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tv   The Papers  BBC News  March 24, 2021 10:30pm-10:46pm GMT

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there are bottlenecks on the daily commute and then there's this — a ship the size of the empire state building, blocking one of the busiest shipping channels, blown adrift by a gust of wind. behind the stricken ever given, a mounting queue of marine traffic, carrying cargo from oil to clothes and food. whereever they hailfrom — china, the middle east or south asia — they are going nowhere. seen from above, the problem is clear. ships have grown to match our appetite to consume more, but they are ill—suited to a waterway that's just 205 metres wide. this canal, connecting the red sea and the mediterranean, was originally built 150 years ago. it's still crucial for modern trade. the ever given ran aground at 5:40 on tuesday morning. it's one of 52 ships a day that travel through this passage of water.
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they carry 12% of global trade, worth over £2 billion per day. there is no easy alternative routes, so this disruption could be costly. the suez canal is blocked for, what, the third time in its history. how damaging could that be to global trade? we think about exports from china, they will take about 10% longer, in terms of shipping time, to arrive at their destination. and when we think about the importance of chinese products for the production of goods all over the world, we have to be worried that this will still have major consequences. they are hoping tug boats, diggers and the tide will refloat this ship but it could take weeks to deal with the consequences. tonight, a side channel has been reopened to divert some traffic. however mighty the forces
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of globalisation, we are all vulnerable to the whims of nature. dharshini david, bbc news. tonight's football, and wales have been playing belgium in a world cup qualifier. there are highlights after the news on match of the day in wales, but if you want to know what happened, here's our sports correspondent andy swiss. it's more than 60 years since they reached a world cup, and wales�*s latest bid to qualify began in the toughest way possible. according to the rankings, belgium are the best in the business, but it was wales that was soon playing like it. bale puts in a beautiful ball! harry wilson rounding off one of the most breathtaking moves you could wish to see. how good was that? but having fallen behind, belgium turned on the brilliance. first kevin de bruyne blasted them level, and when a defensive slip was gratefully accepted by thorgan hazard, the hosts were ahead at the break. after it, wales ramped up the pressure. gareth bale taking the acrobatic route, but it wasn't to be.
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and when a wild tackle from chris mepham gifted belgium a penalty, romelu lukaku ensured there was no coming back. a 3—1 win for belgium — for wales, a pretty decent display, but ultimately a disappointment. andy swiss, bbc news. that's it. now on bbc one, time for the news where you are. have a very good night. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the daily telegraph's deputy political editor lucy fisher and miatta fahnbulleh who's from the centre—left think tank the new economics foundation. the financial times leads on the talks between the uk and the eu to calm the row over the supply of the astrazeneca coronavirus vaccine.
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�*the i' leads on the same story and highlights fears of a trade war which could disrupt the uk's vaccine roll—out to under—50s. the metro covers the borisjohnson�*s response to any potential vaccine blockade, with a warning to the eu that global businesses could stop investing there if they were to go ahead with the measure. the daily mail leads on the news that vaccine passports may be needed to go to the pub, with drinkers potentially barred without proof of a negative covid test or evidence of having a jab. without proof of a negative covid test or evidence of having a jab. the telegraph covers the same story, which came from the prime minister's comments at the liaison committee earlier today. he says any decision will be up to the publicans and landlords. the guardian has an exclusive story on how the school exclusion rates are up to six times higher for black carribbean pupils compared to their white peers in some local authorities. right, what shall we talk about? let us start with the times. pub
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vaccine sport. covid jab needed to enter pub. i did see that bit in the press conference i thought boris johnson threw that away offhandedly. it appears almost everything a newspaper has this as their headline. newspaper has this as their headline-— newspaper has this as their headline. . ,., , headline. yeah, so, the review is deal going _ headline. yeah, so, the review is deal going on _ headline. yeah, so, the review is deal going on to _ headline. yeah, so, the review is deal going on to decide _ headline. yeah, so, the review is deal going on to decide whetherl headline. yeah, so, the review is i deal going on to decide whether this is the route to you uk wants to take. but i think it's definitely the case that it's been considered. i think but it's quite interesting is if he is to be believed, the approach to the government might make it mandatory, but they essentially leave it to the discretion of different hospitality venues, different pubs, hotels, whatever, to decide whether they want to ask for certification of the vaccine or a negative test. my view
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is probably the route to all chaos. it will be far too arbitrary, it would be pretty unworkable and the government neither needs to decide it wants to go down this route and say it's a good requirement as easy as possible, or decides it doesn't want to do that.— want to do that. lucy, is there auoin to want to do that. lucy, is there going to be — want to do that. lucy, is there going to be a _ want to do that. lucy, is there going to be a five _ want to do that. lucy, is there going to be a five year - want to do that. lucy, is there going to be a five year row - want to do that. lucy, is there i going to be a five year row about whether vaccine passports should be dark blue or burgundy? i whether vaccine passports should be dark blue or burgundy?— dark blue or burgundy? i think you brin: u- a dark blue or burgundy? i think you bring no a good — dark blue or burgundy? i think you bring up a good point. _ dark blue or burgundy? i think you bring up a good point. maybe - dark blue or burgundy? i think you bring up a good point. maybe theyi bring up a good point. maybe they think_ bring up a good point. maybe they think it _ bring up a good point. maybe they think it would be an app —based certificate — think it would be an app —based certificate on your phone. lots of problems— certificate on your phone. lots of problems over some early issue rations — problems over some early issue rations of— problems over some early issue rations of testing that showed many people _ rations of testing that showed many people don't have up—to—date phones or the _ people don't have up—to—date phones or the latest software to run some apps _ or the latest software to run some apps i_ or the latest software to run some apps. i think potentially you can see discrimination against people unable _ see discrimination against people unable to— see discrimination against people unable to prove they had a vaccine, as well_ unable to prove they had a vaccine, as well as _ unable to prove they had a vaccine, as well as many people not able to have a _ as well as many people not able to have a vaccine or not wanting to,
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who _ have a vaccine or not wanting to, who could — have a vaccine or not wanting to, who could potentially be discriminated against under this policy— discriminated against under this policy if— discriminated against under this policy if it — discriminated against under this policy if it is widely adopted. thal's— policy if it is widely adopted. that's what we're hearing backbenchers saying this evening. they say— backbenchers saying this evening. they say pregnant women could be discriminated against since the government is urging them not to take the _ government is urging them not to take the job back. also some ethnic minority— take the job back. also some ethnic minority -- — take the job back. also some ethnic minority —— the jab. take the job back. also some ethnic minority -- the jab.— take the job back. also some ethnic minority -- the jab.- i - take the job back. also some ethnic minority -- the jab.- i think| minority -- the 'ab. miatta? i think it's minority -- the 'ab. miatta? i think as definitely — minority -- the 'ab. miatta? i think it's definitely a — minority -- the jab. miatta? i think it's definitely a risk. _ minority -- the jab. miatta? i think it's definitely a risk. if— minority -- the jab. miatta? i think it's definitely a risk. if the - it's definitely a risk. if the government will go on our route to make this compulsory, you can get around this. if you are exempted for reasons like being pregnant, then you can basically show proof of that. i think when the government did this will be key. fighting is more problematic when you haven't got the full population vaccinated because then... if they look to put it in august, when they hope they
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would have provided access to everyone, then you can start to see it workable. there are precedents. no one thinks twice before they get vaccinated and get a passport, and you need to use it to travel. i think there's a scope to it seems... 50% of people are in favour —— 56%. we have to leave with keys, wallet, mats, vaccine passport. we might need a backpack for all the stuff we need a backpack for all the stuff we needin need a backpack for all the stuff we need in the summer. let's look at the financial times. uk and eu try to calm row. lucy fisher, it was interesting what borisjohnson, using the word blockade as if there was the 1962
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cuban missile crisis.— blockade as if there was the 1962 cuban missile crisis. never shy of usin: cuban missile crisis. never shy of using punchy _ cuban missile crisis. never shy of using punchy language, _ cuban missile crisis. never shy of using punchy language, but - cuban missile crisis. never shy of using punchy language, but i - cuban missile crisis. never shy of| using punchy language, but i think he has _ using punchy language, but i think he has a _ using punchy language, but i think he has a point here. what we've seen it be published today, that the eu is thinking about, an extension of powers— is thinking about, an extension of powers that would allow them to block _ powers that would allow them to block exports to countries that have faster _ block exports to countries that have faster roll—outs of vaccination programmes like the uk. and also countries — programmes like the uk. and also countries they feel are being reciprocal in sending doses back to the ell _ reciprocal in sending doses back to the ell i_ reciprocal in sending doses back to the eu. ithink reciprocal in sending doses back to the eu. i think we seen an interesting connotation with the uk and eu _ interesting connotation with the uk and eu announcing they're going to work together to try and tackle the covid-19 _ work together to try and tackle the covid—19 pandemic of this stage in terms _ covid—19 pandemic of this stage in terms of— covid—19 pandemic of this stage in terms of the vaccine roll—outs. also talking _ terms of the vaccine roll—outs. also talking about creating a win—win situation — talking about creating a win—win situation and boosting complexities. it's situation and boosting complexities. it's good _ situation and boosting complexities. it's good language, but that doesn't resolve _ it's good language, but that doesn't resolve the problem. in the uk, we
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found _ resolve the problem. in the uk, we found more — resolve the problem. in the uk, we found more than half our population offered _ found more than half our population offered the first dose. in the eu, it's only— offered the first dose. in the eu, it's only 12%. the commission are really— it's only 12%. the commission are really under — it's only 12%. the commission are really under pressure from their population. i think we'll learn tomorrow— population. i think we'll learn tomorrow when it's discussed at the european _ tomorrow when it's discussed at the european council, just how serious the eu _ european council, just how serious the eu is— european council, just how serious the eu is about pushing ahead. you're — the eu is about pushing ahead. you're obviously with the new economics foundation, but i'd like to spring the question about trade. the eu has been saying reciprocity are really important —— is really important. does that work in this case? is that a principle that should exist or should it simply be the uk signed the contract, the contract should be on them —— honoured? i contract should be on them -- honoured?— contract should be on them -- honoured? ~' . ., ., honoured? i think in the context of local pandemic. — honoured? i think in the context of local pandemic, all— honoured? i think in the context of local pandemic, all of _ honoured? i think in the context of local pandemic, all of our - local pandemic, all of our individual self—interest for everyone globally to be vaccinated quickly. i do think the principle of reciprocity and solidarity and collaboration has to trump all else,
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but i think this is dangerous on all sides. the since we are only protecting our own, not taking... 0ne protecting our own, not taking... one thing we've learned over this year is that what happens in one country can affect us here, so i think we need far more collaboration and cooperation. i think the eu and the uk need to be talking about how they do this in the best possible way, and my personal view is if we've got the instance where actually most of our vulnerable groups in the uk have been vaccinated, but you have 80—year—olds in portugal or wherever that haven't been vaccinated and there's a supply rate, it's a no—brainer the supply must go to those people and i think the same applies for every single country. so i'd much rather receive all of our leaders trying to do this all —— in a way that works for the global good rather than this individualistic approach. ratherthan
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rather than this individualistic approach. rather than collectible. and i pick up on that point? do you think given what miatta was suggesting that under 50s in britain — i don't know how many of us fall under that hyphen would be willing to say let's just wait, send the jabs. where do you see that suggestion? i wait, send the jabs. where do you see that suggestion?— see that suggestion? i don't think the would see that suggestion? i don't think they would be _ see that suggestion? i don't think they would be a _ see that suggestion? i don't think they would be a great _ see that suggestion? i don't think they would be a great deal- see that suggestion? i don't think they would be a great deal of- they would be a great deal of popularity for that stance, and i think— popularity for that stance, and i think there is pressure on boris johnson — think there is pressure on boris johnson to— think there is pressure on boris johnson to ensure the domestic roll-out — johnson to ensure the domestic roll-out is — johnson to ensure the domestic roll—out is completed before the uk since _ roll—out is completed before the uk since doses elsewhere. he's also given— since doses elsewhere. he's also given a _ since doses elsewhere. he's also given a lot — since doses elsewhere. he's also given a lot of money, hundreds of millions— given a lot of money, hundreds of millions of— given a lot of money, hundreds of millions of pounds to the covax programme, to help distribute vaccination technology to the poorest — vaccination technology to the poorest countries of the world. but all along, _ poorest countries of the world. but all along, the government has been clear that _ all along, the government has been clear that it — all along, the government has been clear that it will not be until the uk's _ clear that it will not be until the uk's own— clear that it will not be until the uk's own supply and programme is
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secured _ uk's own supply and programme is secured that it will think about helping — secured that it will think about helping others. realistically, i think— helping others. realistically, i think miatta made a good point about working _ think miatta made a good point about working together, but politically, it's very. — working together, but politically, it's very, very difficult for boris johnson — it's very, very difficult for boris johnson to— it's very, very difficult for boris johnson to do anything else. miatta, we know at some _ johnson to do anything else. miatta, we know at some point, _ johnson to do anything else. miatta, we know at some point, they - johnson to do anything else. miatta, we know at some point, they are - we know at some point, they are working together because they reached a joint statement. essentially said we're looking forward to the next steps, but given that we are three or four months into the post—brexit phase, what your assessment of that relationship?— your assessment of that relationship? your assessment of that relationshi? �* , , ., ., , relationship? it's strange. it was stranue relationship? it's strange. it was strange through _ relationship? it's strange. it was strange through the _ relationship? it's strange. it was strange through the process - relationship? it's strange. it was strange through the process and j strange through the process and everything since has put more pressure on it, which i think again is a huge mistake. the european union, half of our trade goes there. it is such a key partner and the key ally that we cannot afford for this relationship to be fractured. so i think a lot of work has to be put into trying to build it. from the
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uk's side, i think we're feeling the pinch of being a third party, where the eu will inevitably try to protect its interest. it'll be aggressive about doing it and we're on the side. i think given the interdependency, we need to make relationships as cordial as possible because that's the way in which we make our post—brexit settlement work. make our post-brexit settlement work. ~ �* make our post-brexit settlement work. �* ., ~ make our post-brexit settlement work. �* . ~ make our post-brexit settlement work. �* .,~' , work. we're talking about supply lines with the _ work. we're talking about supply lines with the jab, _ work. we're talking about supply lines with the jab, so _ work. we're talking about supply lines with the jab, so that's - work. we're talking about supply lines with the jab, so that's our l lines with the jab, so that's our next story. what's happening in the suez? look at the front page of the ft. the evergreen vessel. how tiny that bulldozer is, it doesn't look like it's going to get the ever green out. it's now blocking trade. lucy, what we learned about 1956,
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this is a vital choke point difficult or medically and for trade. , ., �* , difficult or medically and for trade. , ., �*, , trade. yes, that's absolutely right. 12% of trade. yes, that's absolutely right. 1296 of global— trade. yes, that's absolutely right. 1296 of global trade _ trade. yes, that's absolutely right. 1296 of global trade passes - trade. yes, that's absolutely right. 1296 of global trade passes through j 12% of global trade passes through that choke point every year. it's been _ that choke point every year. it's been described the current intercontinental traffic jam, been described the current intercontinental trafficjam, stuck intercontinental traffic jam, stuck intercontinental traffic jam, stuck in the _ intercontinental trafficjam, stuck in the throat of global commerce, and it's— in the throat of global commerce, and it's an — in the throat of global commerce, and it's an extraordinary. those pictures. — and it's an extraordinary. those pictures, the absolutely colossal taiwanese vessel with all this container— taiwanese vessel with all this container on it trying to dislodge it as it's— container on it trying to dislodge it as it's sort of crashed sideways into the — it as it's sort of crashed sideways into the banks of the canal. it really— into the banks of the canal. it really is — into the banks of the canal. it really is a _ into the banks of the canal. it really is a high—stakes game, there are 165— really is a high—stakes game, there are 165 vessels piled up, waiting to pass through that her stop at most and. pass through that her stop at most and -- _ pass through that her stop at most and. —— stuck at both ends. $10 a day is _ and. —— stuck at both ends. $10 a day is threatened by this continuing, so i think we have to see the — continuing, so i think we have to see the rescue approach. some are trying _ see the rescue approach. some are
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trying to— see the rescue approach. some are trying to remove the containers on the vessel— trying to remove the containers on the vessel in order to get

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