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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  March 25, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm GMT

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you will have to have extra staff to be checking on the door, you will have to have the cost of workplace testing to be borne, 70% of our businesses are smes and simply will not be able to manage this cost of reopening. labour says it's "deeply unfortunate" that the plans were revealed "on the hoof" — we'll be asking how realistic are they? also this lunchtime: as eu leaders meet to decide their next move over export restrictions, astrazenica express anger at being caught in the middle of the vaccine row. over 50s and those in at—risk categories are being urged
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to book their covid—19jabs before a predicted dip in supplies. a year later than planned — the torch relay for the delayed tokyo olympics finally gets under way injapan. iam i am richard cottingham. i'd like to be called richie. finding his voice — the audition to give richie the sound he always wanted. and coming up on bbc news: england get their world cup qualifying underway later — against the world's lowest ranked nation — but tougher ties await for northern ireland and scotland. good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one.
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pub operators and landlords have said they are concerned about the possibility of customers in england having to prove they've been vaccinated against coronavirus — in order to enter hospitality venues. a review is looking into the measure as the lockdown is eased. yesterday the prime minister said the decision could be left to individual landlords — but industry leaders say the plan is "fraught with difficulty". speaking this morning, mrjohnson said it may only be possible to implement a vaccine passports scheme once everybody has been offered a jab — as sarah campbell reports. pubs have had a long time to get ready to welcome back customers. they have had to change their layouts, reduce tables and make sure they are as covid safe as possible so they thought they may have to ask customers to prove they have been jabbed hasn't gone down well. what jabbed hasn't gone down well. what we do not want _ jabbed hasn't gone down well. what we do not want is _ jabbed hasn't gone down well. what we do not want is the _ jabbed hasn't gone down well. “gm"isgt we do not want is the risk of additional costs being put onto our business having to hire people on the door to monitor this, to
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exercisejudgments. we the door to monitor this, to exercise judgments. we want the ability to trade in the normal way. a further issue is a red pub staff and clientele who are generally younger and therefore not yet eligible for vaccinations. you have also not eligible for vaccinations. you have also got potential— eligible for vaccinations. you have also got potential discrimination l also got potential discrimination issues arising in the workplace and in a customer setting where you might be discriminating against those people if you are demanding they have covid certification before they have covid certification before they can pop out for a coffee or pop into the pub. they can pop out for a coffee or pop into the pub-— into the pub. under the current lockdown easing _ into the pub. under the current lockdown easing timetable - into the pub. under the current lockdown easing timetable in i into the pub. under the current - lockdown easing timetable in england outside socialising and limited groups will be allowed from april the 12th and from the 17th of may groups of six or any number from two households will be allowed to drink and eat endorse. the question is whether vaccine certificates will be required, which the prime minister said this morning is being considered. we said this morning is being considered.— said this morning is being considered. ~ , ,., ., considered. we will be reporting on the work of — considered. we will be reporting on
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the work of the _ considered. we will be reporting on the work of the certification - considered. we will be reporting on the work of the certification group l the work of the certification group in early april, either on the face or the 12th. in early april, either on the face or the 12th— in early april, either on the face or the 12th. , , , ., ., or the 12th. desperate to get their doors back open — or the 12th. desperate to get their doors back open again, _ or the 12th. desperate to get their doors back open again, the - or the 12th. desperate to get their doors back open again, the owner| or the 12th. desperate to get their i doors back open again, the owner of this chain of nightclubs says having to show proof of vaccine could be workable. ., ., , . ., workable. our demographic would robabl workable. our demographic would probably accept — workable. our demographic would probably accept it. _ workable. our demographic would probably accept it. it _ workable. our demographic would probably accept it. it is _ workable. our demographic would probably accept it. it is a - workable. our demographic would probably accept it. it is a young i probably accept it. it is a young customer base for us. they already walk around with id such as driving licence and passport to get into a lot of our venues and i do not think they would have a problem with it. it is a market forces bank. the niuht it is a market forces bank. the night before — it is a market forces bank. the night before the _ it is a market forces bank. the night before the last lockdown, public and said many customers counting down the days until the drinks can start flowing again, but the road to the opening is far from straightforward. our political correspondent alex forsyth is in westminster. the idea of vaccine passports, the mood music seems to be warming towards it. , ., ., mood music seems to be warming towards it— towards it. this notion has been kickin: towards it. this notion has been kicking around _ towards it. this notion has been kicking around for _ towards it. this notion has been kicking around for some - towards it. this notion has been kicking around for some time i towards it. this notion has been i kicking around for some time that you could have some sort of proof, a passport or certificate, showing you are at little or no risk of passing
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on the virus if you are in a public enclosed space but ministers said publicly they were resistant to it. then we heard from the prime minister yesterday saying when it comes to pubs it might be down to individual landlords and there has been a bit of a backlash from the industry but also from some of the backbenchers who disagree with it on principle grants. we have had a bit of clarity from the government today. what is happening is a review looking at the role of vaccines but also tasting might have in getting parts of the economy reopened so somehow proving if you're go into a pub or an enclosed space you are not going to pass on the virus if you have recently had a vaccine or negative test, the report is looking at the legal aspects and we expect to hear more in early april but it is worth noting the prime minister when asked said there have been no decisions on this, it is a very complicated issue, so what we are getting is an insight into government thinking about what life
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might look like when things start to move again. might look like when things start to move again-— eu leaders are discussing plans for extra controls on vaccine exports in an effort to improve the rollout of doses for member states. borisjohnson has warned against blockades, which could affect the number ofjabs sent to the uk, but the european commission says it would "expand supply for all". richard galpin reports. here in this vaccine centre in cologne, as in other parts of the european union, there is only a handful of people. one key reason for that is a shortage of vaccine supplies and this is the ego faces a third wave of coronavirus which is sweeping through the member states. frustrated officials believe the uk has had an unfair advantage with the contracts for the astrazeneca vaccine and are threatening a panel of experts of the vaccine to the uk. i do not think we want to use it. i
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am optimistic that a joint agreement between the eu and uk as well as the summit today will help to solve the problem without entering a vaccine war but again the eu has been the biggest exporter. war but again the eu has been the biggest exporter-_ biggest exporter. london and brussels can _ biggest exporter. london and brussels can try _ biggest exporter. london and brussels can try to _ biggest exporter. london and brussels can try to cool- biggest exporter. london and i brussels can try to cool tensions with the statement saying they are working on specific steps they can take to create a win—win situation and expand vaccine supplies for all their citizens. i and expand vaccine supplies for all their citizens.— their citizens. i don't want to see blockades of _ their citizens. i don't want to see blockades of vaccines _ their citizens. i don't want to see blockades of vaccines or - their citizens. i don't want to see i blockades of vaccines or medicines. i don't think that is the way forward either for us i don't think that is the way forward eitherfor us or i don't think that is the way forward either for us or for any of ourfriends. forward either for us or for any of our friends-— our friends. the eu meeting this afternoon is _ our friends. the eu meeting this afternoon is focusing _ our friends. the eu meeting this afternoon is focusing on - our friends. the eu meeting this afternoon is focusing on ways i our friends. the eu meeting this afternoon is focusing on ways to | afternoon is focusing on ways to increase the vaccine supply and improve the distribution across the 27 countries. i improve the distribution across the 27 countries-— 27 countries. i think it should be made perfectly _ 27 countries. i think it should be made perfectly clear _ 27 countries. i think it should be made perfectly clear that - 27 countries. i think it should be made perfectly clear that the i 27 countries. i think it should bej made perfectly clear that the eu does not have a problem with the uk. the eu has a problem with
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astrazeneca because astrazeneca is not fulfilling their promises, their contractual obligations. it is not fulfilling their promises, their contractual obligations.— contractual obligations. it is vital in this pandemic _ contractual obligations. it is vital in this pandemic that _ contractual obligations. it is vital in this pandemic that all- contractual obligations. it is vital| in this pandemic that all countries work together to tackle the virus. vaccine nationalism could prove very damaging. you vaccine nationalism could prove very damauain. ., ., vaccine nationalism could prove very dama..in_ ., ., . . damaging. you cannot wrap a flag around a vaccine _ damaging. you cannot wrap a flag around a vaccine in _ damaging. you cannot wrap a flag around a vaccine in this _ damaging. you cannot wrap a flag around a vaccine in this modern . around a vaccine in this modern world. it doesn't work that way. these are integrated supply chains and any attempt to impose any barriers whatsoever would disadvantage everybody involved. that disadvantage everybody involved. at today's meeting angela merkel will today“s meeting angela merkel will also highlight the need for more vaccines to be made in the eu itself to tackle the supply problems. our europe correspondent, nick beake, is in brussels. the european leaders who are meeting today are themselves under huge public pressure.— public pressure. they are, but i think in the _ public pressure. they are, but i think in the short _ public pressure. they are, but i think in the short term - public pressure. they are, but i think in the short term there i public pressure. they are, but i think in the short term there is | public pressure. they are, but i l think in the short term there is a sense that disaster has been averted because no one wanted a vaccine were
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exploding on the eve of the summit and thatjoint statement, although it is vague, has taken some of the heat out of this dispute but it hasn't gone away because the european union believes it is being short—changed during this vaccination process and they are trying to work out what to do next. on the one hand you have italy and france who are keen on these proposals put forward yesterday tightening export controls that could hurt the united kingdom and on the other hand you have people like the other hand you have people like the swedish and the belgians saying you have to be really careful here because the delicate global supply chain of vaccines and their component parts could be affected by this and it could really bill disaster. angela merkel today was defending the approach the eu countries have taken, there isjoint procurement acting together and she said part of the difficulty they is because both the uk and the us are simply not exporting vaccines. president biden will be joining the video call later today and they may
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well talk about that. it could be an awkward conversation. in terms of what happens next or what they say next we simply do not know one that is the sense some of your colleagues could have felt over the years but from everyone here in brussels best wishes and back to you.— let's get more from our medical editor fergus walsh. one has to feel for astrazeneca who have done some amazing things and yet is at the heart of a huge row. yeah, they keep being kicked, unlike pfizer and madera who to stand to make millions out of the pandemic from their very effective vaccines. astrazeneca also has a safe and very effective vaccine and is being criticised again and again and it was criticised earlier this week by a group of scientists in the us who argues that effectively of potentially issuing misleading information about the effectiveness
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of its vaccine entrails the, so late last night astrazeneca put out some revised figures for the first us trial of its vaccine and it revised down the effectiveness against covid symptomatic infection from 79 to 76%, 80% drop. the effectiveness among the over 65 is went up from 80% to 85% and it was 100% effective against severe disease. pretty much against severe disease. pretty much a lot of fuss over very little indeed and many will have noticed that astrazeneca is doing this not—for—profit and it said it had put that early data out on monday to reassure partly eu countries who were concerned about blood clots because they did a specific analysis showing there was not a problem with blood clots but today one eu
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country, denmark, has said it will continue the temporary suspension of using the astrazeneca vaccine for at least another three weeks.- least another three weeks. thank ou. people in england aged over 50 — and in at—risk categories — are being urged to book their covid—19 jabs before next monday — when experts are predicting the number of vaccination slots will dip. officials expect a slowdown in vaccine supplies in april and medics will be focusing on providing second doses. this from our health correspondent naomi grimley. book while you can — that's the message to the over—50s and those in at—risk groups, who are being urged to secure theirjabs as soon as possible. some vaccination centres will be temporarily closed in april due to looming supply issues, and the government is keen to focus minds in the most vulnerable groups before that happens. we've got very high coverage amongst the over—70s,
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more than 90%, but in other groups there are less... ..figures of less coverage, and we do need to reach out to those groups and persuade and make vaccines easily accessible, in order that they take up immunisation. over 28 million people have had at least one jab, but now of course many of those require specially—timed second doses, so they'll take priority in the next month. new research from warwick university and public health england says it's already saved at least 6,000 lives, mostly in older age groups, between the first vaccinations in december and the end of february. but we're still living with huge uncertainty. foreign travel, for example, remains a big unknown. the biggest risk to the epidemic in the uk now would be importation from abroad and we will have to think very hard about summer
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holidays and travel in the summer, but the best answer to that is to bring epidemic under control in the uk and to make vaccines available globally and then we can get travel, we can get economics and we can get all of our health and education back much, much faster. in exactly three weeks“ time the government hopes everyone in the most vulnerable groups will have been offered a firstjab. it will be a moment to celebrate, but health officials want us to know there's still a long way to go before the country can really relax. naomi grimley, bbc news. a year later than expected, the olympic torch has begun its four—month journey around japan, as it heads to the delayed opening ceremony of the 2020 summer games. the olympic flame was lit in fukushima, and will arrive in tokyo injuly. rupert wingfield—hayes has been watching its progress. it's a moment many had predicted would never happen, but this morning in fukushima, a year later than planned, the runners got under way. the olympic torch relay has begun.
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this is really the point of no return. this is japan saying to the world, this games is going to go ahead this summer — regardless of the pandemic. for months, opinion polls have shown an overwhelming majority of japanese are against holding these games this year, but as the torch relay entered the city of iwaki today a lot of people turned out, ignoring government advice not to gather in crowds, although they did heed the advice to clap rather than to cheer. "when i watched the torch go by today it became more real for me," this lady says. "but i am glad they're not going to allow spectators from abroad." "i'm going to be an olympic volunteer," this student says, "so i really want them to go ahead. "when the whole world is down because of the pandemic i think "the olympics will cheer people up." so the torch relay has now arrived in the little town of futaba,
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and this town is one of them that was evacuated after the nuclear disaster at fukushima daiichi ten years ago. in fact, the nuclear plant is just a few kilometres away from here and despite all of the razzmatazz surrounding the torch relay here today if you go just 100 metres in either direction you“ll find that this town is still completely deserted and some of the people who come from this area are not hugely amused about the amount of money that's being spent on the olympics when they still can't come home. japan has now decided it will not allow foreign spectators to come to the games this summer, but as the olympic flame makes its way towards tokyo the authorities here know they now have no hope of vaccinating japan's population before the opening ceremony onjuly the 23rd. rupert wingfield—hayes, bbc news, in fukushima. our top story this lunchtime. landlords say they're concerned at proposals to ban people from pubs in england —
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if they haven't had a jab. also today — the latest list of endangered species shows africa's elephants are far more threatened than previously thought. coming up on bbc news... the olympic torch begins its journey a year later than planned due to the pandemic, and with a difference — no fans, as the countdown starts to the delayed tokyo 2020 games. a second attempt to re—float the container ship stranded in the suez canal will be made later today. the ship“s owner has apologised for the grounding — and the effect it has had on international shipping. at least 150 vessels are currently waiting to go through the canal, which was completely blocked when the 200,000 tonne cargo ship, the ever given, ran aground. theo leggett reports. and oceangoing giant lies stuck, its bow embedded firmly on the sandy
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bank of the suess canal, and one of the world's busiest trade arteries remains blocked for a third day. the canal provides a relatively quick way for cargo to travel between europe and asia, and for oil supplies to come from the middle east. the alternative is a passage around the southern tip of africa, which is thousands of miles further and can take more than a week longer. with the canal blocked, the backlog of ships with nowhere to go is building up. irate backlog of ships with nowhere to go is building up— backlog of ships with nowhere to go is building up— is building up. we have ships lining u . is building up. we have ships lining u- and this is building up. we have ships lining up and this is _ is building up. we have ships lining up and this is not _ is building up. we have ships lining up and this is notjust _ up and this is notjust containerships, this is bulk carriers, carrying grain cargoes as well. this is crude oil, this is oil product, carrying gasoline and diesel to feed our cars. the ever given is one _ diesel to feed our cars. the ever given is one of _ diesel to feed our cars. the ever given is one of a _ diesel to feed our cars. the ever given is one of a very _ diesel to feed our cars. the ever given is one of a very new i given is one of a very new generation of so—called mega ships, huge vessels hundreds of metres long capable of carrying tens of thousands of containers. the suess canal was built in 1859 and although it was recently expanded it remains a very narrow and tricky prospect
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for such large ships. the a very narrow and tricky prospect for such large ships.— for such large ships. the biggest concern is _ for such large ships. the biggest concern is when _ for such large ships. the biggest concern is when there _ for such large ships. the biggest concern is when there is - for such large ships. the biggest concern is when there is an i for such large ships. the biggest i concern is when there is an incident these ships are too big four salvos to quickly and easily managed to free them and certainly there needs to be a thorough audit of what went wrong and why and at the moment we are not really sure. the wrong and why and at the moment we are not really sure.— are not really sure. the question now is how _ are not really sure. the question now is how much _ are not really sure. the question now is how much longer - are not really sure. the question now is how much longer it i are not really sure. the question now is how much longer it will. are not really sure. the question i now is how much longer it will take for the canal to be fully reopened. a long delay will only add to the disruption to global supply chains already caused by the covid outbreak and ultimately that means a potential shortages and higher costs for businesses. they may already be struggling. theo leggett, bbc news. the new £50 note will feature the computer pioneer alan turing. the bank of england says the new notes will enter circulation on the 23rd ofjune. campaigners have criticised the lack of diversity, but the governor of the bank, andrew bailey, has said he would like the next person featured on a banknote to be from an ethnic minority. our personal finance correspondent kevin peachey reports. alan turing“s work as code
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breaker helped shorten the war and save lives. soon he'll be on the bank of england's most secure banknote. and this is the new note, packed with security features. here's the portrait of alan turing with images of his computer pioneering role. it enters circulation on the 23rd ofjune. why then? the clue is here, on this wavy line in binary code. it“s alan turing“s date of birth, in 1912, on the 23rd ofjune. the banknote also draws attention to his appalling treatment by the state for being gay. today, the bank of england's headquarters is flying the rainbow flag to celebrate diversity, but is it enough? would you like to see someone from a diverse ethnic background on the next note? i would, i definitely want to see it because we are very committed to diversity. so i would definitely hope that one of our next bank notes will obviously feature somebody from an ethnic background, because that would be very appropriate, but i do want to emphasise of course that
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alan turing in his own right is a very strong recognition of diversity. alan turing“s nephew hopes this will prompt wider discussions. i think alan turing would have wanted us to think about things like underrepresentation of women in science subjects, underrepresentation of black and ethnic minority kids in stem subjects at school, and why they are not being given the opportunities that they should have and why that's bad for all of us. these were things i think he was quite keen on during his lifetime. he was keen too on the idea of programming machines, and during the covid crisis we“ve turned to devices rather than cash to pay for things. would you expect next to have a digital currency rather than a banknote? it still very much at the foundational stages, i think, because it does raise quite a lot of issues as to how it would work, how it would impact the financial system, how it would impact society more broadly. a project fascinating anyone inspired by alan turing“s work. kevin peachey, bbc news.
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the nationwide building society is to allow 13,000 office staff to choose where they work under a new flexibility scheme. the company is closing three offices in swindon, with 3,000 staff either moving to the nearby ho, working from home, or mixing the two. managers say its "work anywhere" plan would allow employees more control of their lives. santander has announced plans to close 111 branches across the country due to the shift to mobile and online banking. the bank said it had taken the decision because fewer customers were choosing to bank in branch. about 840 staff will be affected by the closures, although santander promised to try to find them otherjobs within the business. a major report by the international union for the conservation of nature has revealed that africa's elephants are far more threatened that previously thought. decades of declines — caused by poaching and an ongoing loss of their habitat — have driven forest elephants
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and savanna elephants into the two highest categories of extinction threat. victoria gill reports. the largest land animals on earth. but their size has not protected them from the impacts of poaching or from the continued destruction of the vast swathes of interconnected habitat they need. this latest red list of threatened species, considered to be the comprehensive report on how nature is faring on an increasingly crowded planet, puts africa's savanna elephants into the endangered category. forest elephants are now even closer to extinction — critically endangered. it is an alarm bell for us. there are two main reasons for these declines. one is poaching of these animals for their ivory and the second one is habitat loss through human activities that take place in total disregard
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of the needs of these animals. across africa there are nowjust over 400,000 wild elephants, and this latest examination of decades of census data and habitat surveys has shown that the demand for ivory still drives the decline in their numbers. the level of threat they faced had also been masked by the fact that the african elephant was previously thought to be a single species. this is the first time the savanna and forest elephant has been assessed separately. what does it mean practically to have this information about their status? how do you use that to protect these animals and reverse these declines? well, on the surface of it it looks bleak. the fact that it's been flagged is actually positive because then it means we can do something about it. and also separating the species, i think that's also positive because it means we can do something about it on a more concentrated level. the loss of species and natural spaces is happening
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all around the world. but conservationists are confident that this wake—up call could ensure that these giant icons of african wildlife get the protection and the space that they need. victoria gill, bbc news. when you hear of a massive tree—felling operation your heart tends to sink. trees, we know, are vital in the battle to save the planet. but there's one large scale clearance that's happening in the kielder forest of northumberland that scientists say is actually good for the environment. our chief environmental correspondentjustin rowlatt has been finding out more. how can this... be good for the environment? forestry england is cutting down trees to restore bogs in northern england. now, these bog land ecosystems may not look like much but they are incredible. some of them are 15 metres deep, so seven times my height, and they are an amazing store of carbon. some of them contain plants that grew 12,000
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years ago, when the glaziers retreated from northern england at the end of the last ice age. restoring them has been the lifework of 87—year—old angus lunn. my interest in the border mires began when i was doing research as part of a phd project in the late 1950s. as i walked over a huge area of moorland in western northumberland, istarted mapping sphagnum bog, which no one had known about before. so in that sense, i discovered them, yes. in 1971, angus and other members of the local wildlife trust
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decided the bogs needed protection. the building blocks of the peatland, the sphagnum mosses, which themselves like this one, are absolutely full of water, they are about 90% water. and that water is why bogs are better for the environment than trees. vegetation doesn“t rot completely. while a tree only stores carbon while it's alive, a blog can store carbon for thousands of years. —— a bog can store carbon for thousands of years. so this... really is good for the planet, and the project angus began 50 years ago is now the largest completed bog reclamation in the uk. how does it feel, 50 years
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later, to see what's been achieved with the border myers? —— border mires? satisfactory. that's quite low—key response? very satisfactory. is that better? we often hear about people "finding their voice", but richie cottingham is taking that idea quite literally. he's used an artificial voice his whole life, because of cerebral palsy, but now he's on a quest to replace the standard computerised pronunciation with something a lot more "yorkshire". fiona lamdin has more. my name is richard cottingham. i'm richard cottingham. but i like to be called richie. i'd like to be called richie. ..be called richie. 26—year—old richie has cerebral palsy. my generic voice is not my identity. he's never had his own voice and has always had to communicate via a computer. once i have a new unique voice i have an identity. now he hopes to create an entirely
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new voice by blending recordings of two local men. what are you looking for in a new voice? female computerised voice: i�*c like a young man's voice with a subtle east yorkshire accent, someone who has a nice smile. so far, 36 men have come forward. hiya, my name's billy, i live in hull. my name is gaz, i'm 24 years old, from york. . my favourite colour is red and my favourite food is sunday dinner, especially yorkshire puddings. good evening, richie... but it's up to richie to listen and draw up a shortlist. what do you think of that one then? give me a rating out of ten? i'm a local lad myself. obviously i'm a massive yorkshire lad. this is 29—year—old ryan, who lives just a few miles from richie. we need to try and do everything we can to help anybody, you know, and if it's the littlest thing that might make that person's life
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a little bit better than i'm more than happy to help out where i can. being from around the hull area... there's also 26—year—old scott, who“s proud of his east yorkshire accent. it's quite a friendly accent. i'd say that you're a lot more. affable if you sound northern. are there any particular phrases you'd be keen to put in the voice bank? i guess there's a lot of dialect that throws people off. - if i say "chip spice" people haven't heard of that. i it's not mum, it's mam. there's about a hundred different |words for bread roll, isn't there? i i go for bread bap. hi, i'm richard cottingham. but i'd like to be called richie. and there are many, many others who are keen to help. it's something that he couldn't do because he's never been able to speak, but i thought it's something that we all take for granted. richie finally hopes to have his new voice in the next few months. i would like to say thank you to all the volunteers who took the time and effort to apply. fiona lamdin, bbc news.

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