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tv   BBC News  BBC News  March 21, 2021 10:00am-10:31am GMT

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this is bbc world news. i'm shaun ley. our top stories. the uk government is facing more questions over whether or not people can plan forforeign holidays. the cabinet minister, ben wallace, said summer travel abroad is looking increasingly unlikely. i think it would be premature to do that, potentially risky. we are seeing growing variants and we have done a huge amount of work, the taxpayer, nhs staff, my constituency has been in lockdown since september and i do not want us to throw that away. homes washed away in australia as heavy rain and flash floods batter the east coast, thousands of people are ordered to evacuate. uk government has been warned that its decision to slash billions of dollars from its overseas aid
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budget is illegal. a snapshot of life in england, wales and northern ireland — millions of people are to take part in a once—in—a—decade census. over 1000 people allowed to ignore lockdown and social distancing restrictions to attend a music festival in the netherlands, despite the rest of the country being under lockdown. it is an experiment. hello and welcome to bbc news. the uk government is facing questions about whether or not people can plan for foreign holidays, especially to european destinations, over the summer. the cabinet minister, ben wallace, has insisted that the uk needs to preserve the gains of its covid—i9 vaccination campaign "at all costs".
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more than half of all adults in the uk have now received their first coronavirus vaccine. but there is concern about the threat of imported cases, as areas of continental europe face a third wave of infections, and we have learned in poland a rise of 97% in just one week of infections.— of 97% in just one week of infections. a , , it's been a record—breaking week in the uk, at least as far as covid vaccines are concerned. on friday, more than 711,000 doses were administered to the public. that means more than half of the uk's adult population have now received their first jab. the government says the vaccination programme is a phenomenal achievement and it insists it's on track to offer shots to all of the over—50s by mid—april. the vaccination programme is our route out of the pandemic, it will help us to protect people. we know these vaccines protect you but we also know they protect those around you and make it less likely that others, your loved ones,
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will catch coronavirus. for all of us, they are our route out so i am delighted so many people are coming forward and getting the jab. over the past year, the uk has suffered the highest death toll in europe. now numbers of infections and deaths are dropping. but in parts of mainland europe, the virus is reasserting its grip. in response, parts of poland and france have reintroduced partial lockdowns. preventing those different variants of covid entering the uk has led to a warning from scientists that holidays overseas this summer are extremely unlikely. if we were doing better with the vaccination campaign in the eu the story might be different in terms of where we are able to travel. i think it has been hugely damaging in the eu, really mixed messaging. the key thing to me is, we need as many people as possible
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to take the vaccines as rapidly as possible so we can get to high levels of protection rapidly so we can open up, which hopefully in the longer term will include travelling internationally again. it is notjust holiday—makers who want to travel, those with families living abroad are keen to swap online chat for the real thing. a traffic light system is possible, where travellers are given the green light to visit less risky countries while others remain on red. john mcmanus, bbc news. the defence secretary also urged the european commission to meet its obligations over vaccine exports. 0ur political correspondent, jonathan blake is here and was watching these appearances. the mail on sunday has a front page saying europe is holding the uk to
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hostage. presumably the government does not want that kind of rhetoric at this stage. since those comments which have been interpreted as a threat of banning exports of vaccines to the uk, anger at that. it has been said in comments that she should explain herself. the uk needs further assurances that the eu isn't going to stop vaccines crossing from eu countries into the uk both the
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european commission and united kingdom should live up to their obligations. the kingdom should live up to their obligations-_ kingdom should live up to their obliuations. , ., , ., obligations. the eu stands for the rule of lava _ obligations. the eu stands for the rule of law. we _ obligations. the eu stands for the rule of law. we heard _ obligations. the eu stands for the rule of law. we heard her- obligations. the eu stands for the rule of law. we heard her say - obligations. the eu stands for the i rule of law. we heard her say about observing _ rule of law. we heard her say about observing international treaties. we should _ observing international treaties. we should all_ observing international treaties. we should all abide by our contracts, we are _ should all abide by our contracts, we are legally obliged, but the supplier— we are legally obliged, but the supplier and the purchaser. i think the european commission also recognises the world is watching. what _ recognises the world is watching. what are — recognises the world is watching. what are the values of the eu which they profess? if you see this type of language being employed by the commission, it will be counter—productive. the vaccine is a collaborative — counter—productive. the vaccine is a collaborative approach, astrazeneca has supply chain in europe and indie — has supply chain in europe and india. trying to build walls around this would — india. trying to build walls around this would damage both eu citizens and the _ this would damage both eu citizens and the united kingdom. this this would damage both eu citizens and the united kingdom.— and the united kingdom. this is of course crucial _ and the united kingdom. this is of course crucial because _ and the united kingdom. this is of course crucial because the - and the united kingdom. this is ofj course crucial because the roll-out course crucial because the roll—out of vaccines and successful administration in the uk and everywhere is a key factor in getting right back to normal and allowing governments here and across
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europe and around the world to lift restrictions being put in place and allow travel and all other normal behaviour to resume. and that is why this row i think has been such a flashpoint because there is so much at stake. the uk is looking for reassurances as to what the eu is going through. 0ne reassurances as to what the eu is going through. one of the commissioners speaking on the andrew marr programme who held out the possibility that the eu could stop vaccines being sent from the eu to the uk. it vaccines being sent from the eu to the uk. , , the uk. it is interesting the reaction to _ the uk. it is interesting the reaction to facts _ the uk. it is interesting the reaction to facts put - the uk. it is interesting the reaction to facts put on - the uk. it is interesting the reaction to facts put on the | the uk. it is interesting the - reaction to facts put on the table this week— reaction to facts put on the table this week because the eu, as i heard from your— this week because the eu, as i heard from your contributors, are being accused _ from your contributors, are being accused of— from your contributors, are being accused of vaccine nationalism. we could _ accused of vaccine nationalism. we could he _ accused of vaccine nationalism. we could be accused of vaccine internationalism because we have exported — internationalism because we have exported to 31 countries including the uk _ exported to 31 countries including the uk. what is important this week, there _ the uk. what is important this week, there is— the uk. what is important this week, there is an _ the uk. what is important this week, there is an increase in infections across— there is an increase in infections across europe, alarming for
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everyone. _ across europe, alarming for everyone, but the leaders will meet this week, — everyone, but the leaders will meet this week, make an assessment of the current— this week, make an assessment of the current situation about the roll—out of vaccines — current situation about the roll—out of vaccines and perhaps make decisions _ of vaccines and perhaps make decisions. its of vaccines and perhaps make decisions— of vaccines and perhaps make decisions. . , , , ., decisions. as the president of the commission _ decisions. as the president of the commission said _ decisions. as the president of the commission said herself, - decisions. as the president of the i commission said herself, everything is on the table but there is no decision. interesting listening to right mcguinness. she was keen to play down the row over northern ireland and aware of the sensitivities of that issue. i suppose that is complicating the vaccine thing. —— mairead mcguinness. what about whether people can hope to travel abroad, particularly to europe, in the summer?— particularly to europe, in the summer? ' ., , ., ,, , summer? the 17th of may is one key date. the summer? the 17th of may is one key date- the stage _ summer? the 17th of may is one key date. the stage in _ summer? the 17th of may is one key date. the stage in the _ summer? the 17th of may is one key date. the stage in the road - summer? the 17th of may is one key date. the stage in the road map - summer? the 17th of may is one key date. the stage in the road map out| date. the stage in the road map out of lockdown in england where the government has said helpful international travel will be allowed. i think it was interesting
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and probably enlightening to hear gran shapps de transport secretary said yesterday that state was at the very earliest. the government has always said it will be at its earliest. and the 12 april, the government's foreign travel task force is going to report back on when, how and under what restrictions people might be able to travel after that date in may. 0ne plan under consideration we understand as a traffic light system, countries graded according to how widely the vaccine has been rolled out to those countries and coronavirus case rates as well. for now the big question everyone is asking, can i, should i book a foreign holiday this summer and be able to go? if you look at what is happening in europe, in european countries, and the transport
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secretary alluded to this as well, it is just as important as what is happening here. we are seeing rising cash rates in many countries and the reimposition of measures. it is important to bear in mind. 0ne important to bear in mind. one person not packing her suitcase is labour's shadow foreign secretary lisa nandi. i labour's shadow foreign secretary lisa nandi. ~ ., , ., labour's shadow foreign secretary lisa nandi. ~ ., i. , lisa nandi. i know everyone is desperate _ lisa nandi. i know everyone is desperate to _ lisa nandi. i know everyone is desperate to go _ lisa nandi. i know everyone is desperate to go on _ lisa nandi. i know everyone is desperate to go on holiday - lisa nandi. i know everyone is| desperate to go on holiday but lisa nandi. i know everyone is - desperate to go on holiday but we have to _ desperate to go on holiday but we have to proceed with caution, we cannot— have to proceed with caution, we cannot allow the good work to be unravelled by unlocking too quickly or try— unravelled by unlocking too quickly or by failing to secure our borders, we have _ or by failing to secure our borders, we have seen problems with that in the past _ we have seen problems with that in the past -- — we have seen problems with that in the past. —— lisa nandy. i have been travelled _ the past. —— lisa nandy. i have been travelled tov— the past. —— lisa nandy. i have been travelled by the fact the prime minister— travelled by the fact the prime minister privately seems to be sent to some _ minister privately seems to be sent to some of— minister privately seems to be sent to some of his rebels he is keen to -et to some of his rebels he is keen to get this— to some of his rebels he is keen to get this done quickly. we need to be careful _ get this done quickly. we need to be careful we — get this done quickly. we need to be careful. we need to be cautious. frankly. — careful. we need to be cautious. frankly. i— careful. we need to be cautious. frankly, i have not booked a foreign holiday— frankly, i have not booked a foreign holiday for— frankly, i have not booked a foreign holiday for the summer and will not be holiday for the summer and will not he doing _ holiday for the summer and will not he doing so— holiday for the summer and will not be doing so because i do not think we are _ be doing so because i do not think we are there yet. lots be doing so because i do not think we are there yet.— be doing so because i do not think we are there yet. lots of caution in government _ we are there yet. lots of caution in government at _ we are there yet. lots of caution in government at the _ we are there yet. lots of caution in government at the approach - we are there yet. lots of caution in government at the approach to - government at the approach to foreign travel. i do not think there is any chance we are going to see
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the road map accelerated out of lockdown. still hope that people will be allowed to go on holiday abroad this summer but by no means guaranteed. i abroad this summer but by no means uuaranteed. , , abroad this summer but by no means guaranteed-— guaranteed. i guess anyone should make very sure _ guaranteed. i guess anyone should make very sure if— guaranteed. i guess anyone should make very sure if they _ guaranteed. i guess anyone should make very sure if they are - guaranteed. i guess anyone should make very sure if they are going i guaranteed. i guess anyone should make very sure if they are going to j make very sure if they are going to go ahead anyway they have the appropriate insurance cover. lots of lovely places to go to in terms of a staycation. now we have rush on the bookings for wigan? not a bad place to go. tens of thousands of people have taken part in anti—lockdown protests across several european countries — including the uk, germany, austria and poland. but infections are on the rise as a third wave begins to sweep the continent — in poland there were 21,849 new cases reported today — a 27% rise from the number reported one week ago. infections are on the rise
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as a third wave begins to sweep the continent but there are signs of growing frustration as many nations reintroduce lockdown measures to control the coronavirus pandemic. let's talk about the rising number of coronavirus cases in europe. joining me is from professor stephen reicher, a behavioural scientist who advises the uk government as part of sage(0s) who advises the uk government as part of sage. lots of this is about human behaviour. a why we are seeing the third wave. and how best to persuade people to maintain lockdown or how you can elucidate without undermining the achievements but in a way that reflects the fact that after a year people are really running out of patience. thea;r running out of patience. they certainly are. _ running out of patience. they certainly are. at _ running out of patience. they certainly are. at the - running out of patience. tie: certainly are. at the beginning running out of patience. he certainly are. at the beginning we talked a lot about behavioural fatigue, thinking people would be
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tired and give up. what we have discovered is that people are of course tired, fed up with this and want to get out, but people have shown remarkable resilience in not giving up but abiding by the restrictions. in many ways that is why we are in a relatively favourable position, certainly in the uk. if you look at the figures of lockdown, it is because people put up with huge inconveniences and sacrifices, that infection levels have come down and things are looking relatively rosy with the vaccine. the key point is, we have got here because we have worked at it. it has not happened of its own accord, the virus does not simply go away. we have to remain vigilant, work at it, if we do that we can be helpful. if we suddenly believe it has gone away, we can relax and socialise again, the sad thing is that it will come back and it will bite you. that is precisely in part what has happened in europe. in part
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due to the variance, in part biological, in part when the who did this point a couple of weeks ago when the infection rate started rising in europe, in part because of the relaxation of restrictions. if you wantjust one message from the past year, if you are complacent, you past year, if you are complacent, y°u pay past year, if you are complacent, you pay for it. past year, if you are complacent, you pay for it— you pay for it. very pithy and accurate _ you pay for it. very pithy and accurate can _ you pay for it. very pithy and accurate can be _ you pay for it. very pithy and accurate can be given - you pay for it. very pithy and accurate can be given on - you pay for it. very pithy and accurate can be given on the | you pay for it. very pithy and - accurate can be given on the basis of what we have seen, you only have to look at the new figures from poland in the last 2a hours, if you relax your god, the virus finds ways in. the problem with that is, the difficulty in this sense it is we do not know if it is tomorrow, next week, month, year or maybe never. tt week, month, year or maybe never. if you look at it differently, if you say to people we are going to open up say to people we are going to open up all of these dates, people are passive. they have nothing to do,
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all they can do is wait. if it opens up all they can do is wait. if it opens up fine, if not despair. 0r all they can do is wait. if it opens up fine, if not despair. or you can say to the public, we want to open up say to the public, we want to open up on these dates. they are under review. this is what we can do to make it likely, this is what the government and the public can do. you make the public and active participant, give them a sense of efficacy, agency, that is good for your mental health and bringing the infection is down. the danger of saying just wait and it will be fine is you create a passive public and we need an active partnership between the public and the government in driving infections down. figs government in driving infections down. �* , government in driving infections down. a ., ,, , down. as ever, professor stephen reicher, thank _ down. as ever, professor stephen reicher, thank you. _ thousands of people in sydney could be ordered to evacuate as parts of australia's biggest city are hit by a once—in—a—50—year weather event. torrential rains and powerful winds are expected to continue in the state of new south wales until late next week, with floods not expected to subside until thursday. from sydney, phil mercer reports.
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in new south wales, officials had warned sydney was potentially facing a rain ball. there was a been turned into likes. emergency crews have been responding to hundreds of calls for help. —— turned into likes. suburbs are at risk of flooding. taste suburbs are at risk of flooding. we wor suburbs are at risk of flooding. - worry about do we escape or stay here. so what about now? we prepare my handbag and some things, ready to move. we my handbag and some things, ready to move. ~ ., , my handbag and some things, ready to move. ~ . , ., ., move. we are 'ust inundated at the moment. the — move. we are just inundated at the moment. the water _ move. we are just inundated at the moment. the water is _ move. we are just inundated at the moment. the water is still - move. we are just inundated at the moment. the water is still rising, l moment. the water is still rising, about— moment. the water is still rising, about one — moment. the water is still rising, about one foot in the last hour. this— about one foot in the last hour. this is— about one foot in the last hour. this is the _ about one foot in the last hour. this is the worst i have seen it. last _ this is the worst i have seen it. last year— this is the worst i have seen it. last yearjust after christmas it
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was pretty bad as well but not this bad. ., , ., , .,, was pretty bad as well but not this bad. ., , ., , ., bad. lots of people might not get their houses _ bad. lots of people might not get their houses flooded _ bad. lots of people might not get their houses flooded but - bad. lots of people might not get their houses flooded but will - bad. lots of people might not get their houses flooded but will not. their houses flooded but will not get to work, the roads will be wrecked. �* . .,, , get to work, the roads will be wrecked. ~ . .,, , get to work, the roads will be wrecked. a . ., , wrecked. across new south wales, australia's most _ wrecked. across new south wales, australia's most populous - wrecked. across new south wales, australia's most populous state, i australia's most populous state, residents in many low—lying areas have been told to leave. communities to the north of sydney have been badly affected. in to the north of sydney have been badly affected.— to the north of sydney have been badly affected. in parts of the mid and north coast _ badly affected. in parts of the mid and north coast regions _ badly affected. in parts of the mid and north coast regions which - badly affected. in parts of the mid and north coast regions which are j and north coast regions which are experiencing a one in 100 year event there has been sustained damage to infrastructure, to help people communicate and move around. everyone in new south wales who is experiencing that fear and anxiety that our thoughts are with you and we will get assistance to you as soon as we can.— we will get assistance to you as soon as we can. eight town saw a house down _ soon as we can. eight town saw a house down the _ soon as we can. eight town saw a house down the river _ soon as we can. eight town saw a house down the river by - soon as we can. eight town saw a house down the river by flood - house down the river by flood waters. the owners will never forget it, they were supposed to get married but the bride and groom were kept apart the floods. the wild weather has delayed the roll—out of
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covid vaccinations. more storms are expected in the next few days. phil mercer, bbc news, sydney. a court in pakistan has sentenced two men to death for a rape which triggered public outrage. abid malhi and shafqat ali bagga attacked the pakistani—french woman when she was stranded in her car on the side of a motorway — with her two children. police had questioned why she was alone so late at night. these comments sparked a public outcry — with thousands of women demanding justice and better protection for women. thousands of people are continuing to protest against the self—imposed military rule in myanmar — despite escalating violence. videos uploaded to social media show large crowds of people in the country's capital — naypyitaw — fleeing from live ammunition. according to the un, at least 149 people have died
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since the 1st of february — though the actual figure is thought to be much higher. the uk government has been warned that its decision to slash billions of dollars from its overseas aid budget is illegal. britain's former top prosecutor ken mcdonald said the commitment to meet a un target of spending 0.7% of national income on foreign aid was enshrined in domestic law. 0ur diplomatic correspondent, james landale told us more about the case. it comes down to the international development act, existing law. the government says this allows for the target of 0.7% of national income on aid every year to be missed. but this judgment says yes, you can miss it inadvertently, by mistake, and come to parliament and explain why you made the mistake and what you will do to correct it. what the judgment says is what you cannot do is say, we are going to miss the target in future deliberately. we will reduce it down to 0.5.
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lord mcdonald says you cannot do that, only if you put new legislation through parliament and that is why it is unlawful. it's census day today in england, wales and northern ireland. not in scotland. households are obliged to provide background details for every adult and child. the once a decade count provides useful information on uk society for the government and other organisations providing key services. the census in scotland has been delayed until 2022. a music festival is going ahead in the netherlands this weekend, despite the rest of the country being under lockdown. the two—day event is an experiment to see whether there's a safe way to allow large social gatherings without increasing the spread of coronavirus. our correspondent anna holligan is in biddinghuizen, near amsterdam.
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it might not seem the fastest way to get through the lockdown but the scientists involved in this festival, some of them are advising the dutch government's strategy. they believe the science and technology trial tear could help us get back to doing the things we love without putting vulnerable people at risk. ,, . without putting vulnerable people at risk, ,, ., ., , ., 4' without putting vulnerable people at risk. ,, . ., ,, ., risk. surreal as it might work, a reminder of— risk. surreal as it might work, a reminder of what _ risk. surreal as it might work, a reminder of what life _ risk. surreal as it might work, a reminder of what life was - risk. surreal as it might work, a reminder of what life was once l risk. surreal as it might work, a i reminder of what life was once like and an opportunity to pilot a way back to this. i was really happy, we can go party again. back to this. i was really happy, we can go party again-— can go party again. what does it feel like? euphoric! _ can go party again. what does it feel like? euphoric! 1500 - can go party again. what does itj feel like? euphoric! 1500 people mana . ed feel like? euphoric! 1500 people managed to _ feel like? euphoric! 1500 people managed to get _ feel like? euphoric! 1500 people managed to get a _ feel like? euphoric! 1500 people managed to get a ticket - feel like? euphoric! 1500 people managed to get a ticket for - feel like? euphoric! 1500 people managed to get a ticket for this | feel like? euphoric! 1500 people . managed to get a ticket for this and everyone here had to show a negative test before being allowed in.
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everyone is meant to be wearing a mask and as you can see they are not. eitherthey mask and as you can see they are not. either they have not realised or do not care. the risk with an event like this is when people stop following the rules that could potentially affect everyone outside this control environment. soon they were all mixing and the masks had mostly vanished.— were all mixing and the masks had mostly vanished. once you are into the mood of— mostly vanished. once you are into the mood of dancing _ mostly vanished. once you are into the mood of dancing and _ mostly vanished. once you are into the mood of dancing and partying, | the mood of dancing and partying, they fly away in no time. they become a party hat. as all these people are tested and no negatives, of course this is not a normal situation. you have to see them as test bunnies during an experiment. this is not normal life. there will be people who think it is unethical to use these young people like guinea pigs. what do you say to them? mil guinea pigs. what do you say to them? �* , guinea pigs. what do you say to them? . , . , guinea pigs. what do you say to them? . , . ., them? all these participants know there is a minor _ them? all these participants know there is a minor risk. _ them? all these participants know there is a minor risk. they - them? all these participants know there is a minor risk. they are -
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them? all these participants know| there is a minor risk. they are well aware of it. we believe we can see the risk is not much higher than staying at home.— the risk is not much higher than staying at home. these are motion sensors designed _ staying at home. these are motion sensors designed to _ staying at home. these are motion sensors designed to track - staying at home. these are motion sensors designed to track the - staying at home. these are motion | sensors designed to track the group dynamics, and the government is paying for the scientific research. this event will inevitably raise eyebrows and questions about how ethical bases, especially when neighbouring nations are locking down. here in the netherlands the infection rate has gone up by 25% since last week. in what sense is this valuable when the risks are still so great?— still so great? yes, it will only rive us still so great? yes, it will only give us the — still so great? yes, it will only give us the data _ still so great? yes, it will only give us the data to _ still so great? yes, it will only give us the data to reopen - still so great? yes, it will only give us the data to reopen thej give us the data to reopen the society if you plan it right, you can do safe things. this society if you plan it right, you can do safe things.— society if you plan it right, you can do safe things. this is not an unsafe event. _ can do safe things. this is not an unsafe event. the _ can do safe things. this is not an unsafe event. the entertainment industry in the netherlands and around the world has been shut down by measures to stop our social interactions. the isolation has huge
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consequences, for businesses and our mental health. those pictures might be disconcerting to see, especially when you know they are in a country where there is still an average of 6000 new infections daily. what you are looking at you could be a picture of festivals in the future. what we are standing on is a covid test, people picked out of the crowd and taken here to check their negative tests are accurate. if this event can take place safely it will be used as evidence that these types of big gatherings can take place again in a covid secure way. people may think it is fun what you are doing, but it must be agony to watch everyone else having fun and you cannot go anywhere near and take part in the experiment. it is cannot go anywhere near and take part in the experiment. it is rather disconcerting _ part in the experiment. it is rather disconcerting to _ part in the experiment. it is rather disconcerting to start _ part in the experiment. it is rather
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disconcerting to start with! - part in the experiment. it is rather disconcerting to start with! peoplej disconcerting to start with! people seem to slip back into normal quite quickly, actually. seem to slip back into normal quite quickly. actually-— quickly, actually. keep safe, anna holliuan. the duke of cambridge has praised the work of those tackling the pandemic in countries caught up in war, calling them "incredible heroes. " prince william joined a video call with syrian aid workers who have received funding from countries, including the uk, to help vulnerable people affected by a decade of conflict. the duke told the workers he was "overwhelmed" by the scale of the burden they face. at a time when there are restrictions on travel for most of us, wales has found itself welcoming an unexpected visitor. a giant walrus has been spotted in pembrokeshire, thousands of miles from its home in the arctic circle. it is thought the animal may have been the same one that was spotted off the coast of county kerry in ireland last week. biologists believe there's a chance it fell asleep on an iceberg and was then carried south. blimey, a hangover and a half. at
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least it is wales, beautiful at this time of year, you are watching bbc news. try out there today and a largely dry and quite start to the week ahead. expect to see more rain and wind particularly towards the north and west of the country, southern and west of the country, southern and eastern areas will stay largely dry. that shows a nicely on our mental chart. you will notice the lack of blue in eastern areas, an indication of that continuing dry team. try today because we have high pressure in charge, feeling cooler, the cold front pushing through during the night, not much rain but more northerly winds and a slightly
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cooler feel. more northerly winds and a slightly coolerfeel. you more northerly winds and a slightly cooler feel. you will notice the colour flew across the east of england, we got into the mid—teens in terms of temperature. the cloud continuing to break up for many and most of you will see sunny spells through the day, longest of which across southern scotland, parts of north—west england, the wind also lighter. temperatures down on what we have seen over the last few days, pleasant in the sunshine, chilly again in east anglia and parts of kent, 7—8. into the evening and overnight, temperatures dropping a little further with clear skies, mist and fog patches and a greater chance of some frost. avoiding the first in the far north of scotland, outbreaks of rain here, towns and cities just above freezing but knock a few degrees of that in the suburbs and countryside, frost for the new week is a risk. the air coming up from the atlantic across scotland and northern ireland, more of a breeze through monday and the chance to thicker cloud will bring spots of rain every now and again. the emphasis for most on monday, dry and
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the varying amounts of cloud, sunny spells, brighter days in the east and not as chilly as the wind goes south west, not getting the wind off the chilly sea. they went from the south—west picking up on tuesday, dry for most on tuesday, sunny spells towards the south and east, and the weather fronts vision eastwards as we go through tuesday into wednesday. rain at times through the rest of the week. could be wintry during friday's temperature drop, further south than staying largely dry.
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this is bbc news, the headlines: the uk government is facing more questions over whether or not people can plan forforeign holidays. the cabinet minister, ben wallace said summer travel abroad is looking increasingly unlikely. i think it would be premature to do
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that, potentially risky. we are seeing growing variants and we have done a huge amount of work, the taxpayer, nhs staff, my constituency has been in lockdown since september and i do not want us to throw that away. homes washed away in australia as heavy rain and flash floods batter the east coast, thousands of people are ordered to evacuate. the uk government has been warned that its decision to slash billions of dollars from its overseas aid budget is illegal. a snapshot of life in england, wales and northern ireland — millions of people are to take part in a once—in—a—decade census. over a thousand people allowed to ignore lockdown and social distancing restrictions to attend a music festival in the netherlands, despite the rest of the country being under lockdown. now on bbc news, highlights from this year's bbc young reporter competition with kasiha madera.

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