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tv   BBC News  BBC News  March 20, 2021 9:00pm-9:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. thousands of people take part in protests across europe, against coronavirus lockdown measures. france tightens its coronavirus restrictions — more than 21 million people are now subject to tougher conditions as parts of europe deal with a third wave of the virus. but cases remain low in the uk — as the government confirms more than half the adult population have now had at least one vaccinationjab. also ahead — parts of australia's eastern coast suffer flash floods — thousands of people are moved to safety. a volcano erupts south—west of iceland's capital, reykjavik — the first eruption in that area of iceland for 800 years. and in sport, wales are battling for the grand slam in rugby's six nations.
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we'll have the best of the day's action. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. there are signs of growing frustration across europe as many nations reintroduce lockdown measures to control the coronavirus pandemic. infections are on the rise as a third wave threatens to sweep the continent. delays in the eu vaccine program have not helped. today there were protests in poland, where a new lockdown has come into force, after a sharp rise in cases. there were also angry demonstrations in vienna too, with many frustrated protestors calling for chancellor sebastian kurz to step down.
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this protest took place in finland, which has more than 70,000 confirmed cases and 800 deaths so far. and german police used pepper spray during clashes in the northern city of kassel — another city where demonstrators are angry about covid—linked restrictions. germany is battling a sharp rise in infections despite months of strict rules. 0ur berlin correspondent, damian mcguinness is following developments. anti—restrictions demos in germany have become a common site over the past year, really. and we saw the high point last summer where, strangely, the lockdown measures were relatively late in the pandemic ——the lockdown measures were relatively light, and the pandemic was seen as quite under control here in germany. but what we have seen over the past few months is quite a change in mood across the country. now, these particular demonstrations are a mix of people. so you have all sorts of people from far right groups to just people
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who don't agree with this government, right through to anti—vaccination campaigners, even a few people there who don't even believe covid—19 exists, and then other people with more moderate views. so a real broad range, a large demo, about 20,000 people, clashes with police. i think what we are seeing is this particular demo, and these demos across the country here in germany are not really representative of mainstream feeling. because mainstream feeling is not so much angry at the restrictions, but angry at the very slow vaccine roll—out. many people, in fact, think it's wrong of the government to start loosening restrictions in some areas, which is also happening at the same time, quite a confusing situation here in germany. and i think what brings a lot of people together now, the majority probably in germany, is a generalfeeling that the government doesn't really have control of the situation and whether you think the restrictions should be harsher or looser, the government is losing popularity, and certainly that is the case for angela merkel�*s conservative party, which is not good news, considering we have an election year in six months�* time. the protests across europe come on the day france increased its restrictions, following a recent surge in new coronavirus infections.
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france has re—introduced a partial lockdown, affecting some 21 million people in 16 areas — including the capital paris. here's our correspondent hugh schofield. if you went out today, as i did commit didn't feel that different in the streets of paris. the park near me has plenty of people in it, we're all wearing masks and so on, but people bring their children out for walks and so on, because there is actually no limit to the amount of time you can spend outside as long as you are taking exercise. what you can't do is go and have a picnic with loads of people on the grass, but you can exercise. i think beneath the surface, there is a big psychological burden nonetheless in all of this, partly because we can't leave paris, people can't travel outside of the area thatis can't travel outside of the area that is in lockdown now. partly come there is this bureaucratic which,
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means, again, if you leave the home, you have to have this of paper or a web document to justify why you are out. it's the sort of feeling that every time you go out for me might be accosted by a police officer and told to, or asked why you are out of the house. that weighs on people, i think, but above all, there is this sense, i think despite the fact that in many ways, life today is no worse thanit in many ways, life today is no worse than it was yesterday, it is not getting better, and it should be. the restaurants, cafes, there is no prospect of them opening now in weeks or even, well, for another couple of months, maybe. we were all hoping that the end was coming. i think that really is what weighs on people, that exactly a year, exactly one year to the day after the first lockdown, it's coming again. it's like a trend. poland is also back in a form of lockdown as adam easton in warsaw explains. poland, in terms of the numbers, is seeing its third coronavirus wave, and it is seeing
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the infection rate accelerate. we are seeing cases that have reached levels that haven't been seen since november, the peak of the second wave, so i think there is acceptance in society there should be some restrictions. previously we have had regional restrictions and from today they are nationwide. and it is partly because of the prevalence of the british variant, which is rampant in poland at the moment and is responsible for more than 60% of all cases and soon will be responsible for 80% of cases, so i think there is a feeling among society that we should have some restrictions. at the same time, the health industry is warning that there is also a feeling that restrictions are not being adhered to. there is a feeling amongst some people that covid has been tamed to some extent, and people have become accustomed to it, so you have this double phenomenon going on where people expect to be restrictions with the number being so high again,
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here in the uk, officialfigures show there have been a record number of coronavirus vaccinations. the health secretary says half of all adults have now had at least one vaccine dose. in the latest 2a hour period alone — nearly 600,000 people had theirfirstjab. that brings the total nationally to more than 26.8 million. and just over 2.1 million people have now had both doses of the vaccine. here's the uk's health secretary, matt hancock. the vaccination programme is our route out of the pandemic. it will help us to protect people and we know that these vaccines protect you, but we also know that they protect those around you. let's take a look at some of the other stories making the news. 11 people, who were being investigated by the maltese journalist daphne caruana galizia before her murder, have appeared in court in valletta. they face charges of money laundering, corruption and fraud. among the accused is keith schembri, the chief of staff to the former
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prime minister of malta. he denies any wrongdoing. thai police have used water cannon, tier gas and rubber bullets against an anti—government demonstration in bangkok. the violence came after demonstrators broke through a barricade of shipping containers protecting the royal palace. many of the protesters want to reduce the monarchy�*s influence in thai politics. a court in pakistan has sentenced two men to death for raping a woman on the side of a highway last year. the attack on the woman, in front of her children, after her car had run out of fuel triggered nationwide protests. the two men, named as abid malhi and shafqat hussain, were convicted of rape, kidnapping, robbery and terrorism. turkey has pulled out of its landmark global convention aimed at combatting violence against women. europe's top human rights body, the council of europe, has called it a huge set back for the protection of women in and outside the country. people have taken to the streets
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to protest the decision. the istanbul convention requires governments to put in place national laws against abuse including marital rape and female genital mutilation. the bbc�*s 0rla guerin reports from istanbul. well, there is plenty of anger among the crowd here. these protesters believe that this change is going to drag them and turkey back in time and deprive them of key rights and freedoms. they have been pledging that they will resist, but in turkey these days, there isn't much space for resistance. turkey's main opposition party has summed things up like this, saying that "women will now be kept as class and will be left to be killed." ——saying that "women will now be kept as second class citizen and will be left to be killed." some of the protesters in the crowd have been carrying photographs of women who have been killed,
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or placards with the names of women who were victims of violence. and according to one women's rights group, last year alone here in turkey, around 300 women were killed, and they say the numbers have been increasing. the government has given no explanation for this. it was done by way of a decree issued in the dead of night. 0ne minister has said that turkey's own laws and its constitution are sufficient to protect women. but the reaction to the council of europe has been one of horror. it says that this will set back the cause of women, notjust in turkey but also in europe. well, there is a considerable security presence here. the police are lined up, water cannon are at the ready. but so far the demonstration has been peaceful, although the feeling, the mood, is very much one of anger. emergency authorities in australia are warning of "life—threatening" flash flooding as storms batter parts of the east coast. evacuation orders are in place in many low—lying areas, and residents in sydney,
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australia's most populous city, have been told to stay home. david campa nale reports. the aftermath of significant record—breaking rainfall in new south wales. got to go around to the other side of the car now to get the other patient out. across australia's most populous state, dozens of people have been rescued from floodwaters, and residents in many low—lying communities ordered to leave. major highways have been closed and wild surf is battering the coast. more storms are forecast in the coming days and parts of eastern australia could receive up to a metre of rain in the space ofjust a week. officials say sydney is facing what they are calling a rain bomb. the main water reservoir though has overflowed for the first time in years as the city of 5 million braces for what's coming next.
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i hate to say this again to all our citizens of this state, but it's not going to be an easy week for us. but i know that no matter what comes our way, we'll be able to deal with it. the federal government said the extreme weather has affected its covid—i9 vaccine delivery in sydney and throughout the state, but said delays should only last a few days. australia plans to deliver the first vaccine doses to almost 6 million people over the next few weeks. david campanale, bbc news. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. manchester city or into the semi finals after a late 2—0 win over everton keeping alive their hopes of what would be an unprecedented quadruple of trophies this season. they had to wait until six minutes from time for the first goal. cashing in after the effort came back after bar. with everton then chasing a much—needed equaliser, kevin brenner was able to break
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through everton�*s defence and settled the tie just before the finals. it's an incredible achievement arriving at this stage in especially in the premier league and the position we are. so, in this period, we play for three or four days, no rest, so we could not enjoy every game. so it's incredible, the results, what we have done. in every game, we compute, we compute, and thatis game, we compute, we compute, and that is why it's time to celebrate. southampton are also through after beating bournemouth 3—0. a big part to play in all of the goals, and setting him up for the first, then produced a brilliant solo run and finish to put their primarily troubles hide them, they were firmly in control at half—time. he reacted well to seal their place at wembley. elsewhere in europe, robin scored a first—half hat trick as ten byron buick slashed it to move four points clear at the top of the table. it
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takes is tally this ease into an astonishing 42 goals, 4—0 was the final score, elsewhere, astonishing 42 goals, 4—0 was the finalscore, elsewhere, on astonishing 42 goals, 4—0 was the final score, elsewhere, on saturday, dortmund drew with their opponent. two goals, injury time strike helping real madrid to a 3—1 win over celtic. that moves them up to second in spain's la liga. leaders athletic 0n barcelona play on sunday. whales are in six nations action against france in paris at the moment, wales hoping to go through the whole tournament unbeaten, standing in their way, though, strong from sight hoping to secure the title themselves for the first time in ii secure the title themselves for the first time in 11 years. it's proving something of a thriller. into the second half at the moment, it is whales who are edging it. 20 points to 17. some of the results today, england beaten and slipping to defeat against ireland in dublin. the third defeat of the championship, that leaves them second bottom. scotland running in eight tries as they beat italy and
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still to play their postponed match with france following an outbreak in the french camp next week. there will be no overseas fans at the summer's delay tokyo 0lympics will be no overseas fans at the summer's delay tokyo olympics and fairly big games after organisers announced they would not be permitted. the decision comes amid widespread concerns among the japanese public with continuing uncertainty surrounding the coronavirus pandemic. the british limbic association said it would be very sad a family and friends of athletes were not allowed to travel. —— the british olympic association. i really feel sorry for this situation, but it is necessary decision_ situation, but it is necessary decision because we have to respect the safety— decision because we have to respect the safety of all the participants and the — the safety of all the participants and the website from the very beginning that organising these postponed olympic games in this situation, — postponed olympic games in this situation, often still ongoing pandemic will require sacrifices
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from _ pandemic will require sacrifices from everybody.— pandemic will require sacrifices from everybody. pandemic will require sacrifices from eve bod . ., , ., . from everybody. india produced their best effort 20/20 — from everybody. india produced their best effort 20/20 score _ from everybody. india produced their best effort 20/20 score against - best effort 20/20 score against england to win the fifth and final match in a meta— bad to take the series 3—2. it provides a timely boost ahead of the world cup there in october. the host put into bat they for two post office skipper making an unbeaten 80, england switching from 130 to one 2112 for five. staff, the teams now face each other in 31—day matches to come. before we go, a reminder of a special tribute on the bbc sport website and a two leeds united all times record goal—scorer who has died at the age of 7a. for now, that's all for me. john, thanks very much. a volcano in south—west iceland has erupted, releasing streams of lava from under the earth's surface. the fissure, 30 kilometres from the capital, reykjavik, is more than 500 metres long. it's the first eruption in the area in centuries and follows thousands of small earthquakes over recent weeks.
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0ur europe correspondent jean mackenzie visited the volcano last week. the lava bursting through a long crack in the earth's crust, the moment icelanders have been bracing for turns into a spectacle, rather than a threat. translation: the nation has been waiting with bated breath _ for three weeks for this to happen and it's been 15 months since seismic activity began increasing significantly on the peninsula. since the activity ratcheted up three weeks ago, iceland has recorded more than 50,000 earthquakes, a sign this eruption was imminent. we visited the volcanic area just 20 miles from the capital reykjavik last week. the eruption is going to happen most likelyjust beyond that ridge. this island — which straddles two tectonic plates — is used to eruptions. but not here, this area has sat
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dormant for centuries. this is very different to the explosive eruption in 2010 that blanketed the skies of europe in ash for weeks. the biggest threat this time is the pollution from the gases released. with residents being asked to keep their windows shut. translation: people have been growing tired of the significant i earthquakes that are constantly keeping us awake, there's been growing anxiety and some residents said, if there's going to be an eruption, it might as welljust happen. icelanders have nicknamed the pretty eruptions "tourist eruptions" but with no tourists around to witness this one, it is the locals who get to marvel at their latest geological wonder. jean mackenzie, bbc news. let's get more on this — dave mcgarvie, a volcanologist at lancaster university, joins me from edinburgh. thank you so much for being with us
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on bbc news. ijust want to pick up on bbc news. ijust want to pick up on the point thatjean was making there, it has been called a tourist eruption. is it safe for people to go and watch the spectacle? it is indeed. go and watch the spectacle? it is indeed- it's _ go and watch the spectacle? it is indeed. it's one _ go and watch the spectacle? it is indeed. it's one of _ go and watch the spectacle? it 3 indeed. it's one of these very gentle lava eruptions where lava is moving very slowly and you can get up moving very slowly and you can get up quite close to the lava front without too much problem. in fact, i have been watching the webcam for part of the day, and there are a lot of people out there. you know, icelanders are use to these eruptions, so they know how to act safely and to take care at these erections. ii safely and to take care at these erections. , ., ., safely and to take care at these erections-— safely and to take care at these erections. , ., ., ., . erections. if you are watching the webcam, erections. if you are watching the webcam. it _ erections. if you are watching the webcam, it must _ erections. if you are watching the webcam, it must be _ erections. if you are watching the webcam, it must be very - erections. if you are watching the webcam, it must be very hard - erections. if you are watching the webcam, it must be very hard to | erections. if you are watching the i webcam, it must be very hard to get any sleep, presumably this is a pretty exciting time for you. it is. it's been six _ pretty exciting time for you. it is. it's been six years _ pretty exciting time for you. it is. it's been six years since - pretty exciting time for you. it is. it's been six years since the - pretty exciting time for you. it 3 it's been six years since the last eruption in iceland. it's quite amazing to see one in this particular place, because it's been about 800 years since the last eruption here, but with the intensity of the earthquakes over the last 15 months, particularly the last three weeks, odds are that
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something interesting is going to happen. magma moving beneath the crust and forming and a big long fissure, tunnel, if you like them so they knew it was building up and it was probably on the a question of time before it broke to the surface and formed an irruption. the big question was where. and formed an irruption. the big question was where. is a and formed an irruption. the big question was where. is a possible interru -t question was where. is a possible interrupt some _ question was where. is a possible interrupt some else's _ question was where. is a possible interrupt some else's well? - question was where. is a possible interrupt some else's well? or i question was where. is a possible l interrupt some else's well? or this is a very basic question, this release the pressure? it is a very basic question, this release the pressure? it releases a bit of pressure. _ release the pressure? it releases a bit of pressure. i _ release the pressure? it releases a bit of pressure. i suspect _ release the pressure? it releases a bit of pressure. i suspect this i release the pressure? it releases a bit of pressure. i suspect this is i bit of pressure. i suspect this is the start of what might be a sequence of eruptions, but to be honest, we don't have a very good track record of what happened in the past to predict what might happen in the future. as i say, 800 years ago, there weren't many people in this area, records were not brilliant, so everybody is looking a little bit anxious at what we might be waiting for us in the future in iceland, but i think icelanders are now are very relieved that these incessant earthquakes that were keeping many people awake and causing so much distress have calm down for now. so
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something has been released, something has been released, something has been unlocked with the small irruption, and it's actually a very small eruption from a one of the smallest directions i can recall for the last 30—110 years in iceland at the moment. at for the last 30-40 years in iceland at the moment.— for the last 30-40 years in iceland at the moment. at the moment, yes, aood at the moment. at the moment, yes, good caveat — at the moment. at the moment, yes, good caveat he _ at the moment. at the moment, yes, good caveat. he states _ at the moment. at the moment, yes, good caveat. he states about - at the moment. at the moment, yes, good caveat. he states about 800 i good caveat. he states about 800 years since there was such activity in this area, but, of course commits only a matter of a few years since the last eruption in iceland, the ash that was sent up meant that flights had to be cancelled, any chance of that happening here but do you think? chance of that happening here but do ou think? ~ ,,., , chance of that happening here but do ou think? ~ , , ., chance of that happening here but do you think?_ that i chance of that happening here but do you think?_ that is i you think? absolutely not. that is reassuring- _ you think? absolutely not. that is reassuring. this _ you think? absolutely not. that is reassuring. this area _ you think? absolutely not. that is reassuring. this area has - you think? absolutely not. that is reassuring. this area has no i reassuring. this area has no volcanoes — reassuring. this area has no volcanoes capable _ reassuring. this area has no volcanoes capable of- reassuring. this area has no i volcanoes capable of producing reassuring. this area has no - volcanoes capable of producing large disruption ash clouds as we saw in 2010, and just a year after in 2011 that closed a few flights, there is no type of volcano that can come of the type of irruption we are seeing, gentle lava, plumes of toxic gas, but there is no explosions. nothing to indicate there might be a problem with air travel, and the fact that
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the airport last night is only about 20 commoners away, close down briefly, they checked, no problem, it reopens, and some tourist flags flying in last night as they flew over and landed.— flying in last night as they flew over and landed. ., ~ i. . over and landed. thank you so much for aaivin over and landed. thank you so much for giving the _ over and landed. thank you so much for giving the benefits _ over and landed. thank you so much for giving the benefits of _ over and landed. thank you so much for giving the benefits of your i for giving the benefits of your expertise, dave, and good luck with watching the webcam and seeing how this develops or is contained. things very much. thank you. learning a language might have been an aspiration for many of us in lockdown, but now new figures here in the uk show there's been a boom in people learning one in particular — welsh. and notjust in the uk — people have been learning welsh all over the world. tomos morgan meets some of the people in far flung places who've taken it up. i ddysgu cymraeg nawr, to learn welsh now, the classroom's gone online, just like everything else over the last year.
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since i was a baby. but these classes aren't just for those living here in wales that can't speak the language. they're full of learners from all over the world. i will give you an eight out of ten for that, that's pretty good. people like student nicole gallegos who lives in, yes, you guessed it, costa rica. not your usual hotbed for celtic languages, i'lladmit. she began studying in october on a language app after realising that her surname has a welsh connection. i heard that the gallegos people are like a compilation of spanish and welsh people that came to the land many years ago, so gallegos kind of has a little bit of welsh in it. and heraim? to be fluent and to come and study in cardiff in the future. it would be super, super cool if i could go and study there after i finish studying here. the royal welsh college of music and drama in cardiff, is it? yes, that's right.
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i wasn't quite good enough to get in there, so if you do, you'll have done very doing well. thank you. last year, welsh was the fastest—growing language in the uk on duolingo, and the number of users worldwide learning welsh has increased by 100,000 since october, with a fifth of all students based in america and even someone in antarctica. so we're here just outside boom in the netherlands... back to a more familiar time zone in holland and jen bailey, an australian music conductor, has also taken to studying one of the oldest languages in europe over the pandemic. without the social interaction of the orchestra over the last year, the added interaction online, on facebook, has been a huge relief for her. some people live in wales and some of them like me, come from across the world, no particular family connection, no reason whatsoever to learn welsh, and that gave a tribe and it gave
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validation, it's not completely weird to learn welsh. but this increased interest has meant that online classes have been overwhelmed, with a lack of teachers to meet the demand. we were surprised initially that anyone would be interested in wanting to learn online. i've been running online chat clubs all over the world, people from all over the world connecting and ijust put up the chat club and it fills up within a few hours and then i have to turn people away. as face—to face socialising begins again, will welsh continue to flourish as the pandemic eases? for now, there's still plenty of grammar yet to be learned. tomos morgan, bbc news, cardiff. well, you can always reach me on twitter @philippabbc — thanks for watching.
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a reminder that there's always much more on our website or on the bbc news app. you are watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren bett. hello. sunday should be a dry day for most of us, there will be sunshine from time to time as well. now, today, where we have the best of the sunshine across parts of eastern sculling from the northeast of lincoln down into lincolnshire, we saw the temptress going up to 16-17 . that was ahead of this weather front here. it is a very weak weather front and may produce a little drizzle over night. as it heads southwards, mind you, it starts to change the air mass, so it brings in slightly cooler air in time for sunday so i don't think we will see temperatures as high as 16 or 17 degrees even with some sunshine. here is where our weather front is and that's bringing in a few spots of drizzle as it moves down to the south—west overnight. some clearer skies following for a while, although more cloud will arrive
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into the north—west of scotland. where we have the clearest skies for longer, around lothian, tayside and fife, temperatures could get close to freezing, it should be a milder night than last night across south—eastern parts of england. the south—west, still quite cloudy in the morning, few spots of drizzle, the north—west of scotland sees more cloud coming in, a bit misty in the hills but elsewhere dry, there will be some sunshine and the weather should brighten up in the south—west as well. the winds should be fairly light but as i say the area should be slightly cooler, and temperatures will be ten or 12 degrees, a bit chillier perhaps in norfolk, but also in the north—west of scotland. high pressure there is in charge, still, as we head into the start of the new week and it is keeping these weather fronts at bay for the time being. there will be more of a breeze in the north—west of scotland, could be a few spots of drizzle here with more in the way of cloud but otherwise the wind should be fairly light and it should be dry and there will be sunshine at times. those temperatures aren't really changing much, they are near—normal really for this time of year. moving ahead into tuesday, a similar sort of picture for many parts of the country, probably more of a breeze picking up
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through the day on tuesday, mind you, and this band of rain on a weather front is not far away from the north—west of scotland, so those temperatures again, 12, maybe 13 degrees or so. the high pressure is keeping it quiet for the start of the week but it slips away into continental europe, allowing this band of rain to move across the country, opening the door to more atlantic air and lower pressure as well. so that means the weather turns more unsettled as we head further into next week. most of the rain and stronger winds in the north—west, and it'll be drier and brighter towards the south—east.
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hello, this is bbc news. reaching a
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milestone, half of all adults in the uk have had theirfirst dose milestone, half of all adults in the uk have had their first dose of the coronavirus of acting. the uk have had their first dose of the coronavirus of acting.— coronavirus of acting. the health secretary hailed _ coronavirus of acting. the health secretary hailed as _ coronavirus of acting. the health secretary hailed as a _ coronavirus of acting. the health | secretary hailed as a phenomenal achievement. vaccination programme is our route out of the pandemic, it will protect people, we know these vaccines protect you and also those around you. vaccines protect you and also those around yon-— vaccines protect you and also those around you-— vaccines protect you and also those around you. europe braces itself for around you. europe braces itself for a third wave — around you. europe braces itself for a third wave of _ around you. europe braces itself for a third wave of coronavirus - a third wave of coronavirus infections, with fresh lockdowns in france and poland. science advisers warn that some holidays overseas are extremely unlikely this year, because of the risk of bringing coronavirus variants back to the uk. protesters opposed to the lockdown march through central london, police have made several arrests. a volcano has erupted close to rhett kubik, the first eruption in that area of iceland for 800 years. now

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