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tv   BBC News  BBC News  March 20, 2021 1:00am-1:31am GMT

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welcome to bbc news. i'm mark lobel. our top stories: europe braces for a third wave of coronavirus infections with fresh lockdowns in france and poland. the french prime minister gets the astrazeneca vaccine and urges others to do the same, as the eu resumes use of the jab. president biden visits atlanta after the murder of eight people this week. he calls for unity and an end to violence against asian americans. they've been attacked, blamed, scapegoated and harassed. they've been verbally assaulted, physically assaulted, physically assaulted, killed. tanzania swears in theirfirst female president after the death of john magufuli on wednesday.
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welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. a third wave of coronavirus is beginning to sweep across the european union. france and switzerland are extending restrictions from saturday, while polish health officials say the british variant of the virus is so rampant, a 3—week lockdown is necessary. infections have surged, as europe's vaccine rollout has continued to lag behind the pace ofjabs in the us and the uk. our correspondent lucy williamson has more from paris. never mind the prime minister. in france, it was the astrazeneca jab that needed a shot in the arm today. after weeks of shifting guidelines, the message was meant to be clear — it's safe and it works. but only an hour before he received it, france's health authority said a possible link to blood clots in younger
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patients meant the jab should only be used for those over 55. last month, it said only those under 65 should take it. lucky for mr castex that he turned 55 last year. but only 20% of french surveyed this month said they trusted the astrazeneca jab. as president macron held off announcing a new lockdown, cases spiralled, and paris hospitals are now scrambling to find space for patients who need intensive care. a lockdown lite has been imposed on the worst affected areas from tomorrow. translation: it's not because it's nice out, | because it's spring that we put our lives in danger. it's not over. we're still facing the variants, and people should realise the gravity of the disease. across the border in germany, angela merkel said she, too, would have the astrazeneca jab. germany had been hoping to lift
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some of its restrictions next week, but with infections soaring there, a warning from the health minister — public opinion is only half the problem. translation: there are not yet enough vaccines in europe - to stop the third wave through vaccination alone. even if deliveries of eu orders are now reliable, it will still take several weeks before the risk groups are fully vaccinated. only then can we talk about wider openings in society. poland is also facing a surge in cases, with the british variant expected to account soon for 80% of infections. a partial lockdown will come into force there from tomorrow. shops, hotels and cultural and sporting venues will close. there is acceptance breaking across europe that it's facing a third wave of this pandemic. hope that the vaccines might outpace the virus has been crushed by a grinding lack of momentum, supply and public trust. as europe prepares for more restrictions, criticisms are mounting, along with costs.
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empty streets can help save patients but delays in vaccines are expensive, and politicians could still pay the price. lucy williamson, bbc news, paris. while many european countries are resuming use of the astrazeneca vaccine, france has limited it to the over 55s, despite reassurances by eu medicine regulators. the british prime minister borisjohnson received his first dose of the astrazeneca jab at the hospital in london where he was treated for coronavirus last year. he said people should listen to the scientists, who have declared it safe and effective. the british government is aiming to inoculate the majority of adults by the summer. here's mrjohnson speaking after his vaccination. please be warned there is flash photography. i cannot recommend it too highly. everybody, when you do get your notification to go for a jab, please go and get it. it is the best thing for you,
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the best thing for your family, and for everybody else. don't just listen to me. listen to all the scientists, listen to what the european medicines agency had to say yesterday, to what the mhra has said. this is a great thing to do. thank you all very much. thank you. us presidentjoe biden and vice president kamala harris have met members of the asian american community in georgia following tuesday's mass shooting in which eight people were killed. hundreds of people are attending vigils for the victims. the attacks targetted asian—owned businesses, and six of the victims were women of asian ethnic origin. robert aaron long has been charged with eight counts of murder. our correspondent lebo diseko joins us from washington. we know that they are investigating whether this was a hate crime but it was still a markedly different approach, wasn't it, from the president and vice president to the comments from the offices after
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the suspect was arrested, when they quoted his remarks, saying that he may have had a bad day. yes, there was a lot of backlash at the local sheriff's department, the department where these attacks took place and as you said the spokesmen saying that the suspect had had a bad day. later on, it transpired that a facebook account which was in his name had posted anti— asian or anti— chinese pictures, so that spokesperson is no longer making comments or no longer speaking for the department in relation to this case. when you look atjoe biden and kamala harris, of course the first asian american vice president, and their comments today, they really struck a tone of saying to the community that we hear you, we understand you and we're going to do something about this. the conversation we had today with the aapi leaders, and that we are hearing all across the country, is that hate and violence often hide in plain sight.
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it's often met with silence — that's been true throughout our history — but that has to change because our silence is complicity. we cannot be complicit. we have to speak out and we have to act. everyone has the right to go to work, to go to school, . to walk down the street and be safe, and also the right to be l recognised as an american — . not as the other, not as them, but as us. a harm against any one of us is a harm against all of us. . the president and i will not be silent. l we will not stand by. we will always speak out against violence, hate crimes and discrimination, wherever and whenever it - occurs.
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lebo, what are asian—americans hoping forfrom this lebo, what are asian—americans hoping for from this raised awareness of abuse to parts of their community over the past few years? in their community over the past few years?— few years? in short, mark, i think it will— few years? in short, mark, i think it will stop, _ few years? in short, mark, i think it will stop, that - few years? in short, mark, i think it will stop, that they i think it will stop, that they will be believed, and that something will be done about this. it is something i have her time and time again, this week from members of the asian american community is that we have been saying that this has been happening to us and we have not been believed and that has an impact when it comes to, for example, the statistics around this. when people report attacks on them and there is a reluctance to ascribe this to race, it has an impact on the statistics but, for instance, the government might use. how do you address something when you don't have a record of how widespread or not it is. when you talk about this specific
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attack, it is actually come up again, law enforcement and even the fbi have been saying that this may not actually be racially motivated, it may be more to do with sexual addiction that the suspect may have had. asian american people here say look, we were the targets of this, the majority of people in this attack who died were asian—american, the businesses that were targeted were asian—american. what does this make this? so it was interesting to watch the vice president and the president tried to walk this quite careful line of saying we are against racism and acknowledging that there has been a rise in attacks on the asian—american community, while kind of getting around actually ascribing what the intent or motivation of the attacker was. and on another note, president biden�*sjourney to and on another note, president biden�*s journey to atlanta was not without incident, his critics in the past have criticised his stammer and now they are talking about his stumble?— they are talking about his stumble? , ~ ., ,
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stumble? yes, i think there has been a lot of haze as you - stumble? yes, i think there has been a lot of haze as you would| been a lot of haze as you would have expect —— he, as you would expect, on right wing networks like fox and twitter love the meme and the narrative is about joe biden and his faculties, really, and to put it bluntly, he is the oldest american president. but in fairness, when donald trump took a fall, slightly unsteady on his feet last year, the liberal networks also made hay out of it as well. so i think there is a bit of a tit—for—tat they're going on and also, as i said, part of a kind of ongoing narrative about the president, his age and his ability to kind of function. the white house has said he is fine and it was just due to wind. and i think their focus and the focus of most of the american networks certainly today has been the tragedy that has been taking place in georgia. has been taking place in georgia-— has been taking place in georaia. ., ~' , georgia. lebo, thank you very much.
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brazil's local coronavirus variant is spreading through the country as the nation recorded its second deadliest toll on friday. the figures paint a worrying and worsening picture — nore than 90,000 cases in the last 2a hours and more than 2,800 deaths. brazil's death toll is second only to the united states at nearly 300,000. but while it's evident the country is in the midst of a surge, president bolsonaro continues to criticise lockdowns set by local governors. with me to discuss is microbiologist natalia pasternak in sao paulo. italia, thank you so for joining us. —— natalia pasternak. every death is a tragedy but two of the oldest centres have died but now a third senator, 58—year—old, dying. how has that death been felt by brazilians?— felt by brazilians? yes, good evening. _ felt by brazilians? yes, good evening, mark, _ felt by brazilians? yes, good evening, mark, and - felt by brazilians? yes, good evening, mark, and thank i felt by brazilians? yes, good| evening, mark, and thank you for having me on the show. the senator dying i think has a greater impact not on brazilians but on the senate
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itself. maybe it is how they finally realise that it can get to anyone of them, it is a young man, he was only 58, and he was against restrictions, indeed, he took part in demonstrations against restrictions before he got ill so i think it finally dawns into everyone's minds that, at the senate, at the congress, that this is real and they can be next. so maybe now they realise how great the situation is. , ., realise how great the situation is. ,., ., ., , is. indeed, so grave it has the second highest _ is. indeed, so grave it has the second highest death - is. indeed, so grave it has the second highest death toll- is. indeed, so grave it has the second highest death toll in i second highest death toll in the country, america's we mentioned, so the focus of turning to the vaccination programme which under way, do you think you're in a good place at the moment? well, we start to see _ place at the moment? well, we start to see a — place at the moment? well, we start to see a light _ place at the moment? well, we start to see a light at _ place at the moment? well, we start to see a light at the - place at the moment? well, we start to see a light at the end i start to see a light at the end of the tunnel but it is actually too little too late because the vaccines took a long time getting here, and that's mainly the fault of the
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government themselves, ministry of health has not purchased vaccines in time to guarantee an impact this year. so they have finally closed deals with johnson &johnson and pfizer and we're finally getting doses in the next semester but for this semester, we are still in the same situation. we have very few doses and we have to rely on restriction measures like lockdowns which the government is against. indeed, and 'ust government is against. indeed, and just 5% _ government is against. indeed, and just 5% of— government is against. indeed, and just 596 of the _ government is against. indeed, and just 596 of the vaccination l and just 5% of the vaccination also vaccinated. with america sending 4 million astrazeneca doses to mexico and canada, would you like president bolsonaro to be asking for some from america also?— from america also? yes, that would be _ from america also? yes, that would be nice, _ from america also? yes, that would be nice, but— from america also? yes, that would be nice, but it - from america also? yes, that would be nice, but it is - from america also? yes, that would be nice, but it is very. would be nice, but it is very unlike him because president bolsonaro usually waits for the world to revolve around himself. that's what, that's directly what he did with the vaccine. he said no—one offered me vaccine, which is a lie
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because several companies did offer, and now with president biden i suppose it will be the same, some months from now you can bet he is going to say oh, president biden never offered me vaccines, and he is not going to ask. me vaccines, and he is not going to ask-— me vaccines, and he is not going to ask. and he is telling the country — going to ask. and he is telling the country to stop whining atj the country to stop whining at the same time.— the country to stop whining at the same time. yes! natalia pasternak. _ the same time. yes! natalia pasternak, thank _ the same time. yes! natalia pasternak, thank you - the same time. yes! natalia pasternak, thank you so - the same time. jest natalia pasternak, thank you so much forjoining us on bbc news. thank you, mark. stay with us on bbc news. a british classic, six years since the e—type jaguar was unveiled, we get behind the wheel of the first ever sold. today we have closed the book on apartheid, and that chapter. more than 3,000 subway passengers were affected. nausea, bleeding, headaches and a dimming of vision — all of this caused by an apparently organised attack.
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the trophy itself is on the pedestal in the middle of the cabinet here. now, this was an international trophy and we understand the search for it has become an international search. above all, this was a triumph of the christian democrats above all, this was a triumph for the christian democrats of the west, after reunification as quickly this is bbc news, our main headline: europe braces for a third wave of coronavirus infections, with fresh lockdowns in france and poland. covax is an international scheme which aims to help
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poorer countries get more doses of the vaccine. it attempts to bring together governments, manufacturers, scientists, civil society and philanthropy to provide a global solution to the pandemic. the covax scheme has secured 3.5 billion doses for middle and low income countries — but so far only 32 million doses have been supplied. that's less than i% of the total number of doses secured. currently the us has had 115 million doses delivered, china has received 65 million, and india 39 million. but of the african countries who have received the most, rwanda has just 321,698, ghana 300,000 and south africa 177,275. now on top of that supply problem, look at this — this is one of the treacherous roads the vaccines would need to travel down. this is the delivery of another lot of medicine in south sudan by the international development company —
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talk about treacherous roads! joining me now is fergus drake, ceo of a large non—profit company called crown agents, a uk—based in—country distributor of vaccines on behalf of covax. thank you forjoining us here on bbc world news. where have you been able to distribute the vaccines so far?— vaccines so far? thank you for havin: vaccines so far? thank you for having me _ vaccines so far? thank you for having me on. _ vaccines so far? thank you for having me on. crown - vaccines so far? thank you for having me on. crown agents | vaccines so far? thank you for. having me on. crown agents has been involved in the covid—19 response for over a year now, firstly we were involved in distributing personal protective equipment to over 50 countries and overseas territories on behalf of the british government, we have also now focus on vaccines that we have supplied over 200,000 vaccines to places like the falkland islands and st helena and the ministry of health in ukraine. for covax we are working across africa with a particular focus on zimbabwe and the challenges of south sudan that you have just
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mentioned. sudan that you have 'ust mentionedi sudan that you have 'ust mentioned. we saw those pictures. _ mentioned. we saw those pictures, what _ mentioned. we saw those pictures, what are - mentioned. we saw those pictures, what are the - pictures, what are the logistical and political challenges facing these types of deliveries? irate challenges facing these types of deliveries?— of deliveries? we have been workin: of deliveries? we have been working in — of deliveries? we have been working in these _ of deliveries? we have been i working in these environments for over 180 years and we are working in 60 countries but south sudan is the challenging. we have driven over 100,000 kilometres on hardback roads as it gets over 50 degrees in the summer but it also get waterlogged in the raining season. i have seen whole articulated lorries lost in some of these mud traders and you don't want to be camping in the bush in south sudan with armed groups close by. we use things like armed aircraft and —— light aircraft and motorbikes to get to some of the most isolated communities across the country. we have seen only around 1% of doses have been received so far, when do you think this game will get fully under way? it has been a slow start but it is great to hear that they are so many vaccines getting around the world. the vision of covax was
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to get 2 billion vaccines out across the world, until the end of this year. thankfully over 30 countries in africa have already received those vaccines, which is great. but we are expecting a very big ramp up injune. that gives us time to really invest in the infrastructure, community health workers, things like transport and supply chains, so we can really hit the ground running when that second phase of vaccines arrives in the middle of the year. so next ear in middle of the year. so next year in june. _ middle of the year. so next year in june, but _ middle of the year. so next year in june, but when - middle of the year. so next year in june, but when do l middle of the year. so next i year in june, but when do you year injune, but when do you think the whole world will be vaccinated by?— think the whole world will be vaccinated by? there are lots of different _ vaccinated by? there are lots of different conditions - vaccinated by? there are lots of different conditions out. of different conditions out there. if everything goes right we will be doing well if we get the world vaccinated by the end of 2024. but i think we all realise that covid—19 is going to be with us for a long time, we're going to need jab top ups, a bit like flu in the uk, but one of the things we are concerned about is covid—19 becoming a residual pandemic, and so in the same we don't
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really talk about hiv/aids across western country now, hiv/aids still kills more than 700,000 people across the world, and a lot of people in africa as well, and we can't allow covid—19 to go down that route. allow covid-19 to go down that route. . ., allow covid-19 to go down that route. ., ~' ,, allow covid-19 to go down that route. ., ~ i. ,., allow covid-19 to go down that route. ., ~ i. . allow covid-19 to go down that route. ., ~ . ., route. thank you so much for “oininu route. thank you so much for joining us- — tanzania has a new president — samia suluhu hassan, who's made history as the country's first female head of state. she was sworn in this morning by the chiefjustice following the death ofjohn magufuli on wednesday. ms hassan had served as his deputy. she called on tanzanians to "move forward united" — remarks that could be seen as an attempt to heal the divisions created by her predessor. the bbc�*s zuhura yunus reports from dar es saalam. samia suluhu hassan. .. samia suluhu hassan, taking the oath to become tanzania's new president. she was sworn in in a brief
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ceremony at state house in the country's commercial capital, dar es salaam. in front of dignitaries and lawmakers. translation: |, samia suluhu| hassan, do solemnly swear that i will do all my presidential duties for the united republic of tanzania faithfully. i will invest all my effort into fulfilling the duties of this office with all my heart. i will be fair to everyone according to the laws and traditions of the united republic of tanzania without fear, favour or discrimination. so help me god. the 61—year—old, who is the first female president of the east african country, takes over following the death ofjohn pombe magufuli, who died on wednesday. officials say he died of heart complications, but there has been widespread speculation that he contracted covid—19. walking down the streets in dar
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es salaam, you would not know today a president was sworn in. let alone what a historic moment it was for this country. it's first female leader. many tanzanians followed the ceremony on their radios and televisions. few have a doubt of how she will fare, but the majority are optimistic. the new president, who will serve out the term until 2025, also inspected troops at a military parade and received a gun salute. in her address, mama samia, as she is known in tanzania, called her former boss a "great patriot" and urged tanzanians to show each other love and unity, and uphold tanzanian values. and then it was down to business — holding herfirst cabinet meeting, and continuing the work of government. how her style of leadership will differfrom her predecessor, time will tell.
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it was once described as "the most beautiful car in the world" — exactly 60 years ago, one of britain's greatest ever sports cars, the jaguar e—type, was unveiled. phil mackie reports on an iconic sports car. at the start of the �*60s, britain was dull, drab and grey. and then the jaguar e—type came along. made in coventry, it's probably still the ultimate british sports car. even today, it's one of the most sought—after cars in the world. back in �*61, when this first went on sale, you could have bought it for just under £3,000. now, it would set you back 100 times that amount. built here in the midlands, many people still regard this as the greatest british sports car of all time. at this workshop in shropshire, they specialise in restoring jaguars. typically, they have around 50 e—types, more than anywhere
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else in the world. i remember as a toddler seeing and e—type jaguarfor the i remember as a toddler seeing and e—type jaguar for the first time, itjust changed my life really. the shape of it, the sound of it, and the fact that it is a local history as well, coming from the midlands, and being a midlands boy, itjust talked to everything else. e—type bewitched public and prince alike. - launched a year before the beatles first hit the charts, it became the embodiment of the swinging 60s. jaguar is a special breed of car... it was a massive success around the world. overall, it's probably the most important classic car model in the world, definitely. and its importance to motoring and certainly to sports cars in general, you can't underestimate it. yeah, epoch setting. they're still sought after by celebrities
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and royalty alike. it's hard to put a price on this one — it was the first one ever sold. only a few people can afford them any more. sadly, i'm not one. what a car. let's bring you some live pictures now from iceland, where as you can see on your screens, a volcano has a rough third southwest of the capital reykjavik. iceland's meteorological office has warned of falling rocks, boulders and landslides, look at that. this area has recorded more than 50,000 earthquakes in the past three weeks. this was expected in 2010, the eruption of another volcano brought air traffic to a halt across europe. this hasjust brought spectacular pictures, look at the lava pouring down there.
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well. thanks for watching, you can reach me on twitter, see you soon. hello there. for most of us, the weekend promises a fair amount of dry weather, the amount of cloud will vary a bit from place to place, and there will be somejumps around in temperatures as well, as we will see in a moment. this was the satellite picture then from friday, showing we had some decent sunshine, particularly across parts of scotland. that was how the sunshine looked in the highlands. not far away from that, in sterlingshire, we have the highest temperature in the uk, up to 17 celsius, very mild for the time of year. but it wasn't like that everywhere — north—east england had a really chilly day on friday, just six celsius. a big jump upwards in temperatures, though, on the way later today. why the change? well, yesterday, we had the winds coming in from the north—east. it's all down to the wind direction, you see.
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these north—easterly winds brought those low temperature to eastern england because they were travelling over these really cold seas. the temperature in the water just 6 celsius at the moment. but the winds today are changing direction in a big way. they are coming in from a north—westerly direction, hence that big jump upwards in temperatures widely across eastern areas of england. now, here's the weather picture over the next few hours. we've got cloud across england and wales, a few gaps in the cloud for scotland, slowly filtering into parts of northern england. and on account of the cloudy skies, it's not cold, temperatures around 6—7 celsius. 0n into saturday then, this weather front is going to go nowhere fast, staying across central england and wales all day. another cold front will push into the far north of the uk, bringing rain to northern scotland late in the day. could be an odd patch of drizzle as well from that slow—moving front across england and wales. that's why it's going to stay cloudy here, but we'll see some sunshine. central and southern scotland, and particularly north—east england, that's where the best of the sunshine is going to be, and it's going to be a much
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warmer day across north—east england. in the warmest spots, temperatures reach 17 celsius. but those north—westerly winds bringing some cooler weather into north—west england and north wales as well. sunday, while a cold front will have moved across most of the uk bringing cloudy weather across england wales again, what that cold front is going to do, well, it's going to introduce cooler and fresher air. so sunday, temperature—wise, temperatures not quite as high, still, though, managing to reach double figures well, of the area of high—pressure bringing the settled weather is going to continue to influence our weather, but it will probably gradually turn a little more unsettled across the north—west.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: a third wave of coronavirus
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infections is starting to sweep across the european union. new lockdown measures have come into force in poland and across large parts of france, including around the capital paris. switzerland is among other countries extending their restrictions. european leaders have shown support for the astrazeneca jab. the french prime ministerjean castex received the vaccine and urged the public to do the same after eu regulators found it didn't cause blood clots. here in the uk, borisjohnson also received his first astrazeneca injection. president biden has appealed for unity during a visit to atlanta, saying many asian—americans now live in fear. his comments came in the wake of a killing spree at massage pa rlours in atlanta, which left eight people dead, six of them women of asian descent. now on bbc news, it's time for click.

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