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tv   BBC News  BBC News  March 20, 2021 11:00am-11:31am GMT

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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. europe braces itself for a third wave of coronavirus infections — with fresh lockdowns in france and poland. getting his vaccine — borisjohnson comes under pressure, as more than 60 mps and peers call for a change in covid legislation to allow protests during lockdown. president biden urges people to speak out against racist violence on a visit to atlanta after the murder of eight people including six asian women. a volcano has erupted south—west of iceland's capital reykjavik. olivia colman, justin bieber and the duke of cambridge were among the famous faces to come out and help raise money for the bbc�*s red nose day.
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hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. europe is preparing for a third wave of coronavirus amid a surge in new cases and a shortage of vaccines that can reduce the spread of the disease. france has introduced a partial lockdown — with 21 million people in 16 areas, including paris, among those affected. in poland, non—essential shops, hotels, cultural and sporting facilities are also closed for three weeks — as the country has seen the highest new daily cases since november. germany's chancellor, angela merkel, has also said the country is at risk of having to re—impose lockdown measures as it copes with an �*exponential rise�* in coronavirus cases.
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and following a temporary suspension of oxford—astrazeneca vaccines in ireland, the country has decided to resume administering the jab this weekend. this report from simonjones contains flashing images. facing contains flashing images. a third wave fuelled by a faltering facing a third wave fuelled by a faltering vaccine programme with delays and supplies and scepticism about the jab, much of europe is seeing a rise in infections. in germany, there is a warning it is likely the country will need to apply an emergency break and reimpose lockdown measures. just 8% of germany's population has received a first dose of vaccine. translation: ., ., ., translation: there are not enough vaccines in europe _ translation: there are not enough vaccines in europe to _ translation: there are not enough vaccines in europe to stop _ translation: there are not enough vaccines in europe to stop the - translation: there are not enough vaccines in europe to stop the third l vaccines in europe to stop the third wave through vaccination alone. even if deliveries are reliable, it will still stake several weeks before the risk groups are fully vaccinated. only then can we talk about wider openings in society. in only then can we talk about wider openings in society.— openings in society. in france, there was _ openings in society. in france, there was a — openings in society. in france, there was a rush _ openings in society. in france, there was a rush to _ openings in society. in france, there was a rush to leave - openings in society. in france, i there was a rush to leave paris before a new lockdown measures came
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into force at midnight. the prime minister was keen to be seen getting the astrazeneca jab after days of debate in the eu about its possible side—effects. resulting in europe's medical regulator saying it is safe. in the uk, where infections continue to fall in many areas, around half the adult population has now been given a first dose. the prime minister borisjohnson returned to the hospital in london where he was treated last year for coronavirus to back the jab. i treated last year for coronavirus to back the jab-— back the “ab. i did not a thing. it was back the 'ab. i did not a thing. it was ve back the jab. i did not a thing. it was very good. _ back the jab. i did not a thing. it was very good, very _ back the jab. i did not a thing. it was very good, very quick, - back the jab. i did not a thing. it was very good, very quick, and i back the jab. i did not a thing. it i was very good, very quick, and you know what i'm going to say, i cannot recommend it to highway. everybody, when you do get your notification to go for a jab, please go and get it, it is the best thing for you, the best thing for your family and everybody else.— best thing for your family and eve bod else. , ., ., everybody else. there is a warning the uk cannot _ everybody else. there is a warning the uk cannot afford _ everybody else. there is a warning the uk cannot afford to _ everybody else. there is a warning the uk cannot afford to be - the uk cannot afford to be complacent. the uk cannot afford to be complacent-— the uk cannot afford to be comlacent. ~ . ., ., , complacent. we have had our first and second _ complacent. we have had our first and second wave, _ complacent. we have had our first and second wave, there _ complacent. we have had our first and second wave, there are - complacent. we have had our first and second wave, there are areas| complacent. we have had our first l and second wave, there are areas of the country— and second wave, there are areas of the country where it is stubbornly
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staying _ the country where it is stubbornly staying at — the country where it is stubbornly staying at a high level. what will happen — staying at a high level. what will happen later in the year as the infections _ happen later in the year as the infections come back again, if we have _ infections come back again, if we have not— infections come back again, if we have not predicted or vulnerable population by vaccination at that stage. _ population by vaccination at that stage, then we will be back where we were in— stage, then we will be back where we were in march, april last year. we have not were in march, april last year. we have got a — were in march, april last year. - have got a little card to come away with you. to have got a little card to come away with ou. ., .., , with you. to complement the programme. _ with you. to complement the programme, the _ with you. to complement the programme, the governmenti with you. to complement the l programme, the government is with you. to complement the _ programme, the government is funding to new clinical trials to try to develop treatments to stop the spread of disease back amongst the most vulnerable. the message from the prime minister is that the scientist will help us get through this. simonjones, bbc news. brazil has registered its second highest coronavirus toll in the past 2a hours with more than 2,700 deaths — and almost 90,000 new infections. the country is in the midst of a record surge in cases as a local variant spreads through the region, pushing the country's health system to breaking point. the head of intensive care at emilio ribas hospital in sao paolo says the current surge in covid—i9 is increasingly hitting people under 60.
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translation: today, we face a prospect that the situation . will get worse because the patients we were admitting have a slightly different profile than before. we are seeing more younger patients with very serious conditions and no underlying health issues. sorry about those extra sound effects they are. catherine smallwood is the senior emergency officer at the world health organisation in europe and she explained what was behind the rise in infections. it's certainly partly because of the b117 variant, which was first identified in the uk in december. the classic pattern that we have seen throughout this pandemic of infections starting in western europe and moving gradually eastwards, and we are seeing this particular variant of concern very, very gradually, but very clearly replacing other circulating variants and taking up a bigger proportion of the cases. as it is doing that, of course,
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being more transmissible, being more severe in terms of the clinical picture, it is leading to bigger pressure on hospitals. but it is not the only reason either. partly, there is a frustration, as your previous correspondence said, a big push to relax public health measures, and the pandemic fatigue that has affected us all is also taking its toll. but the situation seen in poland is being seen in many countries across central and southern europe at the moment. and what about the whole problem with europe and the vaccine roll—out? how big a part is that playing? and how much urgency is there now for the eu to really step up on that front? well, remember, geeta, that the first primary objective of the early phase of vaccine roll—out is to target those people who are at most risk of developing severe covid—i9 and then potentially going on to die from it, and that is why it is the older age
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groups and people with other chronic diseases that have been targeted first. that means the greater proportion of the adult population, including in countries that are really far along in terms of their vaccine uptake, have still got the majority of the population that are contributing to the spread of covid still not vaccinated. so this is the case across the world and across the european region, as well, and it will take some time before the vaccination rates go up to a level where we would see those particular groups that are driving disease transmission being vaccinated themselves. and just slightly self interestedly, if you don't mind, given the increase in europe, what about these reports of fears that, for example, in the uk we will not be able to have summer travel outside the country? i mean, any threat in any region has an impact globally, doesn't it, if we want international travel? absolutely. we cannot talk about the interest of one country or one city
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or one part of the world. this is so interconnected. and we have really got to come out of this together. it is everyone's self interest for us all to come out of this pandemic together, and that will be the quickest route back to being able to get back to travelling around the world, doing those things that we used to do that we would like to get back to. and with that in mind, there has been a leaked report covered by bbc�*s newsnight programme this week about poorer nations asking the world health organization to help them to get hold of vaccines and some pushback from richer countries on that. i am not familiar with these specific documents that you are referring to, but it has been who's position throughout this pandemic, notjust in the context of vaccine but for all countermeasures, whether it is ppe, whether it is essential medicines, or whether it is the vaccine, that we need an equitable distribution and allocation framework, that we need to do our best to all to come
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together and look at the public health good here. we are in a global pandemic, an extraordinary situation, to the extent that we have never seen before, at least in the last 100 years, so if we are not going to pull together and make sure that we can do this as a global community now, then when are we going to do that? pakistan's prime minister imran khan has tested positive for covid—i9. he was vaccinated just two days ago. according to the country's health minister, mr khan is self—isolating at home. pakistan has recently seen a sharp rise in coronavirus infection. some breaking news — the tokyo 2020 olympic organising committee has said that international spectators will not be allowed to enterjapan during the olympic games which are scheduled for this summer. the decision will ensure the four—yearly spectacle will be a largely televised event this year. olympic and paralympic tickets purchased by overseas residents will be refunded, it said in a statement.
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speculation about the ban had been rife for weeks, as organisers grappled with how to make the games safe during the coronavirus pandemic. here, the government is coming under pressure to ease lockdown restrictions to allow protests to go ahead. more than 60 mps and peers have signed a letter warning that allowing police to criminalise people for protesting is "is not acceptable" and "arguably not lawful". the liberal democrat leader, sir ed davey, joins me. how is it not lawful? the original covid restrictions _ how is it not lawful? the original covid restrictions had _ how is it not lawful? the original covid restrictions had exemption| how is it not lawful? the original. covid restrictions had exemption for peaceful protest because it was recognised that peaceful protest as a human right, a basic freedom. and we strongly objected, the liberal democrats strongly objected when you restrictions in november sought to limit peaceful protest. the courts have made it clear that the human rights act still protects the right to peaceful protest. we need the government to clarify the law. that
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is why we ended up last weekend with the awful scenes in clapham where women staging a peaceful vigil to remember sarah and to recall the violence against women, harassment, abuse that women have faced at the hands of men, it ended in that shocking way. so the government have got to clarify the law. they are putting the police into an impossible position, the conservative ministers are getting a track record at hacking away at basic british freedoms. the liberal democrats will oppose that.- democrats will oppose that. these restrictions. _ democrats will oppose that. these restrictions, on _ democrats will oppose that. these restrictions, on protest, _ democrats will oppose that. these restrictions, on protest, will- democrats will oppose that. these restrictions, on protest, will be - restrictions, on protest, will be lifted if the road map continues at the end of march. is it really necessary to try to challenge this now? , , . ., , , necessary to try to challenge this now? , ,, , ., now? yes, because there is no clarity about — now? yes, because there is no clarity about the _ now? yes, because there is no clarity about the law _ now? yes, because there is no clarity about the law now. - now? yes, because there is no clarity about the law now. that now? yes, because there is no i clarity about the law now. that is the point i am making. first of all, went covid restrictions came in, there was no ban on peaceful protest because it was realised it was a
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basic freedom, human right. indeed, at the moment, the law is unclear, because the human rights act shows it still protects the right to peaceful protest. so the government's argument here is actually an argument against themselves. they are not clarifying themselves. they are not clarifying the law. that is wrong for the police, puts him in an impossible position, it does not help people peacefully, and a covid—safe way, making their point. peacefully, and a covid-safe way, making their point.— making their point. isn't the point that it is very _ making their point. isn't the point that it is very difficult _ making their point. isn't the point that it is very difficult in _ making their point. isn't the point that it is very difficult in reality i that it is very difficult in reality to have a covid—safe mass protest? and to organise it so that it stays safe? if you have a few people spread out outside, arguably it is perhaps ok, but the health service year is already under huge pressure. are you not simply adding potentially to the pressures if you want protest to go ahead? you saw last weekend _ want protest to go ahead? you saw last weekend was _ want protest to go ahead? you saw last weekend was that _ want protest to go ahead? you saw last weekend was that the - want protest to go ahead? you saw last weekend was that the police i last weekend was that the police possibly following instructions from the home secretary, were not
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engaging with the organisers of the protest, and so it became an informal protest. that meant the protections safeguarding, stewards and the rest of it were not in place. it was less safe because the protest was not formally allowed by the police. mr; protest was not formally allowed by the olice. g , protest was not formally allowed by the olice. y , ., protest was not formally allowed by the olice. y , . ., the police. my point is relate that obviously everyone _ the police. my point is relate that obviously everyone understands l the police. my point is relate that i obviously everyone understands that we do not want to have such a restrictive society that you cannot allow public feeling is to be vented when needed. at the same time, it is really difficult, isn't it, to make mass gathering safe? it is mass gathering safe? it is absolutely _ mass gathering safe? it is absolutely possible. i mass gathering safe? it 3 absolutely possible. let's remember, this is what the conservatives are doing time and time again. it is not just about covid, it is their whole approach. in their legislation on police powers in front of parliament, they are taking away your freedom and my freedom to protest. what they are saying is that police could stop a peaceful assembly now and in the future with
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these new conservative laws. if those protests made a noise. i think people should wake up. this is a draconian approach from this conservative government. i am fed up of hearing conservative mps talking about freedoms and free speech when they are voting for some of the most illiberal laws i have ever seen. conservative mps who championed freedom are now voting for the most disgraceful attack on your rights and my rights that i have seen in my lifetime. i really do think that it is right that we make this point now, at this difficult time, and i think we can make protests safe now and we can defend the right to freedom, yourfreedom and we can defend the right to freedom, your freedom and and we can defend the right to freedom, yourfreedom and my freedom. is freedom, your freedom and my freedom. , , , , freedom. is it slightly confusing, the two issues _ freedom. is it slightly confusing, the two issues in _ freedom. is it slightly confusing, the two issues in the _ freedom. is it slightly confusing, the two issues in the wider i freedom. is it slightly confusing, the two issues in the wider set i freedom. is it slightly confusing, | the two issues in the wider set of changes about what circumstances protest should be allowed in terms of noise or whether it impacts the community, that possibly will have huge concerns about whilst saying,
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0k, at huge concerns about whilst saying, ok, at the moment, protests still pose real threats to public health? i will take you back to what happened last week at clapham. if the police had engaged with the organisers of the protest, you would have seen stewards, you would have seen more stewart dimmock social distancing, sound systems, which meant people would not have been crowded together. the failure to engage with the protesters, with the people who were having a peaceful vigil, the failure to do that actually made things more unsafe. i am afraid that government's argument isjust misplaced. not am afraid that government's argument is just misplaced. not only is the law unclear and it really should be clarified for the police's sake, but also it is also not promoting public safety in terms of health and covid. it is much better if you had the clear system. i am afraid the reason why i am cynical about how the
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conservatives are behaving, is because at the same time that they are failing to allow peaceful protest during covid, they are taking away the long term rights as well. this conservative government are developing a track record of attacking freedoms. liberal democrats will cut that out. many thanks. the housing and communities secretary, robertjenrick, has announced measures to help england's retail and hospitality sectors re—open after coronavirus restrictions have been lifted. pubs, restaurants and listed buildings have been given flexibility to use their land to allow more people to meet up. a �*welcome back fund' of £56 million has also been created to boost high streets and seaside towns. mrjenrick says the money will be distributed through local authorities. we want to do everything that we can to support retailers and councils to reopen safely. we are enabling pubs to erect marquees in their gardens for the whole of the spring and summer so we can enjoy a pint with our family and friends, whatever the weather. we are enabling alfresco dining
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again this april as we enjoyed last summer and we're giving money to high streets the length and breadth of the country so they can prepare to welcome us this year. and in doing that, there are fears by opening up and putting money back to get people into the high street, we run the risk of increasing cases again? well, the vaccine roll—out is going incredibly well. we vaccinated almost 26 million people. the road map enables us to cautiously but irreversibly open up again and it's really important that we back hospitality and retail. they've had such a difficult 12 months. so we are cutting red tape so that those businesses can do alfresco dining, can put marquees and pub gardens and can rebuild and prosper once more. and we also want to ensure that high streets like this brilliant one i am in today can spruce themselves up,
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can market themselves and can invest in festivals and events this summer so people can get back out and support those shops. emergency authorities in australia are warning of "life threatening" flash floods as torrential rains batter its most populous state, new south wales. across new south wales, dozens of people have been rescued from the floodwaters. the state premier said the storms could last till the end of next week and pleaded with residents to obey evacuation warnings. agata imielska from the bureau of meteorology urged people to prepare themselves for more heavy rain. in fact, for the mid north coast and hunter region, we are seeing rainfall that is record—breaking for march by 100—200 millimetres above those march records. a powerful 7.2 magnitude earthquake has struckjust off the north—eastern coast of japan. the quake hit along the same coastline that was devasted by an earthquake, tsunami and nuclear accident in 2011,
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with authorities issuing an advisory for tsunami waves of around one metre. about 200 hundred homes in the prefecture are reportedly without power. presidentjoe biden has urged americans to speak up against violence against asians. his comments came after a gunman killed eight people in atlanta — six of them women of asian descent. after he and vice president kamala harris met members of the community, mr biden said hate can have no safe harbour in america. a daughter remembering a lost mother, gunned down in tuesday's attacks. one of eight people gunned down in a rampage that started in broad daylight. on friday, president biden took the role of consoler—in—chief. telling those affected that time would heal. my heart goes out to all, all the family members who lost someone in those horrific shootings on tuesday. i know they feel like there is a black hole in their chest that they are being sucked into,
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and things will never get better, but our prayers are with you. with him, vice—president kamala harris, the first asian—american in this role. a harm against any one of us is a harm against all of us. the president and i will not be silent. we will not stand by. we will always speak out against violence, hate crimes, and discrimination wherever and whenever it occurs. but there is anger — in particular that law enforcement is not calling this a hate crime. both local police and the fbi say investigations are under way, but they say the attack does not appear to racially motivated. atlanta law enforcement highlighted the suspect�*s self—confessed sex addiction as a possible cause, which some say is indictative of an unwillingness
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to describe violence against asian—americans as racist. the person who perpetrated these murders was obiously a product of this kind of, you know, anti—asian and anti—women mentality that has been permeating throughout society. the grief has reverberated across this country, with vigils being held as far away as new york to pay respects. many argue that violence like that in atlanta will not be stopped until all authorities are explicit in calling it out as racist. lebo diseko, bbc news. the former leeds and scotland footballer peter lorimer has died at the age of 7a after a long illness. he was part of the leeds team that won the league twice under don revie and remains the club's all—time leading goal scorer. our sports correspondent andy swiss looks back at his career. when it came to the art of goal—scoring, few did it as spectacularly as peter lorimer.
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here's lorimer! no better striker or volleyer of the ball in football than hotshot lorimer. it was a nickname he earned at leeds united we are, at leeds united where, after making his debut atjust 15, he became famed for his ferocious shooting. lorimer! at speeds of around 90 mph, if you hit the ball harder. lorimer. what a goal! his goals propelled leads to two league titles and an fa cup, as in the late 60s and early 70s, they became the dominant force in english football. at the same time, lorimer was inspiring scotland to the 1974 world cup where he scored yet another thunderous goal. lorimer! 1-0. his career might have been even better. in 1975, leeds reached the european cup final, and lorimer seem to have blasted
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them ahead, but the goal was controversially ruled out for offside and they lost to bayern munich. but his legacy is beyond dispute. his tally of 238 goals still a record for reeds. —— a record for leeds united. despite retiring as a player in 1986, his status as a legend endured. a much loved footballing figure and the man whose dazzling goal—scoring powers... lorimer! ..will surely never be forgotten. peter lorimer remembered there. a volcano in south—west iceland has erupted, releasing streams of lava from under the earth's surface. it follows thousands of small earthquakes in the area over recent weeks. the fissure erupted 30 kilometres from of the capital, reykyavik, is more than five hundred metres long. this is the first eruption in the area in centuries. danai howard reports. this is what icelanders have been waiting for for weeks now. a0 kilometres south of the capital reykjavik,
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lava began spewing from the ground on friday evening. officials say the fissure is around 500 kilometres long, and a no—fly zone has been established in the area. iceland sits between two tectonic plates so eruptions aren't uncommon, but this is the first in fagradalsfjall in 900 years. normally, there are around 1,000 tremors a year but there have been more than 50,000 in the last three weeks — the highest number since digital recordings began in 1991. in 2010, the eruption of another volcano ejected a column of ash nine kilometres into the air that brought flights to a halt across europe. iceland's meteorological office says the lava from this eruption will emerge more slowly and not create such disruption. the small village of grindavik is just a few kilometres away. for weeks now, they have been affected by near constant earthquakes and tremors warning of the upcoming eruption.
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translation: the earth shook well outside and when i came _ in with the luggage, the kitchen island was on its side and various things had come out of the cupboards. we thought we'd prepared! police have told residents to close their windows and stay indoors, due to the risk of gas pollution carried by the wind. and after 900 years of volcanic inactivity, people in the area have been flooding social media with photos and videos of this formidable sight. danai howard, bbc news. stunning images from our reporter. the breaking news we have had in the last half an hour or so. no overseas spectators are going to be allowed at this summer's rearranged olympic or paralympic games in tokyo. that has been confirmed now. there was a meeting of the committee and the japanese government, and that is of course because of the continued uncertainty amidst the pandemic.
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they have said that they will refund tickets through the organising committee that have been purchased, they will all be refunded. this is bbc news. matt taylor has the weather. hello there. it's the spring equinox today, and whilst many will be cloudy and rather cool, there will be a little bit of sunshine to warm things up for some of you. we have got high pressure still in charge. it has slipped a bit further southwards, though, and with that, we will start bringing in wins in from the north and west instead of from the east. that is going to have a big difference to some areas because, crucially, the sea temperatures around the uk at the coldest at the moment get the wind off the sea, it is going to feel chilly. certainly a chilly day across eastern england yesterday with the wind coming off the north sea. today, though, with winds from the north—west, it is here where the best of the cloud breaks will be. same, too, in south—east scotland. and with the highest of the temperatures will be. we will see some sunshine return later, orkney, shetland, and the far north of scotland after a wet and windy spell. sunshine continues in the south
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across the channel islands. that year, with the wind off that chilly say, just 9 degrees. 14—17 possible in some parts of that north—east england. this is where the peak of today's warmth will be. moving away from western scotland, where it was yesterday. that is all due to that shift in wind direction, which will now go to night into more of a northerly direction, pushing patchy rain and drizzle southwards through scotland, northern ireland, into northern england, wales, and by the end of the night, across the midlands, too. with clear skies in its wake and that chilly air in place, it is going to be a colder night than last night across the northern half of the country. could see temperatures low enough for a touch of frost in one 01’ two areas. mild enough, though, in the south, lots of cloudy, damp, drizzly, quite a murky start to the day for some of you, particularly around the hills. the rain and drizzle will ease off, becoming confined to the channel islands, far west of cornwall. skies will brighten. more cloud into the far north of scotland with a few spots of rain. elsewhere, a better chance of a bit of sunshine on sunday afternoon. temperatures, though, will be down a little bit, we have got a slightly colder air mass in place, probably the highest of the temperatures this time
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south west midlands, south—west england, and across south wales. but with the colder air, by and large in place, and some clear skies for sunday night, monday morning could be chilly. gardeners take note, there could be a little bit of frost around as we head into the start of the new week. the new week will start with high pressure in place, we start dry, but as that starts to push its way southwards, we open the door to the atlantic winds and that will bring more cloud and some wet and windy weather for some of you. particularly for scotland and northern ireland. as our outlooks for next week show, rain will be developing at times. further south always drier and always a little bit milder. that is how it is looking. i will see again soon.
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hello, and welcome to dateline london — the programme which brings together international correspondents filing from the uk with the best of bbc expertise. i'm geeta guru—murthy. this week, we ask what is britain's role in the world? with a huge moment of change as we battle a global pandemic, and brexit has become real, there is renewed interest in what the uk's international future looks like. a new government report, called global britain, focuses on the indo—pacific — suggesting closer ties with india, japan and australia. what does this mean for the relationship with china? a question faced at the moment by president biden. meanwhile, nations all over the world continue to grapple with their vaccination programmes. what do the diplomatic skirmishes over covid tell us about where power lies today? with me are isobel hilton, founder of china dialogue, jeffrey koffman, a us—canadian journalist and formerly war correspondent for abc news, and the bbc�*s chief international correspondent, lyse doucet.
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welcome, and thanks so much forjoining me today.

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