a decline in their numbers. the level of threat they faced had also been masked by the fact that the african elephant was previously thought to be a single species. this is the first time the savannah and forced element has been assessed separately. what does it mean practically to have this information about their status? how do you use that to protect these animals and refers to these declines? fin that to protect these animals and refers to these declines?- refers to these declines? on the surface of _ refers to these declines? on the surface of it _ refers to these declines? on the surface of it looks _ refers to these declines? on the surface of it looks weak, - refers to these declines? on the surface of it looks weak, the - refers to these declines? on the | surface of it looks weak, the fact that it has been flat out has actually been positive because it means we can do something about it and also separating the species i think is also positive because it means we can do something about it on a more concentrated level. the loss of species _ on a more concentrated level. the loss of species and natural spaces is happening all over the world. the conservationists are confident that this wake up call could insure that these giant icons of african wildlife get the protection and the space that they need.
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victoria gill, bbc news. and victoria's report ends this half an hour of outside source. good evening. it's felt pleasant when you've seen the sunshine today but we've also had a real rash of showers and some quite hefty showers as well. i mean, it's not surprising. low pressure's driving the weather, it's sitting towards the north—west of us and throwing these bands of showers in off the atlantic. in fact tomorrow, we've got a cold weatherfront coming in — in fact tonight — and behind that, it will turn colder. so the evening will find the showers continuing — in fact later this evening and overnight, they'll merge into a longer spell of rain. that's the cold weather front. so ahead of that, there will be quite a bit of cloud and the breeze will start to freshen up as well. so, temperatures will hold up, but behind this cold weather front introducing a lengthier spell of quite heavy rain, it will turn colder with snow over the hills. so late in the night, dip in temperature for north—western areas but for most of us, 6s and 7s. but this is going to give quite
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a bit of heavy rain for a time and then behind that, you can see the distinction there, got a much colder air mass coming in. so temperatures will be considerably down on those of today. ahead of it, we'll still have a few showers, a little bit of brightness but on the whole, the cloud will thicken through the day, pushing that spell of a few hours of quite persistent rain, some heavy rain eastwards. behind it, the sky's bright and we've got sunshine but it's more likely the showers will fall as the snow over the hills in the north, northern ireland into wales and england, even the moors in the south west by the evening and look at the temperatures. well down on today, 7—10 celsius. so, friday evening pulls that cold weather front of the way. then, we do get that rash of showers. there could be a little bit of sleepiness as i say in the moors further south during friday night into saturday which will be a much colder night with a widespread frost in the north and some frost in the countryside further south. well, saturday brings something drier with high pressure building towards the south until later. the night brings wet and windy weather in that sense, pushes its way southwards on sunday.
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so, a bit ofa mixed bag really for the weekend. saturday at the moment it looks like the drier day of the two. still showers around, still quite a bit of cloud. chilly start again, as we talked about, this frost. and the rain comes in later in the day but temperatures given some sunshine and some strengthening march sunshine at this time of year should recover to 9—12 celsius but by sunday as i say, that rain will have swept southwards. some uncertainty on the details of the progression of this weather front at this stage. so, if you are looking to go out for a walk on the weekend, please stay tuned to the forecast. as ever, there's more on our website, bye—bye.
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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is 0utside source. presidentjoe biden rejected the aba there is a crisis on the us—mexico border. there is a crisis on the us-mexico border. ., ., ., , ., border. the overwhelming ma'ority of --eole border. the overwhelming ma'ority of people coming — border. the overwhelming ma'ority of people coming to i border. the overwhelming ma'ority of people coming to the t border. the overwhelming ma'ority of people coming to the pointer_ border. the overwhelming majority of people coming to the pointer across l people coming to the pointer across are being sent back. the only people we are not going to let it sit there on the underside of the rio grande ljy on the underside of the rio grande by themselves with no help our children. , . , by themselves with no help our children. , ., , , , children. this was the president lus lus children. this was the president plus plus first — children. this was the president plus plus first press _ children. this was the president plus plus first press conference | children. this was the president i plus plus first press conference 65 days after taking office and joe biden says he expects he will run for president in four years time. he also set a new target by vaccination.— also set a new target by vaccination. :: :: ., , ., , vaccination. 200 million shots in 100 da s. vaccination. 200 million shots in 100 days- i— vaccination. 200 million shots in 100 days. i know _ vaccination. 200 million shots in 100 days. i know it's _ vaccination. 200 million shots in 100 days. i know it's ambitious, | 100 days. i know it's ambitious, twice our original goal, but no other country in the world have even
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come close. other country in the world have even come close-— come close. also in the us, astrazeneca _ come close. also in the us, astrazeneca has _ come close. also in the us, astrazeneca has restated i come close. also in the us, l astrazeneca has restated key come close. also in the us, - astrazeneca has restated key data on the effectiveness of its vaccine after monitors is that early information was out of date. we latter in england, pub goers could have to prove they have been vaccinated in order to buy a paint. this idea is mixed reception from landlords. the european leaders have been meeting to discuss problems. to discuss the rising rate of covid—19 and backing one possible response that this is to restrict the eu vaccine exports. that is because our brussels correspondent for the financial times live with us. thank you for your time this evening. how
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do you assess the point that the eu is reaching on this issue of export control? ,., _, ., , ., control? the export controls have one into control? the export controls have gone into voice. _ control? the export controls have gone into voice. so _ control? the export controls have gone into voice. so despite - control? the export controls have gone into voice. so despite some| gone into voice. so despite some concern among free—trade member states about blocking shipments of vaccines from the eu, we have had this mechanism in place for almost two months now. it is effectively been asked that's extended for another six weeks and the question is not whether or not which types of countries are going to be hit with this. at the eu has said it will stop only one out of 350 shipments of vaccines leaving european union. so that whining against the fact that this is something they are trigger—happy with and they will always make a very careful consideration on its terms about when they would like to block any vaccines going outside the continent. it vaccines going outside the continent.— vaccines going outside the continent. , , ., ., ., continent. it seems a long way from bein: continent. it seems a long way from being trigger-happy _ continent. it seems a long way from being trigger-happy frankly - continent. it seems a long way from being trigger-happy frankly and - being trigger—happy frankly and judging by the tweets coming she is animated about the fact that far more vaccines leave the eu than are coming in the study seems to me like
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a nonresponse after a week of making noise about it. i a nonresponse after a week of making noise about it— noise about it. i think we can call eiuht noise about it. i think we can call eight sabre _ noise about it. i think we can call eight sabre rattling _ noise about it. i think we can call eight sabre rattling to _ noise about it. i think we can call eight sabre rattling to be - noise about it. i think we can call i eight sabre rattling to be generous. it's part of a new pose of the european union which they show themselves as not being naive and to also address the concerns of european union assistants that are getting back despite the fact that we have rising cases in countries like france and even in belgium who are going to have to impose new lockdowns over the easter so you see a delicate balancing act of at least trying to show that the eu as being tough but also addressing it internal content particularly among member states who don't want to be seen as disrupting global supply chains for vaccines because effectively, that will harm the european union and beyond. 50 effectively, that will harm the european union and beyond. so they are not going — european union and beyond. so they are not going all _ european union and beyond. so they are not going all in _ european union and beyond. so they are not going all in on _ european union and beyond. so they are not going all in on that _ european union and beyond. so they are not going all in on that which - are not going all in on that which begs the question what are they doing to simply get more vaccines into their member states to increase the speed of their roll—out? into their member states to increase the speed of their roll-out?- the speed of their roll-out? explain them in a statement _ the speed of their roll-out? explain them in a statement by _ the speed of their roll-out? explain them in a statement by the - the speed of their roll-out? explain them in a statement by the export. them in a statement by the export restrictions but actually among member states about what to do with to many a nation of vaccines that i
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due to come in from pfizer and we have a huge debate and quite an emotional debate cannot to the east and countries who are suffering from higher case rates and the fact that they have been suffering from daily vaccines from astrazeneca who would like a huge portion of that 10 million to go to them. you have resistant amount less than member states to say in the east and countries are suffering is because they bad decisions when they tell us to buy from astrazeneca and now they are suffering as a result of it. i think the story is less about the eu relationship with the rest of the route that actually fighting amongst countries which are about how to distribute the vaccines of a before the european union.— the european union. those of you watchin: the european union. those of you watching you _ the european union. those of you watching you can _ the european union. those of you watching you can see _ the european union. those of you watching you can see reporting i the european union. those of youj watching you can see reporting on the website. as the vaccination rollout continues in the uk the uk the government is considering whether using proof of vaccination could be a way to open the economy faster. it's already been proposed that staff in care homes may have to prove they've had a jab
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in order to work. vaccine passports may also be required for air travel. there's an ongoing debate however around how wide the measure should go into other areas of life. last month borisjohnson said this. what i think we will have in this country is as it were vaccination passports to allow you to go to the pub or something like that. he said vaccine passports for the pub would be "going it a bit". the prime minister took questions from mps on wednesday and he appeared to have a change of heart when one of them raised the subject with him again. the kind of thing that may be up to individual publicans. it may be up to the landlord. if landlords are given the choice it would happen only after pubs open, following the timetable to ease lockdown in england. the first day there, is the 12th of april.
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that's when outside socialising will be allowed, in groups of six — or amongst any number of people from two households. the next milestone, is the 17th of may. from that date, those smaller groups will be allowed to drink and eat indoors. and up to 30 people will be allowed outdoors. there's been quite a strong reaction to the of vaccine passports from the hospitality industry which — like many others — has been ravaged by the pandemic. this is the boss of the shepherd & neame pub chain. what we do not want is the risk of additional costs being put onto our business having to hire people on the door to monitor this flies in the face of what a pub is all about. we want the ability to trade in the normal way. a great pub is inclusive and diverse and welcoming to all and does not make judgements about individuals and where they have come from and what they've done. and here's a pithy response to the policy from the head of the trade body representing pubs. this is kate nicholls.
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these venues are safe, that does not need to be an extra barrier to entry and there should not be a passport to get a pint. 0ne argument made against the scheme is it could essentially lock younger people out of pubs until they are called to be vaccinated which could be months away. the prime minister on thursday acknowledged there were "moral complexities" in the plan and mused that it might only start to be implemented "when absolutely everybody had been offered a vaccine" the government has a target to offer every adult one dose of a vaccine by the end ofjuly. some people in the industry support the idea of vaccine passports. peter marks runs a chain of nightclubs. 0ur demographic would probably accept it, it's a young customer base for us. they already walk around with id such as driving licence and passports to get into a lot of our venues, and i don't think they'd have a problem with it. but i think it's a market forces thing to be honest. it's clear the government still has much to do
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to work this plan through. here's alex forsyth in westminster. a bit of clarity from the government today, what is happening is a review and it's looking at the role that vaccines but also testing might have in getting parts of the economy will consult somehow proving that if you go into a pub or an eight space you will not pass on the barracks with you recently had a vaccine or a negative covid—19 test. that is looking at the practical and ethical and legal aspects of this and we expect to hear more in early april but it is worth noting that prime minister asked about this today and said there have been no decisions on base and if of a company could issue so what we are getting it and insight into government thinking about what life might look like when things start to move again. the reputation of astrazeneca's vaccine is once again under pressure. on monday, it released trial data from a us based study — the news was good.
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it was 100% effictive at stopping serious illness we were told. hours later — us regulators said the information was outdated. and anthony fauci said this. it is unfortunate is happening. it is really what you call an unforced error. then astrazeneca released updated data to correct what dr fauci called an �*unforced error�*. the update meant that the overall efficacy rate in the trial was 76%. on monday it had said 79. efficacy among the over 65s rose from 80% on monday, to 85% after the update. and most importantly — the update still showed the vaccine offered 100% protection from serious illness. so no significant change. so why the unforced error — from a company that could really do without further doubts around its vaccine. here's the bbc�*s medical editor fergus walsh on the bbc�*s today programme.
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astrazeneca wanted to get the results out quickly on monday because there was a specific analysis on blood clots which showed no safety issue and there is no change there. also, this was the first child that specifically had a lot of elderly people in it. so it was answering two questions which of course caused all those huge problems in the eu. and so it wants to get the data out there and it takes time to analyse this data. it begs belief that statement was put out. i have never seen a rebuke like that from an independent group. suggesting that astrazeneca were being misleading. now this is the latest in a long run of communication if that is the rapid —— astrazeneca
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a struggling to supply vaccines as quickly as it helped. that is what has been led to so much upset with the eu. here is doctor sarah, a supply—chain expert from liverpool university. there is a lot going on so it a lot of back and forth and notjust on the medical side of their it's as effective at its claim to be but also looking at the supply side of things, why are we now finding the 29 million doses is that they need to supply should be operating? it seems like a very high number of vaccine doses started up there, why are they there? should there be a more efficient in place? it's one thing after anotherfor more efficient in place? it's one thing after another for astrazeneca. they are having a publicity nightmare.
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here is what those inside astrazeneca are saying. i here is what those inside astrazeneca are saying. i can tell ou that astrazeneca are saying. i can tell you that more — astrazeneca are saying. i can tell you that more than _ astrazeneca are saying. i can tell you that more than one - astrazeneca are saying. i can tell you that more than one senior i astrazeneca are saying. i can tell - you that more than one senior person at astrazeneca has said to me privately that they would not do this again. if another pandemic comes, there have been missteps. it's been an absolute roller coaster following this vaccine development along the way and what would help now is that this can be put behind things and their roll—out can continue. because this vaccine is absolutely vital to tackling the pandemic. notjust in europe but worldwide. we pandemic. not 'ust in europe but worldwide. ~ pandemic. not 'ust in europe but worldwide.— worldwide. we will take a look at the us, mexico _ worldwide. we will take a look at the us, mexico border— worldwide. we will take a look at the us, mexico border where - worldwide. we will take a look at l the us, mexico border where more unaccompanied children are crossing and it's testing the american immigration system and a neopagan administration.
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a school enlisted lecture apologised after a cartoon of the prophet muhammad was shown to pupils. the head teacher called the use of the image completely inappropriate and a member of staff has been suspended. this report from our correspondent. all speaking. videos posted online show an angry protest this morning outside a school in batley. all speaking. we're saying to sack the teacher now... parents calling for the sacking of a teacher who used an image of the prophet muhammad, the founder of islam, during a school lesson. by lunchtime, the teacher in question had been suspended pending an independent formal investigation. the school unequivocally apologises for using a totally inappropriate image in a recent religious studies lesson.
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it should not have been used. member staff have also relayed their most sincere apologies. showing the image has offended the muslim community. any depictions of the prophet muhammad are strictly forbidden in islam. batley grammar school is in a town with a high number of asian families. according to a 2015 0fsted report, three quarters of its pupils come from ethnic minorities. people i've spoken to outside the school say they're shocked by what happened. overall, it's offensive. whether it was like i said, a family member, a friend, a teacher, it's offensive. the issue has been raised and flagged and dealt with — it should be laid to bed now. it's quite outside the school this evening, and community leaders here say although they're deeply hurt by what happened, they will continue to work closely to resolve the issue. shabnam mahmood, bbc news, batley.
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this is 0utside source live from the bbc newsroom. 0ur lead story is? joe biden dismissed the idea there is a crisis on the us—mexico border. every week on 0utside source we produce a video for the bbc news website which takes an in—depth look at one of the week's big issues. let's look atjoe biden's border problem. this week we are focused on the us—mexico border and a test of whetherjoe biden can match his words with actions.— whetherjoe biden can match his words with actions. what do you do with an unaccompanied _ words with actions. what do you do with an unaccompanied child - words with actions. what do you do with an unaccompanied child that i with an unaccompanied child that comes to the border? do you repeat what trump taken from their mothers? all them infallible? we are not doing that. all them infallible? we are not doing that-— all them infallible? we are not doinuthat. ,, . �* , doing that. since joe biden became
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resident, doing that. since joe biden became president, tens _ doing that. since joe biden became president, tens of _ doing that. since joe biden became president, tens of thousands - doing that. since joe biden became president, tens of thousands of - president, tens of thousands of people arrive at the us border. most have been turned back. in a change of donald trump's policy, unaccompanied children are now not turn back. these pictures are of a first sight of where they initially stay. children packed into confined areas, surrounded by screens and republicans are blaming the president. republicans are blaming the president-— republicans are blaming the resident. ,. ., _ president. this crisis created by the presidential _ president. this crisis created by the presidential policies - president. this crisis created by the presidential policies of - president. this crisis created by the presidential policies of the l president. this crisis created by i the presidential policies of the new administration. there is no other way to claim it. in a biting border crisis. f way to claim it. in a biting border crisis. j ., , way to claim it. in a biting border crisis. f ., , ., , way to claim it. in a biting border crisis. j .,, ., , , , crisis. they're hoping nobody sees the tra . ic crisis. they're hoping nobody sees the tragic human _ crisis. they're hoping nobody sees the tragic human cost _ crisis. they're hoping nobody sees the tragic human cost of— crisis. they're hoping nobody sees the tragic human cost of the - crisis. they're hoping nobody sees the tragic human cost of the failed policy _ the tragic human cost of the failed policy to — the tragic human cost of the failed oli . ., . , ., , policy. to which they abided administration _ policy. to which they abided administration said - policy. to which they abided administration said this - policy. to which they abided administration said this is i policy. to which they abided | administration said this is on donald trump.— administration said this is on donald trump. president trump dismantled _ donald trump. president trump dismantled the _ donald trump. president trump dismantled the orderly - donald trump. president trump dismantled the orderly humane | donald trump. president trump - dismantled the orderly humane and efficient way of allowing children to make their claims under united states law in their home countries. dismantled the essential american maintenance programme so we are rebuilding villas or and safe
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processes as quickly as possible. joe biden has put vice president, harris in charge of this and she acknowledges there is a lot of work to be done. we acknowledges there is a lot of work to be done-— to be done. we have been in office less than a — to be done. we have been in office less than a hundred _ to be done. we have been in office less than a hundred days. - to be done. we have been in office less than a hundred days. we - to be done. we have been in office less than a hundred days. we are i less than a hundred days. we are addressing it and dealing with it but it will take some time and are we frustrated? are you frustrated? yes, we are. frustration for harris, frustration by the republicans, frustration by the republicans, frustration all around, but we does responsibility lie? for all his criticism of donald trump, is president biden making the situation worse? and that he needs to acknowledge this is a problem with no obvious solutions? that is regularly. starting with the numbers. here is the us—mexico border. it's more than 3000 km long. it's the most frequently crossed international border in the world. this graphic shows the number of encounters with us border patrol since 2017. you will see a peak in 2019, then a sharp fall, that arise
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again in 2020. so beforejoe biden took office and we should note, for this time of year, march, 2021 is higher than the three previous years. also, look at this. a number of unaccompanied children is rising. that started on the president trump, but it increased more rapidly under president biden. and we know where the migrants are coming from. some from mexico, others from guatemala, honduras, el salvador, and nicaragua. and the question at the heart of this story and at this issue by the white house, is why they are heading to the us. this is one reason. these pictures show the aftermath of hurricane iota in november last year. many people lost their homes. then there is the pandemic. if it's update everything. to created reason to believe, and reasons to delayjourneys. both in part explained their current search on the border. and in drug cartels,
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violence, poverty and political oppression, all of these reasons can lead people to conclude that the us is their best, perhaps their only hope. we focus on people heading to the border. these boys have fled violence and poverty. they don't know who presidentjoe biden is. all he knows is how hard it was to say goodbye to his mother and young siblings. they did not know ofjoe biden. but the president is part of the equation for others. this is a photo of a protest in tijuana on the mexican side of the border. this is —— listen to this teenage boy. whether right or wrong, this expectation is repeatedly being heard. , ., ,
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heard. these teenagers get in with the ho -e heard. these teenagers get in with the hope that _ heard. these teenagers get in with the hope that joe _ heard. these teenagers get in with the hope that joe biden _ heard. these teenagers get in with the hope that joe biden redneck i heard. these teenagers get in with i the hope that joe biden redneck than the hope thatjoe biden redneck than in as refugees. the hope that joe biden redneck than in as refugees-— in as refugees. some us officials are d in: in as refugees. some us officials are drying similar— in as refugees. some us officials are drying similar conclusions. i are drying similar conclusions. before the new president took office he did not have the types of numbers coming across. we see unaccompanied children all the time. we saw one on monday coming in from bolivia that was ten years old by himself. but does this add up? joe biden is only two months into his presidency. can we connect him to what is happening? tojudgejoe biden, we need to look at the numbers but we also need to look at how the us is treating people. this audio obtained by pro—public that came from inside a boy at their facility in texas during the trump administration. you can hear children separated from their parents and calling out for them. this is one of the most divisive moments of donald trump's presidency. and after he stopped a
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child separation policy. but not before hundreds of children had been taken from their parents. i'm joe biden glad the condemnation. and now they cannot find over 500 of those parents and those kids are alone. nowhere to go. it's criminal. it's criminal. and it makes us and i think —— laughing stock and validate every notion of who we are at a nation. , ., �* ., , every notion of who we are at a nation. , ., �* .,, ., ,., . ., nation. joe biden was also clear if he were president _ nation. joe biden was also clear if he were president that _ nation. joe biden was also clear if he were president that us - nation. joe biden was also clear if he were president that us would l nation. joe biden was also clear if- he were president that us would help those in need. i he were president that us would help those in need-— those in need. i would in fact make sure that there _ those in need. i would in fact make sure that there is _ those in need. i would in fact make sure that there is immediate - those in need. i would in fact make| sure that there is immediate search in the border, all those people seeking asylum, they deserve to be heard. that's who we are. hand seeking asylum, they deserve to be heard. that's who we are.— heard. that's who we are. and if that was not _ heard. that's who we are. and if that was not clear _ heard. that's who we are. and if that was not clear enough - heard. that's who we are. and if that was not clear enough he i heard. that's who we are. and if. that was not clear enough he also said that. ., ., _ , , ., said that. our nation says if you want to free _ said that. our nation says if you want to free you _ said that. our nation says if you want to free you should - said that. our nation says if you want to free you should come. l said that. our nation says if you - want to free you should come. now it joe biden is— want to free you should come. now it joe biden is president _ want to free you should come. now it joe biden is president and _ want to free you should come. now it joe biden is president and he - want to free you should come. now it joe biden is president and he is - joe biden is president and he is taking immediate action. creativity,
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not figuratively _ taking immediate action. creativity, not figuratively lift _ taking immediate action. creativity, not figuratively lift up _ taking immediate action. creativity, not figuratively lift up -- _ taking immediate action. creativity, not figuratively lift up -- with - not figuratively lift up —— with children from the arms of their families at the border. it’s children from the arms of their families at the border.- children from the arms of their families at the border. it's got a lot of attention _ families at the border. it's got a lot of attention as _ families at the border. it's got a lot of attention as they - families at the border. it's got a lot of attention as they that - lot of attention as they that shaping the policy —— unaccompanied children. laterthe shaping the policy —— unaccompanied children. later the president looked at his message. children. later the president looked at his message-— at his message. don't leave your town or city _ at his message. don't leave your town or city are _ at his message. don't leave your town or city are community. - at his message. don't leave your town or city are community. so, | town or city are community. so, first come. _ town or city are community. so, first come, they _ town or city are community. so, first come, they don't come until we tell you to. all while changing the rules on children. and the republican senate mitt romney has as he had seen, the data does appear to show a rise in the number of unaccompanied children after that change of policy. and that right in arrivals me more children are temporarily in facilities like this. and on that, the white house had this to say. ii
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and on that, the white house had this to say-— this to say. if not acceptable but i think the challenge _ this to say. if not acceptable but i think the challenge here - this to say. if not acceptable but i think the challenge here is - this to say. if not acceptable but i think the challenge here is that i think the challenge here is that there are not that many options. the are ument there are not that many options. the argument being the trump administration did not maintain sufficient facilities but the trump administration is no longer in power and it also did not change the policy on unaccompanied children. and pressure is growing. a democratic congresswoman alexandria because you are quite as this situation saying this is these pictures i showed you earlier were ready by another democrat, the texas congresswoman who says he wants to show people what's happening. underlining all of this consent from across the us political inspection is the question of whether the president has perhaps being naive because make no mistake the americans know if that child separation policy and many of them wants the biden administration to treat people differently and treat them better but changing the policy
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straightaway before facilities are ready risks and influx and risk children ending up in unacceptable conditions. and some would argue it does not address the more fundamental issue here. and that is this current escalation on the border is happening while the us—mexico border is closed. that's because of the pandemic on thousands of people are waiting in makeshift camps might be. but of course the board it will not stay closed forever. when it opens, just like his predecessors, joe biden will need to outline how he plans to manage america's border than many, many people want to get in. joe biden is
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to that, some would add that while the work on the border is urging it is america's role in the region beyond its borders that may offer the longer—term solution. listen to jonathan from the new yorker. joe biden's pics to the american people was in part that he was not donald trump that he followed the saints on the pandemic that he would stop spreading misinformation. this was a little bar but immigration is harder, much harder. and cramped attention centres filling up with unaccompanied children is a long way from joe biden's vision of america. but that is what's happening at his next matters both to those children and his presidency. that's it for it
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hour of outside source. you can find all of our videos on the bbc news website. goodbye. good evening. it's felt pleasant when you've seen the sunshine today, but we've also had a real rash of showers and some quite hefty showers as well. i mean, it's not surprising.
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low pressure's driving the weather, it's sitting towards the north—west of us and throwing these bands of showers in off the atlantic. in fact tomorrow, we've got a cold weatherfront coming in — in fact tonight — and behind that, it will turn colder. so the evening will find the showers continuing — in fact later this evening and overnight, they'll merge into a longer spell of rain. that's the cold weather front. so ahead of that, there will be quite a bit of cloud and the breeze will start to freshen up as well. so, temperatures will hold up, but behind this cold weather front introducing a lengthier spell of quite heavy rain, it will turn colder with snow over the hills. so late in the night, dip in temperature for north—western areas but for most of us, 6s and 7s. but this is going to give quite a bit of heavy rain for a time and then behind that, you can see the distinction there, got a much colder air mass coming in. so temperatures will be considerably down on those of today. ahead of it, we'll still have a few showers, a little bit of brightness but on the whole, the cloud will thicken through the day, pushing that spell of a few hours of quite persistent rain, some heavy rain eastwards.
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behind it, the sky's bright and we've got sunshine but it's more likely the showers will fall as the snow over the hills in the north, northern ireland into wales and england, even the moors in the south west by the evening and look at the temperatures. well down on today, 7—10 celsius. so, friday evening pulls that cold weather front of the way. then, we do get that rash of showers. there could be a little bit of sleetiness as i say in the moors further south during friday night into saturday which will be a much colder night with a widespread frost in the north and some frost in the countryside further south. well, saturday brings something drier with high pressure building towards the south until later. the night brings wet and windy weather in that sense, pushes its way southwards on sunday. so, a bit ofa mixed bag really for the weekend. saturday at the moment it looks like the drier day of the two. still showers around, still quite a bit of cloud. chilly start again, as we talked about, this frost. and the rain comes in later in the day but temperatures given some sunshine and some strengthening march sunshine at this time of year should recover to 9—12 celsius but by sunday as i say, that rain will have swept southwards. some uncertainty on the details of the progression of this weather front at this stage. so, if you are looking to go out
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for a walk on the weekend, please stay tuned to the forecast. as ever, there's more on our website, bye—bye.
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this is bbc news, i'm kasia madera. the headlines at 8pm... a backlash from landlords, after borisjohnson says a vaccination passport might be needed to get into a pub. i think it will drive people away from local hospitality venues and even city centre ones, where what we need to be doing is bringing people back in. zoom summit for eu leaders — they're under pressure to increase vaccine supplies. where does that leave exports to britain? an apology to parents after a teacher shows cartoons of the prophet muhammad at a west yorkshire school. an extra £95 million to improve maternity care in england. it follows the baby deaths scandal at the shrewsbury and telford nhs trust.
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a second attempt to re—float the

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